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The Merciad, June 1940

The Merciad, June 1940

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The Merciad, June 1940
The Merciad, June 1940

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SEE YOU INSEPTEMBER
MERflg MOfHERHOU
ARCHIVE
EMI
NNA
MERCIAD
Published at Mercyhurst College. Erie. Pennsylvania
BEST WISHES TOCLASS OF 1940
VOL. XIJUNE. 1940NUMBER FIVE
Father
Duffy,C.P.
Addresses ClassOf 1940
s
Delivers Inspiring Sermon AtBaccalaureate Services
"The speaker for the baccalaureate services held in the Chapel ofChrist the King on Sunday morn
ing,
June 3, was the Rev. AlfredDuffy,
C^
P., of Patterson, NewJersey, who, at present, is stationed as Professor of Sacred Eloquence at Holy Cross
College
inDunkirk, New York.
The
mes
sage
conveyed to the graduates by Father Duffy was force
ful,
stimulating, and most suitableto the occasion. It was full of illuminating insights into and aptinterpretations of life. The finequality of
the
sermon's subjectmatter and delivery was unforgettably
impressive.*
Class Day IsSponsored by Seniors
Following tradition, the SeniorClass sponsored the last of its college activities, Class Day, at 3
p.
m., June 4.The entire
stud en
t body, wearing formal academic garb, assembled in the auditorium for theceremonies.The reading of the Class Willand Prophecy was done in a lightand pleasant vein. Father Alfred
Watson,
Mercyhurst Chaplain,presented
awards:
and MarionWeschier, editor of the Praeterita,announced the dedication of theyearbook.Then followed the traditionalpassing of the Torch of Knowledgeby the President of the Senior
class;
the acceptance by the incoming president of the Class of 1941;and the turning of the tassels. TheTribute to the Ivy recited in choral
verse
was presented by theClass of 1940. The ivy was thenplanted near the O'Neil Memorial
Chapel.
After the Class Day program,the west lawn adjacent to theGrotto, was the scene
of
;the colorful and ever popular Garden Par
ty,
i
11
W
Spanish Club HoldsLast Meeting
The last meeting of the SpanishClub was held in the Bishop's Parlor.
After
a short business meet
ing,
talks were given by
JeanPrendergast,
Ann Bough ton, andKathryn Monroe. Ann Boughtonpresided. Those attending
were:
Virginia Bryant, Clara Mo-
lini,
Helen
Sullivan,
Ann Bough-ton, Jeanne
Maley,
Mary Riley,Ann Gaffney, Merri Holway, SallyMcClain, Gloria Lutz, Dorothy
McCarron,|
Mary M o o n e y andKathryn Monroe.
t —Sally
McClain(1) The May Queen
andjher
attendants, Janet Mahoney and Muriel
Stickle.}_
(2)i
Betty Ann
Mehl,
the MayQueen. _(3) A panoramic view of the
MaybDay
ceremony.
.(4)
The Merciad editorial and business
staff:
J. Franklin, D. Scalzo, J. Senior, M.
Klampher.
(5) Rosemary McGee, most
beautiful.
(6) Helen Liu,
most!
clever. (7) Helen
Patterson, most
{popular.
S^^^^^S^^B^^sBSB^^S
Juniors
AreHostesses 1For Prom
Betty Ann Mehl IsLovely Queen Of I
pggj
The
May
I
M
Fair Weather Adds Tojs3 Beauty of Spring
g||
^HK'-'''
Pageant
>'
fSm
Fete
Seniors
m
At Tea Dance
Gene Regan Plays For AnnualDance Held At Kahkwa
Gene Regan and his nine-pieceorchestra from Buffalo providedthe music for the
June|Prom
2
-held
at Kahkwa Club, June 1.
