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The Merciad, Feb. 27, 1945

The Merciad, Feb. 27, 1945

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The Merciad, Feb. 27, 1945
The Merciad, Feb. 27, 1945

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*****
(Meg*
'/^^
*
Erie,
Pennsylvania
Volume
XV, No. 4
Liturgy Meaning
j
Explained by
Priest
|
On
March 7, Father E. H.Joyden of Detroit, Michigan,
till
speak to the student body
|
on
the
subject
of "The Liturg-
jjcal
Movement in
the *
United
STUDENTSAWAITNOTED
States."
1
Father Boyden was
ordainedJcently
to
the
Holy Priesthood
[on
February 24, 1945, at Columns,Ohio. He will endeavor tofcreate a lively interest in
litur-
jical
studies and to excite abore active participation in theliturgy Movement. Father Boy-
Ben,
himself,
is
at
very enthusi-
lastic
worker in this field.The PurposeConcerned with learning andWarning, the Liturgical Move
ment
tells the why and where
fore
of the rites and prayers of
pie
Church.The
Lit urgyt at iMercy
hurstAs we know, the Liturgical
Movement
at Mercyhurst has
ai|chief
apostolic work this
j«ar
the organization and direc-
p
of a student choir. The
Jovement
has also studied the
pass
intensively under the guid-
p
of Mother M. Borgia and
fter
M. Inez. The students
[
ve
helped
to participate in the
ay
by individually presenting
P
explaining the prayers of
I
Mass.
I
[^ter
the study of the Mass
f
been
fully
accomplished, a
N«r
study of the Sacraments
? he
introduced.
I
We
will find Father Boyden'sTOoints and aims will
coin-
fc closely with those of our
at
Mercyhurst.
ew
jConcent
Player
"Heard
P
Febr
uary
12, 1945, Mari-
Huron,
American Concert
oph
onist,
played a well cho-
i
d
appealing
tprogram
kichthrilled
everyone.
M
h
el
ta
Huron was born in
*edr
Girl
p
Ohio, and was grad-from
I
Columbus SchoolLli^
18,
At
Fairmont Junior
hi
m
Washington, D.
C,
JJn
Harmony. Since
8
traveled extensive-
niored
^ ***
tpurs.
*hej^|f
Xyi ? ^ttle
known about
_P8b? '
and
'
therefore,
Sty
^
Cti
°n, as well as thelw!
m
ttsic |
written for
k
8ment
»
is limited. Miss
her ^
rche
d
far and wide
kg tK **•'«
who ranged,
*e
orch
COttr
«e
of her
studies,
tea-
e§tta
leaders
to primers.
I
t^
r
°n
e th
ggz—^ concert, Miss
\%tf
°*»*e
[at *
KX
the
Wiuc
h she¥explained^hon
e
/^^izatkny
of the
ai
>
informal inter-
LECTURER
Mr. Frank SheedReturns March 6
One of the outstanding
speak-
Music StudentsiPrepare
for Concert. Standing from^L. to
R.:
H. Martin, D. Telerski, B
Flemiiur
R.
Su.hvan,
S.
.Hanrahan,
E. Fitzgerald, and C.
Cavanaugh.
Seated at the piano is T.
Lenl
ers of the Lecture Series is Mr.Frank
Sheed,
of Sheed and WardPublishing House, who willspeak in the Mercyhurst Audi
torium,
^March
6, 1945.
