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The Merciad, Feb. 14, 1951

The Merciad, Feb. 14, 1951

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The Merciad, Feb. 14, 1951
The Merciad, Feb. 14, 1951

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Participate in thestudent assembly to-day
MERCIAD
Participate in thestudent assembly to-dayVolume
XX11,
No. 4
MERCYHURST
COLLEGE, ERIE, PA
High
HonorSI
{Assembly
Today
II
Janus^Sponsors
Awarded fo
February 14,
1951
Erie Students
Erie girls
are inlthe
lead on theDean's List just posted for thefirst
semester.!;Out
of the seventeen girls who had an average of90 or more in all their courses, tenof the group are day-hops. Allclasses have a
fair
representationon the List with the exception ofthe freshmen, who are still orientating themselves to college
Ufe.
Seniors listed for recognition areNancy Hamilton and KatherineSterrett of Erie, Colleen MoMa-hon of Pelham, N. Y., and Aileen
Yuen
of China.The Juniors too have an evennumber of day-hops
^and
housestudents:
Lydia?
Davey, DorothyRoth and Betty Slater, all of Erie;and Marilyn Garden, (Pittsburgh;Mary Jo Royer, Texas; and Pa-
gtricia
Moran, Titusville.Day-hops predominate
sin
thesophomore group among whom areRuth Briggs, Janet and JoanDavis,Roxana Downing and JoanWeaver; while Joan Harrison ofNew York City and Frances Sullivan
|
off Rochester complete thesophomore honor students.
Blaze Destroys
'Chicken
Roost'
One hundred collegian trunkswent up in flames when
&
storageshed on the south campus ofMercyhurst
'burned
to the groundon Saturday, January-
27.|The|
blaze started between 3:00and
3:30
in
the afternoon. As theflames leaped high in the air, pinetrees on the south side of
thel
building caught fire like torches,blazing high for a few secondsand then dying out. Firemen ranlengths
ofifire;hose
around thecollege and down the boulevard tothe fire hydrant in front of thecollege
'
gates. Before they were
able
to get the water to the
fire,
however, it had spread throughthe building. Spectators from thesurrounding area flocked to thescene. Many of them
did
not realize the importance of the razingof the|old "chicken coop." j
For
the
first few
years of Mercy-
hurst's
existence, the old redbuilding served as a chicken coop.Then it was completely abandonedfor several years. In 1933, at insistent requests of the collegiansfor a
place:Xor
recreation outsideof the college proper, the Deanapproved their plans
for
the chicken roost. At this time, the RoosterClub came into being, derivedfrom the "chicken roost." In 1036,the "Roosters*' redecorated the"Roost" in red and
black
changing it into a rustic yet modernsetting. When the Lounge wasopened in 1940, the students deserted the
"Roost"
and it was laterconverted into a storage shed forthe trunks of Mercyhurst students.Then came the dramatic day inJanuary when a
fire
[
\
of unknownorigin swept
throughphe
buildingdestroying all of its contents.Strangely enough, a new storageshed was planned to be built
in
the
near future.This morning Mercyhurstcollegians will sponsor a program initiating the studentrights plan. This program, presented by the students and forthe student body and membersof the student-faculty committee will
be|
in the form
of!
apanel discussion, followed by aquestion
period.
The purpose ofthis assembly is to interestMercyhurst girls in studentrights and to point out thevalue of such rights in anacademic community.Members of the panel willbe Mary Ann Callahan, Patricia Moran,
Helen Sf
Eisert,
Frances Sullivan, Donna Byers,and Mary Ann Cole. ColleenMoMahon, senior member ofthe student-faculty committeewill preside as chairman.
Notes FromThe Hurst..
|
S
By popular demand
of
the student body, Reverend James Peterson, Gannon College professor,will again conduct the studentretreat. Annually sponsored by theSodality of Our -Lady, the retreat
.will be fheld in
the latter portionof Lent. * * *On March 3, Sister M.
