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The Merciad, April 1, 1949

The Merciad, April 1, 1949

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The Merciad, April 1, 1949
The Merciad, April 1, 1949

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GOOD
LUCKGRADUATES!
Volume XIX, No, 6
ALPHA
ETA
INSTALLED
AT'COLLEGE
Banquet Opens Week
End
Ceremonies
The Alpha Eta chapter of Kappa
Omicron
Phi was officially installed at Mercyhurst during the weekend of May 28-29.A beautifully appointed formal dinner, served in the state dining room, was the first in a series of installationceremonies.After dinner the toast-master, Jean Tobin, introduced MotherM. Borgia, who welcomed the guests, Sister Rose Angela,Sister Rose Marie, Roberta Malone and AnnKelch,all of Set-on Hill College, Greensburg, Pa., and Dr. Opal Rhodes andMargaret Steadman of Indiana State Teachers College. In heraddress, the Dean expressed
herlpleasure
at witnessing therealization of a plan which had been under
discussion for
thepast
five
years. Sister Collette, head of the Home
Economics
Department of Mercyhurst, re-echoed the welcome extendedby Mother Borgia.
i
Guest speaker of the eveningwas Dr. Opal Rhodes, who outlinedwhat Kappa Omicron Phi hasmeant to her. As national chapterand alumnae organizer, Dr. Rhodes
I
has come in contact with many
$MrOPTfllH
fine girls, exchanged ideas with
®
them, and observed
their
numerous accomplishments.
Sophomores PresentLantern Night
Patricia Jack spoke about thework and ambition of the membersof Kappa Omicron Phi.
Doiothy
Maloney concluded the programwith a discussion of the purpose ofthe fraternity: a high ideal of saneliving and a deeper appreciationof
,the
sanctity of
the.
Americanhome.Charter MembersCharter members and pledgeswere accepted after dinner, andthe following officers were elected:Patricia Jack, president; TheresaRowbottom, first vice-presidentand corresponding secretary;Nancy
Plack,
second vice-presidentand recording secretary; Rose-marie Irrgang, guard, reporter, andkeeper of the archives.Sunday morning, a test wasgiven to the pledges, followed byinitiation of both charter andactive members. The charter members are Sister M. Collette, sponsor of the Mercyhurst chapter, MaryAnn Donaher, Dorothy Maloney,Mary Lou Moore, Frances Rossi,Jean Tobin, and Carolyn Wick.Active members are the presentofficers and pledges: VeronicaNakich, Jean
Slav
in and AileenYueh.
!
t
!
.Miss Roberta Malone, presidentof the Seton Hill chapter, presidedat the initiation, assisted by MissAnn Kelch, incoming president ofthe same chapter.
Duties
of theofficers and work of the organization were explained before the
vis
itors left the inauguration of theyoungest chapter,* Alpha Eta ofMercyhurst College.Tonight the little sisters of theclass of
'49
will pay a final tributeto their big sisters, the graduatingseniors by presenting a LanternNight program.Lantern Night plans have quietlyprogressed throughout the monthof May to make tonight's performance a remembered occasion. TheSophomore Class has a unique, butsecret, entertainment for the firstportion of the evening's ceremon
ies.
Noreen Valley and SusanStephens chairmaned this
commit-
tee and all sophomores are participating. After the entertainmentthe sophomores, carrying JapaneseLanterns, will escort the seniors tothe pond. Here, songs will be exchanged
from
class to class, whilethe seniors float little candle boatsacross from their
side'to
the op-posite shore occupied by the sophomores.Lantern Night is an occasionthat
contrasts
fittingly with othertraditions connected with Commencement. It seems to be a mostsentimental affair, yet so informal.Singing
old-time
favorites with agroup of parting friends surelycreates the atmosphere for a long-
to-be-remembered
Lantern Night.
Faculty AttendsGold Rush
The Mount Mirror of MountScholastica College, Atchican, Kan
sas,
carried an article in the May 9issue of interest to all Catholic Students. It offers Catholicity as ananswer to the evils of Communism."It is the part of Catholic collegestudents to arouse the spirit ofunity, of working energetically together for the cause of God and inthis cause is included the fight fora Christian world order. Publicprayer is one of the means."
