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The Merciad, Nov. 14, 1950

The Merciad, Nov. 14, 1950

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The Merciad, Nov. 14, 1950
The Merciad, Nov. 14, 1950

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Attend
theNFCCS Councilmeeting onDecember 2
7^
MERCIAD
Volume XXII, No. 2
MERCYHURST
COLLEGE, ERIE,
PA.
Vying for Queen .
.
CI
Elect
of
tin
NFCCS Harvest Moon Ball are these four lovely candidates elected by their classmates. Front row: Kathleen McDermott and MaryO'Donnell; back row: Mary Ann
Benetin
and Mary Jetn Holahan.
I*
New EducationalCourse Offered
In
answer to
requests
made|by
members of the senior class, Dr.M. J,
Relfhan
is offering a
course
in elementary education to senioreducation students. The
|
coursewill consist in elementary teaching
|
techniques plus a period ofobservation in elementary schools.
jTheffaculty
and administration!of
Mercyhurst Oollegejfeel
that,
since the current demand is forelementary teachers, it is wise togive the senior students in education a basic courseiin elementarywork which will acquaint themwith;such procedure and enablethem to gain an emergency certificate in elementary education.
College DesignsPersonal Card
Under
%he
supervision of theArt Department, Mercyhurst thisyear will have its own officialChristmas card. The productionof this exclusively "Mercyhurst"card was made possible through
|the
assistance of Mr. Paul Trout,an Erie engraver, who made thecolored plate for the card.
On
the outside cover of a Frenchfolder will be an etching of theentrance -gates; inside will appeara scriptural verse and a full colorreproduction of the mural, "TheJoyful Mysteries," painted by JeanBrteham, graduate of '40. Thiscard
will
be sold at cost price toall Mercyhurst students andfrjends,OFFICIALThanksgiving vacation willbegin
after
the
turning
cias&es,Wednesday, November 22, andwill end Sunday evening, November 26. Classes
will
resumeMonday
morn n
o*
Candidates forNFCCS Queen
'
Class
candidates *
for the queen
;
of the Harvest Moon Ball to beheld November 18. in the GannonCollege Commons Room where recently announced. The seniors'choice is Mary Jean Holahan ofWarsaw, New York, while thejuniors
i
have elected Mary AnnBenetin, a Greenville, Pennsylvania lass. The sophomores' selection is Kathleen McDermott ofCamden, New Jersey, and thefreshmen hopes lie in Mary Catherine O'Donnell? from Rochester,New York. A fund raising contestis under way to determine thewinner. The class contributingthe most to the "milk bottle" fundfor the National Federation
fof
Catholic College Students will win
for i ts
candidate the
\
title J of"Queen of the Ball."
^aSK^^j
Orchestra chairman, Jean Sla-vin, has engaged
MattfPommer
to
furnish
the music. The decoration committee headed by ColleenMcMahon has begun work
on
fitsplans. A fall theme will be carriedout in decoration resplendent withthe reds, golds and
bronze I
ofautumn foliage and the deep yellow of the harvest moon. Thecenter of attraction will be thebeautifully decorated throne onwhich the queen will be crownedduring intermission.
iTickote
may
Jje
purchased incollege hall from the members ofthe ticket committee. Corsages offall flowers will be sold at thedoor
byfRosemary Lahr
and theflowercommittee.
^^^^^
;
|^fe#
Seniors
iReceive
Wh
OS
Wh
o
war
O
Girls from five major fields of
study
were chosen to representMercyhurst College in the 1951edition of "Who's Who AmongStudents in American Collegesand Universities." Rosemary
Irr-
_ang and Nancy
Plack
are homeeconomics students;
Kathryn
Sterret is from the math department; while Mary Forche is anactive member of the science division. Another Bachelor
jsof
Science Major from the commercial education department is AnnDeckop. Peggy Jetter, of the English department, brings the totalto six
faculty-chosen
students, selected for
\
their
influence
andleadership in college activities andfor their potential contribution tosociety. |
|
For the past three years Rosemary
Irrganglhas
had an officer'sseat during Sodality meetings; upthe ladder from treasurer, to vice-prefect, and this
|year
prefect.Rosie,
at
prospective teacher, waselected as Presidents of KappaOmicron Phi after experience asvice-president of the Home Economics Club last year.
|
|Kathryn Sterrett, who is President of Student Council, had twoyears previous experience in representing the student body. Versatility is one of Kay's characteristics; fake,
tor
instance, her summer activity directing the KiwanisCamp and her
potential
ability toteach five subjects. William Pennhad Pennsylvania and Kay Sterrett has Sterrettania.