[
Mr. Sheed will develop the
psubject:
"The Church in Europe
Today,"
Tuesday afternoon. In the evening,
he
willdiscuss
"The
Modern Idea ofGod."Mr. Sheed, one of the outstanding Catholic laymen inthe country, is a native Englishman who has won renown forhis work in
Ithe
Catholic Evidence Guild as well as in writ-
Annual Recital Planned
Save
i
Y
°»-
Penni
«»
Z
Z£7Z2??J:
The music students of Mercyhurst are anxiously anticipatingtheir annual concert recital to be held March 11 in the collegeauditorium. Piano selections by classic and modern composers willbe interpreted by Theresa Lennon, Sally Hanrahan, Barbara Fleming, Elizabeth Fitzgerald, Connie Finch and Danusia Telerski. Thevoice students, Ruth Elaine Sullivan, Catherine Cavanaugh, HelenMartin, Mildred Trippe and Elizabeth Fitzgerald, will sing a fewoperatic arias and
other
well-known favorites.Many of
usthave
been
interested
in the new technique employedin training the voice. The groaning exercises are not meant tobe tones nor are they the singing voice. These merely strengthenthe throat, give good support, and after devlopment, they balancethe singing tone. The exercises build a foundation for the voice.Both the piano and voice stu-the author of Sidelights on theAn
Jafternoon
of
If
alls and Catholic Revival, and the editorfrolic willbe|enjoyed by the of Poetry and Life, An Anthology of English Catholic Poetry. His
wife
land co-partner isMaisie Ward-Sheed, author ofthe late best-seller Gilbert Keithstudent body on Friday, March9. On that day, from 4 to 6
P.
M., the Athletic Associationwill sponsor a private skatingdents have
been!under
excellentinstructors, Sister M. Inez and
Mrs.
Giovanna
Klopp.At this time we are eagerlylooking forward to next month'srecital.QUOTATION"There is no truer truth obtainableBy man than comes of music."
—Charles
Avisonparty at the 12th Street Skat-
Chesterton;
Mr. Sheed, with hising Rink. characteristic sense of humor,delights, as well as informs, hisaudience in his intellectual discourses. His manner of presentation, subject matter, and personality lend to the (interest,timeliness, and appropriatenessof his lectures. .
ive
nc
Skating is
an
art at whichmany of us are unskilled. Butamidst the numerous falls andensuing aches, much physicalgood is derived.
Thisiparty
willhelp to serve as a preparationfor the spring months ahead.Miss Loretta Crowley hasbeen appointed as general chairman for this occasion. She isworking with her committees tomake this an enjoyable afternoon for all
who
I
attend.Those of us who were at Mercyhurst two years ago will recall his
highly,
stimulating andthought provoking discourses.We can all look forward withpleasure to the 6th of
March.|
es
Gala BazaarSponsored bySOSi Members
The SOS sponsored a CollegeBazaar on Saturday night, February 10, in place of the annualcard party. The booths featuredwere
fancy
work, snack [bar,Bingo, house of fun, darts, pool,horse racing, and the Color Clin
ic.
The display at the Color
Clin-
.ic
was the result of the wholesemester's planning and work.The girls in the Costume DesignClass made charts and posters.From scientific data they learned to determine personalitytypes and the colors best suitedto the individual in referenceto her hair, eyes, and skin tone.All the prizes were donated,as
?
well as the
different
itemsat the fancy work booth. Eachof
the
day hops contributed to-
ward;
the refreshments.The future will tell if theHome Economics
Departmentwill
make the
bazaar
an
annual
affair*
: •
"*
Fr.Lyons Speaks
A.B. Program Reviewed
To Sodality
Approximately fifty sodalistsattended the Sodality Institute
Day);
on Sunday, February 18.The program, sponsored by theErie District Sodality Union,was conducted by Reverend J.Roger Lyons, S. J.The Institute Day was begunby the celebration of Mass byBishop John
Mark^
Gannon atSt. Peter's Cathedral at nineo'clock. The first of the lecturesfollowed immediately in theCathedral
auditorium.
The
afternoon
session consisted of two discussions. The firstshowed the meaning of, and
link,
between "The Sodality andthe Home," while the theme ofthe second was "Sodalities andProgram Planning."
After |this
the Institute adjourned until theevening session. This was heldin the Cathedral
atjseven-thirty
o'clock.
All these discussions wereaimed primarily to remind eachsodalist of the vital part shehas in all avenues of daily lifethrough her membership in theSodality.
The Liberal Arts Club began the second semester February 11under the leadership of Miss Frances Honeck with a lecture bySr. M. Eustace on "The Standards of Literary Art." The generalcanons of
"criticism
given by Sr. Eustace are determined by theanalysis of artists' pieces themselves.
They'include
unity, variety,proportion, harmony, rhythm, restraint, and balance. Followingher talk was an informal criticism, based upon these seven norms,of present day plays and movies.