Eymard,
instructor in the Mercyhurst department of biology, will speak atthe Biology Institute to be conducted
atfDuquesne
University inPittsburgh. The subject
of
thetalk will be "Ecology in the Teaching of High School Biology." Ecology is the study
of
plants in theirnatural homes, including the studyof their household affairs. SisterEymard will point out the valuesto be derived from directing thestudents to the natural sites ofplants by means of field trips.The talk will also Include; a fewtechniques to aid teachers in theconduct of such trips.
m
* * *Sally Carlow
andf
Mary
jJo
Royer, senior and junior delegates
to I
he NFCCS, attended aregional council meeting at Le-Moyne University in Syracuse,February 6. At
(this meetings
ar
rangements
were concluded for theRegional! Convention scheduledfor April 14 at
Nazareth College
in Rochester.
A
new plan has beendevised for the circulation of TheFederator, the national newspaperofthe|;NFCCS.Formerly the paper was sent free of charge to allmember colleges, but with thepublication of the February issue,a nominal fee will be charged.
Play
CompetitionSunday Evening
^To
add variety to this year'sdramatic program and to
give
Janus Club pledges an opportunity toearn points toward membership,the Janus Club is sponsoring aplay competition on Sundayevening, February 18. Two one-aotplays will be presented, the seniorand sophomores combining theirtalents to vie with the Juniors andfreshmen. The choosing and direction of these plays will be in thehands of the "big sister" classes,while the actual
acting
'i
and production crew
work
< is the task ofthe "little sisters".Under the direction of AlineKarlak, the senior-sophomoregroup will present White Queen,Red Queen, a historical play. Acomedy, The Charm Racket byEvelyn! Neuenburg, has beenchosen by the
junior-freshman
combination under the directionof Mary Jo Royer.
Threef
judgesfrom the dramatic groups in Eriewill evaluate the performances onthe basis
of
costuming, direction,acting ability, production technique, and choice of plays.
Studio ShowsWater Colors
An exhibition of twenty water
colorsf
by Gertrude
Herrick
Howeis at fpresent on display in thethird floor studio of the Mercyhurst art department. Included inthe exhibit
aref
a group ofseascapes drawn from the Cape Codregion, plus a series of
land-scapes
reminiscent of scenes located inthe Smoky Mountains.! A typicalwork shows an isolated mountaincabin, surrounded by barren trees,which conveys* a mood of loneliness and abandon.
Mrs.
Howe is said to have theillustrator's touch as evidenced inher technique of dry and wetbrush combinations, in the snatches of humor contained in some ofher work, and by the whimsical
figures
included in her sea-scapes.A graduate
off Mount
HolyokeCollege, Mrs. Howe has illustrated books for several publishingfirms. In 1945 she was chosen todo the
NationalfBook
Weekfpos-ter. Sister Angelica and the artdepartment extend a cordial invitation! o all art-lovers to viewthis show which will be on displayuntil February 21.
Eye-Witness of PolitburoTo Give Lecture in March
Nicholas Nyaradi, non-Communist Ex-Minister ofof Hungary,
will
reveal some
startling
facts
ahm.t
Dr.Finance othe plans of the Soviet when he speaks to
the
students and
faculty
of Mercyhurst College on Monday, March
ll
in
the
college auditorium.
'
I
th^nJ"?"
da
P
e
^Hungary,Dr. Nyaradi was educatedat the University
of
Budapest, where he became Doctor inPolitical Science and
Doctor
in Law. He was the last non-Communist member of the Hungarian coalition governmentand during
his
seven months stay in Moscow he conferred
with
the leading members of the Politburo. Thus he knows
* .J J
j? what is
In
the minds of the four-
Home-ecers
Plan MovieOf Christ
Club hasmoving-The
Home!Economics
launched] out into thepicture business. They have rented the auditorium of the CathedralGradeSchool,seating capacity
500,
for the afternoon and evening of March 2. At this time theywill show the recent Hollywoodproduction "Upon This Rock."This sound picture in koda-
chrome
presents the
llife
of OurLord through the eyes of thePrince of the Apostles. William H.Mooring commented of the
^pic
ture that he could not rememberin a
picture
a more vivid andcompelling portrait of Our Lord ..gentle but strong, kind but alwaysrobust .. "The portrayal" he said,"gains
both
power,
and
dignityfromHhe
clear strong voice andthe
untheatrical
mien
whichj
dis
tinguish it from the earlier screencharacterizations." J
^^H^E
"Upon This Rock"|is expectedto attract a large audience|
be
cause
of
itsispeclal
appeal duringthe Lenten season.