%^&f$ -M
pPeggy I
 Jetter
lis
editor of the"Merciad" and was a delegate tothe NFCCS conference last year.Peggy is influential in both thestudent council and the studentboard of discipline. As a memberof the
Glee
Club, Peggy
heldfthe
office of president last year.
|
Science
Seminar!
students
allknow
Mary J
Forche
fort
she hasheld an office for two consecutiveyears; she is now president. Mary,as editor
ofjjthe
yearbook is getting the "Praeterita" ready forthepress,
 
Falls
Creek,
I
Pa.
1
isMary's hometown.
111
Nancy Plack is president of theHome Economics Club and wasvice-president of the Kappa Omicron Phi. Nancy is on the advertising staff of the "Praeterita."From near-by McKean, Nancycommutes to Mercyhurst each day.As much at home
in|her
roleas president of the senior class ason the ice
pondlis
Ann Deckop.Ann hopes to be in an executivedepartment of radio or television.During her four years at Mercyhurst, Ann has held two offices inO. G. A. and has been secretaryof
§tuflent
council,
November 14, 1950
Greet your Mends
with Mercyhurst's
Christmascard
:
NFCCS Council MeetingTo Come
to
Mercyhurst
S
Mercyhurst College
will
be hostess to the delegates fromthe Lake Erie region of the
NFOGS
at the second regionalcouncil meeting,
December
2. Sally Carlow, senior delegate,
and
Mary Jo Royer, junior delegate, will officially representMercyhurst on the council board. However, all students areurged to attend the meeting
in
order to observe an
NFCCS
group in action.
j
c
'
'i
Sally Carlow, as regional chairman of the I.
R.
C. commission, willreport on
the-proposed
activities for that {commission. MercyhurstCollege holds the regional commission on I. R. C which means thatthe Mercyhurst I. R. C. group guides the activities of the I, R.C. clubsin the ten member colleges of the region.Regional representatives will include Mary Bush, Nazareth College, regional president; John
CI a v
in, St.
Bona
venture University, and
I
Rita' Mangus,
D'Youville
College,
Author to Discuss
I
Modern Paganism
3
Rosalind
%
Murray,
fl
celebratedEnglish author and
lecturer,!will
appear on the Mercyhurst LectureProgram; Monday evening,
jj
November
20,fat
8:15
\
p.
m. In hertalk, Miss Murray
wUl
discuss theproblem off the division betweenthe
Christianl
and Pagan pointsof view in relation to every aspectof
modern
life.IThe| keynote ofher theme may best be expressedby the term "good pagan", thatfamiliar
typejwhich is j
possessedof many virtues but which urgently needs Christian truth.
\
Miss Murray's literary gifts matured early for she published
£er
first
novel'before
she was eighteen. Since her reception into theChurch in 1932, her writings havebeen
of
an apologetic character,
consisting
of such books as "TheGood Pagan's Failure," "Time andTimeless" and "The ForsakenFountain." In these books she setsforth her
thesis
that the obstacleto the conversion of the modernintelligensia to the Faith is notso much intellectual as moral.
£ut
Miss Murray does not confine
heir
interests to specificallyreligious issues. She is a close observer of the rapidly changingculture in rostwar Britain andhas traveled extensively in Europe
including
Turkey and the Balkans, and has recently been inclose touch with the contemporaryGerman affairs.Miss Murray is making her
first
tour of the States and MercyhurstCollege is fortunate to have her asthe third speaker on its Concertand Lecture Series.
;
regional vice-presidents; JohnCooney, Gannon College, regionaltreasurer; Charles Starrs, NiagaraUniversity, international vice-president and
co-chairman
of
thisyear's travel
^-program, plus delegates from the other colleges ofthe region, Villa Marie, Le Moyne,Canisius, and Rosary Hill.
«Bon
Friday evening the regional
officersI
and
junior
and seniordelegates will draw up the agenda
for
Saturday's meeting which willconsist in the discussion of pertin-ent regional business and commission reports. Definite
-plans
willalso be formulated for the regionalcongress! which
iwill
be held?, atNazareth College later this
year.;
1
Recruits J
Sodality'Kanks
A campaign of recruitment hasbeen going on
4n
Room 9 for thepast five weeks. It has no connection with the Waves or Spars,but it is a campaign which hasfor its joiners a type of
mUitary
service.