Ju venile
'{
Delinquency
Last Sunday Rev. Wilfrid Nash, professor at Gannon College,addressed the students in the Blue Room on the topic, "Is Modern
y
Psychology
the
J Answer
3
o Juvenile
.Delinquency
?" It was ofgreat interest, not only to the Sociology students, but to everyone
npresent.
Next MeetingOn
Sunday,
March 4, the Liberal Arts Club is planning a discussion
on
Catholic Action (Jocist) Movement and MethodThis originated in France several years ago. It has been successfully followed since 1940 at the University of Notre Dame andat many other schools all
over-jJ
the United States. The students
wilU
illustrate
thei
real
purpose
of Catholic
Action-"!-'"To
re-'integrate ithe
sprit'
_
of Christinto student life," and will showhow this has been attempted atMercyhurst.
f j
i
A
March
\
Sh
March
CALENDAR6-eed
'7
denMarchMarchMarch
11-
17-
21
paign."Lecture by
'Father
E. H—Recital-St. Patrick's— CourtesyFrank. Boy-DayCam-
 
II
Page Two
1U THenclad
February
27
19*
I *7£e
pfanetod
/^ttpt\
Assistant Editors
Edit
°
r
fT^Me^
J
Jeanne
Roepke
Rita Rittenhouse
I HhnJiSJ I
Dorothy Barry
tixsy&f*
Joan
WadlingerPublished monthly by the students of Mercyhurst CollegeNews Editor Ruth E. SullivanFeature Editor Mary DoyleLiterary Editor
Barbara
FlemingArt Editors N. Hirtle, G. MiddletonBusiness Manager
|
Marie
Wolman
Editorial
Staff:
M. Savage, L. Crowley, .E. Fitzgerald, P. Sullivan,
I
'-|M.
O'Connor, M. I. Kinnemey, J. Berry, S. Brigham, P. White,fL.
Writer,^
N.
Cooper, M. Gould, J. Schanbacher, M. E. Fitz-
Igerald,
J. Wirges, M. J. Masterson, C. Cavanaugh, J. Videtto.Contributors: R. Morey, S. Melisz, S. Conrad, B. Norton, E. Patrick.Business
Staff:
D. A. Harrington, M. A. Harrison, A. Devine, D.Donatelli, H. Fabian, P. Ferry, E. Reagle, V. Walsh, D. Lynch,M. J. Masterson.
YOUR HONOR, WE OBJECT
The whole school is
talking—about
the latest
"differ-
"To
Have or Have
Not."!
It is gratifying to
AMONG THE BEST
If you are a lover of good books, the Catholic Press offerssomething new.
"The
Scarlet Lily" by Edward T. Murphy is aprose version
of
i
Thompson's "The Hound of Heaven." Both tellthe story of a quest for faith and happiness. In both, the searcherstry
allfthe
pleasures
offered
by the world, but at last find theirtrue happiness in the arms of the Lord. "The Scarlet Lily" is afictional presentation of Mary of Magdala, fallen from grace,groping in darkness, and at last finding the light, white withdeath and ruby with sacrifice at the pierced! feet of the LoverSupreme.
In'this
novel, Mary, the flower of paganism whose petals werecrushed by Roman and Hebrew alike, becomes the symbol oftransition from the pagan error to the Christian truth.The Magdalene at the time of Christ's starry
jbirth
was reaching the lily bloom of her womanhood.
Her
mother was killed withher baby brother who was a victim of Herod's decree of jealous,
mad
death against the Inno-
Mail Call
What more welcome cry is thereThan the cry of "Mail."Men seem to come from every
where
I've never seen it fail.
Congratulation
I
Although the May
D
elections were too
Ub
I
I
to,]
late to meet our deadline, Jnow wish to congratulate'^1945 May Queen, Miss
Mar
gay Savage, and her
coj
Misses D. A. Harrington,
J
Berry, M. O'Hara, E. fojM. Wolman,
R,
Hurley,
\
O'Connor, and M.
Puchner.
IV
ent
Shove and jostle eagerlyWhile a hundred voices shout"Is there any mail for me?"And a hundred hands
reach\out.