During:
the prom, it
was*
announced that the student body hadvoted Rosemary McGee, the mostbeautiful, Helen Liu, the
most
clever, and Helen Patterson, themost popular, seniors.Betty Ann English, Junior classpresident, was chairman of the arrangements. Assisting her werethe following committees: Orchestra; Doris Scalzo, chairman,
Anas-
tatia Cotter, Mary Winston,
Mary-alysl
Klinger; place: Jean Weir,chairman, Anne Boughton, AnneStout; finances: Rosemary
Klos,
class treas.; invitations: MarthaHutton, chairman, class secretary,Rita McCann, Frances Gallagher,Ruth Brugger; gifts: Helen Sulli
van,
chairman, Betty
Trippe,
Lois• The annual
I
May Day Pageantwas
\
celebrated
Ion I
Sunday
aftei
noon, May
26.
£
The ceremonies began with Solemn High Mass in themorning. The public crowning ofthe May Queen, Betty Ann Mehl,took place at three o'clock in theafternoon. The procession of some300 girls passed beneath the portals of the O'Neil Memorial Chapeland took positions forming a circleon the
front
campus.
-j^^^^^^H|
The
|seniors
I attired [alike | indresses of I various pastel shadesformed
a jj
guard
ofthonor
for theQueen
as I
she proceeded down the(Continued
from
£
Page 8)
231
i The
Sophomore f Class If
eted theSeniors on the afternoons of June2nd
with!a teaj
dance.
I
The
dancewas from 3
fto
6
Sin J
the diningroom.
^a^B^JH^^^sS^^^S^^
S
The J invitations | were 1 clever
black!silhouettes.
{This tea dance
brought!
a
1
happy week-end to alovely
ending.!The
Seniors thankthe Sophomores
f for
J completingthe current round of enoyable parties in such a unique fashion.
8MB
Juniors Honor1H Sen ior s Ufl
Blanchard; favors: Mary Klampher, chairman, Betty Schutt, Dor-thy
Reagle,
JeanJpPrendergast;
publicity: Anne Boughton. chairman,Anne
Stout,
co-chairman,
Jane
Franklin, Jean Senior;
publicity—
posters: Catherine Bellucci, chairman, Beth Leahy, and Eleanor Du-
mltru.I
The Tower Dining Room of theBoston Store hummed with voiceson the 11th of May when the Junior Class honored the Seniors witha Luncheon.
*jg3S| k&.
1
j8b
The favors which i formed thecenterpiece during the luncheonwere lovely corsages of
sweet
peas and yellow daisies. Speechesof farewell were made by BettyAnn English, president of the Jun
ior}
Class,
and
HelenfPatterson,
president of the
SeniorfClass.
GraduationActivities
Dr.
Ross;
Hoffman ofFordham UniversityIs Speaker
On the morning of June 5 aMass of Thanksgiving will he offered for the Seniors, after noc-turnal adoration of the Blessed
Sacramenti
by the class of 1940.The Mass will be celebrated by theRev. Alfred M, Watson.At 8 p. m. the Student
^body,
followed by the Senior Class,Alumnae, Faculty, and guests willleave the Residence Hall, and maketheir way over the Senior Stepsto the O'Neil Memorial Chapel.The guest speaker
for^the
Commencement program of
5
the Classof 1940 will be
Mr.
J
Ross Hoffmanof Fordham University,
Jformer
Professor of History at New YorkUniversity. He studied successively
\
at Lafayette, Columbia, andPennsylvania
State
University.Mr. Hoffman
ds
a thorough student of history, and hence a lecture
by
A
him promises to be mostenlightening. His book
''Great
Britain and the German Trade Ri
valry"
won the American Histori-
cal
Association
^prize
for the bestMonograph of the year on
Euro
pean International Relations.
i
IHKppJS;
| |» I
B
Here may we take the opportu
nity
• \ to
I
wish
I
the I
Seniors—theClasstof 1940—the
best wishes ofthe entire student body. May theyhave happiness and good luck.
H
Mercyhurst I. R. C. 1Bi Holds Peace Rally
Delegates
I
From Neighboring
sHColleges Participate
[In
^BBBMBH
Program
19;'
5|jJ
On
May 1, the International Relations Club sponsored the firstPeace Day program to be held in
Erie.iTheiJ
general theme of
^the
Peace
I
Day
^Program J
was "ThePeace of
Christ*in
the Kingdom ofChrist."
