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The Merciad, June 1934

The Merciad, June 1934

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The Merciad, June 1934
The Merciad, June 1934

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M
Published
at f Mercy
hurst College, Erie, Pennsylvania
VOLUME
Vi
JUKE, 1934NUMBER 6
RCYHIURST
GRADUATES
19
Juniors HostTo Seniors InTea Dance
Annual May Fete
Heads!List
OfSchool ActivitiesGuests found themselves in aspring garden Saturday May 5 atMercyhurst when they came toenjoy the
Junior-Senior
tea dance,spring
|
flowers, umbrellas andpagodas accomplishing the outdooreffect in the dining room. GregOtt and his orchestra made of thedance program one long to be re
membered.
 
Miss Anne McGrathand Miss Lolita Lepper did thehonors in pouring at|the tea tablewhere the decorations were in or
chid!
and yellow with tall orchidtapers forming the center piece.The beautiful garden settingturned the fancies of many of themasculine guests to thoughts characteristic of spring, so everybodyin the following guest list had atleast thrillvor two:— *
Dorothy
Bryan, Newel Bailey,Ruth Sterrett, Roland McCaughan,Dorothy Meyer, Robert Chase,Kay Reiser, Edward Mayer, KayEgan, Dick McGrath, EvelynDonohue, Clarence Rapp, KayYates, Charles Cantor, Costella
Ressler,
Francis
I
Nagorski, LauraLaCavera, Paul Knoll, MarthaMeyers, John
Fasenmeyer,
MarySkene, Jack Prettyman, NanO'Brien, Laddie Morrow, Carmo-
lita
Gill, Elmer Christenson, Margaret Clark, Arthur
Arrowsmith,
Dorothy Mooney, Henry Galmish,Connie Ognibene, Dr. Pizzaruso,Louise Pasqualicchio, Dr. Trilli,Helen Loblenz, Ed. Boyle, PatDean, Harold Daily, Mary Yriber-ry, Ernest
Dinene,$Jane
Connor,Frank Martin,
VirginiajRenz,
BudHanley, Marion Summers, DurkBraggins, Theodora Little, JosephEgg, Helen Crowley, LeonardHackes.
:-o-:
POETY
HOUB
DEVOTIONIn commemoration of the passion of our Lord, a forty hour devotion began Sunday, May sixth,with a procession of Seminariansand
Collegia ns
to the chapel formass and communion. At the massthe blessed sacrament was exposedand so remained for three days.During this three day period eachgirl had a vigil of a half hour aday to keep and it was so arrangedthat the girls went in pairs to theChapel and were relieved at
half-
hour periods by two others whoremained a half-hour and were inturn relieved.On Tnesday night the studentsformed a procession
to'the
ehapeland received benediction, whichclosed the ceremony.
<e>
Senior Class Officers
Dorothy
CronanerGallitzin
High School; Basketball
'31,
'32,'33, '34;
Hockey^
'31,
'32,
'33,
|
'34;Tennis team
'31;
Student Council '34; Math Club;
Vice-President^,
of
?
Class$'33;President Senior Class; Vice-President Science Club,
'33;
Allround Athlete]: '31,
V
32,
'33;
Sodality; Prom Committee '33.
I
0. G. A. HOLDS MEETFinal meeting of the 0. G. A.Sorority for this term was held inthe third-floor social room on theevening of
April
30. MargaretClark, chairman of membership,presented fort admission 18 newmembers. |Officers elected for next termare:
\
Leona
^McAllister, president;
Jane Conner,
secretary;
MargaretMurphy, treasurer; and MarthaMyer, publicity chairman.Four honorary members, Teresa
A
'Hearn, Mary Cronin, Ethel Lev-ick, and Miriam Shalkham, werepresent at the meeting and addressed the group on their experience in teaching.During the evening the president, Kathleen O'Brien, presentedto Sister Mary Andrew, 0. S. B.,a portable typewriter as an awardof a contest sponsored by theRoyal Typewriter
company,
i
A social hour followed in whichAlice
Reeder
was hostess. |
&
•£*—Leona McAllister,
'35
;-o-:
SODALITY OFFICERS FOR
1
1934
-
35
^Prefect,
Kay Egan f'35; Vice-Prefect,
f
Elizabeth Montgomery,'36; Secretary, Katherine
Forquer,
'36 ;f
Treasurer, Martha Meyer,
'35;
Chairman, Mission Committee,Natalie Frye, '36; Chairman,
Publicity
Committee, MargeryAlge,'37; Chairman, CatholicLiterature Committee, Jean Hutchinson, '37.