Sister
members of the facultywent
out
[prospecting Wednesdayevening, June 4. The occasion wasthe "Gold Rush of 49," a farewellget-together
with
the Seniors.The gold-seeking
guests
were ledto the students dining room via amine shaft (the elevator), operatedby Rosie the miner. Here a goldnugget marked the place of eachfaculty member. Anne Kennedyand Helen McDonough, as successful prospectors, introduced the program. Alice Murphy's monologue,"The Poor Old Maid," was followedby a clever tap dance of Jean Brig-ham's. A note of comedy was introduced by the Barbershop Quartette's, Jane Denny, Jean O'Neil,Jean Brigham, and Dolores Fitz
gerald--rendition
of "Clementine."Group singing and refreshmentscompleted the formal part of theevening's program,
GOOD LUCK
GRADUATES
!
MERCYHURST COLLEGE, ERIE, PA.
May—June,
1949
Mercyhurst Professor
FRANCIS X. CONNOLLY TO SPEAKAT COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES
sGi
ven
Honorary Degree
Dr. J. A.
Donatelli
Professor John A. Donatelli,head of
Mercyhurst'si
Departmentof Philosophy and Psychology, received the Doctor of Letters degreefrom his Alma Mater. St. VincentCollege, Latrobe, Pa., on Sunday,May 29, at the Commencement Exercises marking St. Vincent College's one hundred and fourth academic year.Doctor Donatelli was born in Mc-Keesport, Pa. He received his elementary education at St. John theBaptist School, Scottdale, Pa.After completing his secondaryeducation at St. Vincent Prep, heentered St. Vincent College wherehe received the Bachelor of Artsdegree, the Excellence in Englishaward, the Master of Arts degree,and where, in addition, he completed one and one-half years of postgraduate work.Since 1934, when he came to Erie,he has been a member of Mercy-hurst's faculty. Beginning as! anassistant in the
^Department
ofEnglish, he later became
Professor
of Economics; and since 1939 hehas been head of
the'
Departmentof Philosphy and Psychology.As a
member}of
the faculty, hehas been dedicated to the advancement of the Christian educationalideal and the Thomistic concept ofculture. For fifteen years he hasserved Mercyhurst unfailingly,making many contributions to hergrowth, notably the following:
.
He founded, and
for
eleven yearswas faculty advisor of the collegeannual, PRAETERITA. For thirteen years he was also faculty advisor of the college monthly, THEMERCIAD. He instituted the St.Continued on Page 5
Father Paul DeliversBaccalaureate
Reverend Henry A. Paul, 0. S. F.S.; MA.,
Deanlof
the Science Department at Cathedral PreparatorySchool delivered the baccalaureatesermon in the Chapel of Christ theKing at ten-thirty Sunday morning,June 5. Father Paul's message wasstimulating and inspiring to boththe graduated and to
tho
underclassmen.Solemn High Mass was celebratedin the Chapel by the ReverendGeorge Groucutt, chaplain of thecollege. The faculty and studentbody were in attendance.
fE ? r?
£
ranC
T??'
C
9
nno1
y. Professor of English Literature at Fordham University, New York City,
will addrei
themembers of the Mercyhurst College
graduating
c
fi!i at
theannual commencement exercises in the Chapel of Christ the
King
on June 8
at
8:30 p.m. Dr. Connolly is chairman of theboard of the Catholic Poetry Society of America as well aseditor of the recent book, "Literature: The Channel of Culture.The Rev. Edward
P.
Latimer,
Ph.
D.,
will present the candidates for
degrees
to
His
Excellency, the Most Reverend JohnMark Gannon, Bishop of the
Erie
Diocese and Chancellor ofMercyhurst College, who
will
confer the degrees.Those eligible for the degree of Bachelor of Arts includeMary Ann Black, Erie; Margaret Bodenschatz, Portage, Pa;
Corinne Braun, Lancaster, N. Y.;Jean Brigham, Oil City, Pa.; RitaCiccone, Johnstown, Pa.; MildredCorrell, Erie; Coletta Crawford,Lakewood, 0.; Jane Denny, Buffalo,
N.
