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The Merciad, June 15, 1943

The Merciad, June 15, 1943

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Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, June 15, 1943
The Merciad, June 15, 1943

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Published by: TheMerciad on May 23, 2011
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fjfaelcyb
urst
ffisto rBrief
Introducing
Our Alma Mater
But Colorful
In
this
issue of The Merciad, we, the students, welcomeyou
to
Mercyhurst College. We will take you on a tour ofour buildings and our campus
where
you will see us study-ing in the classrooms and laboratories, relaxing in the"do:m," browsing about the library, or playing on the tennis
tf
vas August 17, 1925. Sis- courts. You will see a preview of the courses offered in our
of
Mercy, clergy from
colle
S
e
curriculum, and of the campus activities which affordopportunity for the development of literary,fdramatic, athletic, and musical talent.
\
But more than this, we hope to take you behind the scenesof college life to the real Mercyhurst spirit which is thelife-giving |principle of all our school activity. This spirit,centered in our beautiful
Chapel;*of
Christ the King, extends to ennoble our learning with Christian philosophy andto
foim
the Christian basis of
our-social
life.We
havejnot
come to Mercyhurst merely for social accomplishment, or intellectual advancement, or just "a good time."Rather do
welaim
at an effective blending of all three—
fc
^y corner of the diocese,
cd
hundreds of Erie citizenswere gathered on a windy crest
f Glenwood
Hills to witness
L
establishment of a new citadel of Catholic education, Mercyhurst College.
I £j
I Father! Gaston, the founder
0
f
Boston College, advised theSisters to build their
^proposed
college on a hill overlookingthe water. So it was thatMother Borgia, Superior
of
the
Titusville
motherhouse, accom-ied
by
Sister
Col
lette,
reasurer
and
Mother*
Pierre,
isistant
Superior, came to
JErie
in search of a site for theirI prospective institution of learning.
|
Ground Broken
In U
924
F.
F. Durang of Philadelphia,fa specialist in college architec
ture, laid out the plans for the
ischool
building. Ground wasbroken on the feast of OurLady's Nativity, 1924, an aus-
Ipicious
beginning for
a
I
college
I
dedicated to Mary. Workprogressed rapidly, and, on theFirst Friday of September,[1926, Father Sullivan said thefirst Mass at Mercyhurst. Thechapel was located in the present community room.When it came, in 1928, toadding the' finishing touches,{the Sisters of Mercy did not
.content
themselves merely with
•choosing
color schemes. Theywielded hammers and brushes
»,enthusiastically,
arranging desksin the classrooms and furniturein the parlors.the perfect education of spirit, mind, and body. For thisreason, we do not leave the spirit of Mercyhurst behind us
in
the Chapel, but carry it with us to the history lecture, thePress Room, the bridge game, the English
Club
meeting, andthe June Prom.
1
We speak sincerely as students who have felt
this
spiritof Mercyhurst grow within us during the years spent underher gracious influence. It is a spirit expressed most adequately, not in Class Day speeches^ and traditional ceremonies, but
infithe
minds and hearts of those who live thatspirit daily.Finally,
Mercyhurst"
teaches
us fto
be
thoughtful—to
beeducated not merely with a jumble of facts, but with acoordinated volume of
interested
knowledge,
i
She urges us,therefore, to work, not merely for high marks which leadfinally to a degree, but
rather .for
a definite plan of lifewhich leads to our ultimate End of life.
£
1U&
I
CI
asses,
Begin
On September 8, a pioneer[band of nineteen Freshmen and(four Sophomores registered for
|
classes.In June, 1929, fourgirls,
|the
first Mercyhurstpaduates,
received!
their di-fplomas.
j
The formal opening of thecollege was celebrated November 10-12
with
Open House.[Bishop
Gannonf
blessed the
I
building in a solemn ceremony;
the
students piloted a thousandpeople through the collegehalls.
&
You see Mercyhurst now, afull-grown college, whose mag-
Fttcent
collegiate Gothic toweroverlooks 70 acres of rollingPennsylvania countryside, whose
pomelike
dormitory, modernpassrooms,and artistic furnish
es form
an ideal setting
forchristian
education
in
ChristianGroundings.
ueens
Chape
Window
H
>f
Our Lady
•'Petual
Help
of
Vol. XIII,
No.
19
MERCYHURST COLLEGE
Erie.
Penna
Student Leadership
SPIRIT
Cr
MEECYHURST
All
ActivitiesiFeature