/- ^\'
:,
M"'^1^^S.
* 1
Mercyhurst prides
herself!
inbeing able to have
a
hundred percent enrollment of her studentsin the Sodality.
Tliis
year, as before, Mercyhurst is having her induction day for new members onDecember 8, the feast of the Immaculate Conception.
|
Fourteennew members will ascend to thealtar on this day to be receivedinto the Mercyhurst Sodality:Roseann Audio, Jean Drouhard,Jean Broscoe, DonnaByers,Becky
Ganther,
Virginia
Kelly, CatherineKibe,
Marsha
Medina, Ann Mohr,Pauline Solida, Jo Tavalario. Jane
Zuercher,
Sophia Mazionyte, and
Viia
Odieiko.
~£&m
flack,
Pe^gy
Jetter.
^^m
|p
fa.
 
Pag*
Two
THE
MERCIAD
Yo
f
My
November
14,
1950
I
Downy flakes of snow tumble down, obliterating the
sprawling grayihome nestledfin
the crease of the New England mountain. A golden glow peeps out from the
broad'
trout
wind
ow
mingled with the laughing sound of happyvoices
Quiet
now, everyone* while Grandpa says grace." A
stately figure
with bushy
grayfhair
and eyebrows rises slowly from
his
place at the head of the long table, but with theentrance of bustling, rosy-cheeked Grandma carrying asteaming, golden-brown turkey, his words are lost in a babble of
oh's
and
all's.
The sombre rays off the setting sun cut through theharsh coldness of the Korean battlefront to outline the stilled figure of a man. His face lies hidden in the mud. whilefrom his right hand dangles
a^rifle,
readied for action. Agentle tap from his companion rouseshimjinstantaneously,and the two huddle
togetherfagainst
the wind to share theirlast package of K-rat ions. | |
I
These two scenes are not so far
distant^geographically
from one another in this modern age of mechanism,, butwhat a world of difference in the
manner
of
celebrating
Thanksgiving Day!
When|the
Pilgrim Fathers ate the firstThanksgiving dinner with their red neighbors,;; they meantit to be a day
of—just
what its name
implies—prayer
andthanks-giving. To make Thanksgiving 1950 truly symbolicof the spirit of|its originators, it is necessary that all Americans realize its significance. They should apply that meaning
to
themselves by giving thanks that their own countryis still a free
one,|by
praying for a rapid end to all war inorder that their fathers and husbands and sons may be|ableto enjoy next Thanksgiving in a free America, and by asking God for such personal sanctity as to insure that freedom.Before cutting into thatfturkey, let each of us step into thelittle red church around the corner to begin our day in theright
way—by
giving thanks to Almighty God.
Have You Grown Up?
How old are Mercyhurst students? Chronologically theanswer to that would be
thatftheyfare
between the ages ofeighteen and twenty-one. But are they? Are we old enough torealize that in order to gain something, we must also bewilling to give something?I The
issuefof
unlimited lights has long been a subjectof discussion among faculty
membersfand students
alike.By unlimited lights, we mean the free use of
lights
in our
own
rcv>rr,<! for purposes
of^studyiwithout
the supervision offaculty or
student
proctors. The question has been and continues to be asked: "Are Mercyhurst students mature enoughto realize the advantages to
beigained,
if they are grantedthis privilege, and the disadvantages
forthcoming
from animmoderate use of it?"I
\
The advantages of such a system are obvious. Sometimes students need
lateflights
to complete assignments, tostudy, or just to read something they otherwise cannot seemto find time to read. When late lights are necessary,
this'
would relieve the faculty and student proctors
offthe
jobof
"Watch
Men."
|
\ 7
%
§The disadvantages are also evident. There is nothingquite so distracting to a teacher as a class which is too tiredduring the period to contribute anything but an occasionalyawn. Will the
students!realize howjmuchjsleep
they needto be alert in class, and make sure they get it?
^
The question of whether the advantages of such a system outweigh the disadvantages is up to you as students.What do you think? How old are Mercyhurst students?