QDGQS
jibf ill 1
nrHnrfhhH • x ^^^
KR;
%3 *in
j5<-
"^B*^ •S3
1 Inftf•iifc
1-
I
tt-
'•'•>^?aH8i £&\<i2fl
m.
:
"'«a saw 9v-v>->s
^
^D
^
^TO
*t^^^H ^^V^^
Kathleen O'Brien
Crafton
High School; SecretaryClass '33, '34; President 0. G. A.Sorority '34; Glee Club; Pegasus;Sodality; Member Dramatic Association; Chairman Mission Corn-Regis
C.-0'Leary
Sheffield High School,
Shef
field,
Pennsylvania;
Accompanistfor Sally Ann; Treasurer JuniorClass; Vice-President SeniorClass; Prom Committee '31, '32,
'33;
Eucharistic Committee '32;
mittee
'33; Prom Committees '31, Sodality; Home Economics Club'32,'33; Maid of Honor to May
'33;|
Glee
Club f
Accompanist;
Queen '34.
<fcW /f£l
Science Club.COLLEGE POETS HONOREDJulia Belle GallupStudent Council '31, '32; Prom
Committee!
'32, '33;
^Dramatic
Club; Sodality; Glee Club; Math.Club; Home Ec. Club; SeniorTreasurer.
:-o-:
THE MIDDLE AISLE
"The
Hills are Ready forClimbing" is the unusual and provocative title of a new anthologyof poetry by college men andwomen. Mercyhurst has the singular honor of being represented inthe collection by Sister Modesta'spoem "The Little Green
Roof,"
an excellent verse Written withsincerity and sympathy.May, with allits!fresh loveliness of Springtime, has been aninspirational month for our poets.Pegasus held its regular monthlymeeting May 16 and there were
many!excellent
contributions fromalumnae as well as regular students.
"Welcome
Sleep,"
written
by Mary Lucille Burd, a
fresh
man, was
chosen
as the bestpoem by the members of thegroup.Welcome SleepI close my eyesI close my earsI cease to think — to planSleep steals upon the counterpaneSleep does the best he can.Wedding bells will ring thissummer for four MercyhurstAlumnae. Ruth Wilbert, '32, willbe married June 12 in MercyhurstCollege Chapel.
Catherine
Egan,'32,Rose
Beokman,
'30, and Margaret Burkhardt, '30, will also say"Ifdo."
HelenfCulliton,
Buffalo,N. Y., and Sally Edkin, Erie, former Mercyhurst students, haveboth announced the dates of theirforthcoming weddings.But even heWith all his powersTo quiet, soothe and restCan interrupt my weary lifeA few short hours at best.His hands are coolHis voice is softAnd sweet, like flowers, hisbreathI dare not ask him to remainHe'd bring his comrade, Death.
Seniors LookBack Over-College Years
Happy Reminiscence OfMoments At! SchoolBusyFreshman YearWednesday, September 22, 1930,should be written down as one ofthe "more important" dates inthe history
of our
country.
Whvf
On
that ^particular
day, thirty-fiveyoung ladies stepped out of
the
role of the Mighty High SchoolSenior to start once more ashumble Freshmen and
toftake
upmore serious duties as studentsof Mercyhurst College. We wereawe-stricken at the sight of aJunior and tongue-tied when a
Senior
deigned to speak to us.
O
XT
Those were memorable days, theywere happy days too, but we mustadmit that here and there we;
;
found scattered a blue Mondaycaused by that well-known diseasenostalgia. We tried so hard to actnonchalant and to pretend that allthe newness and glamor had no
ef->feet
on us. But, it was to no avail.Especially, when we found ourselves answering the dinner bellby going down toithe Auditorium.However, we would laugh it off,feeling terribly silly all the time,and set out to find some familiarlandmarks that would lead usback to the right
stairway.
Afterwe realized
that,
the Juniors werekind "Big Sisters" and that wewere to respect them but not
Eto
stand in awe of them, somehowour troubles seemed Slighter.Soon, we grasped the idea of
things?
and we found that thedining room was the easiest placein the building to find and thatassignments must be handed in ontime.