Y.; Alice Feehley, Erie; DoloresFitzgerald, Lancaster, N. Y.;
^Lucille
Gasper, Erie; PatriciaGoodwin, Niagara Falls, N.Y.; Rosemary Guinnane, Jamestown, N.
Y.j
Marie Heavey, Buffalo, N. Y.;! Lucille Heidt, Erie; Lucille
Heintt,
Erie; Ellen
Hickmott,
Erie; JoanHouch, Washington, D. C; MaryClaire Jones, Buffalo, N. Y.;
Ai lene
Kurtz, Buffalo, N. Y.; Teresa Marshall,Batavia,N.Y.;Helen
Mc-
Donough, Erie; Ann Mohr, Salamanca, N. Y.; Catherine Munn,| Erie;
Leona
Rogers, Erie; Elizabeth Smith, Syracuse, N. Y.; JanetSteinmetz, Erie; Patricia, Vander-
velt,
Babylon, L. I., N. Y.
^
The following will be awardedthe degree of Bachelor of
Science
in Commercial Education: Elaine
1
Forgette, Pittsburgh, Pa.; Laurel
Groff,
McKean, Pa.; Mary Harvey,Oil City, Pa.; Ann Kennedy, Ches-wick, Pa.; Eileen Mangan, Erie;Antoinette Marino, Sharon, Pa.;Jean O'Neil. McKeesport, Pa.; MaryAnn Plack, McKean, Pa.; Rose-marie
Ratajeczyk,
Pittsburgh, Pa.;Audrey
Sitter,
Erie; Sr. Joan EileenCavanaugh, Titusville, Pa.Those eligible for the degree ofBachelor of Science in
Home
Economics
.are
Marian Andrews,Erie; Mary Ann Donaher, NewKensington,^
Pa-?
Rita Gutman,Cleveland, 0.; Eileen Held, Erie;Dorothy Maloney, Snyder, N. Y.;Mary Lou Moore, Leeper, Pa.;Alice Murphy, Elmira, |N. Y.;Agnes Nakich Albion, Pa.; FrancesRossi, Elmira, N.^Y.; Virginia Stephens, Erie;
Jeari
Tobin, Erie;
Carolyn
Wick, Lackawanna, N. Y.
TraditionalCeremoniesMark Class Day
Mercyhurst campus provided thesetting
for*
the traditional ClassDay exercises this afternoon. JeanBrauch, president of the seniorclass, gave the address of welcome.Then the Glee Club presented twonumbers, "Listen to the Lambs"and "Italian Street Song."
£
|
The main talk was given by Mar
garet > Bodenschotz
on "Better Women for Better Times." JanetSteinmetz spoke on "MercyhurstTraditions."These talks were followed by theTassel Ceremony, in which thestudents, formally attired in capand gown, were advanced to thenext rank* of scholastic standing.Dr. M. J. Relihan then made thepresentation of awards and Rosemary Guinnane, editor, presentedthe 1949 PRAETERITA.The traditional
Planting
of theIvy by the Seniors followed thethe Ivy Poem which was given byVirginia Stephens. The singing of"Alma Mater" by the student bodybrought the program to a close.Later in the afternoon, the students, their relatives and friends,were served luncheon
Jin
the Sunken Gardens
where*gayly
coveredtables had been set up for the an-
nualJGarden
Party.
Class
of
'491
Joins Alumnae
The annual
^Alumnae
Receptionand Tea was held at MercyhurstCollege Sunday afternoon, June 5.
Mrs.
LuElla
Haaf
Jones, presidentof [the Alumnae Association,
.pre
sided at the formal reception
in
thefoyer. At this time, the membersof the class of 1949 were receivedinto the Alumnae Association. JeanBrigham, as representative of herclass, gave the response, expressing the pleasure of the class on becoming members of the Association.Following the reception, thealumnae escorted the new members to
the.