Thelvarious
Catholic col
leges
Bin
I Erie participated withViolet La
Russo
representing VillaMaria
College;ISigismund
Kwiat-
kawski,
I St. John
Kanty;
Albert
Lai
Russo and James
Brugger,
Cathedral
College,
and Jane Franklin,Mercyhurst. Dr. M. J. Relihan wasthe guest speaker. Marie Maddendelivered the Peace Credo. HelenSullivan, secretary of the IRC,acted as chairman.
Mr.
Morellilead the orchestra in playing "GodBless America" and "The Star-Spangled Banner."Father Alfred
jWatson
opened
theiPeaceviDay
Program]
with!
aMass for Peace at which Rev. Jo
sephs
Wehrle, Dean of CathedralCollege, gave the sermon. Afterthe auditorium program, the students attended Benediction of theBlessed Sacrament in the Chapel.
 
Page TwoTHE
MERCIAD
Published monthly by the students of
Mercyhurst
CollegeAddress all communications toJUNE, 1940
TH
EROIAD
Mercyhurst College
Erie,
PennsylvaniaSubscription Rates
ONE DOLLAR
THE
YEAR
MERCIAD STAFFEditor-in-Chief
,J|
Business Manager
, >«
Marie Callan
.
r
Margaret Wadlinger(Printed by the E.
AgrestijPrinting Co.—1710
Cherry St.)
An Open Letter To The Class of 1940
The character of a civilization or culture is largely determined by its philosophy; for it is philosophy which, on
the
rational level, establishes the objectives and the trend of theideas which dominate
a
society. Now the curse
of
the current
philosophies|which
form the tone or atmosphere of ourage is their subjectivism; their assertion that truth is as yousee it,
^irrespective
of whether or not it corresponds with thenature of the reality under investigation. Such philosophiesmust, as common sense immediately tells
jus,
end in intellectual chaos or paralysis; and must, if their influence is
not
checked,
bring *
civilization to the same pass. Individualismalways denies any external norm of truth; discredits and degrades the intellect; glorifies the senses; relaxes (to say theleast) regulatory discipline over the feelings and emotions,over impulses and desires; promotes the vices rather than thevirtues; and, since every man is himself
the
final judge ofwhat is true, unleashes in society
a
multitude of conflictingconvictions and interests which make for disorder and which,since they possess no common denominator, can be reconciledon no basis whatever. Finally,
it
destroys
knowledge —
thebasis of all rational processes; and ends in skepticism whoseburial grounds are the empty fields of nihilism. And truthbecomes an empty word; and man is left without place, without direction, without a guide.Subjectivism is not the philosophy of Mercyhurst.
For
Mercyhurst believes that truth is attainable, and
that^it
consists in the conformity of the idea with the fact. Mercyhurstbelieves in objective truth; believes that it is attainable; andbelieves that the intellect, properly disciplined, can take holdof it. During four years of college life the minds of you, theclass
of;
1940,
have been instructed in and
exercised!
byTRUTH: in large
measurejthe
ignorance
of
your minds —which is
darkness—has
been dispelled; and it
has
been replaced by
TRUTH—which
is light. Year in and year out, inaction and repose, by its atmosphere and by its example, Mercyhurst has
fed
your minds with this 'natural
food
of
the
mind: TRUTH.. And to what end?
Tofthe
end that
you
might achieve within yourselves the perfection of
the
intellect. And this, in Newman's words is "the clear, calm, acur-ate vision and comprehension of all things, as far as the finitemind can embrace them, each in its own place, and with itsown characteristic upon it. It is almost prophetic from itsknowledge of history; it is almost heart-searching from itsknowledge of human nature; it has almost supernatural charity from its freedom from littleness and prejudice; it has almost the repose of faith, because nothing can startle
it;
it hasalmost the beauty and harmony of heavenly contemplation,so intimate is it with the eternal order of things and the music of the spheres."Yet the perfection of
the
intellect is not
Mercyhurst's only
objective in educating you. Because
you
are human_ beings,
liC XXUUVXiiuinaii MWivu n*iv*v v**w^ »
**•
**v
appliediby
you. And the manner in which you will determineto apply them will determine, not only
whether'the
cause oftruth will be advanced or retarded, but also
the
quality ofyour moral character.
