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The Merciad, Nov. 22, 1944

The Merciad, Nov. 22, 1944

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The Merciad, Nov. 22, 1944
The Merciad, Nov. 22, 1944

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05/31/2011

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*2
Volume XV, No. 2
Mercyhurst
College, Erie Pa
Seniors PlanNovemberFrolic
Onej
of the highlights of thepre-Advent and post-Thanks
giving-season
will be an affairgiven by the Seniors for the
J
Freshmen. At this time thesetwo classes will really become
:
acquainted;
they J
will find new
- friendships—ones
that will en-
I
dure for many years. This event- will take place\ Thursday eve-
*
ning, November 30, under thedirection of Anne Kingston, general chairman.It has been hinted that thisparty will be a combination[indoor and outdoor celebration.November 22. 1944
//
Wh
i
OS
Wh
o
t
Eight Mercyhurst
lects
s
enior
Studen
R
eceiye
High
Honor
'.
A.
B.
Group
Beg
ins
N
ew
T
erm
andaughter amidst songs
^^fgames
around a bonfire willSeated fromM. Scullion, A.mark the climax of the evening.
|
M
-
Su,,ivan
»
L
-
C
J
The
Seniorslhave
been anticipating this get-together for
;
several weeks; they know this
J*ill
afford them
an
opportunityleft to right, we
find
M
O'Hara,
A.
McDermott,
Kingston, M. O'Connor, M. Savage, and standing:
Crowley—Mercy
hurst's WHO'S WHO.
reign Language
uos
Unite
The foreign language clubs, Spanish, French, German, and Ital-
-JL
t^
,
j.
i
1
. , , ian, instead of
existing
separately, have united and now form the
,*w oecome
better acquainted
»<rvitit +u« -ni *_
i
,
Modern Foreign Language Club. On October twenty-fourth the
#»witn
the Freshman class. 1
Speaks
n yjt
T
achieved by having several members from each {department con-
|
Mr.
John Henry Coon, noted
Z
.
A
.
T
,,.
„•
.„ . , _ ET
fiM.
duct a meeting. In
this
way, all
will
unconsciously become ac
quirer,
photographer, and
-
traveler presented the second
&e
on
Quatemalo
first meeting of this
new
1
? organization
was held.The purpose of this club is to give to all its members a broaderbackground of
eachj
of the countries represented. This will be
"Who's
Who Among Students in American Colleges and Universities" will list in its roster this year eight
^Mercyhurst
Collegestudents, members of the Senior Class. The girls receiving thisdistinction are
graded!according!to
qualities of leadership, scholarship, personality, and co-operation. One quality is not sufficient;a combination of all four must be present.The girls selected this year are: Mary
O'Hara,?
Beliefonte, Pa;Margaret Sullivan, Auburn, N. Y.; Loretta Crowley, Ellwood City,Pa.; Margaret O'Connor, Pittsburgh, Pa.; Margay Savage, McKees-
~~
port, Pa.; Anne Kingston, Erie,Pa.; Margaret Scullion, Salamanca, N. Y.; and Alvina McDermott,
Belford,
N. J.Biographies of outstandingstudents in 655 colleges appearannually in
"Who's
Who." Candidates are selected from members of the Senior. Class by avote of the faculty.All of these have done finework during their four yearsat Mercyhurst.
For
theirachievements and abilities theyhave been awarded one of thehighest honors that could beconferred on a college student.
To
them the students of thecollege extend their heartiestcongratulations.At one of the recent A. B.gatherings in the Blue Room,students discussed the politicalproblems of the day; namely,the advantages and disadvantages of a fourth-term; theplatforms and policies
tof
thepredominant political
parties!of
these United States; the his-tories,in
brief,
of the Democratic
and!
Republican parties;and the relative values of thechief presidential candidates asindividuals and as leaders infor
the!
ensuing
t
*
lecture of this term Sunday
ev
ening, November 12, in the
# allege
auditorium. Mr. Coon
flighted
his audience with the
^resting
subject of "Guate-rf*fr
a
'"
Col
°rful
picturescom-
j ^ed
with gay costumes of
*
uatemala
natives portrayed a
quaintediwith
the customs and cultures of these four nations.Chosen
to
advise
thevgroup
are: Sister M. Mercedes, professorof French and Italian; Sister Mary Rachel, instructor of German;and Mile. De ^Thierry, instructor of Spanish. The following girlswere elected as officers: Marilynne Cooper,(President; Sally Lund,Vice-President; Teresa AnnLennon, Secretary; Ruth E. Sullivan, Treasurer; and JeanneRoepke, Representative to the
$zCettdo>i
Realistic
scene of
^ericanfneighbor.
our Central
A
-
B
-
£
rou
P-November 22ThanksgivingOne need not be a languagestudent to join this newly form-vacation begins.
