Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more ➡
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Add note
Save to My Library
Sync to mobile
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
×
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Merciad, Feb. 11, 1958

The Merciad, Feb. 11, 1958

Ratings: (0)|Views: 140|Likes:
Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, Feb. 11, 1958
The Merciad, Feb. 11, 1958

More info:

Published by: TheMerciad on May 24, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See More
See less

05/31/2011

pdf

text

original

 
7k
MERC1AD
VOL. XXIX, No. 5
MERCYHURST COLLEGE, ERIE, PENNA.
February 11, 1958
-
V*"
Morality Play To Be Presented
DSO Holds
OpenHouseFebruary
16
During Lent By Drama Society
"Everyman" will be presented by
the
Dramatic Society, on" thefollowingfdates, March 7, 8, 9, under the direction of Miss HelenKelly.
"$S
$
It '
Members of the Dramatics
Cluib
and its pledges cast in the famousmorality play fare: Jeanne Cannon as EVERYMAN; Connie Frank,DEATH; Cathy Cruise, GOOD DEEDS; Maureen Clancy,! KNOWLEDGE; Elaine Curtis, FELLOWSHIP; Barb
l
Jakubowski, COUSIN;
T|Lois
Whelan, KINDRED; Sue McCartney, GOODS; Del Dwyer,CONFESSION;
Cathy
Reid,BEAUTY; Margaret H i r s c h,STRENGTH; | Lolly Lockhard,FIVE WITS; Maureen Jones,
gDOCTOR;
Judy Doehla,
iANdkCi
OF ETERNITY; Sue* Avery andEva
Paul|as
MONKS. Ann Bow-
iman
will
j
act as Stage Manager
forlthe
production and) Mary AnnCunningham, as Choreographer.
Famed iPianhlAppears Here
Adding to the variety of theHurst's cultural series, MartinCanin, noted pianist, will appearFebruary 12. Mr. Canin, a masterof coherence and cohesion, hasgreat technical ability.A native New Yorker, MartinCanin first began
his
piano studies at the age of 5, and at 17years of age he was awarded several; music scholarships. Later, hewon his School's, "Carl M. RoederAward" given annually to a pianist of
outstanding!achievement.
A similar honor was awarded himduring
I
his stay abroad when hewas invited to open the SalzburgMozarteum Summer
^Academy
with a performance of the Cminor Concerto.
^Released
fromthe Army in 1954, Mr. Canin returned to the United States
an.1
became
pianist |
of the ChamberArts group.
'M.I-
With
a
brilliant start alreadylaunched on two continents, Martini Canin is already fulfilling thewords
off
II Corriere in
Novara
Italy, "He is destined for a glorious career.
>
Martin Canin, PianistThe play dates
back^to
the beginning
of *
the 16th century when
drama
was established inChurches. These f morality {playswere concerned with allegoricalcharacters illustrating
moral
truths and representing the struggle between the forces of good andevil for the souls of humanity."Everyman" is considered thegreatest of all of the moralityplays and has had more performances than any other play on theEnglish speaking stage.
\
February-Ma
rch .--
Calendar
J
February
12—Martin
Canin, pianist16—D. S. O. Open House
19—Vera
Denty, Lecturer (AshWednesday)March
5—-Mr.
Frank Sheed, lecturer7, 8,
9—Everyman
*
8—Initiation
of Seniors intoAlumna Association
^ f15—Junior-Senior
Party
Doctor SheeLectures Again
"Our Lady And The Lay Aposto-late",is the topic
oftthe
lectureto be given March 5 at
Mercy
hurstby Mr. Frank Sheed.In addition to [being recognizedas an outstanding {author Mr.Sheed is co-founder of the pub
lishing?
house
of?
SHEED ANDWARD. He has translated manyworks, including "The Confessionsof Saint Augustine"
and*
has writ-ten several^ books of his own—"Theology and Sanity", which isa Junior text used at Mercyhurst,"A Map
J
of Life", and "Com-
munismiand
Man."Dr. Frank
Sheed,
Noted
Lecturer
Mr. Sheed has for over thirtyyears been a speaker of the Westminister Catholic Guidance Guild.He is in charge of training theGuild Speakers in London, andhas addressed in all, well over 3000meetings in England and America.Rome has just awarded him aDoctorate of Sacred Theology. Mr.