I
This
flatter
consideration
is of
the
greatest import to you: upon it hinges the ultimate successor failure of your lives. You can use or misuse
truthJ
by directing it to
right
or wrong ends. If you misuse it,
you
act in the cause of intellectual error, or even
of
moral evil;and you thwart the right development of your character.
If
you use it correctly, you act in the cause of truth and
you
advance your own final interests, as well as those of societyor civilization. You must make the choice; and the choicewill
often
not be easy tomake;and whatever your choice, theconsequences will be in direct proportion to the worth of your
ends,
the honosty of the means you select, and
t
he
energywith which they are applied. If you use the True to achievethe Good, then you will be successful: your lives
will
be
good
And the TRUE being, as it were, a ray of Divine light, shallbe known by you as the GOOD: for
the
GOOD
is
simply
t
he
TRUE becoming lovely, desirable, and enjoyable
because it
is a fulfilment of God's plan. Truth, as we have
said,
is
light!
"Walk then as children of the light. ...
for
the fruit of thelight is in all goodness and justice and truth.
•The Merciad
Nature's Wardrobe
Nature reigned, ablaze withglory,
.
jEnflamed
with
orange,]gold
and rust;
|
One last toss of her queenlyhead,And her jewelled ringlets liein dust.The lifeless form
of
Natureprone:Upon her death bier, men entreatThat heaven's great morticianfoldIt close in
a
winding sheet.Cheers
go''
up as the
first flakes
fall,
I
Snowy gauze for Nature's scars,A welcome boon
to
children all;Twinkling eyes outdo the stars.But the tinkle of sleigh bellsdie
As I
icy tentacles grip thebreath;Swirling flakes heap moundshigh,
^
Whilst belfries sound
the
knellof death.Lances
of
light soon pierce thegloom,Low grey skies give way to blue;The darkling brow of night is litBy starry diadems anew.Sunbeams outlaw
the"
stragglingsnow;Fires race though fields, weedyand dry;Dwellings with fresh cleanlinessglow;Smoke and dust bedim the sky.Pungent wood spice emblams theair;Winged choirs enchant the ear;Keen eyes search the charredmeadow o'erWatching the first green budappear.E'en better than tree-driftblossomsOr sweet-fragrance
of
new-mownlawn,A dress of green velvet, goldspangled,Oh that Nature would first don!
Yes,
fairer than rainbow Autumn,Or stars of the summer night,More dazzling than crystal snow-
cape,
A green sward of dandelion
bright!
—Jane
Franklin
Prelude To Spring
Late winter's
ice—encrusted
knifeIs sunk hilt-deep in Nature s bed.Drab grayness smothers out
all
life;
A muted world lies frozen, dead.This darkest hour, this hopelesswaste
|
These
shouldfengulf
us in dispair.But
no—they
fail. We know thetasteOf Spring's first rain, its thrill so
rare!
—Maryalys
Klinger
Dr. M.
J.
Relihan
Speaks To MembersOf Lambda KappaGamma
At the Spring meeting of Lambda Kappa Gamma, Dr. Relihangave
a
talk on the
"WomeniOf
Homer."
Guest Editorial
(Taken from the
"As
We Were Saying" column of theCOLUMBUS REGISTER)
?
There are drugs and
drugs—in
the base sense. And oneof the basest, in sense and in fact, is the drug of false names
andjlabels
which
stupefy
minds
and
mislead wills. An old
one,
used as widely as marijuana, is the term "academic freedom." Another is
"freedom
of speech"; another "freedom ofthe
press";
another "liberalism," which is, of course, "free-domism." Since the religion of the worldly is pride, and sincepride balks at anything resembling direction
or
regulation,the term "freedom" (misused for the most part of "license")is the rallying cry of the worldly in every circumstance. It isin the name of
freedom
that true freedom among men is killed.The professor wants academic freedom. Rightly interpreted, the term indicates precisely what the professor oughtto have. But as it is used today, the term, "academic freedom," means that the professor is free to teach what he likes,and the students (and their parents) are not free
to
insistthat the professor teach truth and decency. Children must
go!to school—no
freedom there. But, once in school,
they
must be the uncomplaining victims of a shyster with a degreewho preys upon the
public
pocket-book for the privilege(which he terms his right) of shaping their minds and moralsas he pleases. This has come to be the meaning of "academicfreedom."