Student Council
J
Renews Activitie
»'
^e
firsted. club. The only requirementis to have an interest in the
languge
and to be
willing
totake an active part in the meet-Thanksgiving.Senior-Fresh-
5
dent
Council
fresid
meeting of the Stu-
ings.
opened under theNovember 23November 30man party.December 3Advent.December 8 — Feast of the Immaculate Conception.Beginning ofour countryfour years.The A. B.|Club, as a resultof this discussion, decided tohave "student election day" todetermine the political attitudeof the student body.This political analysis, aidedby the experience and knowledge of Sister M. Loretta, is oneof the many
indications
of thefulfillment of the purpose ofthe A. B. Club: "To unite thefields] of the arts into a wholewhich will make the studentsrealize the immense importanceof the liberal arts in their ownlives and in their relation tosociety." Concerts, lectures, discussions, and faculty-studentget-togethers are all a meansto this end. Students areurged to enrich their knowledgeof world affairs by active participation in this Liberal ArtsMovement.
4
Sc
*Uion.
enc
y
m
Miss Margaret
S
lw
8e
Cou
ncil
discussed many
rel
ative
to
the i
students'
N.
F. C. C. S.Holds Convention
if
"iter
¥%t
ii
m
<>tion
was passed
\
°Pen t
°
0Uncil
meetings
be*thoi,cw,
the
student body.
Al-
,S«10tt£h
«.
-«««*"*w
*nmjr.
.ru
bble * students
will not betf*
8
aue
\
V
°
te
the
po'
P^oni
m
*
y
voice
TheaftP
Parliamentary procedure
_^
their°n all matters.
\
e^
omain
business for thea
Schon Wa
s
the discussion of
Ition cvf°
pr
°J
ec
t for fthe
injec-
\:
°* Pari!
f^^as
A
an<
*
c
*
as8
meetings.^arli
am
cided
that copies of
r
taw
^-mT
tary
.
procedure be
P
is
trib
ut
\
mittl
eographed,
and
lenity
A
a11
students and
*ach
DJ
1
ors
'
In this way,
d
Mth
Pari?"
WiU be
acquainted
^l^spectivl
mentap
y rules inlhis
f
/
organization.On December 2, the Regional Convention of the NationalFederation of Catholic CollegeStudents will be held at-Nazareth College, Rochester, NewYork. Mercyhurst will send twostudent delegates to
this'
convention: Miss Marilynne Cooper,Senior Delegate; Miss
Jeanne
Roepke, Junior 5Delegate.PurposeThe
hierachy
in United Statesfavored one strong Catholiceducational body' to representthe Catholic educational interests of America. They appealedto the colleges to pool their efforts and to work toward acommon objective. The collegesresponded, and the NationalFederation of Catholic Collegesmaterialized. This organizationandEdu-rn aserves to consolidatestrengthen the Catholiccational System.How It OperatesEach Catholic Collegespecified area sends two delegates to a Regional meet wherethe students exchange ideason campus activities. Upon returning to their respective colleges, the delegates give a report
of
the meeting to the student body.
*i
Member colleges of the LakeErie Region?are: Nazareth College,Niagara University,
D'Youville
College, Villa MariaCollege, Canisius College, andSt.Bonaventure's.
Commissions
Each college has a particularinterest group or commissionwhich
it;wan(
to foster. Oncea college succeeds in interestingall other member colleges ofthe region in establishing thesame commission, it may holdan annual convention for thediscussion of technical problems.The International Relations Cluboperates under this plan.FutureIf Mercyhurst succeeds withher endeavors in the region,perhaps she can look forward toa national commission. Such anhonor would enable her to des-seminate information to colleges throughout the country.Students! Support the N. F.C. C. S. on your campus!Watch for its bulletins in thefuture!