With these ^firmly
fixed inour minds, life ran along smooth-
ly.
|
Our class
advisoi
during ourFreshman year was Mother M.Pierre who proved very helpful tous.The first big event on thecalendar of our Freshman yearwas the election of our class officers. At this time, we chose KayRyan as our President,
0ol
Mooney as our Vice-President,and as Treasurer and Secretary,we selected Irene Strahl andEileen Foster.Everyone of us very anxiousto know when we would be invested in the cap and gown thatmakes us true daughters of Mercyhurst.] At last the great day arrived
and?the
Seniors with all
the
solemnity of such a great event,invested us in the royal robes of(Continued on Page 2)
 
Page Two
THE
MERCIAD
JTOE,
1934
Published
month lyfby
the students of
Mercy
hurst CollegeAddress all communications to
THE MERCIAD
Mercvhurst
CollegeErie, PennsylvaniaSubscription Rates
ONE
DOLLAR
THE
YE
AltI
MERCIAD STAFF
f
EDITOR IN-CHIEF
4 ,
t
,.••
|.....i..^...|Ruth
SterrettASSISTANT
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF •|--^*
Virginia RenzBUSINESS MANAGER
-
••»••
Costello ResslerEXCHANGE EDITOR
; i .-
J
-4
fDorothy Bryan
d
ASSOCIATE EDITORS:
$
Alary
ODea
—3Betty Banner
— Martha Meyers — Betty Streuber —Jean Reese
f$
Jane
Uprichardi— Eugenia Sproat —Jean St. Lawrence
2
-
Alexandra KacprowiczSTAFF REPORTERS
M
Miss Burd — Miss Bigler —- Miss Rectenwald
Miss Lyman
1
FIELD CORRESPONDENTS
}
Miss Barrett — Miss Mooney
MERCYHURST, WE
WISHfYOU
WELLOur
Almal
Mater has
prepared fus
for the assumption ofeffective womanhood. In our mental and spiritual heritagethere was little which fitted us for the active life of maturity.All the businesses and professions of the world require yearsand years of training.
Truefit
is that our education beganwith the first breath of
life
under the loving guidance of ourown mother. She gave to us
alllthat
was finest in her. Andthen she placed a trust uponus,?,a trust which has even beenkept in reverence by that mother of ours who through adoption becomes our Alma Mater.We are fully aware of the harvest gleaned. To be at homein all lands and allages;to enjoy
life
in its truth and beauty;to have the world with its
fullest
resources at our
command;
to count Art as a bosom friend and to know Nature as oneknows one's
self;
to
form
a sound philosophy; to gain astandard
for
right and wrong; to have an appreciation
for
other men's efforts and broadmindedly to understand theirshortcomings; to utilize one's abilities and to be conscious ofone's limitations; to lose
one's!self
in generous enthusiasmsand
sacrifice
self
for
common
good;
to taste of culture; tolearn to be true to worthy ideals which are stern
task
mastersand to form character under professors who are Christian —these are the fruits of college during the best four years ofone's life.
|
No more
shallfthe
class! of 1934
meet*
as the students ofMercyhurst College. We now join the ranks of the Alumnae.We shall love our adopted Mother as they, our fellow-sisters,
do.
There is a kindred spirit|among those who cherish thesame ideals when! they pass
Jinto
the sphere of new experiences.
|
The time hasfcome. We
part.JWe
do not say goodbye.|Faror near our hearts twill always respond. We will be loyal,loving children. Our only
wishtis
that Mercyhurst may farewell. And so, with a tear in our eye and with a sad half smile
we say
FAREWELL.
j§
CLASS HISTORY
ft
(Continued from Page 1)the daughters of our College. Now,we were full-fledged students.Until the middle of October,everything
 
was grand, then oneday
we
learned that
^initiation
would start on -Sunday night. Good
grief!
What chills and what worries and what resolutions to begood sports even if it cost us ourlives! However, it was not nearlyso bad as we had expected andwhen it was
over,
we had enjoyedit as much
as our "initiators,the Sophomores.After so much excitement, werested until December. Then, wehad our first taste of the art ofentertaining at; Mercyhurst. Wehad decided to give a Christmasparty in honor of the Faculty andstudents. We had all -the air andentertainment
of|a
real night clubset up in our own dining room.This party was unanimously
voted
one of the most elaborate and mostsuccessful ever given at Mercyhurst by any one class. SantaClaus, who in real life was noneother than Dibbie Wilbert, camein during the evening with a
huge
bag of presents for every one atthe party. Our class
President,
Kay Eyan made a very charmingand
perfect!
