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The Merciad, Feb. 16, 1949

The Merciad, Feb. 16, 1949

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Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, Feb. 16, 1949
The Merciad, Feb. 16, 1949

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Volume XIX, No. 4
MERCYHURST. COLLEGE, ERIE,. PA.
Dramatic
Club
February
16,
1949
Announces
New Chaplain
Dean's List Is
Introduces Senior
Published for
Study Club
Father George Groucutt, the newchaplain at
Mercyhurst,
is beginning a study club for the Seniorson "Marriage." These discussionswill
bef
:
given every Thursday forthe rest of the school year, beginning February 17.
?
I.
Father Groucutt intends to refer to the text,
Marriage
Guidance,byHealy.This bock discusses thepreparation for marriage, the
na
ture of love, woman in the home,divorce, parents'
duties
in general,and several
pother
topics
a relative
to the subject. On the whole,Father Groucutt intends to instruct
by? giving
the girls notes of hisown from which to study. Pamphlets will also be given out on whichreports will be* prepared. Thesereports will
thenibe
discussed bythe group and any objections answered. In addition, the theologyof marriage will be explained.Father Groucutt is very anxiousto have an. active
<study
club organized at Mercyhurst.
JL
Students FeteCollege President
On
Feast Day
*
•Mercyhurst College gave
tribute
to
Its
president, Mother.
M. DeSales, on the evening of February
3,
by celebrating her feast day witha program in the college auditorium.
After
the
"Pledge
of Allegianceto the College" given by the stu-dents, and Felicitations by JeanBranch,
i
senior
class
president,
musical and drama tic
selectionswere presented. These included:"Deux
Ara
basque"
(Dtefoussy)
played by
Rayetba
Beaver; "LetMy Song Fill Your Heart"
(Gharles)
by Marilyn
£ Langmy
er;
Eileen Yuen's violin selection,"Minuet
in
G" (Beethoven); "TwoPortraits" (Bach) played by JoanHouch.Following a Presentation toMother De Sales by
Rosemarie
Ratajczyk,
president of the Student Council, the program wasclosed by the singing of the AlmaMater. The Faculty then proceeded to the Lounge where refreshments*
were
served.. The faculty and student bodywish to extend their deepestsympathy to Rita
Gutman
onthe death of her mother.
First
Semester
Mary Harvgy,
aj&sni^r.lic'ps
allscholastic averages on the Dean'sList with an all A record for thefirst semester. Maiy, who hailsfrom Oil City, Pa., is a
commerical
education
majoi
preparing for ateaching position. She is
prefect
of Our
Lady's
Sodality, a
memhei
of the 0. G. A. sorority, on thestaffs of the Merciad and the Prae-terita, and was recently elected
10
"Who's Who Among AmericanColleges and Universities," theAmerican Collegiate honor society.An average of 90 or better is required for honor ranking. Numerically, the seniors led
within
ninenames; the
freshmanjfwere
secondwith five. Following is
a|list,
according to
class»|of-
the honor students.
-
4
Seniors: JeanBrigham,
{Elaiue
Forgette, Rose Marie Guinnane,Mary
-
Harvey, Mary Claire Jones,Antoinette Marino,' Mary LouiseMoore, Frances Rossi, and JeanTobin.
.4
t
*-
t&
Juniors: Eileen Ignasink, AliceKuczka, and Kahleen llahill.
Sophomores: Mary Forche.
^
Freshmen:
Lydia
Davey, Jacqueline Hoffman, Patricia Lynch,Dorothy Roth, Mary Jo Royer,
and
Nancy Van Dor Klcefc.-
$
Coming
Events
February
19
J*
Mercyhurstplays Westminster, away.February
22—Science
Seminar.FebruarySorority.
23
O. G. A.February 24, 25 —Janus Play,"The Lamp and the Bell."
f*
February 26 -— Mercyhurstplays Westminster, home.
BHi
March
2—Ash
Wednesday.
(M
March 3-6
-Retreat,
ji&f
k
Dominican
toll
Conduct Retreat
th11
be
re-
At the
beginnings
of Lent,students of
Mercyhurst^wiprivileged
toihave as
their
treat master Rev. Vincent Donovan,
0.
P., a member of the Dominican Order. He will open theretreat on Thursday evening,March 3, and close it Sunday'.moxning, March
6.
Father Donovan, who comesfrom New York City, has traveled extensively in the United Statesand Europe. He is well known forhis inspiring retreats to collegegirls and has been enthusiasticallyreceived wherever he |has conducted a retreat.Depicted
abovo
is a scene from (he
liorlhcomingjt playt
"TheLamp and the Bell."