Sodality
InductsNew,
;
MembersDecember 8
Christ the King Chapel
will
be the scene of a very impressive ceremony on December 8when the Freshmen students ofMercyhurst College will be received into Our
Lady's
Sodality.Before the reception all the candidates will have received a fewweeks' instructions in the history and organization of
the^
Sodality. During this time
the*
many privileges of the association, into which they will soonbe accepted, will be related tothem.The prospective soda
lists,
each carrying a rose and attired in cap and gown, will marchin procession to the front of thechapel to offer their bouquetto the Blessed Mother on herfeast
day—the
Feast of the Immaculate Conception.Margaret Sullivan, the prefect of the Sodality, and DoloresDiVincenzo, the vice prefect,will pin the medal of the Immaculate Conception over theheart of each new sodalist.These new members, havingbeen received into thePrim aria, are afforded
graces
and indulgences!wise' hot received.That
evening
the students willmeet in the auditorium to enjoy a program in celebrationof the great feast of the Sodality, and to honor the new mem
bers.!
*
»l
&
Primamany
other-
 
Page 2
TJfo
Tftencfad
Octobe
LiilDli
7<fe
IKencituL
Editor
(SlQ^^i
Assistant EditorRita
Rittenhouse
4
BmS I
Jeanne
jjltoepkePublished
monthly by the students of Mercyhurst CollegeNews Editor Ruth E. SullivanFeature Editor Mary DoyleLiterary Editor £ Barbara
Fleming
Art Editors
N.
Hirtle, G. MiddletonBusiness Manager
Marie Wolman
Contributors: M. Savage. M. Scullion, T. Lennon, M. Cooper, L.Crowley, E. Fitzgerald, P. Ferry, M. Mohr, P. Dengate, J.Wadlinger, P. Sullivan, M. O'Connor, M. 1. Kinnemey, S.Conrad, K. Connolly, J. Berry, M. Masterson, S. Brigham, P.White, L.
Writer,
N. Cooper, M. Gould, J. Schanbacher, M. E.Fitzgerald, M. O'Hara.Business
Staff :|
D. Harrington, M.| A. Harrison, A. Devine, D.
|j
Donatelli, H. Fabian, P. Ferry, E. Reagle, V.|Walsh, D. Lynch.
Tojthe
Student Body: I |
',
§ |The Merciad? What is it? It is your paper. It is to be the expression of your opinions, 'your thoughts, and your desires. Anopportunity is afforded each of you to relate your ideas in
"Letters
to the Editor." It is not necessary for you to be a master in theart of literary
writing—all
we want is your own opinion in yourown words.What did you think of the
presidential
election? What areyour feelings toward extra-curricular activities? What new ideashave you that may be beneficial
tojthe
school, your class, or yourfriends?
Don't]
talk about
these'things
with your roommate orkeep
them
within
yourself.
Write them down!We want The
M
LittleContinues
Theheld
ecrferi
resultslast
Iof
week
ciad
to be an expression of the personalityand spirit of Mercyhurst students. Won't you help us out?The Editor.
Many years ago, a comparatively small group of peoplebowed their heads in thanksgiving for all
\
that God hadgiven them. These settlers were thankful for a safe look at all the food that is being
A Day of Opportunity
Thanksgiving Day is almost here! Just smell (mentally, ofcourse) that turkey roasting in the oven! And as you sit in youreasy chair, can't you just picture all the other food that completesthat wonderful Thanksgiving menu: creamy mashed potatoes,stuffing, gravy, cranberry sauce, green peas, yellow corn, andmince-meat pie? And
doi
yourecognize all those familiarfaces sitting around the table,eagerly waiting to begin
?
Just
3£i
journey to America and for the freedoms which are enjoyed only in a free country. To these people, thanksgiving was a time for showing their
gratefulness
to God
brought to the table.
You'd
never know, from that
mind's
eye view, that there is a wargoing on, a war with its food
forfall Hejjhad
done for them. They had enjoyed so few rationing and all the otherprivileges in their mother countries that they truly ap- small discomforts and inconveniences, would you?But suppose that we take aminute right now and recallsomething that did j!remind usof this global war! It was thatheadline in last night's news-
I
paper, "Greek People Starving."Those pictures of little childrencrying in the street becausethey were hungry didn't leavemuch doubt in our mind aboutthe shortage of food in Europeand other parts of the globe.And do you| remember thatpnewsreel which showed the longbread lines, and the happy
faces
Have you ever stopped to count the number of times of those who came away withyou gripe about things in one day ? It seems that that only
|one
loaf of bread
?