State-Dining
Room fortea. A spring motif was followedin the decoration scheme, while thetea table was arranged with afloral centerpiece. Mary jjKlann,president of the Erie chapter ofthe Alumnae Associat ion, and Margaret Anne Emling, past presidentof the Erie Chapter, poured duringthe tea. They were assisted by thefollowing* members of the Eriechapter: Anne Kingston, ElaineBrown Schuster, Ann Fornan, RoseMary Schitea, Katherine Barrett,Rita Lohse Kast, Katherine Connolly, and Helen Klan.
Juniors Fete
Seniors
Guests arrived from
far
and nearthe weekend of June fourth to bepresent at the first of the activitiesproper to Commencement, theJunior Prom.
'
This delightful"Serenade in Blue" was held Saturday evening from nine to one atRainbow
Gardens.?
Neil Charlesand his orchestra furnished themusic for the collegians and theirguests.At intermission the seniors received gold picture frames bearingthe Mercyhurst seal as
favors
of thedance
from
the Junior Class. These
frames
match the gold compactwhich the graduates received atthe Fiesta Party last week.The Juniors, under the generalchairmanship of Polly Slater, areresponsible for the success of theSerenade.
i
 
Page Two
THE
MERCIAD
May—June,
1949
THE MERCIAD
;»
Member of
ASSOCIATED COLLEGIATE
PRESSEditor
Alice MurphyAssociate Editor
-—,—..
Margaret
Bodenschatz
Assistant Editors
Polly Slater, Cecile JewellBusiness
Manager
Rose Marie
Ratajczyk
Writing
Staff
Miriam Gemperle, Margaret
Fusaro,
Nancy Whclan, Mary
E.
Stanny,Pat Walker, Jane Denney, Carolyn Cairns,Cynthia McMahon. Peggy
Jetter,
LucilleHeintz, Marie Heavey,
Mary
Harvey, Dorothy Maloney, Colleen McMahon, Laura-
jean
Bly, Catharine Munn, Alice Kuczka,Margaret McGuire.Business
Staff
Jean
O'Neil.
AntoinetteMarino, Elaine Forgette, Ann Kennedy,Mary Helen Kenny, Edith Harris, Mary A.
Witt.
1
m
Change
to
'Doctor'
D..
After Sunday, May 29, the familiar sound of "Mr.
D"
must changeto "Doctor D."
In
accord with a decision reached by the
faculty
of St.Vincent's College,-Latrobe, Pa., tohonor
IMercyhurst's
head of psy
chology ^and
philosophy
with
the
degree, Doctor of Letters
(Litt. D.)#
Both faculty
and
students
at
Mercyhurst rejoice
in
the distinction that has come to Mr.
Donatelli
in recognition
of
years devoted
to
eager search
for
truth
and the
equally energetic task
of
imparting
it to
Mercyhurst students andto the various civic groups underhis direction.
We
congratulatehim and wish him the full joy ofthe honor that has come to him.To change but
a
word of Chau
cer's
high praise
of
his Clerk, wemay say
of
"Dr»
D."
|ffi
"Gladly does he learn and gladlyteach."
W-
FAREWELL, MERCYHURST...
For us seniors the sun is
fading
from the splendor that isMercyhurst in the
spring/glt
is
fading
from the trees that line
JfOT
Yoiir
the boulevard, from the wide, green campus, the tennis courts,the
grotto|the|island;
it
is fading from the majestic, Gothic
Slimmer Reading
building. But
at
eventide, red, gold, and purple will glow inthe sky, and that
magnificent
sunset will be a promise to us,
a
promise of
a
bright day tomorrow when
a
new life begins
for
us elsewhere;
Yes,
the glowing hope that we carry
in
us
at
the end ofour college lifefhas been kindled by teachers who have aidedus to both
a
spiritual and anintellectual!growth.We havebeen taught how to live as well as how to make
a
living.Now, dear Alma Mater, the time has come to sayfarewell;goodbye to the restrictions, which we once thought unnecessary, but which we now know were our security; goodbye tothe warm companionship
of
living, working, and sharing together; goodby to the Holy
Sacrifice
of the Mass at the coming of each day, the Benediction at the close; goodbye to classparties and proms; goodby
to
all those things that make up
f
college
life—but
never goodbye to our search
for
truth!Now
is
the time to leave. For four years we have beencoming back, but now we shall go and never return as students to your shelter. We pray that we shall instead return asgood alumnae who have taken our place in society as responsible adults, using the "shield of
faith
and sword of the spirit"which was given to us in our years within your walls. Mercyhurst, thank you
for
your knowledge, and culture, and Faith.And so, farewell.