9SB
Students Welcome
I
Famed
Philosopher i
I
Mercyhurst welcomes back to itslecture platform on February 26,after an absence of three years,Dr. Charles
DeKoninckJ
one ofthe foremost philosophers^ in theworld
todayj
For four successiveyears Dr.
DeKoninck^was
on thecollege lecture program, usuallyremaining* at Mercyhurst three orfour
days land
giving
ia
series oflectures to students
and*
faculty.Internationally known, Dr.fDe-
Koninck |
is
|
now Dean of theSchool of Philosophy and Theology at Laval University
in
Que
bec,
Canada.The topic of Dr.
DeKoninok's
lecture is not definite, but It isprobable that it may be the timelysubject of
|"
The
^Assumption
ofMary and the Cult of Her Person".Whatever the
subject,
the Doctor'stalk is sure to be very worthwhilefor it will
beltoased
on the philosophy of St. Thomas Aqinas.
*m'
HWlflI
-w~~.
Trusty
Merciad
photographertorfc roost before flames devourcatches last view of the his-the trunks of the students.The faculty and students ofMercyhurst College offer sincere sympathy to Sister M.
Victorine
on the death of hersister, to Sister M. Philippa onthe death of her sister, and to
Margaret -tSueta
on the deathof her brother.
gteen
men controlling Russia's des-
1
tiny.
In the United States Dr. Nyaradi
I is
no stranger, for it was duringa trip to Washington, where hehad been called to discuss economic matters with officials ofour State
-{Department,:
that hewas appointed Finance Ministerin the Hungarian Cabinet. He isthe author of the series of "Saturday
Evening!Post"
articles: "I
•Saw
Russia
Preparing?for
WorldWar in," etc. jDr. Nyaradi iswell-known,tothe lecture-going public becauseof his timely comments and
eye
witness accounts of the tacticsemployed by the Russian Politburoin Eastern Europe and the world.
Students, FacultyDiscuss Problems
The Student-Faculty Board,
"which-a
few months ago
was-meie
dream
stuff,
has become a realityat Mercyhurst. By the close of
th2
Board's fourth weekly meeting onJanuary
18l
the members haddrawn up a tentative constiution
of
the organization, ready to bepresented to the Student Counciland to the Faculty.The purpose of this Board asstated in the constitution is "topromote better understanding between faculty and students: thusit
aims
at better student facultycommunication."!Composed of six members, threestudents and three faculty, theBoard has
'been
holding- weeklymeetings on Thursday evening at7:30 in the third floor social room.At these meetings they discussonly those matters referred to
tha
Board either by the Student Council or
by
{the Faculty. Then theymake recommendations which arereported back to the two organ;- |zations concerned.
It
then becomes the duty of the President jof the Student Council to make!arrangements for reporting the
•findings
of this
Board;to
the student body.
In the Future
February 15—Big| and
-Little
Sister
Dinner—College
Inn.February
16—Varsity
game-
here—8:00
February 17—Teachers* exams
S
Strong Vincent High School.February
18—Play
Competition.February
23—Varsity
game—here—8:00.
'j.
February 26,
27—DeKoninck
lectures.March
2—Varsity
game—'here,
8:00.
I
March 8, 9,
10—Retreat,
irch
12—Dr.
Nicholas NyaradiLecture.
 
Pag«
Two
THE
MERCIAD
February 14,
1951
The Fourth Station
*
Are you standing beside Mary on Calvary as the shadowof the cross falls upon her? Do you see her pain-filled eyes
as
she suffers with Him
eachlfresh
torment that the burden
ol
the cross offers?
;
m
Yes, Mary was at Calvary.. She knows the helpless, terri-
iying|pain
of watching a loved one suffer. And Mary
acceptecl|her
pain; she accepted God's will.At this fourth station take Mary's hand; she offers it toyou. Ask her to help you
suffer,
accept, and pray. Lent isyour
time
to stand close beside Mary. Ask her if abstinencefrom candy would be adequate sacrifice to offer Christ, Whofasted forty
daysfand forty
nights. Ask her to help you renew your intention of attending Mass each day, thereby participating in the Sacrifice of Christ. Ask her to remind you
jftto
accept those little daily trials in silence so that you may
^meditate
on Christ's words of submission to His Father:
?Not
My will, but Thine be done." Learn from her what youmust do to share in the life of Christ so that on Easter morn
you^still
stand at her side and rejoice in the fulfillment of
the*
Redemption, §
<
Life Can Be Trivial
1 The magazine Life is supposed to be about life; but whatdoes it
picture as
important in these our days? Stories in theSaturday Evening Post, Ladies'
Home
Journal, Cosmopolitantell of crises in human lives, but
what
kind of crises?