Theyis the thing to do nowadays; for, with this war on, we are were thankful
for^the little
bitbeing deprived of so many
things—not
enough butter or they received. Are we
^really
eggs, too little sugar, no tires, no dances, no|men! There thankful for what food we have,is a shortage of this and a shortage of that! We really and for what we will eat onhave it tough, don't we? Can't anything be done about Thanksgiving Day? We say:this situation? Here we are, young college women missing "Certainly we are." But weout on the very things for which we waited to grow up. must show our thanks. Thanks-
preciated everything they received.Today, how
much
j does the day called Thanksgivingmean to us? Will it be just another
day;
or will we provethat we, too, are
thankful
? We, the people of America, ifwe
simplyllook^at the!situations
in foreign lands and allthe suffering there,[must realize that we have much forwhich to be thankful. On this Thanksgiving Day, let usall bow our heads in prayer and realize the true meaningof giving thanks. Let us all join in a fervent prayer thatnext year at this
time|bur
families will again be united
for I
a more joyous, but none the less grateful, Thanksgiving.
I
0*
W*
%>t
7*>
£*te
ymn
The sea sang sweetly to theshoreTwo hundred years ago:To weary pilgrim-ears it boreA welcome, deep and low.They gathered, in the autumnalcalm,To their first house of prayer;And softy rose their SabbathpsalmOn the wild woodland air.The Ocean took the echo up;It rang from tree to tree:And praise, as
from
an incense-
cup,
I I |
)
Poured over earth and sea.They linger yet upon the breeze,The hymns our fathers sung:They rustle in the roadsidetrees,And give each leaf
*a
tongue.The grand old sea is maoningyet
|With
music's mighty pain:No chorus has risen, to fitIts wondrous anthem-strain.
an
elect*
placed
u- saret
O'Connor at the head]
pthe
Mercyhurst Little
%>'
gpolores
DiVincenzo is th
e
representative to Student (V
cil
and*
will also act
as J
president
ofjthe
group.
<w
ine
Gavanaugh
was electedcordingsecretary;Mary
Jwill
serve ascorresponding!retary for the
coming
y
ear
l
The ^Mercyhurst
Little
TkJ
ter functions along withJanus
Clu
b as part of N.P.ccJLake Erie Regional
Conunii
on the Catholic Theater.The purpose of the
CaM
Theater Movement is to ftthe;writing and
production
1good Christian drama*
This pa
pose is fulfilled by the
CatM
Theater Commission at
Me)hurstJthrough
the
combined*
forts of the JanusClub,
M
production end of the
prograJ
the Mercyhurst Little
TheilJservice')unit
designed to
aid
co
leges, schools, and parish
or
ganizations; and the
varied
classes in the curriculum
whn
deal extensively^ with the studand writing of English
dram
When human hearts, are tunedto Thine,Whose voice is in the sea,
Life's
murmuring waves a songdivineShall chant, 0 God, to Thee!
—Lucy
Larcom.
We
Express
\Our
Gratitude
1
This year, upon their
retnfl
to Mercyhurst, members
of
*
student body found a
loveW
surprise. During their
sumnw
vacation, a bevy of
worked
painters, and decorators
sw
into the halls of the
school ^
changed the. South Parlor
W
a? place of splendor,
beanf
and charm.The redecoration of
the
W
Parlor was made
po
851
through the generosity tf °*benefactors, Dr. and
Mrs.
M*rice E. Sullivan,
parents
H
Ruth Elaine Sullivan.
The
&*
livans chose this
generous
as a means of showing
the
nip
esteem with which they
i&\
our Alma Mater and the
#*
work it is doing.Our deepest thanks toand Mrs. M. E. Sullivan
Oh why, oh why, does everything happen to us?Well, Sit isn't easy to tell you why everything happensto
us—why
everything
good
happens to us. Yes,
every-
giving means a day on whichwe have an opportunity to thankGod for all our benefits. Thethanks before beginning theirfirst Thanksgiving Dinner. Letus remember to go to Mass,and to thank God for all Hispray, too, for victory and peaceso that soon there will beaThanksgiving Day celebrated allover the world.