You hear it in the first friendly "Hello" that greets you
aafe
a Freshman, in the last earnest "Good-bye, good-luck!" warmingyour heart on Commencement night.You feel it in the rush of the wind
around
the chapel, whenthe sanctuary lamp is flickering, and you are very close to God.It laughs with the merrymakers chattering in whispers overcrackers and jelly "after-lights".It sings in the reverent notes of the "Alma Mater", whether on^the Senior steps or at a hockey game.It broods lovingly over the library, the classroom, the laboratories, filling the minds and hearts of the students learning there.It cheers at basketball games, when the score is tied withthree;
:
minutes to go.It
speaks
in the noisy chatter of the dining room, the measured words
of'a
lecture, the formal
small-talk
of a tea.
sollege
Sh
nne
To
thejleft
is pictured thebeautiful triple Gothic window! in the
Queen's
Chapelat Mercyhurst. The stainedglass image of Our Lady ofPerpetual Help, glowing withrich,
warm|color,
is framedwith delicate Gothicltracery.The Italian
marble
altar isa perfect example of liturgical art, with crucifix andcandlesticks of an indestructible glass substance. Thenave of the Chapel contains
small
shrines of the Infantof Prague, St. Therese, andSt. Anthony.This little Chapel
Jwas
built at the request of Mary
Coyle
O'Neil,
donor of thelarge Chapel of Christ theKing.
*Jt
is here that theSeniors keep an all-nightvigil before the Blessed Sacrament on the eve of Com*
mencement.
It chuckles over the "campusslip," the reproving note of aroom-inspector, the anxiousvoice pleading, "But Sister, thealarm clock just didn't go off!"It
lives^in
the rustle of blackrosaries, in the serene faces beneath modest white head-dress
es,
in the rhythmic tones of the
Office
rising through the evening shadows.You feel it in the worry ofterm papers, the hard work ofpractice teaching, the thrill ofhonors hard-earned.With
invisible
hands, itcrowns the tower, rising againsta breath-taking starlit sky, orthe dazzling blue of aspringmroning.It glows in the cheerful company of you "roomy", in thecomradship of classmates, inthe heart-warming loyalty ofthat friend who "always understands*.
.
L.
*
These things are THE SPIRIT OP MERCYHURST!There is no course entitled"Leadership" offered at Mercyhurst, yet that is one of thethings we learn here. Perhapsthis is because there are somany student movements andorganizations in which we notonly take part, but which wealso plan and direct.For instance, there iisi' theStudent Council! composed ofrepresentatives from the various clubs and organizations inthe college. These girls, whoare really deeply interested inMercyhurst as a whole, planand carry
out
activities which
aid?
the students and the college, as well as integrate theprograms of the extra-curricular groups.Another student activity isthe Liberal Arts Movement,sponsored by the A.B. students,but more directly by representatives from* the six LiberalArts clubs.
v
It
is for all the
students^and
is designed tocoordinate all fields
of
the arts.Informal student-faculty meetings at which pertinent topicsare discussed and thought isstimulated; concerts with recordings of the classics andcomments on them; exhibits ofstudent art work; panel dis
cussions—these
are the activities of this movement whichgives an opportunity for activeleadership.More Leadership WantedNew activities will give evenmore opportunities, The Liturgical Movement teaches usto make our faith the
center
of our lives, while the CatholicTheater Group
alms
to teachappreciation of fine dramathrough study and actual production. There is the Sodalityfor Catholic students and aclub for each major department.In all these activities we findfun' as well as increased knowledge, but most of all we finda chance to organize, plan, andcarry out programs. Facultymembers remain in the back-
j
ground to guide and advise,leaving the leadership to us.Here at Mercyhurst, we learnto lead by leading. The
oppor
tunities are here, the
leader
ship is up to you.
WELCOMEFRESHMEN
College life is new andexciting and just a little frightening at first. So we have planneda special program for
your
first days at Mercyhurst.It begins even before youarrive, when you receive yourfirst letter from your "BigSister," a Junior who helps youthrough'-; those first days at
MercyJhurst.
These Juniors andthe Student Council have arranged a program by whichyou meet
Mercyhurst—the
traditions, the building, the spirit,the faculty and students, thetask that lies ahead.College is not frighteningeseyou
.t
 