-••>[
And "freedom of the press" is another drug-term to stifleclear thinking. That the press ought to be free from the evilinfluence of owners who misrepresent facts; free from
the
playing up of filthy items of news that inflame ignorant andunregulated human passion, free from political and religious
bias,
all will agree. But the "freedom of the press" does notmean all this. It means that the paper must be free to printwhat lies it pleases, what evils serve its interests in the worldof gain, what filth will smear
those
persons, places and institutions to which the paper stands opposed. The readers whobuy the paper are not
free
to have
facts;
no matter, we musthave "freedom of the press."
I.
ij
Twin brother to "freedom of
the
press" is "freedom ofspeech." Now, no man in his
five
wits wants to be under Hit-lerian supervision, with an agent in a brown shirt at his elbowweighing every word he utters in hope of finding somethingpolitically out of balance. Of course not! On the other hand,no one in his right mind wants himself or his children s u b -
jected
to openly uttered filth, blasphemy, calumny, detraction.For there is such a thing as evil speech, and reason recognizesit as clearly as the eye recognizes red or yellow. And freedom is essentially concerned with the choice of things good,not evil. There is no freedom for the use of evil things in anevil
way.«
Still, "freedom of speech"
is ^invoked
by seeminglyreasonable men to justify foul speech.! Here as in the "freedom" of the press and of the professor, the term, "freedom,"is used, as Scripture says, "as the cloak for malice."
The Land of Wonder
The mind of man is naturally an inquiring mind.
From
birth to death, man is curious about himself and the universewhich confronts him; and his mind takes spontaneously tophilosophizing about the nature of things. As Aristotle says,"It was owing to wonder that men began to philosophize inearlier times just as it is today, wondering at
firsttabout
theproblems that lie close at hand, and then little by little advancing to the greater perplexities." And this wonder is
a
lively thing, for it is closely associated with life and springsfrom it as a native impulse, so that one might well say
that
a man
is
dead when he has ceased to wonder. Epicurus sumsit all up nicely in one of hisletters:"Let no one delay to studyphilosophy while he is young, and when he is old let him notbecome weary of the study; for no man can ever find
the
time unsuitable or too late to study the health
of
his soul.And he who asserts either that it is not yet
timelto
philosophize, or that the hour is passed, is like a man who should saythat the time is not yet come to be happy, or that
it is
too
late.
So that both young and old should study philosophy,the one in order that, when he is old, he may be young in goodthings through the pleasing recollection of the past, and theother that he may be at the same time both young and old, inconsequence of his absence of fear for the future."
He noted that nowhere in
the
Odyssey does Homer give a minutedescription
of
his female charac
ters.
This is an art of Homer thatallows his readers to fill in
by
visualizing the characters as theythink they should be.Dr. Relihan selected several ofHomer's female characters anddiscussed them. One of the mostinteresting
of
his selections wasPenelope who depicts the role ofthe ideal wife and mother.Dr.
Relihan's
scholarly paperwas striking evidence
of the
speaker's easy familiarity withGreek literature
in
general andHomeric literature in particular.It was followed by interesting discussion.
 
JUNE. 1940THE
MERCIAD
The last quarter, the winning
point,
the final half of the ninthinning, and the fourteenth hole areall unwound in the great game ofsports that started in September,
1939,
and is ending now.The next best thing to say is,and ever has
been—but
can I helpit? No—BASKETBALL.It sneaked in another encore before the whistle blew, though; sohere are some more
reports—The
famous all-resident team drew arecord crowd of attentive spectators one Fridayevening__J'pinch-hitting" for
a'
movie must have
|
meant fun for everyone thissame game also featured somenovel referee work of an enthusiastic and entertaining
fan__A
little matter of a locked door without akey|can be remedied quiteeasily too, so
'tis
seen no private detective training necessary
—Then
there was that game whenthe Freshmen met their "big sis
ters"
and managed to scare themaway just one point. And, in caseyou haven't heard or stopped toremember, the Glass of 1940 haswon class intramurals for fouryears. You just try to find another class that can do that
andwell
play them some alumnae
week-end!