hostess. With
this
Christmas Party, we started atradition in the school,
andlnow
every year before we leave for ourChristmas vacation, the Freshmanclass entertains the Faculty andentire
student
{body* We have attended our own and three othersand while we had a wonderfultime at each one, and we do notwant to make ourselves out"braggers," we
«till
have thatfeeling that
"ours
w*s
just
right."£r|
Christmas vacation land all thefun and excitement of going homeand returning. Then, examinations. Our first college exams. Thegeneral feeling was one of alarmbut as soon as we received ourmarks,
\
peace of mind was oncemore restored to us.About the middle of January,
Celia
Donnelley, one of our classmates, announced to us that sheintended to enter the convent hereat
Mercyhurst,
Of course, we realized that it was a wonderful
thing
k
and
all that, but we had alittle queer feeling to think oneof our own had chosen that vocation.Next, about the first of February, the Juniors were our guestsat a
theatre
party and supper.
"
Again, we were very quiet untilabout the middle of May when weentertained the Seniors at a
picnic
on the lake shore. The usual goodMOTHERS' WEEK ENDAlexandra KacprowiczSt. Stanislaus High School;Silver Quill; Pegasus; Latin Club;Associate Editor of Merciad.time was had by all.Home! Vacation! Rest fromstudies
I
Full fledged Sophomores!September 21, 1931 and westarted on the
second!
lap of ourCollege days. We were very sad tolearn upon returning to schoolthat Helen Hauber and PatO'Hare would not be returningwith us because of illness. Margaret Bacon who had been a
''
day
?
hop'
1
the year before, came to usas a boarder this year. We werealso fortunate
jin
adding JuliaBelle Gallup and Mary Yriberry toour class.The first thing we did this yearwas to elect our Class officers.Mother Pierre was still our advis
or.
The results of
«the
electionwere Marg Clark, President;Mickey McDonald, Vice-President;
Al
Reeder, Treasurer; and JaneMulheirn, Secretary.Our
first?
real duty as Sophomores was to initiate the Freshmen. Now, we could
sitjback
andwatch other people do silly things.It was fun and the Freshmenwere good sports to the end. Afterit was over, we took the entireFreshman class to the theatre andthen to supper.In January, we gave one more ofour classmates to the Convent.Frances McCarthy entered ourown| convent here at? Mercyhurstand her
fname
now is Sister M.Evangelista.
This
1
year we
were fvery
quietuntil May when we had full chargeof the Mission
Day I
Program.;; Atthis time, we instituted anothertradition. Every year now, theSophomore class gives a play, theproceeds
if rom
which are turnedover to
the I
Missions. We put ourbrilliant minds together
ondvunder
the capable direction of ourclassmate, Ruth Sterrett, presented"The Charm School." |We gave our sister class,
[
theSeniors, a picnic on the peninsulaas a farewell party in May.Once more, we turned to ourhomes having climbed one morestep up the ladder of education.We started out our Junior yearwith much enthusiasm! This yearwe were the big sisters to thenewcomers, and we felt a responsibility on our shoulders. Weadded to our number, Helen Loe-belenz, who came to us from SetonHill, and Dorothy Bryan whocame from Syracuse. Mary Eleanor Morin left us to go to school
in iWashington
D. C, her home.Ft has been* an annual customat Mercyhurst to set aside theWeek-end of Mother's Day inwhich to pay tribute to themothers of the students. ThoseMothers who are able to be onthe campus are
feted royally
atentertainments of every description, while those who are unableto be present receive the tributeof remembrance. It is
fitting
thaton his occasion we honor them,publicly whom we honor ourwhole lives through, our Mothers.
:-o-:
*
Revised VersionMan can live without friends,He can live without books,But civilized man can notLive without crooks.Florida Times-Union
•••••
Concetta Jean
Galbo
North
East}High School
;|KappaChi Sorority; 0.
G.
A. Sorority;
Glee Club.!