Page
2
T
H
El M|E R
C I A
D
MERCYHUlRST OFFIfRS
.
11
f
M
.
,
,_x„„j *„
L.I,-
„# nnr
HVBS
will determine what
thisichoice shajl
be.
» 2 1} j 5I2M
what
we
mtend
to
makeof our
live^
^
aete m
rf
regardless
of
what field
we
have chosen;
theeellThere are
a
few^sub ectsttat
«^^firLSL .»d,
for Catholic
students, religion. Then
in
each field,
|
^.re^K^
particular course.
Th
e
courses arevariec.even |S3ou must
take
to
fulfill your major requirements,
and
usually there
is
tune to|shp
in
a|few
un-
|"SSl?£fclasst'are Tmall
so
that
therjis Jchance for discussion>d
questions. Even
in the |
J£?ctesses *ere
is
tmTfrom Inures
and
note-taking
for
student participation.
Of
course, there
%
^s^ZlT^
did
expect them!),
butj
they become just
one
more part
of^a well|>ala*ced
col-
g
l6
lfeiuridoes offerfthree
main courses
which will
prepare
you
for
earning
a
living,
or findings
en-
'joymentto
life,
but
it
does more than
that-it
gives
you the
real
meaning
of
life
as
found
through
theSection
of
Christian principles.
You
learn kore
than facts from books, more than technical processes;
you
learn
how
to
live
a
fall,
rich
life
based
on
Christian
chi
DRAMATICMRTt
TEACHES EXPRESSION
$We|
find
at
Mercyhurst
one
course
thatf
is
^common to&all
fields.
This
-is dramatic
art.
Voice!
and
diction teaches
the
proper
way
of
speaking,
but|
es
pecially
it
tries
to
correct voice
defects.
4 Play !
production
fpre-
pares|us
for
presenting*simple
dramatic productions
for!
high,school
or
club groups,
fwhile
public speaking gives
us|poise
and
conf dence£
to appear
be
fore groups.But
dramatic.art
extends
be
yond f
class
I
work.
^The
JanusClub
fpresents
an
^opportunity
for acting, costuming,
or
stagecraft.
The
history
of
drama,writing
and
production
of
plays
will|bef
studied
-through
the
Catholic Theater Movement.
&
In
dramatic
art
there
is the
expression*
of
l
all, fields,
whileit,
in
turn, contributes
to
eachof them.
EDUCATION DEPARTMENT POPULAR
"Education
courses
are
amongthe most popular
at
Mercy
hurst,
for
many
of us
plan
to
be
teachers.
We
realize what
a
splendid work
it
-
is to
showothers the truths that have beengiven
to us.
Courses requiredby
the
various states
for
a
cer-
tificate
to
teach
in
that stateare offered,
so
that
we may as
sume such
a
position anywhere.But preparation
for
teachingextends beyond classroom* lectures
and
examinations; herethe city high schools cooperatewith Mercyhurst. Educationstudents spend
a
portion
of
their time
observing
the
technique
of
experienced teachersof high school classes. Thenthese students, applying! what
they I
have learned, assume
the
role
of|teacher.
No matter what field
you
choose
to
follow, education willfit
in
along' with your othercourses,
|supplementing
themand preparing
you
for a
careerof service.
HOME ECONOMICS
Mercyhurst would
not be
complete without
the
home economics students whom
we af
fectionately call "home wreck
ers."
These
are the
girls
who
manage
The
Cupboard, wherehungry students
|
find
new
strength;
who
fill
the
hallswith tantalizing odors
of
cookies
and
things;
who
make
us
envious
of
their smart clothes.The courses these
students
take here
at
Mercyhurst
are
manyj^
and
vary
from
homenursing
to
tailoring. Many
of
them
are distinguished
by ac
tual practice
in
making thingsand
in
carrying'
out
the
ideaslearned during lecture periods.A well-equipped foods
lab,
the
clothing
lab
with
its
busy sewing machines,
an
arts and
crafts
room,
the
college kitchen
It
self for
^experience
in
quantitycookery,
and the
Practice
Housed
for
six
weeks actual housekeeping provide
the
stage uponwhich
the
home
'ecers'
perform.Their
fspeeial
club,
the
S.O.S.,to which
all
home economicsstudents belong,! offers discussion
on
topics related
to
their
field.
f
m
M
For
girls
who
specialize
in
thisfwork,
there
are
many
op
portunities
for
positions. Somebecome teachers!
but
otherfields
are
open—dressmaking,tea room management, ^institutional cooking, demonstrationwork, nutrition education
and,
after
a
little
more training.-dietetics. Training needed
to
obtain such positions
as
thesecan
be
found
at
Mercyhurst.
COMMERCIAL EDUCATION
For those
of
you
who-
desirepositions
in the
business worldas secretaries, accountants,
or
stenographers, Mercyhurst
of
fers
the
training that
is
needed.Commercial education gives
you
all
the
necessary courses,
as
well
as
actual experience
in
that type
of
work.
.
The curriculum is varied, withspecial commercial courses, likebusiness organization, shorthand,
or
accounting being giveneach year.
Yet
these coursesare light enough
to
enable
you
to take
a
few
subjects
in
other
fields,
as
science, language,
or
philosophy. These elective
sub-
jects help
to
vary your program,
and,
if
carefully selected,give
you a
broad backgroundfor your more specialized work.You
in the
commercial
field
have your
own
particular terri
tory—the
typing
and
accounting rooms,
as
well
as
the
OfficePractice Room.
In the
O.
P.
R.
you gain
the
actual experienceof working
in an
office;
you
apply facts learned
in
lecturesto conditions similar
to
thosefound
in the
business world.
I
Then
too, you
will
get
muchreal experience that
is
not
listed
in the
catalogue.
You
willbe
the
members
of the
typingstaff
of
Praterita,
our
yearbook,
and the
Merciad,
newspaper.
You
will
pro|_
find
yourself typing
stencili
faculty members
or
stu<j
 