1
movie,
^__^_ ^^^_
hear that a great many of the college students have senseenough to recognize it for what it
is—a
typical Holly-wood play on the emotions, 1 appealing to our lower na
ture,
a waste of time and money— and a very bad literary work.
I
This"sultry"type of
film
shouldn't
affect us—but
itwill affect young girls all over the country. It is an
example^of
the
un-Christian
wartime American. The new
Is a
warming
S
i
g
ht
to see.star did not play the part of a
lady—she
was said to havebeen the victim of circumstances, but
...
The picture had a small amount of entertainment
They sit in the nearest placeWhere they can readAnd
thej
happy smiles on everyfaceBut when the mail is all passed
out,
value—the
photography was good and there were a Some slowly turn away,few laughs. However, people go to the movies
to|
be And I truly pity those withoutwholesomely entertained, and there wasn't one uplift- Any mail from home today.ing spot in the entire movie.As college students, we are expected to know enoughto intelligently criticize dramatic productions, insteadof "swooning" and trying
tof
imitate everyglamour queen that comes along.
The^fHayes
office
If the folks hack home knewwhat it meant
^'O-called
Those letters to receive
must have been napping to put this film on the B listthat is,
Unobjectionable
for Adults.The general discussion at Mercyhurst of this "ToHave or Have Not" is a small example of how the picture-is being talked about all over the country. In instances such as these, it is our responsibility to discourage such types of entertainment and support all
around
Christian movies, such as "Going May |Way,"
"Meet
Me in St. Louis," or
"Till
We Meet Again," (which,
incidentally,fis somthing
to talk about!)
I'm sure those letters would hesentTo gladden hearts that grieve.cents. From this blood of innocence, the Lily took color andthe scarlet hate of that day is
the'
first flush of her pagansins. In the petals of the Lilyunfolded, they revealed a morescarlet depth. Thus, the Magdalene had no cause to lookfor hope or for a color transformation. In her paganism,the materialistic paradox of everything in nothing attained itsfull growth.But as the first tint of scarlet had come from the flush ofhate at the slaughter; of theInnocents, there escaped theOne
.at
Whom that hate was directed and Who was alone ableto blanch the lily, take awaythe scarlet and leave it a white
flower
that was. to grow evenfairer. Mary who had beenbargained for with false Romanpearls, came to know the pearlof great value, and though shewas tempted with new riches,
to
her choice remained true. Atthe foot of the Cross she completely realized thecharacter
of?
Christ'sHer search
for
faithpiness ended there.
Promise
ofiPeaceP
un
the spring of1917, tbi!"small shepherd children
weJ ^
tending their parents' sheep I
tn
a
field near
the little
village
J
te
r
1
tl
1UW
Patima, Portugal. They
had id
finished reciting the
Bosan
when a vivid flash of
lightui
in a cloudless sky drewattention. A second flashpeared soon afterwards,
I
they became frightened.
Ton
ing, they saw, hovering
over
small green oak a short
disti
away, a most beautiful
M
surrounded by a brilliantof
light.
She bade them dm|near in such a
sweet,
gen8
voice that their fear
subsded!
The holy Mother of
God
bj
presented herself to them.Mary appeared to
these lij
children twice afterwards,
bifcfk
ing with her a message
of ^
to the world. Holding
befef!
la
if
r
II
In
f
spiritualkingdom,and hap-I can appreciate their hungryeyes,
I
It's a sight I hate to see,For I know how my own hopesdieWhen there's no mail for me. •
Mrs.
Theo. Rathburn,!
802,
W. 11th St., Erie, Pa.The style of the novel isstrikingly simple; it is forwardand direct; the action is swiftand sure. Yet,
-it
is grandlypoetic.
Wordl
pictures and senseappeals are especially vivid.The high literary quality coupledwith its religious theme, whichappeals to a fundamental, universal instinct in man, makes"The ScarletLily"truly good.them in her hands a rosary,urged the
frequent
recitationthis most powerful
prayer!
promised peace and love
to
war-torn world for
devotion
it. She also promised to
help
the hour of death with thees needed for their
sahflj
the
first 81
1
I
whomever
—on
urday of
five
consecutive
«*•]
shall confess and receive
MI
"penance"
ACCENTUATE THE POSITIVE
Lent
is a
season foff
penance, and, for some reason orother, everyone seems to connect the wordwith a list of
"don't"
of
"I
won't."