I I
Sister Mary Alice was appointedby Mother
Borgiat
to
advises
usduring our |next two years. Ourclass president was Alice Reederand she was ably assisted by Dorothy Cronauer,
Vice-President;
Regis
OLeary,
Treasurer; andKathleen O'Brien, Secretary.Our first big enterprise was theparty of welcome for the^Fresh-men.This was given in the formof
a?carnival
and a hilarious timewas had by| all. Next came theMid-winter promt and our president acted as General Chairman.She was assisted by membersfrom
(the
Sophomore and Freshman! classes, and the prom was ahuge success. We were then inactive until May when we said"Farewell" to the
Seniors
in theform of a Tea Dance. Our finalactivity"
for
the year was theSenior Ball. This was under thechairmanship of Alice Reeder andwas held at Kahkwa
$
CountryClub. It was a very successful affair and was our final goodbye tothe Graduating class. Anotheryear was over and we were nowSeniors.When we came back
Ito
schoolin September 1933, we felt verydifferent
j«than
we did in September 1030. We, the dignifiedSeniors,! were on the last lap ofour college career. 1934
brought
us Virginia Renz
from
the University of Pittsburgh, and it tookfrom us Eileen Foster. Our classhad for its president fDorothy
Cronauer;
it's
Vice-President,Regis O'Leary; Treasurer, JuliaMargaret E. Bacon
Franklint
High School; Hockey'30;Prom Committee
'33;
Sodality; Glee Club; Kappa Chi'30.
:-o-:-
Waste Not Want Not"Did ye hear about Sandy
MeCulloch
findin' a box of corn
plasters
?""No, did he?" "Yes, so he wentand bought a pair of tight shoes."
—Sydney
Bulletin
—:-o-:—
I"No, soup, please; I just had mysuit cleaned."
—Californian
PelicanBelle Gallup; and Secretary,Kathleen O'Brien. The first activity this year was to welcome intoour midst
the 1
class of 1937. Thiswas done in the form of a
break
fast held in the dining room atMercyhurst.
-<Next
we had theprivilege of investing the ^Fresh
men?
in their caps and gowns. Ourbiggest enterprise of the year wasthe Hallowe'en Dance which washeld in the auditorium and which,thanks to the students of Mercyhurst was very successful.Ever since we had come to Mercyhurst we had looked forward tothe day when we would be honoredby dining with His Excellency theBishop.
This I
dream was realizedon December
;12,
when all theSeniors had dinner with BishopGannon. From then until Maywe were very retiring.We*satback and let other people plan for
us,
but on May 23 we took the
"wheel"Iagain
and said "Fare-well|
,
and "Thank You" to oursister class
in
the form! of aTheatre party. On Saturday afternoon we
were
^received*
into theAlumnae Association, on Satur
day
levelling
fWe
were honored atthe Senior Ball,
Sunday}was
ourBaccalaureate, Monday
our Class
Day and Tuesday our Graduation.
Tomorrowf we$
say goodbye toMercyhurst, but before we go wewant to thank God for the privilege of a Catholic education, thankthe Faculty and Sisters at Mercyhurst for all they have done tomake
these
four years memorableones.Years that will always livein our minds and
$
which we
will
look back on with the greatest ofjoy. Thank the students for allthey have done to make our
life
happy, especially these last fewweeks. We are leaving Mercyhursttomorrow, but we will take withus her high ideals, her high standards and we'll
always
i
remember
her motto,
"Carpe
Diem."
—Dorothy
Mooney,
1$*
—Alice
Beeder,
|*S4
 
JUNE, 1934EXCHANGE NOTES
THE
MEROIAD
Page ThreeA survey of the exchangesshows that every student in everycollege is looking forward tograduation and the usual round ofpleasure that this seasonbrings.Between the time that I write thiscolumn and the
tiirie
of graduationthere is ' one
drawback,
namelv.final examinations. The announcement of the days when these ogresshall be met, is sandwiched in between a tea dance on one handand a graduation rehearsal on theother.In reading one of the recenteditions of "The Varsity News"I read
an
interesting account ofan exposition, held at the University
of
Detroit, in which each de-| partment had an exhibition of thework that they were doing. Aradio station in operation featuredthe Electral exhibition. Four shortplays were presented twice a dayby the dramatic department. Eachdepartment put on its best forcompany. The exposition was tobe open three days and more thantwentv thousand visitors were ex-
pected.