Pictured!
from fie
ft to right are BellyCairns, Joanne Bellas, and Madelyn Naud. .
"
I New
fStudents,!
I New Con
rses
i n
|
I Second Semester
NFCCA ManagesRadio Pout
:
*•
',M
The new semesterfbrought several new faces to the student bodyat Mercyhurst. Joan Oster of Erie,a transfer from Western ReserveUniversity,! is now
fa member 1
of
the
f
sophomore class, i Joan ?Rob-erson of Wesleyville, who attended Penn State Extension last semester,
NancyfZeller,
Q
transfer student from Ohio Wesleyan, and Ani
?
toinette
Bonsignore-jof
ElmirajN.Y., are all members of theffresh-
man
class. Agnes
1
Kalata,
j
whospent the
first gseme'Bter at£
Temple University,
returned
to join theranks of the Juniors.
U^^^^^m
Bin
addftion to the. regular courseof'studies,,?, the
^following
special
courses
fare being
toffered
to|en-rich the curriculum:
In
the Sciencedepartment,
f
Physical Chemistry|and General" Physics; in
thefBi-9ology |d
e p ar
I m
e n t,
advanced!
courses
fin Bacteriology and Histology; in English, the Essay, Modern Drama, and the Tragedies
of|
Shakespeare; in the
.Dramatic
Artfield, Stage Craft and a Survey ofthe Theatre. A special course,
Cer-|
amies, is being offered in the
fiekll
of arts and crafts.
iDr.
M.
J.jRelihan
of the*Educa4;tion
department
is offering
a|
course in Educational Measure-^
ments
and Statistics, and Professor, John
A.IDonateUi
is
giv4
courses in Abnormal Psychologyand the Psychology of Adjustment.
8s\
Mercyhurst has accepted the in*vitation of the Press Commissionof the
NFC'CS
to conduct a Radio
Acceptance
Poll on its campus, incooperation
':
with
colleges
andschools everywhere. In doing this,
she*-recognizes
the fact that thework of lifting radio to a high en-
teitainment
standard is something
important to
the students. Polling week began October 17, and
\$jjtl
be carried on for the twenty-four week'fall, wintei, and springradio season.'.
•.'•->•.-•
;i
. ;/
This-poll, known as RAP, existsfor the
nbrpose
of enabling college
students
to determine the ac
ceptability v
of noteworthy radioprograms^ There is a need for determining iljis,
first,
because radiois the most powerful means of mass
audience
appeal; and secondly, because some radio programs have atendency to
resort
to a
low
burlesque type of entertainment. RAP
will!concentrate?
only
-
,
JJ&
radiocomedy shows.
W
SSu
afe*:
6
*S Eachiparticipating
college maintains a poll committee with a chairman in charge.
jThe
poll
commif-
lee
chooses each week, ten
differ-^
ent^studentsjwho
listen to
specif
i<m
programsiand rate!them
as follows (1) [Highly acceptable,
(2)fl
Acceptable, (3) Barely acceptable,(4) Unacceptable, (5)
Unobjection-H
al. After the poll results are
tabu-H
lated,
they are digested and
used!
for news releases to
bo|
sent ta^newspapers and J radio
stationsffl
throughout the country. In
chargej
of
RAP^fcii
Mercyhurst are
Mary$
Claire Jones and Helen Berkey.
Play
Alpha Psi OmegaPresents
"The Lamp
And the Bell"
The dramatic fraternity ofMercyhurst, Alpha Psi Omega, will present
"The
Lamp
andithe
Bell," by Edna
St,
Vincent Millay, Thursday andFriday, February 24 and
25,
at 8:30
in-the college
auditor
ium. Curtain
time
will reveal
tolthelaudience
one of the
mostfspectac ular -produc
t ionsever presented on the Mercyhurst stage.SG|i&|
*^^^H
wmBlg&m
THEIPLOT
K^^H
&g
The J plot f
centers 'around
twostep-sisters,
|
Bianca,
*
Eli za b e t h
SCai
ns, and Beatrice, Joanne Bel-lias, who are both
-in
love withSMario, king of Logaverde,
.Mario
is portrayed by Rosalie Warner.