Mercyhurst Answers
the
Question
After the appearance of the editorial Mercyhurst Is Dead in theOctober
18
issue of the
Merciad,
it seemed
I
almost imperative forMercyhurst students to answerthat bit of philosophy with
a
littleof their own.Mary Lou Dwyer, Joan McCor-
mack,
and Jo
Tavolario | are
:,
inagreement with the editorial. Theyfeel that the students have theability
.to
display that spirit if onlythey would develop their interest.They feel that if the students don'tlike the regulations, they shouldgo
tofthe
right sources to havethem modified.
I
Mary Jo
Royer
and Marge Suetahave
1
similar opinions. | Margethinks that there are plenty!
of
social and
sports g
activities, if thegirls would only participate inthem. Mary Jo says that the girlsdon't have enough school spirit.Mary Anne Hayes, Donna Byers,Julie Tech, MarilynGarden,MaryAnn Callahan, and Laurie
Blythink
just the opposite of the editorial. They feel that everyonehas good school
spirit!
and showthat they have it by participatingin the many and varied clubs andactivities. Mary Anne says thatyou cannot expect the same schoolspirit that you
find
in high schoolstudents. However, she feels thatthe girls as individuals have interests in allfields.Marilyn thinksthat the girls here are more activeand spirited than those in largerschools. Julie thinks that there arenot enough social activities."The general feeling of the students is one
*of
loyalty to theschool," states Donna, "whichdoes! a lot in promoting schoolspirit."Laurie puts it this way, "No,Mercyhurst is not dead,
but I
welack
aflot of
the qualities thatclasses before us
'have
had. Wedon't put our hearts into the truetraditions of Mercyhurst,"
y
ea
t
CULTURE0
I
N£R
(JSooks
How many times have you madethe remark, "This afternoon I wasthinking . . ." and then had someone interrupt before you could goon,
"Nol You?don't
mean to tellme you were thinking!" It may bea joke, but stop a moment to con
sider.!
Do we really do much
thinking?
Sometimes we have atendency to accept very passivelyWhat
is
told us in class.What is all this leading up to?
it
is not a lecture or a sermon, b3-
lieve
me. This is an invitation tothinking; it is an invitation tojoin the Great Books Club here atMercyhurst.Attend the next meeting and seefor yourself how interesting andlively the discussions are. Discoverfor yourself how it feels to be considering the same -problems thatlearned men have been ponderingdown through the ages. Humannature (has not changed sincePlato's time. How different is yourphilosophy from his?The readings and discussionswill give you a background andtraining which will
be^very
helpful to
you{when|you
have to defend your philosophy after youleave Mercyhurst. More than this,however, they will make your liferight now richer and more in-preciation of the value of thisClub by reading an article aboutit. You will have to take part inits meetings and learn for your
self,
t
£f|
if
^
As always with anything worthwhile, there is work connectedwith Great Books. But the hoursspent in reading the ever-popularclassics
arefreally
hours spent ina profitable and pleasant manner.The Great Books
Club
meetshere at Mercyhurst twice a month.The time of the meeting is from7:30 to
9:30;
the place, the lounge.For more particulars about thematerial which will be read oranything else you would like toknow, follow the directions of theposters you have seen aroundschool and "See Dr. D." Then talkto some of the girls who attendedthe meetings last year, and maybe you will
be
one of those attending this year.THE MERCIAD
Mercyhurst.
College, Erie, Pa.Member of Associated Collegiate Press
a
Editor Peggy JetterAssociate Editor Pat MoranAssistant
Editors
BarbaraHempel, Frances SullivanBusiness
Manager
EdithHarris f
*
Writing Staff Laura JeanBly,
f
Colleen McMahon,Margaret McGuire, MaryJo Royer, Ceci Wert, Florence Cherry, Norma JeanSoott, Margaret Broderick,Doris Moore.Business Staff Mary Adelaide Witt, Rosemary Lahr,Dolores Wally, Corrine
Prenatt.l
Dorothy Roth,Claire Todd, Lucreta Pavlov,
Fe
aChallenges Hope
in
,iS.
r
before
,
in
.
ol,r h,8tor
y have
Americans organized
"...iif^iTf
th
.
eir own fate
"'
Thus wrote
columnSGeorge Sokolsky
after attending a meeting of the
Board of
n(
SY
,f
Washington, D.
C,
and listening to a calm
fusim«ss-hke
discussion of preparations for the day of
doom
But we can do more than sit around
in
meetings
dis-
'•uss.ng the
end.