I won't go tomovies during Lent. I won't eat candy or drink cokes.I won't talk in class or write |letters when I should betaking notes.
These
,
 small,
}
but
difficult, penances tareindeed commendable. If they are offered to
Gdd
in thecorrect spirit, they will be
^rewarded
richly by Him.However, the emphasis is on the word
"not."—We
areaccentuating the negative side of Lent.
|I
There is a positive side to this holy season, too. Itdoes not necessitate a long
jjlist
of "I won'ts." On thecontrary, a short list of "I wills" would be
justljas
effective, if not more so. In the first place, a short listcould more easily be carried out; a few things done toperfection are much more meritorious than many thingsonly half accomplished.
1
As for the items on the list
itself,
why couldn't we
planjto
do our everyday tasksmore thoroughly, doing them with perfection for thelove of God? Why not attend Mass and Communionevery day, pay closer attention to the Massfwhenfthere,do our homework more thoroughly, or keep our roomin a neater and cleaner condition than we have been?There are so many more
"Ijjwills"
that can help purgeour souls for that great Easter morning. However,we must remember
to-?keep
the list short, yet effective.There
are
some things «that„are..,
harder
A
or
.some.to.do
than others. We
must? choose
those that are the hardest, those that we will surely carry through,
those jthat
will more efficiently help to lighten Christ's burden onCalvary. In other words, we should accentuate the positive side of Lent. It is morel difficult
tojobserve
thanto avoid; but, because
of]this,
it is the superior way,and Christ will reward it accordingly.
ARE YOU IN TRIM?
Since?the
school year started in September, all of us have offeredmany prayers for
victory—we
have but to think of our dailyRosary, offered for a just and lasting peace. During these pastmonths our boys in the fighting forces have made many a sacrifice, even the sacrifice of life for that peace and victory for which
we5
pray. Months, even years ago, these
boys!were
inducted
into
a fighting service, which called for
sacrifice—a
sacrifice to last
for
the duration of the war.
Ash
Wednesday has come upon
us—ushering
in the season ofLent and sounding
01m
call to service here on the
"homefront."
We hear and read about ourselves,
2the
smug, complacent home-front. Well, here's our chance to get into action, into
service—the
service of prayer, penance, and sacrifice, to back the efforts ofour boys throughout the world. The season of Lent offers us agrand opportunity to go
"alljout"
in the use of those spiritualforces placed above command.
M
So,
Minnie Mercyhurst, what
is your!Lenten
Spirit? Does itprompt you to take basic training and join the ranks of thosepracticing the DAILY SIX for the
durationjof
Lent:X. Daily attendance at Mass.
-—Coram
union—."
j
In her great love for «*Mother of God deigned
to <°
to earth
^to
admonish,
I
console, and reprove
her«
|dren, and to call them
to
r
ance and salvation. As
ier
1
dren we should show
our H
tude for her loving and
b«H
condescension by
exhibit^!
devotion to her on the fl* 1Saturdays and
encourag^J
practice among others.
,
and will, be the
salvation oj
times, these war-torn
P I
we will it to be.
After the 1
ious promises
made
^i
Mother of God,
cert*!
would not fall
^
he
%,
her ears
andjher
mer*
1
sympathetic heart
I
1
ft
P
2.
Daily Holy Communion.
3.
Daily making the stations.
Letter
I
to the Editor
*r?M
4.
Daily visits to the BlessedSacrament.
5.
Daily rosary.6. Daily acts Of self-denial.
Haye_you
r
the
courage for induction into this' special and intensive service of Christ theKing and Mary,
Hia
Mother, forthe 'duration" of Lent? TheDaily Six will be your real testbecause remember, daily impliessacrifice!Dear Editor:
allStfc
v
iT
Wl
Wk
plow many|of
us realize what a pagan and
maten
we are living in today? Further still, how many are
fl
expose it? Catholic
.Press
is the answer; it is the
fro*
Sn«9f ^
Christian living; it
is
the guiding post on the road
to~.
