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The Merciad, Feb. 11, 1959

The Merciad, Feb. 11, 1959

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The Merciad, Feb. 11, 1959
The Merciad, Feb. 11, 1959

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t
Miss Alice
Curtayne
Author HailsFrom Ireland
Alice Curtayne, an Irish author,will pay
her first
visit to
Mercyhurst?
College on March 10,at 11:00
a.m.
in the Little Theatre.As her topic, she
has?
chosen tospeak on "Irish Heritage" withemphasis on history and literature.
Tour ShowsTrue Russia
In the summer of 1958, a groupof prominent American educatorstoured Russia with an eye to appraising the Soviet educationalsystem. One of
the
jj members ofthis team was Dr. Urban
H
Fleege. On February 11, Dr.Fleege will speak in the Little
Theatre£at
1:00 p,m. His topic is"Russia from the Inside: theCountry, the People, theirSchools." Although censored whilein Russia, he has returned to lay
*bare
the facts in this country. Hisreports are
intendedfto
bring theAmerican public to an awarenessof the real situation in Russia.A Catholic educator fromDePaul University, Chicago, Dr.Pleege posseses a diversifiedbackground, qualifying him forhis current position.has taught in Catholicschools throughout the nation fortwenty-five years. Marquette,Loyola, and Catholic University areamong the many schools that oncecalled Dr. Pleege theirs. He hasserved in governmental positionsas
an Ieducational
director.He is not only
a J
teacher, he isan author as jjwell. Among hisworks are books on psychologyand on education. Dr. Fleege isalso a contributor to more than a
I
This is Alice
Curtayne's fourth
visit to the
United |
States. Since
1953,
she has completed three extensive lecture tours. Two of thesetours were trans-American, duringwhich she spoke in the principalcities of 20 states of the Union.In private life, Miss Curtayne isMrs.
Stephen
Rynne, whose husband is the author of Green Fieldsand
All
Ireland. They have fourchildren whose ages range from
sixteen
to twenty-two. Their homeis a County Kildare
farm
which isan old Georgian house builtaround 1800.
Miss
Curtayne had lived in, Italyfor some years before
I
she beganto write. Saint Catherine of Siennaand A Recall to Dante are the fruitof that period. Her subsequentbook titles show a widening rangeof interests: The Trial of Oliver
Flunkett
(a legal appraisement);Sarsfield (biography); SaintFrigid of Ireland (a Celtic study);and House of Cards (ajtnovel).Of her books, Reverend JohnKennedy states in Our SundayVisitor, "She writes simply, yetthere is an art of no mean orderin her cannily controlled performance ... The result is a beautifully wrought book which appealsto the imagination and lays holdof the mind." f
I
jjSW-
"r:-""$?^?^?*$&sg&%pi
Doctor Urban Fleegedozen national mazagines, bothCatholic and secular.
I
Dr. Pleege has traveled extensively in the country. Much of thistravel has been in connection withhis various appointments. Thenature of his work is such that itdemands more than a cursoryglance so that he has been require-ed to live for a time in foreigncountries. Consequently, he haslived in such places as SaudiArabia, Thailand, Hong Kong,Great Britain, and several European countries.
Student Council Sponsors ContestFor Selecting Best-Dressed
Girl
r
Gannon,
Mercyhurst
GroupsDiscuss Religious Topics
Ma r o 1
og
y i Workshop^Mariology
Committee of Mercyhurst College! Sodality is sponsoring a workshop with Gannon'sSaint Thomas More Club on February to
discuss
the virtues of OurLady. Discussion will be based onSaint Luke's Gospels.
| e
Mariology Committee exists tospread devotion to the Mother of
God.
This year emphasis hasbeen placed
onithe
study of doctrine with special attention devoted to Mary under her varioustitles. I
t
Family ForumFamily Life Commission of theNational Federation of CatholicCollege Students at Mercyhurstwill hold a discussion on familylife February 26. Marlene Franco,chairman,
jj
with eight Mercyhurstgirls interested in the discussionwill make up half the panel.Father Peterson has chosen eightGannon students to complete thepanel. The discussion will beopen to only these 16 and theirmoderators.!
StudentiCouncil
of MercyhurstCollege is sponsoring a personalappearance contest. The Councilwill choose
I
four girls from eachclass as judges of the entire student body. These judges will, after careful consideration, vote tonominate
ifour
girls from eachclass as contestants for the honorof "Best-Dressed Girl at Mercyhurst College." From these 16one will be selected as the representative of Mercyhurst in theGlamour
Magazine
contest toselect the
"10
Best-Dressed College Girls
in I
America"! for 1959.Contest NormsGirls will be chosen more forneat appearance and appropriateattire than for wearing the latestVogue in apparel. Cleanliness,color co-ordination, and becoming styles will also be determining factors in the rating of the
girls.
I
~'f#*'
1 -T
I
Judges
are-to
be chosen by theStudent Council rather than byopen election from the studentbody in