Ill §
Looking at Life, we find that politics,
fash
ion,
It
heater,science,, and odd events make up
thefweekly
substance of amagazine bought by a great many Americans.
So,
what'swrong? Just one thing. Such a coverage leaves out the ideaof life that
afCatholic
has. The Catholic knows that lifeis the anteroom of heaven. Life {knows politics, fashion,theater, science, odd
events—no
more. Is
Life
a great magazine? No.
p I
What two problems face the characters in the shortstories of the Saturday Evening
Post*
Ladies' Home Journaland Cosmopolition most often? Money and unrequited love.Life must be rich and romantic. There lies happiness. Onemust also be^young, thin, healthy, and gorgeous. Is this thesubstance of a
Catholic^mentality?
We'd be insulted if anyone said, "That's it!" |
\\ \
So,
do we need a Catholic press? Is the secular pressleaving out something pretty important: the next world andits influence on this? Is it being trivial?! It looks like it,doesn't it?
%
Now?
for a little speculation. Which do we Catholicsread more of, the secular or the Catholic press? The secular?If we do, we must be a little inconsistent, a little foolhardy,or a little
stupid—don't
you think?
3
How Strong Are
You ?
4
.
Yes,
we now have a Student-Faculty Committee! Itsconstitution has been written and explained to the membersof the college, to both faculty and students. But the purposeof this article is not, as you might suspect, to bolster interestand
confidence
in the Committee, but toipoint out to bothstudents and faculty that this group cannot possibly| solveall the problems existing between the two groups.
J
It is not to discredit the Committee to say that it is likea new toy which has to be wound up before it will work. Ahandful of students and faculty members alone cannot beexpected
tofbetter
the relationships between individuals andgroups at the college. Their
main
job is to bring about moreefficient student-faculty communication. §In order to accomplish this student-faculty communication,
there;must
be an individual effort
en
the part of eachand every faculty member as well as every student so thatthe two groups, through the
lindividuals
in each group, donot work against one another but work together to makeMercyhurst a better and happier
placelf
or all of us.There is an old and
oftenfquotedjadage
which says thata chain is only as strong as its weakest link. Each studentand each faculty member is a link. How
strongfis
our chain?How strong are YOU?
CULTURE
0RNER
There
Is
a popular and quiteerroneous myth that grand opera,conceived as dramatic entertainment, consists largely of over-up-
#holstered
females complainingnoisily in foreign languages! to orabout their scandalously unro-
mantic-looking
lovers. The amateur listener considers the storiesas idiotic, the characters as impossible people whose
unbridled
passions
can!bear
no conceivablerelationship to life as theyf knowit. But such is not a true pictureof opera.Opera Vehicle For DramaSince the time of
Gluck,
operacomposers have
-(considered
their
f
works primarily! as vehicles for
Bthe
dramatic stage, that
is,
as goodstories
revealed |
on a stage bysinging actors with the assistanceof an orchestra. (Sometimes, ofcourse, our composers made mistakes
in
judgment, just as theshrewdest of Broadway and Hol
lywood!
producers do. But thatthey tried their hardest to getgood
books
for their music is revealed by the fact that Puccinitook several times as long whipping the
Uibretto
of La
Boheme
into shape as he did composingthe music, by Verdi's attention toevery detail of the libretto of Aidain his lengthy letters to the manwho was writing it, by Wagner'sand Leoncavallo's
insisting* on.writing
their
own librettos inorder to be sure to get a worthydramatic story for their talents.Original
Saurces
Of OperaThe original sources to whichthese
men?