Letter to the Ed
thing good! Let us stop and think for just one
.moment.
Pil
^
rim
s knelt
in a prayer ofThink about the boys you know that are fighting at this
f
moment
for*,
their country and for you,; your brothers,uncles, cousins, and sweethearts. Were any of
them fin
school when they were drafted for service? Did theyhate to leave that school more than anything else? Did g™*s| bestowed on us, and toyou stop to think why they hated to leave that school jso much when they were always complaining about itbefore that? The reason
was?because
they realized thenthat
their
l
greatest opportunity in life was being takenaway from them. They were beginning to understandthat school was not all drudgery, that there was a greatsatisfaction in the accomplishments derived
from
hard
Dear Editor
.
work. They were beginning to
understands
that their Iwhole
futures
were dependent upon what they wouldderive from their education.They
foundlthat
out too late. We
stilifhave
time to
re
alize the advantages we have at hand and to
benefit
bythem. It is not too late for us to be thankful that Godgave us parents who aspired to send us to a Catholic college, that He made it possible for them to realize theiraspirations, that He gave us the ability* to
benefit
bythese previous gifts. No, it is
not^too
late; so let us reallybe thankful. Let us give thanksgiving in our hearts, inour minds, in our actions, and, most of all, in our prayers.
Don't Deny Them That Joy y
Not too long ago, an
American
soldier wrote the
following ^
to his mother on the eve of an invasion: "Some of
us J
wounded; others will die; but the group will have a great
tr ^
Mom, if I'm wounded,
111
return to Africa; if I die,
I sn
my
God—.
Would you deny me that joy?"
;
^
That soldier could have been questioning anyone
of u*
g<
v
this month of November which is dedicated to
tne
yrtf
flS
lthouv
t1
Few persons, indeed, enter upon the Beatific Vision witnpassing through the flames of purgatory. A hero son tt
s
from
the
fiery
caldron of war, and his soul is speeded to e
J
Is his soul speeded immediately to eternal peace?
We
J|
earth can hasten that eternal peace by performing a
hero j
an act of charity. Generous hearts will offer up
all
tti
^
works, penances, and indulgences for the release of
the a _ ^
souls. Though God
is "J^JJ
nothing
defiled
can obtain
inal
peace; so the
souls m
J
main
in
cleansing
**?
atonement has been
mad • ^Wouldn't
it be easier
w J
atone for that boy's »w^saying indulgenced
asp
^
a
SAt
Mercyhurst as well as in every college of the country, the
"rights^of
seniority"is a respected tradition. How happens thesudden open disregard of a fact and a position for which a classhas worked three long years?Since when do frosh and sophs and juniors barge ahead ofseniors into chapel doors, lounge doors, and just plain doors?Since when have the two large "senior tables" been occupied byother classes while seniors sit in the rear of the dining room?Since when and why a lot of things?
I
The Senior Class deserves the respect of the other
classes—at
least the consideration for the position it holds as the oldest groupof the student body. How about it?Sincerely yours,
.}
"A Little Sister"
to
ra)
VP
!
I
I
I
I
I
k
than to give wayand excuses? Our
V-jp
united with the Holy
*» p
of the Massthrough**
J
world, can satisfy
GodSJ
f
repair
and?
cancel th
e
rftfV
temporal punishment, a
pHl
the soul of every «*** jsoldier from imprison*
6
^j
Would you deny
tw
joy?
 
4
November
22, 1944
7^
Ifancuid
lafo It
'pi***
"?&em70et>(d
M
Pag
*
Our plane came back
all
alone,
and so
full
of
holes
it
looked likea sieve. Every engine
had
been
hit and one was
completely
out
We were over
the
North
Sea for two and a
half hours with
no
ajor
Minutes
I.
R.
C.
i
i
*
c
~'^
~
-
r\
V
°
vx wie 0
Pmion
that "Godwas our co-pilot that day.
Lt.
Raymond
A.
Guerrein U.S.A.A
F
England.
f
Our chaplain said something
at
Mass this morning
thatiril
never
ibrgekf
If
we
die
for
something
we
love, something
we
know
is
right,
we won't mind dying, because it's
the
way we've been taughtto live."