Carm
"Do I Love You, Do I?"Savage and Eileen Rehler startedthe ball (ball bearings, then) rolling one fine day, while the
'ol
weathered eye was a-squintingaround looking for a glimpse ofDoris Scalzo's bicycle.Indoor tennis warming-up wasmore fun than you'd ever imagine.We even invented a new type ofgame for playing doubles in thegym. But along came Spring,eventually, and brought the phys-ed classes onto the courts. Thelist for tournament plays has beenposted, so come on and get in thereSomeone has to win JeanneHockensmith must play a wickedgame she's had one racquet re-strung already.Maida Wendel, Erie's one golfchampion, is spreading her interest about school.Organizing a
'Mercyhurst
teamto compete with other schools tooktoo long this year and preventedour entering. Meanwhile, this season will find our three teams digging up the earth, or maybe break-
(Continued
on Page 4)
S. O. S. Club ElectsOfficers
The members of the S. 0. S. heldtheir last meeting of the year inthe Home Economics Laboratoryon Wednesday, May 7. The Meeting was brief and was called byPresident Mary Louise
Healy
forthe purpose of electing officers forthe ensuing year. Officers electedwere: President, Jeanne Senior;Vice-President, Catherine McMillan; Secretary, Dorothy Reagle;Representative to the Merciad,Dorothy Tormay.Plans were made for the annualpicnic which was held on MemorialDay, May 30, at the Peninsula.The picnic was the last social function of the year, and was thoroughly enjoyed by all club members and advisors as well.
•Pauline
Lynch
Freshmen Give TeaFor Seniors
The upstairs dining room of thePussy Willow was most attractively decorated on Saturday, the18th of May. Formal afternoongowns were worn by the gracioushostesses of the day, the Freshmen. The occasion was the lovelytea given by the Freshman Classin honor of the Seniors.
*
And the Band Played
When I entered the auditoriumthe audience had
already
as
sembled!
and upon the
stage:the
band was tuning up and otherwisepreparing in true concert style to
i^play.
It was the night of the:' St.Andrew's Band concert.Professor Owen, the conductor,opened the program with the stir-ring "March of the Pioneers" followed by the Overture "Oberon."Then appealing to a lighter mood,he directed the band in the playingof "Scatterbrain." The two dancesfollowing, the "Chinese Dance"and the "Dance of the Militants,"were from Tschaikowsky's charming Nutcracker Suite. After wehad heard the band's arrangementof "Oh Johnny!" selections fromthe Red Mill by Victor Herbertwere presented and the ever beautiful "Bells of St. Mary's."
',
Mr. Joseph Sulkowski, first clarinetist and assistant conductor ofSt. Andrew's Band,
stepped:to
thestand to
lead
the band in "Polonaise Thadeus Kosciuszko," "Manhattan Serenade" and the old"Beer Barrel Polka." ProfessorOwen
conducted
for the remainderof the program which consisted
^f
three dances from Henry VIII and"God Bless America" which theaudience sang heartily. For theencores, the band played a "Victory March" and "Chicago Tribune."
} I
.
|
This concert of old favorites andunfamiliar numbers was keenly enjoyed
J
by the Mercyhurst audience.The modern pieces played, such as"Scatterbrain" and "Oh Johnny!"were not announced; but ProfessorOwen watched the audience's reaction, and his smiles indicatedthat he found it favorable.
I
After the concert the Sophomores entertained the members M£;the band, their conductors and |sponsor in the Dining Room. And |the boys, after playing the classicsfor us, concentrated on "swing" jwith zestful interest for
the § rest ^
of the evening.
c
E.
Rehler
MERCYONUS!0. G. A. Convenes InFinal Meeting
At the final meeting of the 0. G.A. Sorority
forlthe
present schoolyear, Miss Martha Hutton waselected president for | next year.Her assistants are: Dorothy O'Ha-ra, secretary; Mary
Parmeter,
treasurer; Mary Isabelle Winston,publicity chairman.A special feature
of?
this meeting was the motion picture, "TheWorld's Champion Typist
>
in
Ac-
tion," given through the courtesyof the Royal Typewriter Company.The club's activities for theyear were climaxed by a picnic
at
the peninsula, sponsored by theMisses Weschler, Hutton, Madden,and McGee.