went were often themost obvious
sources
for good
stories—stories
that had capturedthe imaginations of thousands before them. Wagner went mostly
to|
tha powerful
ancient Norsemyths;
Gaunci
used the legendof Faust which had! appealed? todozens of authors beforefhim;Puccini, in Madame Butterfly andTosca, went to the popular dramatic hits of his day; Bizet went,for Carmen, to a thoroughly fascinating Frenchlnovelette, and soon.These fine stories had, foroperatic
sta*ge
purposes, generallyto be made shorter and more compact, for singing speech is slowerthan any other, and
ah
operashould not last longer than thehours between dinner and
bed
time. The alterations were oftenan improvement over the original.Carmen, for instance, in Meri-
mee's
tale, begins with a long andunexciting account of how theauthor happened to
iberln
Spainon a pseudo-scientific expeditionwhen he happened to run across aparticularly interesting femalecriminal. This is all happily cutout in the operatic version, whilean addition is made
infthe
formof the simple village
girl
Miceala,who provides an excellent dramatic foil to Carmen
herself.
Mostof Goethe's profoundest philosophy is cut out of the libretto ofFaust because it would make long-winded undramatic stuff when setto music.Saturday Afternoon OperaWhile most of us are unable toNext Column
A Challenge to Students
Perhaps the best deal would be to dig a hole, climb downin, cover ourselves up, and stay there. As the leaders of theworld are striving for peace in this their generation, the crycomes from somewhere that the youth of today can neverbe the "guiding lights" of tomorrow.We beg to differ. There are many students who have noidea what they want and less of an idea where they are going,
I
but for these there are others who
Welcome
...
This
is our first chance to tellyou that we're pleased to knowyou, Mrs. Margaret Dean Kealey,Field Secretary for MercyhurstCollege. Although we're not
ol
theclass of 1935, we do say welcomeback, since your new career beganhere on January 15.Born
In
Buffalo but an Erieresident most of her life, Mrs.Kealey, a past officer of theMercyhurst College Alumnae Association, has had valuable experience in both the teaching fieldand in the business world. Forseven years she taught Commercial Education in the Erie Public
-School
'System, and three of theseyears included work on the Museum
Staff.
The past three and ahalf years were spent as a private
secretary?
at General Electric.Civic activities of Mrs. Kealeyare many and varied. She is anactive member of the Philharmonic Auxiliary and of St. Vincent's Junior Aid.
Forlthe
pasttwo years she has done volunteerGray Lady work at St. Vincent'sHospital. Active in Playhouse af
fairs,
two years
ago|she
was theassistant Campaign Manager forPlayhouse Membership.
I
Interviewing Main DutyInterviewing high school seniorswho are interested in| attendingcollege twill be the main duty of
Mrs.
Kealey.* These wiU include
g-'rls
not
only
in Erie and thecounty,
.but
also
in'New
York,
Ohio, and Pennsylvania. Sinceshe enjoys traveling, she is sureshe
willj*enjoy
her
work.-3
Everyone has a pet peeve, and
Mrs.
Kealey
Isaid I
hers is peoplewho are late for appointments.Among her favorite sports are golfandbowling,
jj
There
[have t bean
some changes made!atfMercyhurst since 1935, and among theoutstanding onesKealey
are
*
theand thethatlhernoticed foytMrs.Public! AddressGates. But she
^^^^^
only trouble isthe switchboard
J
whenbusy with
another*
mes-
System
tells usrunningDoris issage.
X'i
1
WM-
v B£
We all wondered who was to
c-dcupy
the second desk in the Information Room. And now that weknow Mrs. Kealey, we're reallysatisfied.attend grand opera, we can listen
to
{the programs broadcast from
l
wo
to five every Saturday afternoon from the Metropolitan OperaHouse. Although you will be unable
to ^witness
the grandeur ofattire and scenery, you will hearthe very best of musical art. Forit is the peculiar power of musicdrama to project its passions moreforcefully and more compellingthan any other form of art.have risen above student
indiff
erence, going outside their owncollege to accept the challengethat this bemuddled world offersthem. It is to these that we look.There exists in the UnitedStates an organization whose primary purpose is the training ofleaders among its student mem
bers.
It isjj
the National StudentAssociation. Conceived in Prague,in 1946, by twenty-five U. S. students who attended the now politically run International Unionof Students, its goals are the development among students of anawareness of responsibility to theschool, to the community, to humanity and to God.
N.
S. A. Leaders Excel
N.