I
say
we
have
hope! And I
mean i i
v'v
e
beengiven
so much
downright,
cast-bound, secure hope-toask for any more is insulting.
p lo
Btut l
he
fulfillment^
the promise of hope—ocae*
ifsoiris
not gotten without a big price And
lUt™ t«
fw
?
'price
isn't
dollars! The
price iffi
Wood!
ftL"
rte M?and
sacrifice." And no matter how
mud.moneyami
blood
wc give neither
will make the least
dent
in he
paving
II
Pncc-because
t
hat isn't what has been asked
Cf5h\?
h
T ,
much
money has been spent since
19R Thinkn
fcl un
h
bl
,
00d iaLs
gone
down the drain ....
and is stX1
lowing. What has it bought?
SIU1
Why didn't money and blood buy peace? Thev
alwavs
have
,
n
the past (Haven't they?, I'll tell you
whf because
God
is
fed up Remember Him, God? We're
going
to haveo
remember Him
because "the
caseation
of the
Uriel
forts many transgressions is at hand."
that's
why there hasbeen no peace. Because the
world,
including Catholics! has
transgressed
and offended God pretty seriously.
Thereforeuntil
we make
up with
God and pay the price due ESS
we
re going to
have our
wars, our atom bomb, and
Wre
going to
be^stuek with
our money and blood.Hope For Peace.
Our hope
for peace is completely simple—penance, con-flH
ol
prayer and sacrifice. And penance by whom? 'The
BBK5!
i
s
.
the
Fai
thful
we who go to church on Sun-clay, that God
is
angry at. Our
Most
Blessed Mother Mary
said,
and
I quote, "I have come to warn the
FaiI
h/ril
toamend
their
lives and ask pardon for their sins. They
mustnot continue]to
offend Our Lord, already so deeply offended. They must say the Rosary."
e*
i
s|
'Taint funny
McGee-is
it? Taint funny that we won't
^!lh
r?.
rt
hT
rely medi
?
cre
'Jives. Taint funny
that
notenough
Catholics
are saying the Rosary. Taint funny that
we area
t the best
Catholics
ever." Nor is Korea funny, nor
Poland,
nor Mindzenty. Nor is God laughing.As the shadow of fear creeps over this beloved land of
oura
as men read
"How»to Survivean
Atomic Bomb."
a&^nErie
grammer school boys says, "We had
ah
Atomic Bombdrill today, we Catholics are more
literally*"the
hope ofthe world" than ever before in history. "A fight for peace?"We have to fight only ourselves. We have that on the authority of God. So
I|askfyoiU|,
in God's*name, are we doing
this?
I ask you, where is the campaign that Ave should bewaging, every one of us; the untiring, unceasing, constant,battering, desperate campaign for the price of our homes,our
country—before
it is too late to pay it?If We Refusel. . .If we refuse
Godfthis
thing He has asked —Confession,Mass and Communion, the
rosary.ffifteen-minute
adorationon the first Saturday of every
month—we v
ill lose all toRussia. We will lose freedom; we
will
lose our churches, ourhomes, many dear lives, and worse, many souls.
2
Why do we have a few voices er\ ing this message continually in
tho
wilderness of lectures? Why is
"The
FirstSaturday" considered a devotion instead of a solemn dutyof reparation for ourselves, and
for!the
world that is notcapable of this act? This is the Price of Peace! What are wethat we won't pay it? Do we possess the audacity, or theloathsome inertia to throw this magnificent hope back into
thefface
of God?
4
We have boundless
hope—even
the promise of finalspiritual victory over Russia, and Peace. Must we
seepour
homes burn before we recognize the will of God? Somedaywe will make reparation, but will it be by the sword, or bysimple compliance with
Gods
plea now? If you
want]the
sword, you'll get
itnn
full measure ("How To Survive AnAtomic Bomb")- Oh, please, let us take the hope Mary givesto us. And let us trust in God for once, instead of in GeneralEisenhower. Let us lift the shadow
of
fear
overjourselves
and over the
world—because
there is no need for it. We haveHope -
^cast-bound,
secure from the hand of Our MotherMary.
I
MercyhurstPerhaps we at
Mercyhurstjthink
this doesn't apply to
us.
All I can say
is>
I have a hard time making reparationaway from the school's influence. Last time at home,
1
didn tmake the fifteen-minutes meditation in company with Mary.Most of my parish has not made reparation. How aboutyon rs?If there is no reproach
to]us
in
making preparation
what about our giving hope to others? If we knew what we
were
doing, would we be inert in this? Or should we
be
onfire to convert Russia soon when we read the
headlinesf
 
November
14 1950
er A
on a
orirui
ltd
»aAec4M
^The time is
y:3U
p.
m.