Not only to outsiderswould this be
of|
great interest,but in most cases the averagestudent does not know what thestudents in the next departmentare doing. What
ibetter
way is
there
to know one's own school.Dr. Carr, an associate professorof Economics and Finance at SaintMary's College spoke recently onthe subject of the attitude of theUnited States toward the policyset forth
by|Japan
in which sheset up the
Monroe*Doctrine
of theEast. All of Europe awaits ourreaction!to
this!
doctrine. If wespeak from an emotional point ofview our sympathies are
aptf
togo to China, the poor down-trodden country. If we are to speakfrom an economic point of view,savs Dr. Carr, we will realize thatChina is a backward country usingonly about one tenth as muchgoods as she would if she wereproperly civilized. The quickestway to do this is to have someone to come in from the outsideto do this. Japan, because her people are of the same race and because of her geographical positionis best suitedfto do this. This mayseem selfish but if we are seeking China for a
worldjmarket
thisis the
bestfway
to do it.In one of the exchanges therewas
suggested
in one of the editorials that the graduate askhimself two questions. The usualthings will be said this graduation. Congratulations will be offered and gifts presented etcetra.Why have I|been in college!Have I
followed
my plan
for
my future
careerf
There are
manyl
more articlesthat are well worth the time andeffort that
fit willftake
you toread them. There are accounts ofMay Day programs, stories ofsports, advance news on proms,and in one paper there is a newmethod of cribbing. I
won't
tellyou how it is done but if youfeel that you are in need of thisstimulus for "finals" you willfind this information in one of theexchanges. I am ahead of you. Ialready know. You will be surprised and well rewarded if youwill take time to see what othersare doing.
;AV«V
K;
^§^M
Carmelita
Gill
Olean
High School; Glee Club;Sodality; Dramatic Association;
Promf
Committees
|'31,
'32,
'33;
Pegasus; Member Cast of SallyAnn.Louise Evangeline PasqualicchioVilla Marie Academy; Treasurer Kappa Chi Sorority
'33
j|
Vice-President Kappa ChiSorority!'34;President Latin Club
'34;
Presi
dent;
of the Circolo
Italiano
of
Mercvhurst.
SKIPPER'S LOGThe lookout sighted land thismorning. The skipper is sorry toreport that the
cruise *will
be oversoon. Over, but not forgotten. Onedoesn't
forget J
a delightful experience easily. He tucks it into a corner of his brain so that he may
take it out now and then, dust itoff, and relive it in memory. Therich man is he who has
aftreasure
chest full of memories. This cruisehas started all of
us|weli*of
theway to being millionaires.
5
If itwere much longer we would haveto build an addition to our treasure chest. To those of you who arewalking! down the gangplank forthe last time I wish the greatestof success and Godspeed. May allthe coins you gather for
^our
treasure chest be golden ones.Congratulations to Marg Clark
whofhas
a position teaching commercial subjects^ next year .
We're all
hoping
that Costellogets that job she has in view . .
\
If ability and perseverance meananything there's not a doubt as tothe result
,|.
. Ruth gave us another proof of her coaching
ability
in
a
Peg of My Heart" . . .
Carm
isquite!the typist . . .Just ask Nan about her ability. . . Dot Mooney is a
amoothee
. . . Marg
Clark
made a charm-Maria
Elisa
YriberryCrandon Institute; Colegio dela Immaculada Concepcion; Glee
Clnb;
Sodality; Science Club;
Mathlciub.
$ I
Dorothy Bryan ing May Queen Sunday . . . TooAlice
Beeder
Jamestown High School; JuniorClass President;
Sophomore
ClassTreasurer; Student Council '32,
'33;
General
Chairman]Prom
'33;Prom Committee '31, '32, '33;0. G. A. Sorority; Sodality; Glee
Club;
Dramatic Association; Pegasus; Member cast of Sally Ann.bad it had to rain . . . Dot Bryanlikes elementary^ education andcan tell you some funny experiences about it . . . Marg Bacondoes more walking than any othergirl at
Mercy
hurst . . . MaryYberry is a close runner up . . .The girl that played Wallace Bee
ry's
wife in
"Viva
Villa" bore astriking resemblance
to
Helen Loe-belenz J. . Those girls who werelocked in the Social Room theother day had horrible visions oftheir bony remains being removeda hundred years
T
hence . . . Thedoor had to be taken off to getthem out . . . Have you got anybets
on -the
tennis tournament?....My money is on Dot Cronauer . . .Julia Belle has a pleasing personality . . . Regis O'Leary is an accomplished pianist . . . Sign upnow for the Prom ... It's goingto be the best ever . . . GinnyRenz has lost all appetite for froglegs since Mother Pierre's class
m
. . It looks as if we'll have towear heavy clothes all summer ifthis weather keeps up . . . Canyou imagine people* wearing furcoats in
July?