S. A. now numbers 332 colleges and universities, amongwhich are 'St. Mary's of NotreDame, Seton Hill College, NiagaraUniversity, St.
Bonaventure
University, and John Carroll University. It occupies two seats on
UNESCO^the
educational branch
_
of the United Nations. The leaders of the N. S. A. have more thanexcelled themselves. This year,
Al
Lownestein, National
President,
journeyed to Canada where
he
spoke
to .Canadian
youth. In December, he was
wrJn
A,'s
votingdelegate at(Stockholm,Sweden,where leaders of nineteen nationalstudent unions met to discuss proposed multilateral working arrangements between their organizations.Elmer Brock, who last year waspresident of the Pennsylvaniaregion, and this year holds theNational office of Student Affairsvice-president, attended the White
House
(Conference on Youth andthe j Preliminary Conference onRights of the Educational Community,!
co-sponsored
by N. S. A.
and!
the American Council onEducation. N. S. A. is divided into
re jions.1
Known
fort
its strengthis
Ithe ^Pennsylvania
Region
§of
which Kenneth: Kurtz of ©warth-
morejCollege
is
president.
This is an uncertain generation.The situation
wttl
only be remedied by those who are courageousand unselfish in giving themselves.The situation calls for the makingof a choice. Dig through educationfor the tools necessary . . . climbhigh and stay there.!"Let it not be said that we were
unequal
to the
taskSbefore
us."
Gripe
11
Campaign
Join with the Juniors in
their
anti- gripe campaign.Abolish the "fifth-column" of
eomplainers
at Mercyhurst.
THE MERCIAD
Mercyhurst College,
Erie,
Pa. Member of Associated CollegiatePress
IEditoi
Peggy
Jetter
Assistant Editors Barbara HempeJ, Frances SullivanAssociate Editor Pat MoranBusiness Manager
_ Edith
HarrisWriting
Satff—Laura
Jean Bly, Colleen McMahon, Margaret Mc-Guire, Mary Jo
Royer,
Ceci Wert, Florene Cherry, Norma JeanScott. Margaret
Broderick,
Doris Moore.
i&
Business
Staff—Mary
Adelaide Witt, Rosemary
Lahr,|
DoloresWally, Corrine
Prenatt,
Dorothy Roth, Claire Todd, LucretaPavlov, Anita Sontominna.;;
f.
 
February 14,
1951
kYI'UYI'nYl
Personality*
Portraits
'
Dr. Relihan chats with Arlene Murphy, Mary
Ann
Benetin,and Gloria Ruocco.
February opens
a new
semester here
at
Mercyhurst,
and
this semester means "observing"
for the
Junior Glass.
The
weekly jaunt
to
Academy
is,
according
to
some, much moreinteresting
as
time goes on.
But2
there
are
others
who
rathermeekly utter,
"How can I
ever stand
in
front
of a
class
and
teach!"
Dr.fRelihanfdoesn't
seem
the
least
bit
worried about
I
these
future^teachers
as we
see
him
telling
one of his
favorite stories
to
these juniors girls.Striking
a
familiar pose with "spectacles"
fin
hand
is
Arlene Murphy from Greenfield, Mass.
A
biology major,"Murph"
is
also athletically minded
as is
shownfby
her
star-
pplaying
on our
Varsity basketball team.
Weji
have recentlyseen
a
showing
of
this Janus member's dramatic talent,
and
we're looking
forward
to
more
of
the same, "Murph" is secretary
of the
Science Seminar,
a
member
of I. R.
C,
and
Student Council representative
for
A.A.Next fall this junior
wiU
teach health during
her
periodof practiceteacfclng.Mary Ann Benetin
of
Greenville,Pa., should
have|no
trouble getting
her
pupils' attention withher winning smile. Mary Ann,
an
other biology major,
is a
memberof
the
Science Seminar,
an
hono-1
rary member
of A. A., and a
Janus
dub
pledge. Hers
is the
beautiful soprano voice that upholdsthe junior class
at
choir practiceand daily Mass.
Her
voice
and her
active participation^
in
Glee Clubhave
won for
her
the
office
dfB
president
of our
college choralgroup.This junior will
be
able
to
compare notes next year with"Murph",
for
Mary
Ann, too,
will
be teaching health.Always
and
forever
(we
hope)with
a
grin
is
Gloria Ruocco
of
Corning,
N. Y. The
linguist
of the
class, Gloria
is
majoring
in
Frenchbut
is
also taking Italian.