Yet, there are few people who
read'Catholic
mag*
81
J^ofl
andfbooks. Why? We, here at Mercyhurst, have an eX*
f
portunity
to acquaint ourselves with current publ»
c
gdfij
how many of us do? This is Catholic Press Month.
I
s
^W
magazines and books. How
about
fit?
I
¥
9HB
all out drive
for
more and deeper readinp. of
£
 
Febni8ry*27, 1945
%
THenciad
HORTSPORTSTORY
SIFT and SNITCHPage Three
The Bucket and Shovel
J
\\
q
•?
i
I
II
m
1
I
J.
»r
H
d
\
new semester, a new beginning, but the same old muscularaches and pains, according toSome of the Sophomores whoare now trying their skill at badminton. The foils and masks
avejbeen
replaced by racketsand
tricky
little "birdies" who
Lfuse
to remain still long
Enough
for a sound whack, soit seems.
f
Oh yes! Basketball has definitely put in its appearance.The Villa seems to be the onlycompetition at present, but Allegheny and
Tdanboro
are scheduled for the not too distant future. The Freshmen| on theteam this year are: Betty Rock,Peggy Leicht, Rita Brocke, MaryJo Smith, Nancy Smith, MickeyJames,
Mildred!
Trippi and AnnNickum. Congratulations!Let's give fifteen,
"rahs"
forthe new cheerleaders: GerryBaker, Susan Conrad, Joyce Elliott and Danusia Telerski. Theirpep and vitality are
certainly
evidenced at the games and peprallies. Ever notice
thlat
bigcommotion;on the stage severalafternoons a week? Well, that's
our
famous four
keeping in trim.
Anf
extra
cheer g
must be givenfor Gerry, the captain. You'rereally doing a grand
;fjob,j
gals.The big A.| A. news of themonth is ^initiation. This yearthe Athletic; Association welcomed
the;
following
girls whohave earned at least twentypoints through participation invarious sports: Sally Hanrahan,'Nancy Smith, Mary Jo Smith,Ann Nickum, Katherine Griffin,
^en
Jean Walters, Theresa
-088,
Rita Brocke, Susan Conrad, Gerry Baker, Connie Schneider, Lucille Vitello,
;
Mercedes
^umbeck,
and Stephanie Me-asz.
Well, we lived thru exam weekso we're back again with
by
Heck
What
do you
think?
of whichshould say th
_put
her mailmadly to her box(I don't know how, but we did)
iaiSfipgtp
^
m
x aever
y day
if you don't believe
me
p*
suies
that, Dottie Lynch got word the other
S^L^aX;
she would see
"that
certain someone" around Easter.
SpeakW
ofnan
7r
ere
*°? ^ ^
**™**
<
th
*
ones
«htl|
Huh7
C
A^VT
gm&
°
n)
^ ^
Sch0tt haS been
porting
late y
\
?u
tr
1
,
h0P
*
n
°
ne
0f
^
0U has mi
^ed
Elaine
Brown's
swordLehman. We're
glad|to|have
them all
SWOrd
Oh before
we
forget,
as if we could, we want to tell every single
^mber
of our Basket Ball team that we are very proud of theand next
time
we'll surely show the Villa. We wish
M
i,
T
to
L^
erc
y
hurst
Jeanne
Le Doux, Joan Dobbs,Mary fciwi, Shirley Hathaway, Cissy Pugh, and
Margare
Lehman. We're glad t ohave them all.
Ohhhhh—Is
Joan Lutz partial to the Marine Corps! (P S We
got a peek
at him, too.) Mary Lou Castanzo had avisit from her handsome brother, and Jean
Brwin
wenthome to see hers. And speaking of brothers, we certainly do missPaul Berry after he practically spent the week-end with us.—
'Why
Doesn't This Happen More Often?"