It.makes
sense, doesn't
it? I
guess that's how
we all
feel
Cpf.
George
H.
Flood USMC, South Pacific.
j> £
You'll probably
be
surprised
to
hear
from
me, but
something
opened
the other day that reminded
me of a
certain young ladya certain dance,
and I had to
write.
We
didn't have much time
to
get acquainted
in
one short evening,
but
you'll never know what
an
impression
you
made.
So
much
has
happened since then that
it
seems like years
ago, and
right
now I'd
give anything
for
justone dance
at
Mercyhurst.
P. F. C.
Donald
s
B.
Schmidle
USMCSouth Pacific.
5
'
I did get
to
Mass
a few
Sundays
fago.
Gosh,
but
itffelt
great
to
be able
to get
inside
a
church again.
I had
practically forgotten
f
how
to
act,
and
almost clapped when
the
priest finished
his
sermon.
I
was
so
thankful that
I
was able
to
go,
I
didn't even whistleat any girls,
on the way
backto
the
ship. Ensign
J ohm
J.
Howe, USNR, France.
|
At present
we are
quarteredin
a
coconut grove
... a
beautiful South
Sea
setting
in
everyespect
...
blazing
hot in the
daytime;
thej?
daily rain keepsjus supplied with
mud and as
sorted insects
and
animals;
and
last but
not?
least,
we?have
our
special enemy.
It's
about
a
fifty-fifty bet
at the
latest,whether
a
falling coconut
or a
ap
will prove
the
nemesis.Bounds like
a
comic strip,
but
-
the
former really
are
danger
ous.
Cpl. Donald
J.
Kasperek,USA, New Britain.
& I
At
the
first;
fall meeting
of
|the
I. R.
C,
under
the
presidency
of
Sally Lund, there
was
a discussion
on
Federal Insurance. Book reviews were givenby Misses Sally Lund
and
Barbara Fleming.Janus ClubSome
are
still reminiscing
the
Halloween Party which
the Ja
nus Club sponsored. Dressed
in
ludicrous costumes, everyonehad
fun. In
fact,
it
may
be the
beginning
of an
annual affair.English ClubOn November 14,
the
EnglishClub held
its
second fall meeting with Miss Margaret O'Connor presiding. The program centered around Catholic books
and
authors. Refreshments wereserved
to the
guests
and
mem-
(Continued
on
Page
4)
A TurkeyThanksgiving
AA4CNG
H
EEJT
t
TheHuchet
and
Shovel
i
is
recent weekend ?
fellas."
MercedesAs Told By: OscarThe Talking Doll,Who Sees
All,
J "Knows All,,; andTells Everything
I
How
I
love Autumn, with
its
brightly colored leaves, rustling
r '
an(
l gay
Seniors roaming
our
halls once more, wiser thanJ
eve
r after
their practice teaching!rev"
Ailer
e's
Rosemary
Held,
most welcome
wheri __
A
Sraham-cracker
pie to the
seniors
one
weekend.^
So
much happens
wer
weekends
here!
For
example, what three Sophs dated
the
jj
Bradford High football stars over ascertain,
Ito
guess! If
y°
u
can't,
ask M. J.
about
"the
A
win
beck
had
such
a
grand time
at
Grove City that
she was
~T?
er
reluctant
to
leave. Marg O'Connor flew through the
air
with
a onae
^*
r
Corps
man the
other
day, and she,
Margie Acker-J
*>
anM
am
*
Maryellen Knauer enjoyed Hal£ Mclntyre's orchestra
at
C|p
e
"Mere"
to the
utmost!
Dot
Donatelli
and
Helen Fabian
say the
PI
P
boys they
met
at
the
Dedication
of
the new
school
are
veryPJ^f^now about that? Mary
Jo
Smith and Sally Brigham haver yea weekend furloughs very much and* lucky Barbara
*
Fleming
A
j.
°
Buffalo
for a
Canisius College prom. Helen Martin
re-
".,• ^ ,
a
dozen
red
roses fromSher friend
Jim and
went home last
v
wi?
nd
*°
see
a Bobi
Weii
»
ai1
right!
I
$ the
TJ
1S
^
e
^
Sullivan's secret
for
reducing from what
she was
at
f
p
o
c
h
ll0Ween
Party
tolwhat
she
is
now?