—-Frances
GallagherGangway, Juniors. Here comesyour farewell Merciad for the 1940season. We hereby officially usherin summer, convertibles, dandelions,tennis I rackets, summerclothes, and your vacation.Under Old Business (very old)comes the annual migration ofMercyhurst to Buffalo. As surelyas the birds come north, Mercyhurst goes to Buffalo. Eh bien,east
is
east, and
west
is west, butwho's going to meet the twain?Under New Business, we findour summer vacation wrapped inpink ribbons waiting for us to| "claim our own." Soak up the sun,
•gals,
and the fun. And the moon!In fact, what I mean*is, Have AGood Time!
\
Other New Business is the JuneProm. The Juniors wish everybody enjoyed a Happy June Prom,
withlthe
Man of the Hour."Make way for her Gracious Majesty, Queen of the May." Orchidsto our May Queen, who was anextremely lovely one, and to hercourt. They made a rhapsody ofcolor in the midst of the green ofthe lawn and the blue of the summer sky.Speaking of Sharon (who was?)how about Sharon* some of thosenumerous dates of yours, Button?(That's one way to get a pun in,I always J say.) When they have tocome in relays,
well—that's
goingtoo far. "Share the wealth" is ourmotto, Button.Here's a loud cheer for BettySchutte's article in the last Merciad. Take heed, friends. It contained a great deal of truth.
~*"T
Have you noticed how earlyStoutie arrives these days? It maybe the weather, but whatever it is,it certainly is nice to see herbright and shining face (a dash ofWoodbury's face powder would fixthat up, Stoutie) at 8:10 insteadof 10:08.Here's an idea for your sparetime, and if you don't know whatspare time is, look it up in a dictionary.Where's my dictionary
?
Anyhow, knit something for the RedCross. They need it, and you cando it. Why not try?(Continued on Page 4)
MRS. J. H. SHANAHANENTERTAINS AT TEA
The Senior Class was honored ata lovely tea in the new home of
Mrs.
J. Hugh Shanahan, directorof Dramatic Arts, at 130 West26th Street. The time was 3 to 6Sunday afternoon, May 19.Assisting Mrs. Shanahan wereMiss Ruth E. Whalen and MissMarguerite O'Donnell, both members of the Merychurst Faculty.Page Three
SENIOR. SIDESHOWFashion ShowFeatures Home
Ec*s
In a drawing room setting, thefreshmen, sophomore and SeniorClothing Class members presentedtheir annual Style Show, underthe direction of Miss Ruth Whalen.The many garments shown weremade and professionally displayedby the individual stylers and
.mak
ers.
The show was presented on Tuesday evening, May 28th.the
El-
thetheHello and Goodbye from the
Ors.
S e n i or s always startthe
"remember
the time"around this time of year, and although we may experience indulgent looks from the underclassmenwe like to reminisce, about thetime Marg burned her diary on the
island;
Mary Ann and Jean in bedcomplete with mittens and coats;Ann and the rhumba; the dayswhen Marie was the "Bunny" ofCanisius; Fran and the Moose;Sleuth Boyd; Weschler, carrier ofPhotograph lights; Janet and Niagara; Buffalo Club Dances;"Blinds" for our first dance;mer; Jack; Snow White andSeven; proms; nights onbridge; campuses;
Dottie's
storiesof that fabulous man in her hometown; Laddie; the Roost and thewhite-wash; the Girl Scouts; Sas-| ka; sunning on the
Island;
Gin-| nie's sunburn; phone calls to WestPoint; Collette's party, snowstorms; to mention only a few.The Seniors who had planned aweek of magnificent loafing thelast week of school were amazedand pertrubed to find they werejust as busy as ever. Our MayDay was a huge success with Betty Ann, lovely and regal, and thecourt looking like a heavenly vi-sion. Mary Louise Cornelia'sbrother; the man with the rose;Mr. Miller were all very much inevidence with cameras.