Here's
a bit of something interesting that
the!
porter on thetram told
us—for
a price. It seems Barb Brown made a hit with
the ^Navy—must
be the
hair—and
Cathie
Cavanaugh
with "Uncle
Sam"—could
be those eyes!
meteamto welcomeOur
'HI
Nurse
Mary
EllenBoles has
moved
I
to the practicehouse now,
and J
my, she missesthat extra 10 minutes sleep inthe morning. She should 'havethe plaid shirt Johnny sent toDot Donatelli for her birthday.Speaking of presents, MarilynCummiskey had an answer toour favorite theme,
'Send
MeOne Dozen Roses/' and
#her
roomie, Lee
Riley^also
receivedgardenias from Bob on Feb. 14
—but
she isn't the only one—Dot Barry and Marie Gould alsowere wearing gardenias fromtheir Allaire's Sally Gunn andPeg Sullivan got flowers, too,we noticed.We'd better
hangjjour
close onthis
line—wait'for
us.
'Bye
Now.
*7a4e\ VtYpn&K\76ent
 8
7tte V(d
Major Minutes
u
a
t
B>D
THRU THE LOOKING-GLASS
•The
reflections
ins
the looking-glass show . . .
One f
of the funniest scenes occurred recently when a group of"bang-up" freshmen solemnly marched down to the cafeteria line
*t
lunch time. What was so funny about that? Well, it seems thatthese girls had suddenly turned barbers! Definite proof of this
was
given after just one look. Short bangs, fluffy bangs, sleek
bangg
are now adorning the countenances of a number
of jour
freshies. We must admit, too . . . they certainly look snazzy!
To
whom it may concern: Our thanks for the happy birthday
Sheetings
that are being placed on the college hall bulletinjboard.
r
8 B0
nice
tolbe
remembered—and*
reminded.
4
i
i
A
A
n
1
The
Kiss in English: A kiss is a noun because it's common andProper.
It's
a verb because it shows action. It's a preposition be
cause
it has an object. It's a sentence because it has a complete
fought.
It's a conjunction because it joins two things. It's an
Interjection
because it shows strong feeling. (From the "QuakerChallenge/' Quakertown, Pennsylvania.) 1
Two
of
Mercyhurst's
greater artists will one day leave Mercy-
Urst
»
but their presence will be remembered for many years tocome. The painting of two murals by Gloria
Middleton
and Nat
*urtle
are now under way. Watch them grow in the college hall.
Down and^down
it goes, and when it stops nobody knows. It's
.
snow we're speaking of in this case. We can't say when
if
s
&°tog
to stop, but we can offer an explanation as to what causes
^
According to several scientists' reports, sun spots govern the
^"dness
or severeness of the winter. This year the blizzards and
^wfalls
were caused by an unusually
large
amount of spots onthe
L
i
n
to.jv
8Un
surface. And nowhere's something to look forward
thi
8
e
*t
year the winter is expected to be at least as severe as
one
> if
not worse!
i.
rl
j,
Speaking^of
snowfalls ..brings.,
badutheJnceasant.echoes
,of.
Helen|
aoian's
favorite "joke" during this snowy season. It seems that
******
in Pittsburgh had quite a bit of trouble getting through
e
*»l*ed
roads. "Fabe" says that it was so
badlthat
the drivers,on the road had to sing out,
"You
take thewin.
,T'
-—*•
j*
n w»ke
the low rut."
vlaJL ******
glass frowned right back on that one, so we'd better
H
ave
right
It may be that Mr. D. has made us very "philosophy-conscious,"or it may be
thatjevery
man is a philosopher when he takes hispen in
hand!.
. . at
any
Irate,! we couldn't j help but notice howmany of our service men!
arejthinking ml
terms
{of
"whys" landwherefores." Nor can we help but be impressed, every
time f
weread these letters,
byI
the number who have the ultimate "wherefore"always beforefthem. As an example of what these boys thinkof as they fight, there are the following excerpts from letters bysoldiers in England and Belgium, a wounded sailor in the Pacific,and
':&'
Marine,
who J
re turned from overseas.
vflER^'B
W
"Each run is getting
J
easier, because before I go up,
if
go toCommunion (as
almost(every
Catholic herefdoes), and I'm ready;
I
but
my
insurance man gave mesixty years, Hand I please don'tmake a liar out of him." HH|I Sgt. Carl Wirges, England.