Floor phones
and
both phones
are
^practically
ringing
off the
walls,
and
that unseen person
is
fpaging
Miss
So-and
So for
afphone
call from
Mr.
So-and
So,
|who usually
waitsjso
patiently,, knowing that
it's
quite
a
pong trek from
the
Lounge.
And
when
the
switchboardoperator finally hears that ever-familiar, "Hello-o-o!
How
are you?",
she
hangs
up her
receiver;
but
don't think
itfisn't
a temptation
to
hear what
is
going
on!
Here
in the
Information Office
are
four
of
our
operatorsperforming
the
general routine.Seated
at the
desk studying
for
tomorrow's classes
is
Margaret McGuire*
a
senior from Rochester,
New
York.Studying,
by the
way,
can be
done between phone calls.
Mac
is
a
sociology major
and
psychology minor,
and
afmember
of
the
Sociology Seminar. International relations andldra-
matics are f
favorites
withSher,
for she is
secretary
of
IRC
and vice-president
of
Janus Club. Copies
of the
Merciad contain many
of
Mac's contributions!
m
^
mmmmmmmmmmm
^
mmmtm
^
mmmmmmmmm
^^
m
tofthe
writing
staff.
And!speaking
of contributions,
we|
can't overlook Mac's stuffed monkey,
Joe,
who amuses
the
girls
on
thirdfloor residence.Another member
of the
"Mercy-hurst Menagerie"
is
Herbie, Peggy
Schuienberg's
stuffed elephant.
In
the picture
we see
Peggy, whosehome
is in
Dunkirk,
New J
York,operating
the
switchboard.
A
business major
and
sociologyminor, this sophomore spendsmuch
of her
time
in the
typingroom
and in the
library doing
the
many 'outside" assignments
for
Introductory-Sociology.
Peggy
is
an active member
of the
SociologySeminar
and^OGA,
and her
finealto voice contributes
to the
harmony
of our
Glee Club.
MercyhurstOn
T. V...
Mercyhurst Glee Club
and the
Meicyhursi
Dramaticcently presented
| two
re*
television
Sewing WhizReading
up on the
fundamentalsof
a
pleasing
telephone voice
is
Mary Jane
Seman
of
Mt. Lebanon,Pa.
A
home economics student,Mary Jane
has a
variety
of in
terests, sewing
"being
her
veryfavorite. This
we can
easily tellfrom
all the
beautiful clothesMary Jane
has
made. Vice-president
of the
Home Economics Club,a member
of
Janus Club,KO,
and
AA,
and
a
soprano
in the
GleeClub, Mary Jane
is
a
versatile
and
active member
of the
junior class.
I
Rita Shanahan,
who is
picturedon
her way to
page someone overthe
P. A.
system,
is a
newcomerat
the
switchboard this
year;
however
she had
experience along thisline
at the
Shredded Wheat Plantduring
the
summer
in her
hometown, Niagara Palls,
New
York.Another sophomore business student, Rita
is a
member
of OGA,
Glee Club, Sociology Seminar,
and
is
a
pledge
for AA.
Rita's hobbyis collecting china cups, saucers,and plates.programs over station WICU.
H
As their contribution
J
toltheCommunity Chest Drive
the
GleeClub appeared
on the
program,"Musical MardiGras,"October
25.
Before introducing
the
Glee Club
Dickf
Johnson,
the
show's
M. C,
presented
Mr.
Edward!
Lamb,owner
of
station WICU.
Mr.
Lambpraised Mercyhurst College
for its
many civic-minded
I contributions
to various drives
in|the
past
and
expressed
his
thanks
for
their present work.
The
Glee
Clubfunder
the direction
of Mrs.
Dolce opened
the
program with "Salutation"by Goenes. Bernadette
I
Metznersang
two
selections,!
"if
Hear
a
Lark^at
Dawning"
by
Krienz
and
"Slumber Boat"
by
Gaynor.