As**Hrt? ptajT
progresses Gcrfdo,Aline
Karlak,
who is a very ambitious man, persuades Octnvia, Theresa Stroebbel, Bianca's
mother,
to
send
Bianca away Sand {then! tobring
herjback to
marry Mario sothat he can have Beatrice and
tho
throne. In the meantime, Beatricehas promised
tolmarry
Mario butgracefully withdraws and never informs Bianca about their j love.Mario and Bianca marry and go tolive at Logaverde.
;
•%
v
'^ji?i^§^W
Throughout
^ the
Iplayi^Fideiio,the court fool of the palace of Fi-ori, makes merry and finally givesan
interesting -switch tovthe final
outcome.
r
Joanl
Gallina portrays
1
Fidelio.
,As
to
tho&inal
results of
•Gulclo's
treachery and Beatrice's!secrecy,
on)y||SdnaJ
St.
|
Vincent!
Millay can put
them
together into!a beautiful play.
ifj£JS!lBWHB^H
.:J.
<:
\
THE CASrflH^^H
Supporting roles are played by:
Mary «
Joy^ Fallon las jGiovanni,Claire Todd fas jLuigi, MadelynNaud as ^Francesca,
land 1
EileenHeld as Carlotta. 1 Other parts aredone by Rosemary Lahr
as
Grazia,Dorothy Zak as Lorenao, and Marilyn
Langmeyer
as Giolletta.
KlTME
COSTUMES AND SETTINGmedievalcostumesfor theandplay
e#f
he
H^a^n
elaboratel
settings
^^^^^^^^
have been
done|by
student crews.The J entire {production
I
is underthe
direction
of Betty AnnJMaheu,head of the dramatic art department of the! college.
Rosemarie
Ratayzck is chairman of the ticketcommittee and tickets
may
purchased from
lany
memberthat committee for a dollar,eluding tax.
S%
be
ofin
 
-t-
Page Two
THE MERCIAD
February 16,
1949
SOMETHING? MUST BE DONE
Perhaps
one of the biggest hurdles
with
which Mercy-
hutat
challenges her youngest daughters is the demand forseniority rights. To the newcomer the never-ending routineof stepping back for an unaccountable number of late-arriving
upperclassmen
is a hard pill to swallow. Perhaps it isa pill of pride that just won't go down; maybe
it
is resentment or misunderstanding. Whatever the cause, maybe
i1j
has grown into a gigantic grudge. §Something must be dope—the- need for
understanding
and
respept ofIseniority
is urgent. Seldom have
the
priyil*eges of the upperclassmen in the
cafeteria,
the post office,and the
Iauditorium
been so completely ignored. Whosefault? Seldom have upperclassmen felt the need to stresstheir seniority rights. Whose
fault?
Let us not forget, too, that
frpmj
the upperclassmenmust come a certain
dignity—a
dignity
tfyat\yillfnot
 allowthem to abuse their privileges, a dignity
tha-t
will urge
themlto
strive always
tofmake
themselves
worthy
of theirseniority.This editorial has not been written for you to
gcan
oyerlightly and shrug off with a "What can I do about it?" air.You can do
something—you
should do something if you expect as upperclassmen to have seniority rights. It is nothingshort of unreasonable
for
a class or an individual to demandof others what they themselves will not observe. Are theupperclassmen asking too much when they have been givingfor the last two and three years?
I
>
A WEEK
END
WITH GOD.
Let us retreat
fromithe
world
for
a short time and liveentirely! with
God.
Let us enter this year's student retreatwith minds whose consuming desire for Him leave no roomtherein for earthly cares. Let
his <forget
our
3wipttk/our
pleasures, and all
mankind;
flet
us live alone
with
peace
m
Christ that He may live in us.
| .. I |
.
This
isinotjthe
time for catching up on our correspondence
andf
overdue assignments or writing
our Engl
ish
;
compositions because we are "forced" to stay in a quiet building where there is
nothing
"going on" all week-end. We arenot to engage in social conversation with our friends, butwe should speak any necessary words-
**
Let us spend thesedays!in
attendance
at conferences, making the Stations of
the
Cross, reading spiritualbooks; saying the rosary. And as we pray and meditate weshall be strengthening our spiritual life and we shall receiveGod's greatest gift—Grace- |We are concerned
witlj.
aids to our physical health;
"let
us welcome this help to our soul. Those who have made agood retreat
willfbe
able to say, "We who were weary are
now
^refreshed-we! face terrestrial sorrows with a fortifiedCatholic philosophy; and we that were hungry have been
fed -with
the Living
Christ."
