Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword or section
Like this
15Activity

Table Of Contents

March 15, 1938: A Husband Executed
September 8, 1927: Digging His Own Grave
1926: Stalin Plays an Unlikely Cupid
Summer with Stalin (1927)
June 1928: “You and I Are the Himalayas”
July 4–12, 1928: Bukharin Fights Back
Autumn 1928: Pity Not Me
Autumn 1928: A Fifteen-Year- Old “Co- conspirator”
Early Warnings: Stalin Is Dangerous
Father and Daughter as Bolshevik Idealists
Summer of 1934: A Second Fateful Meeting
August 1929: Removal from the Politburo
April 16, 1930: Bukharin Sinks to His Knees
July 1930: With Anna in the Crimea
October 14, 1930: Overtaken by “Insanities”
January 27, 1934: Courtship, Bad Omens, and Marriage
December 1, 1934: Kirov Is Shot
August 23, 1936: Nadezhda Tries to Help
April 25, 1935: Humiliating Editor Bukharin
March–April 1936: Bukharin Opts to Stay and Fight
August 27, 1936: What Accusers? They’re Dead
November 16, 1936: Bukharin Grovels
December 4, 1936: Dress Rehearsal for Arrest
December 1936–January 1937: Confrontations
February 15, 1937: “I Will Begin a Hunger Strike”
February 24, 1937: To a Future Generation
February 24–25, 1937: On the Whipping Post
February 27, 1937: For or Against the Death Penalty?
February 27, 1937: Arrest Warrant for “Bukharin, N. I.”
February 27, 1937: Arrest and Parting
February 1937: Anna Larina Is Betrayed
April 1937: Impossible Dream
June 2, 1937: Bukharin’s Cagey Confession
June 1937: Anna Meets a New Widow
March 2– 13, 1938: Twenty- one on Trial
P. 1
Politics, Murder, & Love in Stalin's Kremlin, by Paul R. Gregory

Politics, Murder, & Love in Stalin's Kremlin, by Paul R. Gregory

Ratings:

3.25

(4)
|Views: 2,024 |Likes:
Published by Hoover Institution
A founding father of the Soviet Union at the age of twenty nine, Nikolai Bukharin was the editor of Pravda and an intimate Lenin's exile. (Lenin later dubbed him "the favorite of the party.") But after forming an alliance with Stalin to remove Leon Trotsky from power, Bukharin crossed swords with Stalin over their differing visions of the world's first socialist state and paid the ultimate price with his life. Bukharin's wife, Anna Larina, the stepdaughter of a high Bolshevik official, spent much of her life in prison camps and in exile after her husband's execution.

In Politics, Murder, and Love in Stalin's Kremlin: The Story of Nikolai Bukharin and Anna Larina, Paul Gregory sheds light on how the world's first socialist state went terribly wrong and why it was likely to veer off course through the story of two of Stalin's most prominent victims. Drawn from Hoover Institution archival documents, the story of Nikolai Bukharin and Anna Larina begins with the optimism of the socialist revolution and then turns into a dark saga of foreboding and terror as the game changes from political struggle to physical survival. Told for the most part in the words of the participants, it is a story of courage and cowardice, strength and weakness, misplaced idealism, missed opportunities, bungling, and, above all, love.

Paul R. Gregory, a Hoover Institution research fellow, holds an endowed professorship in the Department of Economics at the University of Houston, Texas, and is a research professor at the German Institute for Economic Research in Berlin.
A founding father of the Soviet Union at the age of twenty nine, Nikolai Bukharin was the editor of Pravda and an intimate Lenin's exile. (Lenin later dubbed him "the favorite of the party.") But after forming an alliance with Stalin to remove Leon Trotsky from power, Bukharin crossed swords with Stalin over their differing visions of the world's first socialist state and paid the ultimate price with his life. Bukharin's wife, Anna Larina, the stepdaughter of a high Bolshevik official, spent much of her life in prison camps and in exile after her husband's execution.

In Politics, Murder, and Love in Stalin's Kremlin: The Story of Nikolai Bukharin and Anna Larina, Paul Gregory sheds light on how the world's first socialist state went terribly wrong and why it was likely to veer off course through the story of two of Stalin's most prominent victims. Drawn from Hoover Institution archival documents, the story of Nikolai Bukharin and Anna Larina begins with the optimism of the socialist revolution and then turns into a dark saga of foreboding and terror as the game changes from political struggle to physical survival. Told for the most part in the words of the participants, it is a story of courage and cowardice, strength and weakness, misplaced idealism, missed opportunities, bungling, and, above all, love.

Paul R. Gregory, a Hoover Institution research fellow, holds an endowed professorship in the Department of Economics at the University of Houston, Texas, and is a research professor at the German Institute for Economic Research in Berlin.

More info:

Publish date: Apr 19, 2010
Added to Scribd: May 20, 2011
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:0817910344
List Price: $19.00

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
See more
See less

04/06/2014

213

0817910344

You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 28 to 205 are not shown in this preview.

Activity (15)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
dinosaurio56 liked this
alfonso388 liked this
infonomics liked this
anchua12 liked this
Marc A. Fellman liked this
ligacaj liked this
Hoover Institution added this note
If we think our 2012 election will offer a stark choice, it’s nothing compared to Russia’s. - Read Author Paul Gregory's take on the Russian Rift on National Review Online http://tinyurl.com/3oqlx93.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download