B
•BBS
v-<^H
*
|
*
I
*
*&
ff^ljffl
^^^ Maybe
m
we *
brothers don't1 know how much our sisters miss
B
us, but we have come to
realizeI
fully 1 how much we love and
Imiss them.jThis
war has
made!?
B us appreciate
\
a great many
I
things more J than ever before."I
\
Charles Moody S 2/c, Pacific.
*
* *
L*J>j
"November 7 will mark
four
te years in the service for me, and
1
every minute of it, against allmy principles.
31 'havejalways
loved tocreate':things,and thisonly means to destroy ...
It
must be wonderful to be atschool
\
knowing everything youdo makes sense
/..
. you seemto be part of something that isout of this
world!.
. .
1
would
I
give anything or everything to
•be
in some
similar'place.?
I'mjust a marine with a civilianmind."
PI.
Sgt. Joe Murphy,
.'•.
1.
J.
Camp Lejeune.
* *
*
In
many of the letters thereis a paragraph similar to thefollowing, which does more toreassure those at home, than Jany presidential message . . ."We have no Catholic Chaplain on board, but we read theprayers of the Mass and saythe Rosary together, so it isthe
next;best
thing. It is reallya beautiful sight to see all thefellows at prayer with the sunshining down and the flame ofthe candles blowing in thebreeze..
^
^
v
,
••* .-
jJames F. Neal, E.
M?
3/c.
•*
E
* * *
oaay
s
Date
Sociology
Seminar
On February 5, Miss HelenJ Norton, a
personnels
director in
p
the General Electric Plant ofErie, gave a] discussion on "Personnel Work." In reviewing the
||5
field of personnel, she empha-
tg
sized the important role of the
g
study of sociology
in
j obtaining
m
a true understanding of socialI
problems}
which one encounters
p
frequently.
lH
Foreign Language Club
%
The Spanish department will
I
conduct the
-February
meeting
I
of the Foreign Language Club.
I
A
p
brief business meeting will
gj
be held in the lounge; then themembers will adjourn to the auditorium for the Sremainder ofthe meeting. There will be
SaItalk
given on four outstanding
La tin-American
poets and askit, "Una Fiesta Mejicana,"presented. Spanish songs will bealso featured throughout theprogram.I.
R.
C.
|
At the recent I.
R.
C. meeting, Miss Marjorie Ackermangave a talk on "Framework ofPeace." Barbara Fleming discussed the seven
fundamental
points of peace according to theSyracuse pattern. Later in theevening, there was a panel discussion on the "Negro Prob-
le
m.
One of the important dateslisted on this month's Calendaris February 27. This signifii-cant date commemorates thebirthday of one of America'smost outstanding poets, HenryWadsworth Longfellow.Henry Wadsworth Longfellowwas born in New England. Hedeveloped his talent in his youthby writing prose and verse fornewspapers and magazines. Later in his carrer, he became ateacher and in connection withhis work, he did text-book writ
ings,
translating, and essays onforeign
languages
and literature. When he became tired ofthe
teaching
profession,
];he
resigned
and^turned
his entire attention to poetry.
Ha..i
d roads
- "
Fi
g*>*
one another
n,
*J
**t,
and I'll
tal
now!Longfellow is still as muchread today '
asy
any Americanpoet. His work
is
importantbecause it extended Europeanculture in America and contributed to the development ofAmerican literature.Science SeminarAfter a brief business meeting of the Science Seminar onFebruary 6, the sophomoremembers of the club reviewedtheir term papers which per-| tained to scientific topics. English ClubFollowing the business meeting on February 13, Miss Margaret O'Connor, president, readher term paper on "Emily Dickenson." Natalie Hirtle reviewedtwo recent novels,
"Between
Heaven and Earth" by Franz
j
Werfel and "Green Years" byA. J. Cronin. Mary ElizabethPowers spoke on the origin andthe composer of "Intermezzo."She concluded her speech byplaytng*the*?c0mpMition*
om
thepiano.«;
^A
"-'•
-
*-•'
"In case you were beginningto forget, there's still a war on
si.
. and more than one G. I.thinks the folks at home need(Continued on Page
Four)
O.
G.
A.On February 21, the 0. G. A.held a very interesting and intellectual meeting. The program(Continued on Page
FourH
x\
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