\
THE
MERCIAD
rjh
Member
of
'
ASSOCIATED
COLLEGIATE PRESSEditor Alice MurphyAssociate
Editor!
Margaret
Bodenschatz
Assistant Editors
__
Polly Slater, Cecile JewellBusiness Manager Rose Marie RatajczykWriting Staff Miriam Gemperle, MargaretFusaro, Nancy Whelan, Mary E. Stanny,Pat Walker, Jane Denney, Carolyn Cairns,Cynthia
McMahon,
Peggy Jetter, LucilleHeintz, Marie Heavey, Mary Harvey, Dor
othy]Maloney.,
Colleen McMahon, Laura-
jeanXBly,
Catharine Munn, Alice
Kuczka,
MargaretMcGuire.Business Staff Jean
O'Neil,
AntoinetteMarino,
f
Elaine Forgette, Ann Kennedy,Mary Helen Kenny, Edith Harris, Mary A.Witt.
m
Wt
Be
f I
Discriminating,,.
H#c<&tls?
a. fciihly
 warded
book
Oluto hid
as
lbs
selection for themonth
somerset Mwgftam'e
newpulbliO«tti^
(
CATAI4NA,
A
fewpages back
In
the pamphletwhich the club
publishes
to acquaint the readers with new books
appeared
a"
review of another newliterary work —. THE
SHiVEN
STOREY MOUNTAIN by ThomasMerton. '
T ;
;
.
|
|
Both books serve
'fctoe
Aristoteliantheory
of
art,
and
both books end
with
"justice triumphing." But inorder to
make
a choice betweenthe two,
we-^imust fbe
acquaintedwith the
Christian
philosophy.In 'this
matter,
it is not enough tobe a good pagan. Sometimes weare just this,
when
we falter underthe pressure of expertly
written
reviews and of glib pep talks givenus by
salesmen^at
book counters.They proudly tell us, "This book
isIcerfaainly
a good book; doesn'tit serve all
ffche
necessary principles of good literature?" Here,then, |is where we
usuaUy
can'tgive an answer in spite of all our
fine J
English courses and ourknowledge of what a book oughtto be.A comparison of the Maughamand Merton books is enlightening.In addition to the qualities listed,the works are modern; they arewritten by modern authors; theydeal
with ^
our times, and theirliterary styles are good. They arerealistic, too, and
tftiis
is where weare able to decide which of themis worthreading.!Foranything,
overdone
canno^ claim unquestioned literary value, and withoutbeyond the
thirteenth.
pagein
CATAIJINA
we are fully convinced that Mr. Maugham haslittle regard
for*
the principal ofrestraint. He makes use of allthe better-known adjectives constantly
and!
seems to think thatif immorality is shown to be nogood ultimately, it may first be
described
in
allfits
ugliness. Thewhole! book is a
*ma«s
of over-glorified trash.
.*'»
This is not so, however, in THESeven Storey Mountain which isas realistic
asjany
other modernbook. This quality
of.
restraintis maintained exceedingly well,for Mr. Merton has used wordswith discretion in all his beautifulpassages. He doesn't believe in
the!'baker's
dozen, but prudentlythat twelve is the accepted standard. This book moots all the nec-
going
THOUGHTS...
On
the
Atomic
Age
Ifaia
atomic ago is an age of supreme,
scientific
achievement, Howmany of us
urt
aware
of
its
eignifioance In
term* of human relations?
WJ
ti*Vf .'"at
fought the
greatest
war
Ul *il
history,
largely beonuatof extraordinary soionbtfie
material, we
ww
victorious.
Yet
we have
pet tl;9 internal
peace nor the
international
unity we
sought,
ThePhi 1 ad
Nations
i-3
torn up by the constant conflict of ideals, of politicalfrgumen.s, and of affected brotherhood among men. Paradoxically
nations ai
a
rapidly
producing more
arms
and
publishing more
propa-'
%i
:ida.
The
view of many experts affirms that if
we
are to survive, our
faworioft and
laboratories must produce at top speed
In
preparation fora
w^r
of defense. Ours would seem to be a hollow, materialistic victory.But we ought not be surprised at the muddled state of the world today. One needs only to glance back over history to see the almostmonotonous repetition cf kingdoms growing
in
power and reaching apeak of material glory, eventually only to be destroyed by greater
powers
from
without
or
by
essential weakness Irom, within. Nations do notseem to
learn*realistically
the lesson that survival is as fully dependenton
wie
quality of life as on the power of
arms—dependent
on a perpetualbalance of spiritual and material powers.