Thoughts
on
Self Improvement
Occasionally
it is
good
to
taketime out from our daily activitiesfor silent reflection.
It is
wise
to
have
a
heart-to-heart talk withourselves
about
our
part
in the
activities that occupy our time.Are
we
kind and just;
are we
considerate,
understanding,}
andcharitable
1
to the
people?we
meetdaily? Are
we
satisfied
wi'th
the
example we constantly set beforeothers?
Are our
actions guidedmore
by
reason than
by
feeling?It
is
only too simple
a
matter
to
live
an
entire lifetime withouttaking time out for such practicalmeditation.
I
In everyday life
we are
continually moved to action. Only toofrequently
we
respond unthinkingly to the first impulsive feeling.These impulsive
I
responses, likeother responses, contribute
to
andreveal our character.
I
Frequently neither ignorancenor deliberate malice is-responsible for the pettiness that creepsinto our daily actions. Feelings andimpulses which rule apart fromreason, and bad habits which gainfirm
holdlon
us
are determiningcauses
for
weakness
of
character.
i
After
intelligently reasoning anddrawing conclusions about the values in life, we can arrange to seekobjectives according
to
solidlygrounded resolutions; we will
try
to avoid impulsive action and' willtry
to
live according
to
soundly
established
principles..:As we make progressive headwaytoward
our new
goals,
our re-
sponses become more natural andfinally become second nature,
or
habit.
A
good habit,
to
turn,
is a
virtue which leads us more surelyto God.Good
habits
do not
make
us
mechanical
as
some would hold.They are simply regular, deliberateactions by which we put into practice
the
principles we have reasoned
out—with
the happy resultof increasing the
fruitfulness
of ourdaily
life.
Ifltheftime
we have spent
at
Mercyhurst
this!
year
has
benefited us at all, it should have madeus conscious^ of
our
equal needsfor work, rest,andlplay.Whether
we
f
are now leaving
to
return
as
students no more,
or
whether weplan
to
come back
in
the fall
to
"git more larnin", most
of
us are
first
bent on
a
long REST.Even resting becomes tiresome,but reading should
be an aid to
relaxing
and
spiritual uplifting,which "may"
be
what
we
needmost. Summer reading
is
oftenhampered by our summer location.Book stores are
not
just aroundthe next corner. Even the generouspublic library
has a
way
of de-
manding books returned, and onlytoo often, before
they 1
have beenread "'thoroughly/'This
year,
fregardless
of
wherewe go
or
how we intend
to
spendour vacation, there
isfa
convenient publication that seems idealin every way. For Rev. Joseph
B.
Frey
has
arranged
the
inspiredBOOKS OF PSALMS into
a
perfect prayer book
for
<he
laity.
It
does not include the common pray
ers,
as
we might imagine. Ratherit
is
divided into prayers for ma
tins,
for lauds, for prime, for terce,for sext, for none, for vespers, andfinally
for
compline. The book
is
published in the style of the easy-
to-foUow
Sunday Missal withwhich we are all familiar. Thus,
it
isfweU-printed,
yet inexpensive.This little gem,
Hhe
first
col
lected manual
of the
PSALTER,
is appropriate
for all
times,
all
circumstances, and all needs. Onlythe Missal
is of
greater dignity,but that too includes many
of
thePsalms. This book twill meet ourvarying moods and keep us united with the
&
rest
of the
Churchthrough
its
office.No recommendation
can be
given better than that of the Popewho said that
the
"Psalms holdup shining examples of sanctity before our eyes, nourish within
us
the
love I
of God,
and
increasesentiments
of
Christian' fortitudeand the spirit
of
true contrition."When we decide to read the bookthat will help
us
the most this summer,
and the
rest
of our
lives,THE PERFECT PRAYER BOOKshould top the list. We all try
to
save time and money. We can doboth these things
and
save
our
most precious soul
if
we buy this
economy sige
"investment"
WHEN TOMORROW COMES
REV. JAMES PETERSONWhen tomorrow steps
off
the bus, you will
be
gone. Mercyhurstwill wake up without you.
t
But the day will never come when you willwake up without Mercyhurst.