Sheed's
new book is "TheologyFor Beginners," a fall publication.Open house for senior studentsof city and county high schoolsand their parents and
guidance
directors will be held
at
fMercyhurst College on Sunday afternoon, February 16, from
2:30
to 5The opening session registrationwill take place in the Little
Thea
tre.|.
"""
.
5
... iw
:
Following the assembly, the
guests
will be conducted on
a
tornof the college. Faculty! membersand student representatives
of
each department will be in thevarious
classrooms
to answer questions about courses and career activities. Activities will
endI
withrefreshments served toy DSO members, chairmaned by Frances Reynolds, in the student's lounge.Miss Helen Clancy, senior, who was lately chosen Coed Colonel ofGannon ROTC, receives military salute from cadets
Al
Rossi, BillFilipowski, and Arthur Gunther. Helen will receive her title formallyat the Military Ball on March
15.
|
=?
v
Gannon College ROTC HailsSenior,*Coed Colonel Of
'58
a?
"*<.
Gannon College will break tradition this year at the MilitaryBall, to be held on February 15 at the Gannon Auditorium. In previous years the Coed Colonel has worn a military
uniform
upon assuming her honorary position.! But this! year it was decided that awhite full length gown, of debutante order, should be worn
<by
the
1958
Coed Colonel,
.Helen
Clancy, senior student at Mercyhurst.
I
The
gownl
selected for the
occasion|by
Miss Clancy is made ofsilk taffeta. The skirt is cut on a straight line in front giving a sheatheffect and flares in back, much in the manner of a train. A militarycape of maroon velveteen with a gold taffeta lining and a gold eagle
embroidered*
on the back
I
will be
I
%
President of Delta Signa Omi-cron, Anne
|Marie *
Bergen, announced the committees forthe^Open House in
last|
month'si
MERCIAD. Chairman of Invita-*tions, Barbara Dibble,
expect.*
more than
last*
year's attendance!of fifty prospective
students andt?
their parents to attend
this
year's^DSO
sponsored!Open
House.
Dean's
List
worn over the gown. Miss Clancywill also wear a maroon
velveteen
band running diagonally from herright shoulder to her
waist.^A
goldeagle is embroidered on the bandjust below the shoulder.Committees for the MilitaryBall' have announced
that? Vic
Savelli and his orchestra will'pro-vide dance music, and that gold
andfblack
are
to
be the
colorsrforthe Ball's decorations.'Decorationplans
include a false- ceiling ofgold; and black crepe paper andbehind the
bandstand'a
keystonewith a gold eagle
in£the
center.
a *
•*
*
«At
approximately 10:30 inter-
Teach
er
-N
In Manyreas
Prospective teachers interestedin positions should consult theofficial bulletin
board
regularlyfor announcements, of coming
in
-
terviews?
ifW fW>
? v?
For
those
interested in teaching! near
lthe
metropolitan area,Mr. Lawrence^C. Lobaugh of Len-denhurst, Long Island, will holdinterviews sometime during
tthe
second and third weeks of March.mission will
-begin
with a
per^
Several
positions are available on
It V
Seniors:
.£
%
* -
Marilyn ChromeyLinda Collin
|
Maureen Jones
*
Vivetta PetronioJean CriswellJulia Ann Simons
*
Katherine
Ann?
King
**$
Lucille Turner
Mary Catherine
Donatelli
Virginia! Flak |
Mi
j||
Anne JohnsonConstance SettlemeyerMary Anne Castora
Juniors: .Rita Joan
Imhoi
Welling ChangBerley Schaaf |Anna Marie BerganEmma Jean
Newby
Frances Reynolds
?>,*F
Sophomores:Joan ByeCynthia Hauser
Margaret
ToppingEdith
iwinter
Janet McGough
$
Wanda TothJanet Marie KussMary Jane BauerCarolyn
Golankal
•.