This
is
a
lesson we need to learn
fully
in.our own
age—an
age oftenreferred to as materialistic; as worshipping science rather than God; asdominated, rather than served, by science.. Perhaps in this invertedorder lies our essential weakness. Perhaps it is time again for us to heedthe lessens we. learn fromhistory; to realize that science cannot replace God if man is to
sur
vive or to progress in a manner
suitable
to his dignity. Science,properly, is
tiie
servant of manand needs, to be guided in its
application'by
wisdom and moralprinciples. Modern man needs torediscover and to reestablish aphilosophy which is based on anappreciation of the true character
ofr
man and which is enlightenedby the external truths of
God.
Such
a
philosophy, working handin hand with science, is ourgreatest hope in these distressingtimes if we are to achieve a human
YourStudent Reporter
Question: What Is Tour "Pet
Peeve"?
'
i
Mary Harvey.
'49 **•
My "pet peeve" concerns peopleWho can never seem to say "thankyou" when you do something for
them.£
After all, everyone likes tofeel that he is appreciated.
*
#•
AnnDeckop.
'51
Among my . "pet
*
peeves" arepeople who can't make up theirminds when ordering in a restaurant, and people Who whisper andtalk during concerts and movies:
Awiida
Irizarry. '52What bothers me?
Tolhave
thefront seat in class
."and
sitting inthose chairs
in
the biology lab.Audrey
Dudenhoeffer.
'50
t
My "pet peeve" has to do with
people
who tell me that
15
shoulddo something when
Ifcintended
todo it anyway. Also I dislike insincere flattery. *and a lasting peace.essary requirements, is "modern"in 'both matter and appeal, butwhat is more, it has Christianideals.We are not able to read all the
new3
publications and make comparisons for all the new books ofourselves. For this reason, wewould oe wise to follow such suggestions as AMERICA, THE SIGN,and
\
THE >
CATHOLIC DIGESTgive us as guides in a proper selection of "what to read."Apropos are the following remarks of Charles A.
Ldndburgh
taken,from his latest
book,
OfFlight and Life:
"Like
most of modern youth, I worshipped science. I was awed by itsknowledge. Its advances! had
sur
passed man's wildest dreams. Its
V
benefits and
«powers
appeared unlimited. ' In
3its
learning: seemed to
I
lie the key to all mysteries of life.It took
many Tyears
for*
me to discover that science, with all itsbrilliance, lights only a middlechapter of creation, a chapter withboth ends bordering: on the infinite*one which can be forever expandedbut never completed. When man devotes too much time to this
chapter,
he loses the greatest value of thebook • • ,
When we worship
God
and live by His spiritual values* the
^
knowledge and
infinite
complexityof science are channeled by a wisdombeyond human capability."
Hamlet: Historic and Noble Occasion
Shakespeare's immortal
"Hamlet"
will never cease to be read andstudied in schools or in literarycircles. It will never cease to beadmired
as*
a [play, but we whohave seen the "Hamlet" produced
onfthe
motion picture screen! bySir Lawrence
Olivier*
will nevercease to
rememberjit.
Olivier hassucceeded in capturing the Elizabethan manner more closely thanany other post-Elizabethan producer
ha"s
dejne. By use of the artof photoplay, Olivier effects asense of reality. His handling ofthe soliloquies was especially
ar
tistic. In them, he had the voice ofHamlet's thoughts without anymovement of his lips. Such a fetecould
onlyMbe
accomplished bymotion picture technique. ;
Olivierfdiscarded!
minor themes*'and characters of the originalplay. Some critics would say
this
lessened their enjoyment of
the
play; most of us never
missed
them. Besides substituting modernlanguage
foi
archaic words andphrases, he rearranged the sequence of scenes and interpolatedsome scenes which Shakespearedid not write. Despite the changesmade, the speeches disregarded,the characters absented, Olivier
produced
i
a
crystal-clearv'Hamlet"
without violating its integrity.As the
pleading
character,^Ham
let, Olivier gave a superb performance. He was dynamic as the melancholy, irresolute prince. Onewould think, had he not read theplay, that Eileen Herlie overactedher part as Queen Gertrude} butsome critics perceive that Shakespeare condemned through herthe over-anxiety of
a-11
mothersof that period
for',their
sons. TheQueen's anxiety and too amorousaffection, they say,
served^to
develop Hamlet's character; hismelancholy and his irresoluteness.