The
program
was
closed with
the
singing
of "Go Not Far
From
Me,
O
Godl"
1
|||||f |||f •
The Janus Club made
its
firsttelevision appearance
at 11 p. m.,
November
l,
when
it
presented"The Purple Doorknob,"
a one act
comedy
by
Walter Richard Eaton.Aline
Karlak,
Mary
Jo
Royer,
and
Louise Hufstader took part
in
thisproduction
which fwas
under
the
direction
of
Miss Helen
Kelly,
m
THE MERCIAD
Pago
Three
HOME
OF
jMercyhurst
Girls
THE 'HURST
"Just look
at the
bargain
we
found today!" exclaimed RosieIrrgang,
the
assistant cook
at the
Practice House.
And
what
did she
display
but a
turnip which
had
been purchased
for
thefsum
totalof three cents.
Its
fate
was to be
part
of a
stew.While Veronica
Nakich,
the
cook,
and
Rosie
put
away
the
day's purchases,
the
expenditureswere carefully
|
noted
by
JeanSlavin,
the
^hostess. Even threecents
for a
turnip
is not
forgotten, because
the
budget
has to
balance
at the end of the
week.!
Maybe you're wondering justwhat
the
practice House
is and
what
the
girls
do.
According
to
the catalog
the
purpose
is "the
study
l
and
|
application
lof
\
the
scientific basis
of
household
or
ganization
fandl
management!
in
home
j
and!
teaching Isltuations."In other words,
the
five girls,
the
baby,
land J
Miss Reilly,
as the
guiding! hand, live
and
work
to
gether
as a
family group
for six
weeks,weeklychancej
Who
in
the
The!duties
are
changedso that
each
;
girl
has a
to work
in
every capacity.When Baby Criesf§rafiB|
getsfupjif
the
baby criesTheandfor-Themiddle lof
the
night?motherdoes.
|
Who bathesdresses
the
baby, makes
the
mula,
and
feeds
the
baby?mother
and her
assistant,
who is
also
the
housekeeper,
are
responsible
for all
care
of the
baby
Sandthe nursery.
Now all
along you'vebeen wondering
about ithe
baby.Jeannie,
J"with
the
light]brown
eyes," four months
old on
November
8,1
arrived
if rom
1st.
Joseph'son
Tuesday,
October
31.
and*
wasmet
by
Nancy
Plack,
the
mother,
and!Eileen
Yuen,
the
[assistantmother
and
housekeeper.
A
littletired
|
from
all
i
thei
excitement,Jeannie
was put to bed in her own
room,
y
and
^everyone^ tip-toed
aroun
d
so
th
ey
; wo
uldn'
t
f
disturb
her.
 fe^
:
.v.
!
'
 ^W^-'^^
H
The
cook
and her
assistant
don
chef Mats
and
reign
in the
kitchen,where they prepare breakfast
and
dinner
for the
rest
of
line
familygroup.
But
someone
has to
planthe menus,
f
set the
table,
\
serve,and arrange
for
guests
and
parties. That
is the
work
of the
hostess.
She
does
the
marketing
and
the bookwork,
and
makes sure thateveryone
I
gets fphe | daily
i
BasicSeven.j^^H^SSf^^^^^^^P^^The House I itself
is
built
in j
themodern ranch style
oft
everythingon one 1
floor.
The
J
furniture
J ismaple,
and all the
appliances
are
up-to-date.
In the
little room
ofl
the kitchen
is a
Laundromat
and
the I telephone. Everything
has a
place,!
and it's
there,
too;
fcozy
and inviting
it is.
fflMBw^fei
U
These
I
are six!
weeks!that
the
girls,
and
Jeannie
too,!won
1 forget. Come
out and
visit
the
Houseof
the
'Hurst',
and you
won't forget
the
darling fsmile
with whichJeannie will welcome
you.
IH^i
DON'T
BE
SHY.. I IS AY
HI
The week
of
November
5
startedoff with
a
'Hi,"
| as
freshmeninitiative presented
to the
upper-classmen
the
idea
of
alfriendship
project.
:
k
Wearing white
cards!bedecked
with ribbons
and one of the
following verses, freshmen kept
to
the cheerful theme which carriedthe implication "Hail! fellow well
met."
I
I
i?
Don't
be
a shmoe—say
hello!
Don'tfbe
meek-
Don't
be
shy—say
please,! speak!
"hi"!
H
As
a
pleasant result
of all
those*"Hi's",
the
student body receivedan invitation from
the
sophomoresto attend
a
Bonfire Party Saturday evening.
Not to be
outdone,the juniors organized
a
SurpriseNight
for the
evening
of
November
8 and
thelseniors
planned
a
Freshmen-Senior Supper
on
t^ne
third floor Thursday evening.