'4
;
m
3.002.812.77
2.73|
2.632.62
2.612.612.582.582.57]2.522.502.872.712.702.582.552.52formance by the Pershing RifleDrill Team.
The.team
will com-
plete
their performance by form-
-
ing an aisle
downline
center!
of
Ijthe
auditorium to serve as honor^guards^ Cadet
Lt.
Colonel ArthurGunther will then escort Miss
fClancygup
this aisle
to $
the
band*
standi where she
willlreceive herjt
official title
as&COED
CADETCOLONEL OF|:195B* The. goto
beagles
will
be^plnned
on her
,
shoulders by Lti.ColJyV. E. WilUs.Following this
Miss,l
Pat Jstinne-ford, Coed
ColoneUof
j.1957,
willpresent
Helen
fwith^
a .bouquet
of
lantheriansl Col.I Willis
will escort
jrMiss
Clancy back down the aisleof honor guards,
m
te4The dance is strictly
formali
both elementary and secondarylevels which includes openings forinstructors of
A
handicappedf
children.
.?
Mr.|
Milfordl
H. Pratt,? supervising
"principal
of Barker CentralSchool in Baker,. New! York, willbe at Mercyhurst sometime thismonth. The date will be posted.
.-
i.
.
i;-..'
2.832.76
2.65
2.592.552.552.52
2.50
2.50
<A
Freshmen
:j
Susan Stark
|
Virginia RossoniJulia KoscoEleanor Hertel
Gretchen
HalleyLois Csernyicky jMargaret Tellers
it
*
3.002.83
2.832.802.67
2.56
2.52
Attention Seniors
Sister Mary
Janet?
GuidanceDirector, has
recentlyMannpunced
that she is fin receipt of manyfine fellowship and
scholarshipgoffers
in almost any field?desire-able. A number of science, journalism, sociology fellowships aswell as librarian
assistantships
are available to qualified studentswho are sincerely interested ingraduate work.
*
&&&
£,]p\ster
states
that
•among
'
thoseschools
-of
fering: graduate aid areCatholic.-. University, New YorkUniversity, University of Missouri
and
many less well-known universities. Full information with
regardSto
offers in graduate workin. to
be?
found in the J guidance
office. . <*'
...&-.
Twenty-six girls have been interviewed by Mr. Hoyt M. Armstrong, owner and manager of the
.interstate
Teacher Agency of Ro-
chester,
New York. Mr. Armstrongwill be contacting them as openings occur.
|*
Doctor DentyRevisits Hurst
"'Doctor
Vera D. Denty, Britishpsychologist, will return for thethird visit to Mercyhurst whenshe lectures on February
19
in theLittle Theatre.Miss Denty is a member of theBritish Psychological Association
and!
the American Catholic Psychological Association. She was anhonor student at the Universityof London, when she completed hereducation in child psychology andpsycho-analytical training. .Past topics of Miss Denty's talkshere at Mercyhurst
:have
been"Psychological Aids to Study"and "Psychology and Religion."The topic for this year's lecturetopic for this year's lecture hasis "Leadership inAction."
/
i.
;':.:.';.!:
 
*
Pare Two
THI MtRCIAD
February 11. 1958
ac
u.
Ml-
y,
Have you heard of the "Jack-of-*all-trades, master of
none
?"
Such is the personwho vows many things for the season of Lentbut masters none of them. This type of person usually vows to give up candy, gum,desserts, and so on, but weakens until he failsin them all, never sticking to?one. He vowsto go to Mass everyday. Again failure is theresult.
I
1 I
M
On the other hand, if the initial determination were centered upon one certain
sacrifice
and promise, the results would naturally be much better. It stands to reason thatto do anything thoroughly or successfully,one must concentrate upon it alone.Therefore, concentration upon one thingis the best theme
ffor
a good, profitableLenten season. This means concentration upon
soul,,
sanctity, and sacrifice. That is onesoul (our own), sanctity of one person (our-
self),
and one sacrifice. 1
"S,
oon
%J3
r
ever.