Ac
cording to
Nhis
theory Hamletfelt slighted after Gertrudemarried Claudius. If we acceptthis interpretation, Shakespeare sallegory is unique. Hamlet is representative of all the young menof his time and Gertrdue
ot
allmothers. There is another schoolof criticism that sees Gertrude'sanxiety as a natural reaction to adisposition and attitude she hadnot before noticed in her son.The version produced by
Laur*
ence Olivier for the motion picture screen is something unique inthe 350
years!of
Hamlet history.
Dalys
Powell, after the premiere of
Hamlet
unfolded in London's Od-eon Theater, said: "The indefinableexcitement with which one comesaway
from
the film proceeds froman occaion more than
unusual ;|
an occasion, I think I can say, bothhistoric and noble."
 
February.
16,|
1949
*
J
W
THBfMERCIAD
re
ercyhurst
Girls ATalking About
.,
11 tt o
eweetheapb, Alice,, ,the impressive
coronation
ceremony .
^he
strlk*
ng
\decora<tion*
oawied «ut in * Valentine
motif'.
.
^
colorful whirl of
WW
gowns. .
.Che
constant
f}aafc 9?
cameras.
,'*
dance
not soon to beforgotten.
f -' f
MERCYHURST Glftl^
ARE TALKING
ABOUT. .
.the!
unjust sentencing of Cardinal Mindszcnty. .
, .the reallia-i
tion that Communism
ia
a real menace to a}l, even here in,America.
,,MERCVHVRST
CURLS ARE TALKING ABOUT. .
.tomorrow's formalnoeofcinjg wi.h
the Chancellor, .
.the
glee club's first appearance
of tfte
year. .
.the musiioale
honoring Mother
dsfsates
on her feast t}ay,
,
,and Marilyn Langmyer. |.
aannon's
first Junior-Prom.,
.the
lucky
srlrts
highlighted by Joan Brauch's speech. .
.vooal
numbers by Betty Cairnswho attended:
Rosie
Irrgang, Jean
O'Neil,
Polly Speno, Mary Jean Hola-han,
Mimi
Hoerbelt,
Bam
Muir,
Marilyn
Fregelette
and
many
others, , .(fencing from nine to
one
to the strains of
Matt
Pommer...
.
MERCYHURST
GIRLS ARE TALKING ABOUT. .
.the
basketball games
with
Villa. .
.the
cute gals who led thecheering. .
.the
party which
followed
the game. .
-the
appearance of the new blazers. .
.so
white for
the
timebeing . . the spectacular production of Hamlet. .
.and
our
H
pwn theatre party. , •
.the
cleverly advertised carol partyand fashion show sponsored by
the
]
home ec.
club,
,
,eqpfirst glimpse| of the new spring styles. .
.the
noon-daylunches prepared by the junior home eeers. .
.tales
of woefrom the practice house..
.all those formal
dinners. . .,MERCYHURST GIRLS ARE TALKING-ABOUT, .
.the
roses delivered to the
International?House
in care of Margery Yang. .
.Jean
Brauch's trip to Notre Dame .
.Niagara
U's Military Ball attended by
Pat
Goodwin, Colleen
McMahon
and Betty Russell. .
.Rudy's "Hair
Cutting Establishment". . .
.KikiJNaud's
recently acquired speech impediment. .
i
. '?
MERCYHURST GIRLS ARE TALKING ABOUT . . .getting accustomed to the new
semester's
schedule . . the
• 4 •
lucky few who made the dean's
list..
the sophomores' sighsof relief at the completion of their term papers . . welcome
V
to the new students. .
.April
Hinkle, Toni Bonsignore, Jody
I
Roberson ...
St.
Valentine's Day . . all
the!intriguing
florists' boxes ...
'{
MERCYHURST GIRLS ARE TALKING ABOUT. .
.the
sharp declineof the stock market. .
.the hefcivy
western snow storm
anld
its disastrouseffects. . .
.where
our eastern share was
during;*the
Winter CarnivalweejcenjL^
^_
tw4
*u^j&&*.
£& k
-*••
-
*fei
•&**•
» *• -*
MERCYHURST GIRLS ARE TALKING ABOUT. .
.the
gleeclub's two concerts with Canisius.
.•.one
here and one inBuffr/.o... the retreat, scheduled
for
the first week of
Lent..
the juniors' varied experiences
while
observing..
.the
recentemphasis of seniority rights..
.especially
in the lunch line...and last, but not least..
.the
juniors' Courtesy Campaign...