... Oh well,stranger things have happened . .Ask the seniors about the telegrams at the convention lastweek J. . Some of them weremighty clever . . . Decoration Day"ONE MORE RIVER"Dorothy BryanSyracuse North High School;Syracuse University '30, '32;Kappa Chi Sorority, '33,
'34;
Student Council '34.
I
Virginia RenzErie Central High School; University of Pittsburgh '31, '32,
'33;
Associate Editor of Merciad '34;Sodality; Glee Club; Silver Quill;Pegasus;
15
hylomaletic.is a free day . .
.{Wait
a minute,don't start shouting yet . . .Exams are scheduled for the following day
so fyou
can figure outfor yourself how we'll spend theholiday ... It won't be wavingflags either . .
.
Speaking of theflag reminds me of the noble efforts the Juniors put forth on thissubject in English 18 . . . MaryLucille Burd writes
lovelyfpoetryu
. . Jean Griffin's new car is ahoney . .
.Connie certainly?
knowsher bugs. . . No offense intended,that's just our quaint way of saying | biology . . .
j'I'll
| StringAlong With You" is a catchy newtune . . . That book of her ownpoetry which Kay Barrett presented to Sister Philippa is amasterpiece*, . . Pauline Urickis some chemist . . . Her stockings bear witness to that . . .Mary Moran made a sweet Peg in
|'
Peg of My
Heart"...
.The
puppy in the play was a darling. . . The Stylo Show was a greatsuccess . . . The Seniors had ahectic week, what with all the entertaining in their behalf . .
.Thesongs for
commencement arecom-
along
splendidly . . . Allhands be on deck next September. . . Goodbye until then myhearties.—Skipper.
'35
ing
It is unfair to any author tojudge his work by a standard lower than his own
bestjachievement.
Mr. Galsworthy has been allthrough his literary career a gracious
recipientlof
criticism, whichfor the most
partfwas
favorable.To find fault with his last novel,completed before his death in
Januaryjof
the year 1933, mayseem unmannerly. And yet Mr.Galsworthy himself must havefelt that "One More River" fellin quality far below his earlier
novels.gThis
last novel of
a!dead
author
is
spun out of decidedlythin material. The storv culmi-nated in
"One
More?River"
runsthrough the three important worksof Mr. Galsworthy. Beginning withthe three volumes of the "ForsyteSaga," then through the
fthree
volumes of
"A-f
 Modern Comedv"and
^finally
through! the triologyof "Maid In|Waiting," "Flowering Wilderness" and "One MoreRiver" the fortunes of the Forsyte family, symbolic of the upper-middle class
ol
England, aretraced.The author felt obligated to hisreaders to inform them of the lastadventures of his delightful hero
ine,
Dinny Cherrell.
Thisfor
toquote one of his critics, "perhaps the
Jtrilogy
habit for thetime being got the better of him"is the real cause for the product"One More River."
It'jis
easy tosee why such a product, comingfrom the pen of one whose workfor many many" years has givenhim great and lasting pleasure,should be of mediocre quality.
g
Dinny Cherrell is perhaps thebest-loved and most completelyrealized of all Galsworthy's hero
ines.
Her part in the dramaticnovel may be summed
ug
verybriefly; her passionate love affairwith Wilfrid Desert comes to anabruptffinis,
shejjmends
her ways,and marries, somewhat unconcernedly, a barrister of muchworth but little interest. The complementary actress in the story is
Dinny's ^younger
sister, Clare. Before the story opens she has lefther husband, Jerry Corven, amiddle-aged
officer
in Colonialservice. She returns
to
England.On board ship she makesthe*acquaintance of Tony
Croom
and ina short time falls desperately inlove with him. His infatuation forher is as strong as hers for him.All is well until the indignanthusband also returns to England;
he,
in search for Clare. The sensational
divorceij
suit which followsbrings out effectively the shiftingmoral standards of modern
Ensr-
lish
isociety. The dramatic sceneswhich take place in the crowded
court
room are the climax of thelives of those immediately concerned, as also of the story run
ning
through many volumes of theforegoing novels and touchingmany generations.
a
One More River" cannot
fullv
be appreciated per se; it dependsfor most of its interest on aknowledge of the
preceding
books.It would be to one's great plea
sure
to meet Mr. John Galsworthythrough other than "One MoreRiver."
—Alexandra
Kacprowicz,
'34
/

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