The ''Spoon-Feeding," of which American education is so often
accused,
is beginning to tell its tale on the products of thissystem. Like the
\
pampered child who hasnever been given a chance
to
\
feed or dress
himself,
today's student and graduate growsup unable or at least unwilling to feed anddress himself — intellectually. So used tohaving learning fed
motheringly
to him, hecannot learn by himself and is growing upalmost emaciated as a result of intellectualmalnutrition.
\I
For him graduation day means
the fend
of having to ever put another thing into his(he thinks) sufficiently-filled head. If Plato,Shakespeare, Aquinas, even the Bible is notread at school, it is never so much as lookedat
afterward—since
learning supposedlystopped on graduation day.
|
Since this is
I
Catholic Press Month(although we are but a minute voice in theCatholic Press), we would like to shout loudlyto point out the opportunities being left to
sHo
by. These opportunities lie in the bestof literature which
was'
created to help mangrow to be whole. We
can't
urge the studentbody enough to take up a perpetual studentvocation by feeding themselves with a
whole
some diet of good books and magazines.LETTER TO EDITOR:Dear Editor:
||;
f
In reply to the editorial entitled "In aNut Shell" in your last issue, I am wondering who, outside of Student Council, has beenburdened with the duties of the studentcouncil members? It has always been theright
and!
yes, the duty of the StudentCouncil President to delegate duties outsideof Council in order to stimulate interest inthe student body and to give as many aspossible the opportunity to exercise leader
ship.
I
This year the members of Council sacri
ficed
two days of vacation and came back toschool early in September to study studentproblems and set up a program for the year.Members of Council make themselves available every day in the Student Council Officein an effort to be of service to
all.
We wantyour interest and cooperation. The StudentCouncil is not something intangible ... it
Is
a council of STUDENTS working to benefiteach and everyone at Mercyhurst. We arewhat you want us to
be;
no more, no less.
Yes,
we did miss the December meeting,and for a good reason. Our date was takenfor a guest lecturer and the calendar was socrowded that no other date [could be substituted. Council members were asked if theyhad any urgent business that would require
an
evening meeting and all agreed that therewas nothing that
couldpiot
wait until January.
I ; I
We were very happy to see about halfthe student body present at the Januarymeeting. This reflects the fact that we havean interested group of students
and
\
we
hopethat this interest will continue.We do not think that Student Council is
"in
a rut" and its members sincerely hopethat they may live
upfto
the responsibilitiesyou have entrusted to them.
* H
Mary Rachel
Shine—Student
Council Pres.
Lenten
Spirit
UnhamperedBy Complementary
Programs
|Most
certainly a penitentialspirit prevails over the college during the holy season of Lent, butall work and no play makes Janea
dull
i girl. Here are proffered aminimum of entertainment op
portunities—guaranteed
to offer
*
jkWe
See
Jt
Your Editors Recommend:. . . that a few stop ruining thelounge privileges for everyone.
|
, . . rules for order
In
social roomsand kitchenette be observedmore closely.
|'
f. . . that some rule be passed byStudent Council to limit
*
phone calls to 5-10 minutes
funder
force of penalty.. . . that a few "disillusionedthieves" examine their conscience in respect to cheating during or in the correc-tion of exams.. . . that the "weak spots" discovered by the retreat check-
i
I
up not be neglected.Your Editors Commend:the spirit shown in the recentretreat.the improved observance of"quiet hours" in the dorms,the growing interest in in-
teUectual
pursuits on campus.Father Smith for his variedand mature
>
retreat subjects.Your Editors Thank:
i
the A. A. for two ice-skatingrinks.
S
$
&
the contributors of the newchapel veils.Student CouncU for the newdecks of cards for the lounge.all
l
those concerned
for
ournewly-polished dorm floors.Your Editors Welcome:... all
hew In-coming
students.. . . suggestions for articles or improvement for the
Merciad.
. . . "Ron" as the third memberof
"Mercyhurst's
Men's Club".Your Editors Bid FareweU:... to Tina Herskind and Jean-ette Mancuso.Your Editors Offer Best Wishes:... to Polly Bresnan and ConnieTaylor in their religious vocation.... to Dusty Schmidt, SaranneDurkin, Barbara Matts, JackieOavanna, Carol Dodson, ontheir engagements.