Sophomores Choose"Sweetheart!ofSophonade'
SOCIAL WORKER GIVESCOURSE TO JUNIORS
The Sophomores did themselvesproud at
the J
annual Sophonade,February 5. The theme was basedon a Valentine motif and wascarried out beautifully throughoutevery nook and corner of theArmory where the dance tookplace.The high point of the eveningWas the coronation of Alice Feehleywho had been chosen by popularVote to reign as "Sweetheart ofthe Sophonade." The membersOf the Sophomore class led theprocession
I
by candlelight andformed a heart through which thequeen and her court passed ontheir way to the elaborately decorated throne. Upon her coronation the Sophomores sang thetitle song of the dance,
"Sweet
heart of the Sophonade" to thetune of "Sweetheart of the Sigma
Chi."
The grand march led bythe royal party followed, and
end-
edigaily
by intermission. It was,
55
The administration of Mercyhurst has engaged Mrs. J. H. Trimble for the second semester to givea general course on "The Fieldsof Social Work" to junior sociologymajors, prior to their placement inhome town social agencies. Mrs.Trimble is excellently qualified togive this course, having done herundergraduate work at Smith College and her graduate work at thefamous New York School of SocialWork. Since coming to Erie, shehas done volunteer work in varioussocial?agencies.
M
This course was formerly givenin the first semester of the senioryear,
butethis
change in the
cur*
riculum will enable the girls to dotheir
field's
work
inf
the summer
following
their junior year. In thisway! they will be gaining experience which| will offer better opportunities for them in their hometowns after graduation.indeed, a lovely dance and willlive long in
the*
memories of allthose who attended.
Page Three
SOPHOMORE
OF
SMSS^JPW*
4
SNOWLESSTHE MONTHWINTER WEEKlEND
Jorene MorrisseyIf asked to describe,
in
a fewwords, Jorene Morrissey,, the Sophomore of the Month, we would say,"Jorene
is
a lady." But
to
furnishfurther information, we want youto know that her birthday is celebrated on March 23, she formerlylived in Gallitzen, but recentlymoved to Johnstown, Penna. Jorene takes pride in
the If
act thather older sister is an alumna ofthis college.The "candy-store" is the nickname given Jorene's room by herfriends, due |to the wonderfulgoodies obtainable there. Whenshe can't be found in her "candy-store,"
norjjin
the library, you may
be
able to locate her in the lounge.
Reenie
is one of the few who frequents the lounge strictly forlounging purposes. P.
S.
She
plays
bridge. .
$*
11
As
treasurer,^
of
^the.^Sociology
Seminar,
this Sociology majoriisable to keep scholastically busy inand out of the class room. jEa4£.fM||Jorene is to be praised personally each time the sophomore
class
receives a
general*compliment,
(because the entire sophomore classthrives on her spirited {exampleShe is the
?
ideal;' class president.
Possessingjsa
perfect blend of gaiety and seriousness does the trick.She not only plans many activities,but also sees her plans through tocompletion.
§£ Ifipj^K^HB^H
Her stirring
I
portrayal!of theBlessed Mother in
\
the Christmaspageant received very
Jfavorable
criticism. However, she lis Icon-
stantlyjrequesting
back stage dutywhenever her services are neededin any Janus Club production.
MB
When Jorene hears
the!
song,"That Certain Party," we wonderif she remembers the same one we
do.
She couldn't forget it. .
.her
friends won't let her.
| £
|Although we could write on andon about Jorene, we'll make use of
one
of her most outstanding characteristics, simplicity, and end oursummary now of a perfect "typical-college" girl. 1
#j*H
The Winter Carnival.
Weekend
may have lacked the proper
set*
ting, but it
displayed the
energe*
tig
sphool
ipirit
of Mercyhurst,which made it
an
overwhelmingaupcesB, Weekend activities, ably
planned
by Jean Ann
Enright,
Dolores Fitzgerald,
and.Jean Brauch
with her committee, were largelydependent upon the weather, butwere quickly altered to meet the"snowless" situation.
m
Friday night's hay ride openedthe Carnival activities forMercyhurst sport ladies and their escorts,dressed in their warmest andbrightest outdoor outfits. Singingaround the south campus bonfirefollowed
thefbrisk
hay ride." Con-eluding an evening of fun and fro
lic,
Carnivalers entered "Mercy--burst Lodge" via the skies-and-skates-bedecked staircase for asock dance. The Lodge, sportivelyarranged, was complete with fire-place, benches, deer-heads, stuffedpheasants, and camp lanterns.A change of mood and attiremarked Saturday evening's formaldinner held in the Mercyhurst Din-
Professor NamedPresident offTorch I Club
SB
I
Professor John
%
A.| Donatelli,
headfof
the Department of Philosophy and Psychology, was elected president of the Erie Torch Clubat its recent annual election meeting.
|He
officially t ook over theduties of his office
at
the January
261meeting
which was addressedby Attorney Robert H. Chase on
the
1 subject
"Four?