Frostie
reported a wonderful weekend in Notre Dame. Our Home Ec seniorsare doing quite well, both MaryJane and Mary Ann will be numbered among the employed nextwinter. Rosie's Joe will be missedthis year at the dance, we remember his romantic dash for the lastProm. Gin Bryant is looking longingly again this year toward theIsland but her numerous friendsshake warning heads. D o tti eand Chuck
are
spending
the
last week together night and day.Frannie is wearing down a littlepath between Cleveland and Erie
—he
hasn't missed a weekendsince he met Marg. Clara waswondering why Bob didn't call andwhen she picked up the eveningpaper, Bob was in the hospital.Clara is homeward bound on the8th of
June—Happy
Landing!What is this situation among theMcCarthy's and Wadlingers! Ourbest wishes to Agnes, who willsay "I do" shortly.
" $
And so the end of a column,
t
he Jend of a year, the end of ourschool days, but not the end of jmemories, friendships, love for ourschool, traditions. We
hope
tofind as much happiness and kindness when we leave, but it couldn'tbe possible; so Adieu, and Thank
SOPHLYSPOKEN
Well, Sophs, one more year ofour college career is over
_
andaren't there just loads of pleasantmemories
?
Will you ever forgetour triumph on the night of theSong Contest? Marie was somewhat of a contortionist that night—and did she get results! Dotmodestly says that even she produced melodious tones Remember the night of the St. Andrew'sband concert when Miss Green carried out her duties as chaperoneso
effectively
? Carm remembers,we know.
.Then
the MercyhurstClub of Buffalo held a ball andfrom all appearances "romance ran
high"—Annette
met Bob, Peggyrenewed her romance with Jack,and Mary Kay and Betty Donatel-
li
returned to Mercyhurst
con-1
vinced that 'blind dates' aren't so
bad—There
was a return engage-
ment
to Buffalo when the GleeClub held its concert at Canisius.Betty was feeling 'miserable' af-
(Continued
on Page 4)
Latin and Greek ClubHear Speaker AtLast Meeting
At the last meeting of the Latinand Greek Club the Reverend Harold W. Gilmer, Ph. D., spoke onthe subject of Virgil's commissionby Augustus to elevate the moralsof the Roman, people. This project Virgil sought to work out inhis
Aenied
by advocating virtuescomparable to earth and iron,genuine materials which cannot beimitated. Dr. Gilmer held thatVirgil was justified in his characterization of Aeneas because thathero was driven on to the fulfillment of a divine destiny, namelythe founding of Rome.Dr. Gilmer was well qualified toaddress the group. He has servedas professor of Latin over a periodof twenty-six years at eight
dif
ferent colleges, most notably Chicago Unversity. At present he isrector of St. John's EpiscopalChurch of Erie.
,
The club was addressed by twoof its members also; June Curriegave a book review of Catullusand Horace by Tenney Frank, lateprofessor of Latin at Johns Hop- |kins University and incidentally afriend of the guest speaker. Martha Haley spoke on "The Amuse-
ments
of Roman Women." Shetouched upon many similarities,complimentary and otherwise, between the women of Rome and thewomen of today.
—Jane
Franklinyou•V, Hileman
Betty Ann
Mehl
(Continued
from Page 1)
;g
center of the campus and took herplace on the golden throne, surrounded by her court. The attendants of the Queen, Rosemary McGee, Marie Mclntyre, Allene Stephens, Margaret Battaglia, MaryJane Mahoney, Helen Patterson,Marie Madden, and Marion Weschler were clad in gowns of eggshelland queen blue, with flowers, hatsand gloves of blue. Spring songs,May Pole dances by the Seminar
ians,
remarks on May Day traditions by college Seniors, and asolo by Jean Shipman preceded thecrowning of the Queen by Margaret Wadlinger and
Katrina
Quinn,the Prefects of the College andSeminary Socialists. The procession then moved to the Grottowhere the May Queen placed afloral crown upon the head of thestatue of the Blessed Virgin. After the recitation of an act of consecration to Our Blessed Motherand the singing of hymns in herhonor, the May Day ceremonieswere concluded with Benedictionof the Blessed Sacrament in theChapel of Christ the King.

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