*
the unbeatable combination ofboth culture and pure enjoyment.Cyril Ritchard, Anna MarieAlberghetti, Sal Mineo, and PeterLoire combine talents Friday,February 21 (7:30-9:00 p.m. EST)for CBS Television's 90-minutecolor musical, "Aladdin." For this
"DuPont
Show of the Month" ColePorter has written his first television score.Erie PhilharmonicErie Philharmonic Orchestraand Chorus wiU present Jack Russell, as soloist on February 11 and
12.
Mr. Russell, celebrated Broad
way
and TV star wiU sing Romberg's "Desert Song," the Soliloquyfrom Rogers "Carousel," Porter's"In the Still of the Night," Rogers "Falling in Love With Love,"and will narrate Copland's "Lincoln Portrait." Also
presented
willbe
Kabalevsky's
"Overture to Colas Bruegnon," Weber's
"In
vita-tion to the Dance," Liszt "LesPreludes." Strauss' "Tales of theVienna Woods," and Berlioz's Trojan March.Rudolph Firkusny, world-famous pianist, will appear with thePhilharmonic March 18 and 19.playing Mozart's
"Concerto |
in DMajor for Piano" and Grieg's"Concerto in A minor for Pianoand Orchestra." The orchestrawill play Strauss' "RosencavalierSuite" and Tchaikovsky's "Symphonic Poem Hamlet'".
jiiii
«
Song
of Bernadette
it
*
For Playhouse enthusiasts, onTuesday, February 25, "The Songof Bernadette" by
Jean
and Wal-ter Kerr will begin for a Lentenrun.. Dramatized from Franz Wer-fel's-novel, it is
Intended
as atribute on the one hundredth anniversary of the miracle of Lour-
des—the
appearance of Our Ladyto BernadetteSoubirous.
TVUcOf
Sati:
Pride is the anesthetic thatdeadens the pain of stupidity.
—Rnute
RockneLet no man be less good
for
having known you: be less true, lesspure, less noble for having traveled in your company,—Late Bishop of Philadelphia
r
A
n
Ounce Of Etcetera
"Chemise or not chemise, that isthe question." This slight variation of Shakespeare's immortalphrase suggests a fashion boomfor the Spring season. Once againcloset contents must be sorted andreplaced. However, the complaintsare few, because the chemise ispopular. The "roaring 1920" styleof dress seems to bag and sag inthe right places; places that mightotherwise reveal figure faults.Whatever its advantages, it is recognized as an extreme change ofstyle;a change that will
Jcost
fathers a pretty penny; but, also achange that will lift femininespirits by labeling daughters"walking fashion plates". How
ever,
which is the more important,fathers,
baggy-eyed
from financial wories, or daughters, baggilydressed and momentarily contented?An Erie oddity was reported thmorning after a "slight" snowstorm. While clearing the 38thStreet sidewalk, a medium-sized
snow 1
plow with heavily chainedtires skidded on
a!slick
piece ofice.
This I observation
proves thatno vehicle short of air vehicles canbe guaranteed "skid-rree".The quiet months of the schoolyear are upon us. With Christmasweek, semester exams, and winterCarnival becoming definite eventsof the past, we are assured of manypeaceful hours in which
we j
canperform
student
duties. Suchduties entail: bridge games, afternoon trips to Art's; manicures andhair-styling;
ttwo
hour gab fests;knitting sessions,
and-
an afterlights study hour. Good luck, students (?).
-A
3W
Selfat,
<2*K
tyou
$ct?
\
During the last semester, the numberof times that the lounges had been left indisorder was a disgrace. What can be doneto remedy this
much-complained-of
situation this semester?The first thing necessary is to enlist theaid of all those who frequent the lounges.
Everyone—resident
and
day-hop—should
make herself feel personally responsible fororder in the-lounges. Why not remind eachother to empty ash trays and put empty cokebott'es and lunch bags where they belong?Is this too much to expect from girls in college?After all, it not
absolutely
necessary thatthe lounges be kept open. They were setaside as recreation rooms so don't selfishly abuse the privilege.