Legal Aspectsoff Recent
ILabor
\
Legislation."Professor Donatelli ispf.an^prgan-izer and J charter member of ErieTorch. jHJB^^fe&.jfe•
:
:'"}
:
^mk
K The
i*
Erie,Pennsylvania, TorchClub
|is
one of
*six|y-tihree
suchclubs with a total membership ofover three thousand men,
affiliated
as
1
the International* Associationof Torch Clubs,
f The
\
objects ofthis Association are to give members of
the I learned
I
professionsan opportunity of meeting togetherin the spirit of fellowship; to prevent the narrowing tendencies ofspecialization
|byIdevelopingbreadith
of thought; and to fostertine
I
highest
t
standards I
off
pro
fessional
I ethics
land
I civil
j
well-being..
H ^fHBffFWtranirJ^ffl^i
HOME EC I CLUB PRESENTS'VALENTINE VOGUES
The "Valentine Vogues," sponsored by the Home Economics Club
thisfpast
Friday evening,,
was
anevent which deserves to become
a
tradition of Mercyhurst.The smartest spring fashionsfrom Trasks
andlother
Erie storeswere modeled by some of our home
ec.
"beauties." Lovely ceramic
pieces
made by the members ofthe Club were given as prizes forthe highest bridge scores. To really complete this affair, an attractive
lunch,'/consisting
of red
rasp
berry tarts, cookies, and coffee wasserved by charming hostesses.
|
As one walked into the auditorium,
gaily
decorated tables andwalls following a Valentino metthe eye.
It
suggested the Spirit ofSpring which was indicative of
i
he
suits and dresses modeled|by themembers in their "Valentine Vo-ing Room. Under the
chiirminshlp
of Jorene Morrissey, the sophomores uniquely decorated the din*
ing
room, preparing • perfect
let*
ting
for
the picturesque buffet, Thedinner was followed by the looked-
forward-to semi-formal
dance.
Oar*
nivalers enjoyed dancing
in ihe
Lodge to the music of Matt Pom-
mer's
Orchestra. The crowning ofSnow
Queen^Jane
Denney highlighted the evening's activities.Mass in Christ the King ChapelSunday morning served as a perfect climax to a perfect
weekend.
The Lodge Lounge, attractivelydecorated by the freshmen, wasthe scene of the breakfast,
after
which goodbyes were said,
the,
weekend becoming a memory
qf
mid-winter wonder.The cooperation of all
students
made possible such an
outstand?
ing social event. This year's Winter Weekend is proof posfcive, too,that it is neither snow, nor ice,nor wind, nor weather, but realschool spirit that makes any occasion.
X - CHANGES
thehile
|
leafing throughColonial News, we find that"students have been parking in thelot that is reserved for the faculty."Sounds familiar, doesn't it?Attention, Science majors!
"H20-
it bothers me,N20-What can it be?Carbon tet-Now let me see,Is the valence 93?
yCharles
and Boyle
wonYjet*
free.KpJ^pSwSuRHHBH Niagra
Index 'meI
Fromfthe McAuleyan^welfindthait
"fads sweep the country andgo right on out and there you arewith a strapless,
*
backless, ankle-length cocktail dress when all youdrink in the afternoon is coffee."
8
Not good
'til 'the
last
drop.f
1
"Tha
college paper is a gTeat invention nH^HB^^ii'i The college gets all
Ghe fame
1 The printer gets all the money
%
I
And the staff gets all the blame."
WaHnBtm?
I Tomahawk
%
I
"Ain't" it the truth!
'mf#M4
I
Radio Acceptance Poll reportsthat radio comedy has hit a newhigh in decency,
K
|
?
Mount|Saint
Mary Charter News
jS
It's better
o>
emain silent andkeep
*he|teacher
in-doubt,
thanto say something
and?let
him besure."
S^H8ift3
i
t&Sfcii§3slSS
The Bona Venture
•ART'S
ICE
|
CREAM
BAR!
SUNDAESLuncheonette
and
Delicatessen
gues
ii
4036 PINE AVENUE

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