How did the
beautiful
rf'
tim.
Dtus
(Margie Puchner) captivate
\
herhandsome brave,
in
t
eert
these? Dressed
as a
sailor,
Sue*
Conrad resembled
a
%
1
And*?
h
f
artbeat
in
Ann
Nickum
s
life—could
it
have been Ted?V Tu
* ^
ean
Erwin make
a
cute
war
veteran?
$•
1^
w
handsome soldier whofpinned
his
wings
on
Joanne Videtto?iutleraM ^l
r
.
broth
er,
and
that
is
the
truth, this time!
Ask Lib
Fitz
erald
-
wuitter, ana mat is trie truxn, tnis time:
ASK JUIV
riw
niAfu
w
*
Uc
b|
Sophomore corresponds frequently with
her
future'"other.** i_
,-
. .
*.
A
__ _ -
.
Have you been looking
for a
novel which
is in
keeping with
the
times—one
that will satisfy your desires
for
adventure,
excitement,
and love? Kay Boyle,
the*author
of
thirteen books,
and
twice
the
winner
of the 0.
Henry Memorial Prize
for the
best short storyof
the
year,
has
written
a
L
book, Avalanche, published
in 1944,
which contains
all of
these elements.To give
you an
idea
of the
interest that
is in
store
for you in
this book
I
present
the
following synopsis:In
the
blacked-out
train passing through
"unoccupied"
Francesits
a
young American girl,
Fenton
Ravel, who has come
to
searchfor her lover, Bastineau, who disappeared after
the
coming
of the
enemy. There
are
two men who have been
in
her constant presencein the train. Wherever Fenton turns they are
at
hand: De Vaudois,the imperious Swiss with
the
cold, intelligent eyes
and the
scaron
his
cheek;
and
Jacqueminot,
the
faun-like young Frenchman,a newcomer
to the
village.
She
cannot tell whether they want
to
\
help
her or to
destroy
her.
Because
of her
love
for
Bastineau, Fenton continues
to
search
for him,
.1
ignoring
the
warning
of the
guides
who in
timate that,
for
anyone seekingBastineau, death waits
in the
mountain.Finally,
on a
dangerous
Al
pine train, roped
to the man
she]brought
that
she now
recognizes
as an
enemy, Fenton solves
the
mysteryofBastineau'sdisappearance.
On
her courage
and
fast thinkingdepends
the
safety
of the en
tire village
and
of a
vital linkin
the
French underground.*What
she did and
how
she
did
it
can
only
be
answered,
my
dear reader,
by the
actual reading
of
the
book.
I
will
not re
veal
the
answer.
You
must findit yourself.When November comes
in
the
fall
of
the
year,We mortals know
we
have nothing
to
fear,But have
you
ever looked
at
the
other side
?
At
the
poor *lil bird
who
must sulk
and
hide.From
the
shadow
of
death
in
an
axe's shapeAnd from which death, there
is
no
escape,For from
the
axe they cannot fleeThanksgiving dinner
is
their destiny.Since
the
Pilgrims landed
so
long
ago
And
the
horn
of
plenty began
to
flow,Poor
Mr.
Turkey
has
been mainly
the
bufferHe
is
the one who has had to
suffer.They start treating
him
well long before
the day
Which gives
the old
bird
a
cause
to be
gay,
They fixihis every ache
and
pain,Then fatten
him up on
feed
and
grain.Along
in
November comes
the day
Mr. Turkey says farewell I to
his
life
so gay,
Off comes
his
head
and his
feathers
too,
And into
the
oven
to
bake
and
to
stew.At
the
passing
of
the
turkey
we
shed
not
a
tearFor
the
fattened bird dinner brings plenty
of
cheer,The delights
of
the
feasts
do not
need stressingThere's nothing
as
good
as
turkey
and
dressing.And
so
ends
his
life
of
loving
and
living,
i
So
eat up, Mr.
Turkey, soon comes Thanksgiving.
it
Been Said
Be
ft
ExchangeOur thanks
to
Miss FrancesHoneck
who
represented
us so
well
at the
reception
of
Archbishop Cicognani.
u
TEMPUS
IS
FUGITING
]
Mother-IINHo f JLt
*?
w#
**
ave
you
heard that
it
was
Mary Doyle's marinethat
~~
11years
ago
.jg1933
first
0ok
Green
Island?!