"Where
are the Catholic
Salks,
Oppen-heimers,
Ein&teins
?"|
asked F'ather John J.Cavanaugh, former president of Notre DameUniversity, in a recent
JllME
Magazinearticle.In commenting on the low percentage ofCatholics
named
to Who's Who In America,Fr. Cavanaugh notes that out of 303 namesnames chosen for their eminence in scienceonly three were Catholics. If this is so, ourCatholic educational system and the 35 million Catholics of this country are not producing anywhere near their proportion of lead
ers,
not only in science but in politics, litera
ture,
or other fields.
U.|S.
Catholics may say in defense thatthey are in a minority group, an immigrantpeople, usually from modest
homes—but
then the Jews are an immigrant people, oftenfrom modest homes. They too must fightbigotry, but the Jewish race is producingleaders far out of proportion to theirnumbers.
I
'*
I
We—U. S. Catholic College Students—stand on trial.
We^will
take up the presentslack
?
Do we have what it
Stakes
?If Alexander Graham Bell had receiveda busy signal when he
first
telephoned
Wat
son, the device might not have been
^invent
ed. This example, of course, is an absurdity.However, fit emphasizes the fact
that
astream of busy signals discourages callers.Would you consider a girl kind and generousif her gift of gab
prevented!
your receptionof
an I
expected call? Long, social telephoneconversations cannot exist in a college dormitory. Shall we coin a phrase and aim to be
"Christ Callers"?
The qualifications are:
—when
you're near a ringing; telephone,
T|answer
it;
fg j
I—do
your best to locate the receiver of acall; if you're unsuccessful, take themessage and deliver it;
• fir—limit your
personal calls to FIVEMINUTES.All women enjoy talking. Why don't you giveyour neighbor a chance?
Vema#d *76e Sett
In^the
past few months an increasingnumber of poor quality films have pouredout of Hollywood to theaters all over thecountry, as can be noticed in some of
Erie's
theatres. By glamorizing crime and portraying teenage morals at their
slowest,
thesemovies
have"
had a degrading effect on themorals and standards of American youthand have contributed to the
high
rate ofjuvenile delinquency. With the keen competition between movie and television indus
tries,
the movie makers must give us the excellence we
demand;
we must let them knowthat only the best is good enough.
Ml
Mill
PRESS
THE MERCIAD
Mercyhurst College, Erie, Pa.
I
Member ofAssociated Collegiate PressPublished Monthly
 
February 11, 1958
TM
E
i\
M E R C
I
A D
Pare
Three
STUDENTS EXPERIMENT
Sylvia Haise (left) and Ruth
Friel (right)
check their vacuumequipment before subliming
Hhe
esters needed for rate measurements.
Careful Preparations GiveLaudable Project Results
Mad scientists at work???As
oneewalks
down studio hall past room 26, better known asSister Carolyn's research lab, she may find
two?'budding
scientists,Ruth Friel and Sylvia Haise, who are
taking!a
course in researchchemistry as part of their curriculum. They are busy at work withtheir latest experiment.Ruth
and-
Sylvia first of all started to look for information aboutthe experiment (they would perform in the stacks of chemical booksin the research lab. When they fin-
Classics
ShowPopular
Tunesf
Why is it
that;*the
majority ofpeople fail to realize the impetusof good music on them, emotion
ally,
mentally, and many times
physically^.
.
*
.It doesn't take muchfto set thenormal
person's
foot tapping if shehears or suddenly remembers somehaunting little tune. She hums unknowingly a fragment of melodyunknown to| her but
i
certainly
catching to her ear.In the musical world a particularstyle of music will become popular,remain for a period of time andthen lose its. place to
another
equally
well-received
type. Calyp
so,
waltzs, mambos, rock and roll,all take their place in line decided by their reception by the listening public. Yet, this same publicwhose foot is tapping doesn'tknow the origin of that tune.Classic FavoritesA few hours listening to whatthe public usually avoids wouldanswer the question. Practicallyevery particularly catching orhaunting melody is found in aclassical or semi-classical musicalpiece by one of the masters—Tchaikovsky, Beethoven, Dvorak,Brahms to name only a few.The theme from "Stranger inParadise" repeats over and
*over
again
Jiin
Borodin's
"Polovitsian
Dances" from Prince Igor, and thefinal part of
Liszt's
"HungarianDances" contains "Put AnotherNickel in, in the
Nickel-o-deon".