and term papers
for
the
hi
arts
and
home economicsdents
to
whom
a
typewrite!just
a
mystery.Along with commercial
jects,
many
of
you
may
wsfc
take education
so
that
you
obtain positions either as
n
ers,
or in the
business
^
There
are
many fields
j
which
you,
with your
coucial
education training,
may
ter after
a
little
sped
education
personnelbanking, executive
posil
LIBERAL ARTS
?
The
Liberal Arts curriculumfunctions
to
broaden knowledge
rather
than
to
specialize
it,
and;
to
enrich
it
with artistic*and cultural appreciation.
The
interrelationship
of
the
history,the
"*
political
and
religiousthought,
the
science
and the
art
of
the
ages
is
stressed, ratherthan
a
;
smattering
of
so-called
sc
AL
SC
I
m
N
H
E
y
The
departments?of
biology,chemistry, physics,
and
mathematics compose
the
science curriculum.
All
Freshmen
are re
quired
to
take |general
biology,orfgeneral chemistry. Laboratory work
in
such
courseslas
organic!
and
inorganic chemistry, bacteriology,
and|generaiphysics|is
carried!on|
in
modern, well-equipped laboratories.Science holds
the key
to
innumerable professions
or
fields
of
advanced study such
as
medicine research chemistry,
and en
gineering.?
"cultural" courses which wouldprepare
the
student
for
nothing
*
but
intelligent-soundingconversation.
~A11
Mercyhurst students
are
thoroughly grounded
in the
mechanics
of
English,
and a
survey
of
English literature.English majors
continue
v
withsuch
specialized
courses,
as ^the
short story, composition,and literary criticism.The heritage
of the
cl
is brought
to
the
-liberal
student directly through
the
cient
and
modern languagepartments.
The
former
ind
Latin
and
Greek,
the
1
Spanish, French, GermanItalian.
*jiii?T**iiBetl9KGr:
""•*•"^
The Social Studies
d<ments
include those
of
hisl
sociology, political scienceeconomics. Students
may d
any
one of
these
as a
field,
or she
may
have
aeral
social studies
minor,
fields
of
opportunity
are of
to
the
student
of
social
sti
such
as
teaching, research.
raiy
science.
j
I
The
sociology student
is
pared
for
advanced
sudy
such various fields
as
jw
delinquency, social
psyw
or departments
of
puN*sistance.>'^-.'
i
Christian philosophybinding element
of
the
curriculum. Therefore,dents
are
thoroughly
»
in general
psychology
ethics,
and
histom°t I
phy. Elective
courses
m
ed
in the
philosophy
*i
Aristole,
and
Aquinas-Psychology
has
ifdeveloped into
a
mm*
ment,
with
J»f/%-
courses
in
applied P • J
social psychology,
f
1
chologylof
personal^
j
....
.5
SE
*¥lf*
M
A
wf
CyhPm
'
St
f*
udTenta
in
the
home economics,
or
commercial
science fields
are
encourage JE„,,ir ^
L
i
beral
A
!t
curriculum
which, together with
the
required
courses'"P^
Sn\
SCienC6
'
an
l
(hamati
<=
a*,
will
act as a
broadening
Influence
upon
the
n«nd.
J
knowl.^!
P
r0fid
f
nt
not
""I? in
teaching, accounting,
or
dietetics,
but
also
in
sound,
knowledge co-ordinated
by
Christian philosophy
and
enriched
by a
love
of
beauty.
^J
PH
I
L
O
S
O
PHy
 
THE
M|E
R
C I A DPage 3
Chapel and Tower
I
a
A
ud IF r o m
I Her
\
H e g h t
s
BB
Majestically
SheMfv
Reigns O'er All"
&!
"Queen of Our School,Liege Lady ofOurlHearts"High on a Hill
|There's
a College
WelAll
Love"
"CladIin
Snow,!
Garbed in Green"
••i ••-> i•-
Practice House Drive
**
In Gothic SplendorOur
Alma
Mater"

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