Just like that!
Lee
Riley will tell
you
t)
!\
thriu v
06
^
118
gardeniasl wired from Naples
is
quite
a
li^JW
*
0u
should have
a
whiff
of
Eileen Klempay's
new
perfume; uiwuuiu. «c
ycai
o
-JMU««U-
Tonp
vnt
George sent
it
from France. Congratulations
to
Mary tions and schedule were planned
t
Nov.
20, 1933 .. The
meeting
of the
Dramatic
Or
ganization
was
held
in the au
ditorium.
The
year's produc-
J
Stone
\
rge
sent it from France. Congratulations
to
Mary
J
Wa
g
8er
sol
itaire
is
lovely!
Now
we
know
why
Gerry Baker
A
Cer
taini
anxious to
make ijthe hockey team—those Edinboro trips
1
»il«_
^
Came in
 We're
wnnH
OT
ino*
if
Kav Connollv
was
w
4
ple^
dy
cam
®
in
 handy.We're wondering
if
Kay
Connolly
was
cards.
and
the
adoption
of
"WardrobeDay"
was
discussed
for the pur-
or
n
ot when
she met her
former pupils with their report
Cm.
e
-
a
-
e
-
you
UP
in
pose
of
gathering costumes.Rules were given
for
joining.the
air
now
with
a
few
questions. Should
/
a
Ce
Hain
y
<.?
Urley
Relieve
the
fortune teller's news,
and why
should
/
For Jr^
ree
"
b
y-
fiv
e piece
of
tfaper exciteSally Lund?
0re
np-to-the-minute news, tune in^next month!By
now,
Oscar.Nov.
25, 1933 . . .
a lapse
of
three years
the
an
nual benefit bridge tea
j^
wasagain held
at
Mercyhurst.
As
a [novelty entertainment,
a
styleShoulders stooped
as if
under
a
great weight,
a
dilapidated felthat pulled down
to a
point almost coverging with
a
worn
and
frayed collar
of a
tattered coat, shoes.batteredinto shapelessness,and torn, ragged trousers, splattered with mudfand grease,
and
somewhat changed
in
color
to a
repulsive green—the green
of
heavy grassstains—this
was the
stranger that passed
me
in
the
street.
To
see him was
adequate reason
to
turn aside;
to
watchthat painful, fagging gait
was to
envision
a
nomad wanderer,
who,
having Host
his
camel,
is
forced
to
traverse
the
shifting desertsands until overtaken
by
death. This
man was
indeed
a
wandererwith nothing
in
his
pockets
but
ragged holes.Then,
as I
watched
him
plodding down
the
street,
a
peculiarincident occurred,
for
instead
of
turning
the
corner which wouldhave takenlhim
out
of
sight into obscurity,
he
ascended
the
stonestairwaytto
his
left, passed through
the
small welcoming arch
and
knelt
in a
little
pew of
St. Paul's Chapel.His entrance into
the
small chapel affected
me
like
the
welcome
sun
bursting through
the
sheaves
of
thunderheads.
Led on
by curiosity,
I
went
up
afterhim into
the
church. With
the
removal
of his
indescribablehat,
he had
suddenly changed.His head
was
encircled
by a
multitude:
of
blonde waves,
his
visage, though shadowed, began
%
to glow with reawakened life,and
his
body expanded
to
bursting with
a
sigh that seemed
not
of
the
material flesh
but
of
the
immortal soul."And then,
as he
knelt devoutly there,
his
wholebeing fully devoured
by
prayer,|*I
saw
just
how
much better
a
man
he was
than
I.
Here
was
a
soul, lost like
the
Arab upon
the
material sands
of
the
world,
but
glorified
in its
love
of
God.
1
//
revue
was
given
by the
students
for the
guests. Against
a
background
of
fall decorationsand color,
tea
was served
in
thestudent dining room.9 years
ago
. . .
I
. .
Marie Hous-ov.
7,
1935
. .1
ton, soprano, presented the firstconcert
of
the season
at
Mercyhurst. Miss Houston sang
se-
After lections from Mexican, Old English, German, Indian,
and
Italian folk songs
in
costume.Nov. 22, 1936.The Mercy-
(Continued
on
Page
4)
•The Stilus.

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