The theme from the ever-popular"Eddy Duchin Story" comes fromone of Chopin's "Nocturnes".Children and adults alike thrilledto
Walt
Disney's "Fantasia" whichwas a video presentation of Tchaikovsky's "NutcrackerSuite".Mercyhurst students walk to El-gar's "Pomp and Circumstance" onMay Day and this year the Sophomores presented
i
their pageant toBerlioz's
"Enfance }
du Christ."
Good
music can satisfy desiresfor
something,
much better thanthe ordinary and yet a full musical
education
is not necessary to obtain complete enjoyment.ally did find some information
it
happened to be written in GermanWhat next??? This actually
wa*
not too much of an obstacle be
cause §both
have a reading knowledge of German. The translation
.of
the text was then fastidiously accomplishea.However, one final step wasnecessary before the student-scientists were ready to performtheir proposed experiment. Calibrating burettes and standardizing acids and bases became theorder of the day. For
the
{
layman,
this translated means the determination of whether their buretteswere even in circumference in allplaces, and what the strengthswere of the acids and bases.Finally the
Misses
\
Sylvia
and
Ruth were prepared to commencewith their experiment in researchchemistry. For results, a visit inroom 26 anytime they are at workshould satisfy any curiousity. Theywill be happy to answer any ofyour questions about their experiment. Scientists, yes, but definitelynot the mad type.
Lore/}
Kilbracken
Talks With EditorElaborating On Moscow Adventures
|
*
By
Joan-cimhof
"Just call me
John,"
requestedLord Kilbracken in his definiteBritish accent. Sinking back
.into
the sofa in the Bishop's Parlor andstretching his long legs out infront of him, he looked as muchat home there as he would havein his farmhouse.. in Ireland.In the next few minutes the
Lord,
said, "I never meet anyone but common people," which
Valentine DayGreeting CardChanges Face
%
A new trend in greeting cardsfills [the corner store stands. Fascinating studies if a person feelsshe can spare the time to lingerover the innumerable and sometimes indescribable specimens ofmodern-day wit.Holiday CardsAll holidays are "conventionally" covered from Halloween
<
toFather's Day. Many a side comment for the normal* occurrencesand personages encountered inevery-day life are
'Shuffled
inamong them . . . clever, witty, andall
definitely
for {he sarcasticminded. f
#*•*•
£
"Will
you I
be
'. ?
. my tranquilizer?" St. Valentine
"will
neverbe the same. Reading" these cards,one can scarcely believe that thismodern sarcasm evolved from anancient Roman custom
onValen-
tine engagements and the four-teenth century} sending"
of
cardswith verse as a symbol
ojf
friend-
Ship. '--CWi-£.
r
'
a&
Tweedy
Men|
.
•{
#,
From the hearts and flowers "I
love;you"
card to the tweedy manon the "You're
jijst
the kind ofman I like . .
.|single".
A
card
isquite a change. Even the heartyearrings on the girl with theshag "I've got you . . . right whereyou want me" seems to be slightly more expressive than the"Prince
of
a fellow
.
. . here,Prince!" type.Sarcasm lover? Then the cornerstore is just the
iplace .
to spendthose
many-pennies for
asSt.
Val-
en
ine card in (this latest "conventional" garb.*
Individual
RetreatsClose
I
*
After Self
-
Reflection! Time
Rejuvenation in the spirituallife
of;
the Mercyhurst was provided for by the annual three-dayretreat, this year held separatelyfor the Seniors and Juniors, Sophomores and Freshmen on January26 to 28 and January 29 to 31respectively.
I
Sponsored by the MercyhurstSodality, the Senior and Juniorretreat was
conducted
by FatherFrancis J. Smith, S.J. Father is aprofessor of English at the University of Detroit. His conferencesubjects were varied and provokedmany comments. Christ's passion,sin, agnosticism and atheism, andthe power of prayer were "thoughtprovoking and inspiring," "deepbut practical topics," and "mostbeneficial
for-
mental prayer and
self -
reflection."