Her
various interests
are
shown
by her
membership
in the
French Club,Sociology Seminar,
and
Glee Club.Gloria
is
also
a
Janus Club pledgeand
is
secretary
of our
-Sodality.Around school, Gloria
is
bestknown
by her
quick
wit and
contagious laughter.
If she
keeps
her
students
J
as happy
as she
keepsher classmates,
all
will
be
well,weather
it be in
French
or in
Italian class.FEBRUARY
IS
CATHOLICPRESS MONTHHow many
of
these Catholicmagazines
do you
read?The SignIntegrity
§
CommonwealCatholic DigestSurvey
|
Catholic MindAmericaAction
Now
Orate Fratres
Second SemesterBrings Changes
Augmenting
the
usual coursesof study, several
of the
departments
of
Mercyhurst College
are
offering special courses
for the
second semester.
At
group
of
science majors have registered
for
on advanced course
in
herbarium.The girls will collect plant specimens
and
mount them accordingto category.
The
science schedulealso includes
courses;in
bacteriology
and
histology.Dr.
M. J.
Relihan
of the
education department
is
offering
a
course
in
'
educational measurements
and?
statistics
o
n
the
elementary
and
secondary levels.
Modern < dram
a, the
tragedies
of
Shakespeare,
and the
essay
are the
new courses
in the
English department, while reading seminar
and
the senior coordinating seminarwill continue
through j
the secondsemester.
A
special course
in ad
vanced ceramics
is
being givenin
the
field
of
arts
and
crafts.A
new
course
in
special problems
is
offered
for
majors
in the
sociology department.
Dr.
MarieHaas
is
teaching
a
French literature
I
course
in
naturalism!
and
realism.New Students
\
Enroll
The
new
semester also
enroUed
new students
at
Mercyhurst. JoanMurphy,
who
attended Syracuse
Universityjlast
semester, rejoinedthe Junior class, while
the
sophomores
^welcomed
back their former class president, BarbaraKlein
of
Warsaw, New York. PaulaBrugger,
a
transfer student fromSeton Hill College, also Joined
the
sophomore class.
THE
MERCIAD
FORGOTTEN ?
Not
the
Carnival
"Memories
. . .
memories",—so goes
the
song,
and so
will
the
social whirl
of the
Winter Carnival
be
redeemed from" oblivion
by
the many Mercyhurst studentswho attended
it.
They'll retrace
the
rollickinglaughter which accompanied
the
exhilarating sleigh ride
and the
•Sock
Dance,
the
sportive afternoons when they took
off for
skating, tobogganing
and
skiing
in
brightly colored outfits.
And
then,that Semi-Formal Dinner—"Oh.was that turkey scrumptious—ummmml"
And too,
wasn't thatcandle-light effective?They'll review
the
highpointsof
the
Semi-Formal
Dance,—the
Gym, adorned
in gay
decorations,depicted
a Ski
'Lodge.
The
cheerful
red and
white checked tablecloths,
the
Lounge where boys
and
girls
met
each other
and
madewith
a
hey
day,
i
singing with zestand pulling
capers—wasn't
it all
Iterrific!
And of
course, they'll
re
call
the
crowning
of
lovely JanieSharp, their Snow Queen.Reminiscing, they'll retrace thatSunday morning when both girlsand their escorts attended
the
10:30
A. M.
Mass
and
Benedictionin their College Chapel. Following
this,
the
coffee
and
donuts thatwere served
in the
Lounge.Lastly, they'll recollect
the Tea
Dance later that same afternoon,which marked
the
closing eventof that wonderful, festive escapade—"The Winter Carnival."
I
Pianist and DancerEntertain Students
"And
how
would
you
likeClaire
De
Lune?" With
the
de
lightful encore, Inez Palma,
the
charming
and
gracious pianist,concluded
her
recital
on
January
18.
This talented virtuoso
of the
piano
was
bornin&Meadville,Pennsylvania,
and
later moved
to
New York State.