Are
Talking About
MERCYHURST GIRLS
ARE
TALKING ABOUT
... the
HARVESTMOON BALL
.?.
.
warm autumn shades that will decorate
the
Com-i
mons
Room
. .
.Matt Pommer's
smooth combo which will provide
the
swing
and
sway
... and
last
but not the
least
the
lovely candidates
for
the title
of
Harvest Moon Queen. Mary Jean Holahan
. . .
Mary
Ann^
Benetin
. . . Kay
McDermott /.
. and
Mickey O'Donnell.
$
MERCYHURST GIRLS
ARE
TALKING ABOUT
. .
.*tne
death
of
King
Gustav
V of
Sweden,
the
world's oldest monarch
. . . the
passingof
one of the
world's most
beloved!
entertainers,
Al
Jolson
. . the
anniversary
of
Mary Kelly's fatal accident.
MERCYH
URST GIRLS
ARE
TALKING ABOUT
. .
jthe
new
volleyball teams
... the
intramural play competition sponsored
by the
JanusClub which
wUl
feature Big-Little Sister casts
. . .
varied commentsheard here
and
there
on
last month's editorial
... Is
Mercyhurst stilldead???MERCYHURST GIRLS
ARE
TALKING ABOUT
... the fun
fined
St.
Bonaventure-Niagara
weekend enjoyed
by
Mary
Joy
Fallon,
Pat
Moran, Betsy Peters, Janet
Sabella,
Mary
Jo
Royer, Helen
Eisert,
MaryJane Seaman, Claire Todd, Barbara Tonry, Florence Cherry
and Kay
McDermott
... the
thrilling account Which Mickey O'Donnell
and
Joan Mccormick
give
of the
Navy-Notre Dame football game.MERCYHURST GIRLS
ARE
TALKING ABOUT
. . .
Vice PresidentBarkley's memorable speech
at
Gannon
. . . the
coming Erie city elections
. . .
Philharmonic concerts which
the
music students have beenprivileged
to
hear
. . . the
wonderful performance
of
Brigadoon
. . . our
T. V. stars
. . .
Eileen Joyce who
was
Queen
of the
Dahlias
. . . Al
Karlak, Mary
Jo
Royer,
and
Louise Hufsteader
who
presented
The
PurpleDoorknob."
f^E^B^SlHH^^B^RB^^^R
*I
MERCYHURST GIRLS
ARE
TALKING ABOUT
... the
home-ecers*exodus
to the
practice house
... the new
baby carriage
for
Jeannie
. . .
the knitting-bug which
has
attacked
so
many
... for
advanced instructions consult Dottie Klein
. . . the
Adolescent Psych' Class's advice
to
Dr. Dee: Read on!
... the new
course
in
Elementary Education whichwill turn
the
seniors' interest from
pep
rallies
to
rhythm
bands J
MERCYHURST GIRLS
ARE
TALKING ABOUT
... the
intenseKorean situation
. . . the
invasion
of the
Chinese Reds into Tibet
. . .
the overseas
P.
O.addresses
. . . the
anniversary
of the
United NationsAssembly which
was
marked with
a
prayer
for
peace
.§. .
theSlforty
Hours Devotion which
was
marked
by its
impressive opening
and
closing processions
... the
swing toward
the
intellectual life with
the
opening
of the
Great Books discussions.
WuESasBBESBmm
ill
•»
v .%.
-y.\
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v.*.%* v.\v\
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Jlermie's
"fyn"
University
of
NebraskaLincoln, Nebraska
o*~~~
fOOO
Vi
r-*»
rf
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vv
inii=ovL
HC£*
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TRADE-MARK
®
TRADE-MARK
®
\ I
In Lincoln, Nebraska,*
a
favoritegathering spot
of/students
A
the
University
of
Nebraska
is
Hermie's"Inn" because
it is a
cheerful
place
•full
of
friendly university atmosphere.
And
when
the
gang gathersaround, ice-cold Coca-Cola gets
the
call.
For
here,
as in
universityhaunts
everywhere—Coke
belongs.
*
Plus 1*
S
Ask
for
it
either way.
..
both
1
trade-marks mean the same
thing.
State Tax
$£l ___ _
«„„__-,
9mSBiaf
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BOTUED
UNDER AUTHORITY
OP
THE COCA-COLA COMPANY BY
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ERIE
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