I
Four years have changed you.
You
r minds, for one thing, are different now. Your powers of thought have been developed in a way that willaffect your whole life. Of course, knowledge
is
not goodness.
.But
evilcannot touch you in the same way now. And mediocrity and sin will haveto cope with the knowing you.
,
You will be tempted to
rationalize—to
think that there are realitiestoo deep for thought, too deep for anything but feeling. That
is
an attack
to
get you
to
renounce your mind. You will be tempted to thinkthat no man can^ understand you, that the Church does not understandbecause she
is
old, she
is
stuffy, she
is
logical. That is
anothei
attackon your mind to get you to
follow
direct emotionality. You will be tempted
to
use your knowledge, your power
of
convincing for
a
dominatinggoal of wealth, security, comfort. That is
a
temptation to get you to useyour mind
merely
to help you be
a
good animal.
Nevei
will you be ableto yield
in
good faith. Now you know. And
in
compromise, what youhave learned will haunt you.But you have wills too. And they have
changed—God grant—with
adeepening love
and
unselfishness.
And
unselfish love
is
goodnessYou can lose that goodness unless you have responsibilities, and
thought-
fulness
of
others, and prayer, and the Sacraments, and Mass to keep
it
alive. But even
if
you lose
it
through carelessness, weakening faith, andredirected ambitions, Mercyhurst will be with you.
It
will be there as aweight. You can fall into greater callousness, greater resistance to in-spiration, to regeneration once you have had the vision and let it slide.But
it's
not going to rain. We have spent too much time getting umbrellas ready.You have been prepared, you can use the Mercyhurst that
is
withyou. Tomorrow your minds and wills are yours
to
know and to love.Tomorrow you will see the needs of the children of men and you will carefor them. Tomorrow you will be with God in prayer and you will loveHim.
In
your closeness to Him and
to
Mary, pray for those who camethrough the four years with you, and
for
those who
come—that
theirminds may be prepared well to know and to love.And the day after tomorrow, all
of
us will wake up
in
the sun andknow the God of Love.
Letter from
the
Editor
Dear Editor-Elect:This is not an ordinary
"Letter from
the editor."
It
is a note of congratulations together with best wishes that you may have
a
happy andsuccessful year as top name on the masthead. This letter also containsbest wishes to your assistants and to your entire
staff.
With such
a
finegroup, you can't help but be
a
success.After all the times you have helped with the layouts, dummies, andarticles, how can
I
offer you advice? You know by now what occupyingthe editor's chair demands
of
you. You know that the Merciad isn't all
work—it's
lots of fun and relaxation,
too.
J
I honestly envy you and your staff next year.
I
know there'll
be
times when you think the deadline just won't be met, but that feeling isnothing compared to seeing the
first
copy when
it
comes
from
the print
ers—it's
wonderful!
<
So again
I
say, best
of
luck
to
you
andlyour
staff next
year—I'm
depending on you for an excellent Merciad every issue.
$$1 £
Your retiring Editor
May
God
Keep
You All
Graduation coming fast, oh so fast;
S£j|
And your college life is past, in the past
KS
As
if
you did bequeath us loneliness,
IS?-=
There is an emptiness we can't
express,
f
When you leave, let it not be for aye;Pray return on some less glad-pathetic day.Here Christ, the King, awaits you on His AltarEach Mercyhurst girl, his faithful daughter.
So,
we say adieu,
adios,
and farewell
|
Good luck to you and may God keep you allThe shades of eve' now close on
Hurst's
towersAnd turn the page of many happy hours.
TRAGEDY HAS STRUCK
Tragedy has struck! Death, as spring naturally follows winter, hasfollowed life. And so, the girls on First Foor Residence wish to expresstheir deepest sympathy on the passing
of
"Mary Joy" on May 10. MaryJoy,
a
favorite among the girls, was
a
sleek, slim, golden blonde.