Her
parents
are
both professional musicians:
her
father,
a
violinist:
her
mother,
a
pianist. After studying abroad
in
France
and
Germany, Miss Palmahas returned
to the
United Statesfor
a
tour
and a
concert
at
Carnegie Hall.
Her
winning personality
and her
dexterity
at the
keyboard gave
us
an?
enjoyable
and
inspirational evening.
V
Broadening
our
understandingand appreciation
of the
dance,Jean
MicLean
presented
|her
soloperformance
of
Modern Dance
on
February
13.
Graceful
and
excellent
In
body movement
and
technique, Miss McLean's Interpretations
and
demonstrations werehighly interesting
and
artful. MissMcLean
taugtit
dancing
at the
University
of
Colorado
and at
Marymount College
and now
conducts
her own
school
of
dancingin
New
York City. Once
a
studentwith Martha
sGraham
and
withAlbertene
and
Dannishawn,
she
can truly
be
called
an
outstanding American artist.
Compliments
of
YAPLEDAIRY
i
LINDJHARDWAKE
38th
and
Pine
Ave.
Phone 0-7464Erie.
Pa.
/
i
Pago Three
Mercyhurst
Girls
Are
Talking About
MERCYHURST
GIRLS
ARE
TALKING ABOUT
... the
WinterCarnival
... the
impressive crowning
of
vivacious Janie Sharp
as
Snow Queen
... the
decorations which truly turned Mercyhurst intoa
ski
lodge
. . . the
delicious turkey dinner
and the
swing
and
sway
of
the formal dance
. . . and
Mass
and
Benediction with
our
dates whichmade
it a
weekend
to
remember always!MERCYHURST GIRLS ARE TALKING ABOUT
... the
lovely program which honored Mother
De
Sales
on her
Feast
Bay—the
excellentJob
which
Miss Kelly
and her
cast
did
withjthe
play
. . .
BernadetteMetzner's
vocal additions
to the
evening
and
last
but not
least
the
.
. the
Modern dancingsurprise" refreshments after
the
program
.
of Miss McLean.MERCYHURST GIRLS
ARE
TALKINQ.ABOUT
... the
secondsemester
and j
the
new
courses that
are
being offered
.
$
field herbarium, modern drama, ceramics! etc
... the new
students
.
.<.
the
return
otf
Barbara Klein
.|.
. the
wonderful semester vacation which
is
stillfresh
in
our
memories,|the
numerous weddings
of
former Mercyhurstitesand graduation {which will climax this semester!MERCYHURST GIRLS
ARE
TALKING ABOUT
. . . the
PennState answer
to "The
Thing" which Mary Forche
and
Dottie Klein
re
ceived
... the
Cornellfweek-end
which Colleen McMahon attended
. . .
the hospital trip which Jean Slavin substituted
for
the trip to Cornell...Aileen Yueh's completion
of her
college course
and her
departure
for
Chicago
... the
fire which destroyed
our
"bags
and
baggage"
... the
Red Cross blood-typing program.MERCYHURST GIRLS ARE TALKING ABOUT
... the
possibilities
of
women being drafted
... the
world situationVin general
and our
part
in the
world
as
Catholic college students
... the
plea
of Our
Ladyof
Fatkna
. . . the
Nightly Rosary
in the
social room
.
\
. the
excellentattendance
at
daily Mass
. .
.'the
Lenten Retreat which will be
conduct
ed
by
Father Peterson.
v
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Brooks Student StordrnKmOklahoma A & M CollegeStillwu(er> Oklahoma fm
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BK
TRAOE-MARK^g)
TRAOE-MARK
®
Meeting
tKe
gang
to
discuss
a
quiz
—a
date with
the
campus queen—or just killing time between classes
—Brooksl
Student Store
at
Stillwater, Oklahoma
is one of the
fa-vorite gathering spots
for
studentsat Oklahoma
A
&
M
College.
At
Brooks Student Store,
as in
collegecampus haunts everywhere,
a
frostybottle
of
Coca-Cola
is
always
on
hand
for
the pause that refreshes-Coke
belongs.Ask for
it
either
way
. J
.
both\
trade-marks mean
the
same
thing.
|
BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY
OF THE
COCA-COLA
COMPANY
BY
ERIE COCA-COLA
BOTTLING^COMPANY
© 1951,
The
Coca-Cola
Company

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