"v
Father J.
C.,Schwarz, g.
J., alsoof the University of Detroit, acted*as retreat master for the
Sophomore-Freshmen retreat. He is professor of theology
*
and.
chaplainin a student dormitory. The fresh-men and sophomores commentedenthusiastically with opinions re-
fleeting
Father's "gentle: yet pos-itive approach," "versatile subjectmatter," his "excellent treatmentof pride and humility,"''and
r
his
"concern for our general spiritual
state
rather than one particularstate in life."Both retreats were composed ofspiritual and
voca 1
exercises designed to relieve mental and physicaltensions. And the general atmosphere was* notably maintained byany students who kept silence during their
three-id-ays
of retreat.. seemed to characterize him completely. The
only?
people he evermeets
are
the Krushchev, Bulgan-•ih;
Jayne
Mansfield
type—all?very
common.
- :-••*" -.4w
Novel
Material
i'
"'i
"
When asked why'
'lie
had beendetermined to go
to'Russia
thistime, the Lord grinned. "Everyyear," he explained', "I plan to dosomething a little out of the ordinary farm routine so I havesomething to write about. I thinkI mentioned my car trip aroundEurope
and
the search for thelost treasure of
the
African Corps
—and,
of course, this last "visit"
to'Moscow.
I'm
.
reliving them innovel
form."
'•
''
Many of the things which LordKilbracken mentioned about Russia were not. unusual, but somewere
surprising.!Moscow,
in contrast
to^what
one would expectin a capital city,
• -is • 'one
of themost drab, and most gloomy inRussia. The
common
4
people
havenone of what is termed ''necessary
appliances,"
^latest
styles,- happiness,- or
even|
smiles.
^
•'State Pays
..
. .,3
; In
Russia if
a
student's gradesshow ability his education
^
will be
continued
at
the
expense? of theState. The amount of the moneygrant depends on the course be-' ing studied and
upon*
the excellence of the student's grades.Choice of course and
of
job positions
after graduation?
are all
if
made
by|the
State.Places of
'entertainment
aresparse *
except
for the
^ballet
and
theatres:-'At
the few dances, theband usually plays
American
music of the
'30's
with an occasional"Rock
and-
Roll." But even whendancing, the Russian people don't
seemf happy—perhaps
it has something to do with the fact thateveryone wears big boots and no'one. seems to have heard of
rhythm
One night Lord Kilbracken and a Swedish girl "stoppedthe show" by simply enjoyingthemselves while "rocking."Colorful
Museums?
Although there are churches,synagogues, and temples in theMoscow' area, they are attendedinfrequently. "Most of them arejust
colorfuljmuseums"
for whichthe old reverence
is,
still held.Churches outside of
Moscow,
especially the Greek Orthodox,are commonly established... Most of the Russians are curiousabout the West, but conditions donot indicate the discontent amongthe people that is
often
imagined.Now that their country is seemingly ahead of the West scientifically,the
Russian
people feel that thegovernment will soon find timeto work on improvements for dailyliving conveniences.
It
seems theWest is
not quite
attractive toRussians
as*the
West would liketo imagine.•; .
;
:
Will
you take advantage ofthe Student Union during Lent?With casualness
the.password,
in
formal
evenings will include playing cards or ping-pong, samplingthe coffee, dancing, or just getting
acquainted!
with students
from
Gannon,
and surrounding areaschools.
•coup*
u
a
•CQHUBKO
TUM<
00*ra<«tf?IM9 TMC
CO<*€*v*
Of Two
Minds
«&£iOn
the- one hand,
you
have Thirsty G. Smith.
$?Good
taste to him means zest and zip in a
.*£&
beverage, sparkle and lilt and all like
that...
$&®Oniheotheriand
*T. Gourmet
SmytheV perceives
good taste as
the'right,
fit and
propc
refreshment for a Discriminating Coterie.So? .... Have it both ways! Coca-Cola
,r...
so good in taste, in such good taste.
Etvous?*
SIGN OF GOOD TASTE
•••
Bottled
under authority of The Coca-Cola Company by
BRIE COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY
*

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->