Her
main interest in life was swimming. She was, to use the term of the ex
perts,
a
"natural." Her death, though not recorded in the papers or onthe local broadcasts, greatly affected the
lifesof
each and every one ofher friends
at
Mercyhurst
The cause
of
her untimely call to the greatbeyond was at first undeterminable, but after
a
thorough investigation itwas announced that starvation was the medium used by the hand of Fate.After the traditional period
of
mourning, Mary Joy's close friends,attired in formal cap and gown, marched in solemn funeral procession andcarried her to the Grotto Bridge for
interment.
There, with all the honors accorded her, and because
of
her love
of
the water, Mary Joe wasgiven
a
naval burial, with the 21 gun salute.
\
Her former companions feel badly, to say the least, but they are consoled by the fact that Mary Joy was put to rest in the Grotto creek, hernatural habitat. |And she is completely happy in her particular heaven.
l-g
In
order
to
prevent any further tragedies, you
are
requested
to
always clean the goldfish bowls thoroughly and see that the golden ones
ape
fed
regularly
and
according
to directions,
 
June,
1949
THE
MERCIAD
Pago
Three
Impressive scene showing Solemn Benediction in Chapel on May Day.
npre'd'fl yyya
5"gV5"fl"<r(r<nra"(nnnnn>
05500000
flnprraTroxoTrB'o^'onroTroiroTr^^
oo
0 yinnroTd oinnnnry
MA DAYMM
.,>.„„
hf
f
'
».mnm»mMH»mH»»nnmm<J»Hm,mm»tr
"On this day, oh beautiful MotherOn this day, we give
thee
our Ive"
On this day which we chose tohonor Mary,
Queenfof
the May, intraditional pageant, our hallowedMary did choose to bring us into thepresence of her Son in the chapel ofChrist the King where we did payfitting homage. What was lost
in
magnitude, in cessation of dance andformal address, was gained in serene,sublime, solemnity.
|
*
Parents, ^relatives, and friends ofthe Seniors assembled in the chapelto
sitlini^udienee
with
our | HolyQueentand
Her Son, there to awaitthe! entrance of Miss Rita Gutman,our
august
May Queen, her attendants,the ladies of the court, and the
other?
members of the Senior class.The procession,
whichjjformed atfthe
community room, was led by theMisses Jean Tobin and Audrey Sitterthrough the foyer and into the chapel. They were followed by the lovelyladies of the court: Elaine Forgette,
Bette
Cairns^
f
Alice
J
Feehley, JeanBrigham Arlene Kurtz, Mary Ann
Plack,
Alice Murphy, JeanBrauch,Teresa Marshall, and
Maryf AnnDonaher.f
mk-
Rita jGutman,
Ipreceded
by MaryHarvey and Adelaide Nowak, her attendants,! and pages,
walked?slowlydown
the aisle and assumed her regalposition on
thefthrone
in justoposi-tion to the altar of the Blessed Virgin Mary. When|all the girls had
readied
their places, they knelt together while
MarygHarvey
crownedRita Gutman, Queen of the May.
HEg
Reverend James Peterson deliver
ed!
an exceedingly I
impressive
sermon
whereinjhe
expressed the ideathat Mary has a way about her ofwanting to share her honor with herDivine Son.
| •_£ ||
J||§
IAt
this time the Queen and her attendants
-A
arose, genuflected
$
at
i
thealtar, and
;,approached-
Ou| Lady'sShrine where Rita crowned:Mary,the loveliest Queen of May,
i
with
a
garland of gardenias. The ten ladiesof the Court then followed theirQueen and placed their fans of flowers at the feet ofM^^f>.
;
-'
?
:
;
^-
:
v.-v
:
To close
this
impressive
pageant.
Reverend James Peterson, Reverend Gordon Gutman, and Rev.
J.
Lorei
celebrated Benediction of theMost Blessed Sacrament.
V ^
Rita Gutman places crown upon Mary, Queen of Heaven.
^
&
~
s
Mar,
"Harv^ p.aces
crown on
M.ss
Ktta
Gutman
wM.e M«ss Aae.a,de
No
W
a* h-U*
the
fans
of flowers*
i

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