order
to avoid possibilityof the girls being rated accordingto popularity.New York Via JetWinners of the Glamour Magazine's "10 Best-Dressed CollegeGirls in America" contest will beflown to New York in June via
Amei
ican Airlines'
?new
707 JetFlagships to spend a week inManhattan as guests of the magazine.There are [three ultra-moderngalleys J aboard, each of which isdesigned to enable
a-stewardess
to serve 42 meals in about asmany minutes.This Jet Flagship, though powerful and fast, is quiet inside.
%
MERC1AD
VOL. XXX, No. 4
MERCYHURST COLLEGE, ERIE, PENNA.
Februray
11,1959
Glee,Cecilean
Symphonic
Choir
Of\Erie
Presents Music Program
lub
SayWith Music'
Mercyhurst College students willpresent an evening of music March
12,
at 8:30 p.m. in the LittleTheatre. Glee Club and CecilianClub will work together on thetheme, "Say It with Music."Most of the scenes will be takenfrom musical shows. Numbers willinclude pieces from "The King.
and.
I,"
"Oklahoma,'*South
Pacific,""State Fair,"|"Brigadoon," and"Showboat." One of the mainfeatures will be a presentation of"Clair de Lune" which was writteniby Debussy.
For?
this piece AliceThomas will| play a piano solo
|
while Sissy
Natili
dances the ballet.
§ J
Officers of the two clubs areplanning the show.
Plansfprovide
for costuming the performers. Included among the performers isCarolyn Heyl, a voice soloist. Asone
of
her pieces, Carolyn will singa selection from "Showboat." KayClayton, Rita Gazarik. and JudyMullen are to dance as "ThreeLittle Maids."
j
Alice Thomas and Sister MaryHelen Jean will work together onthe accompaniment. .
PopeHeadslNext Council
Pope John
xxin
announced the21st Ecumenical Council, whichwill probably meet in 1961. Thiscouncil will bring together thewhole world's Roman Catholichierarchy.!Decisions of the ecumenical council, subject only topapal confirmation, are binding
on
all Catholics.Prime object of the next council will be "to invite the separated religious communities ... toseek the unity of the church, desired by so many souls all overthe world," as the Pope explains.Among councils in the past were
Nicaea
which formulated the firstN i c
e
n e Creed; Constantinople,which was the beginning of thefinal schism between the Easternand Western churches; and Trent,which condemned Martin as aheretic.Erie Symphonic Choir, under the direction of Obed L. Grender, willpresent a concert at Mercyhurst on March 15, at 8:15 p..m, in the LittleTheatre.Organized in 1948, the Erie Symphonic Choir has spent the pastten years building a reputation for choral music in Erie and surrounding area.Erie's choir comes to Mercyhurst stage with the reputation for quality. Several times it has opened
Juniors StartArt Projects
Artists of the class of '60 havechosen their subjects for their classin art thesis.
W/KHB^SmSiMm
Studio visitors will find PatriciaColeman working on
a*
set of endtables, decorating them with carved and stained linoleum tops.
>WBB
Margaret G
e
r a c e, PatriciaHaben, Linda Rosinski, MargeTopping, and
Pat |
Walsh, underthe direction of Sister MaryAngelica,** are experimenting con
tinually I
in
i different artf
techniques.These
preparations!are
fortheir own exhibits.
&2a^'lBH
Mercy hurst's Christmas {Crib,much damaged by the snow, wind,and rain, is being restored by daystudents Mary Jane
Ste
George andKathy
Reid,
under the supervisionof Sister Mary Joachim.
jKjB
Georgianne
Kwlatowski
will bechipping stone for her life-sizemodernistic project.
IHBi
the season at Chautauqua, and, inJune of this year, members wereaccorded a
special
honor,
^heywere?selected
to sing the chorusparts in the Jerome Hines opera,
"IiAm
the Way." In addition, sixmembers of the choir appeared onthe stage with Mr. Hines in oneof the opera's dramatic scenes.
j^BBK
Mellon Performance
W
On March!
18,|1958,
the A.
W.
Mellon Concert Series presented aconcert
atfthe
Natonal Gallery ofArt in Washington, D. C. The ErieSymphonic Choir participated inthis. Groups of musicians may perform at the National Art Galleryby special invitation only.
[JlPjiJl
Critic's PraiseJohn Ha skins, music
critic jj
forthe Washington Post and TimesHerald described the concert presented by the Choir in Washingtonwith the words, "An occasion ofjoy to encounter a chorus of suchquality."
f Pf
?
This fchoir
will entertain
Mercy
hurst,
?
March 15, at 8:15 p.m., inthe
Little
Theatre. They are specializing
In
choralImusic.
rv
 
Yfcgt
Two
JlP,
THE
MERCIAD
February
11,
1959
rofed&oreAianA
Mercyhurst College accepts a resignation
from
a
professor.
To those outside the radiusof students, family, and friends of DoctorMichael J. Relihan, this would seem merelyanother factual statement. To us,
his
students and friends at Mercyhurst, there
is
a
rmeandng
that goes deeper than either pen andink or vocal expressions
cant
capture. Wemust be satisfied to present here merelywhat words seem fairly appropriate.Doctor Relihan, we wish you a happy,healthy retirement; We all shall miss youradvice and guidance but we
future
teachersshall more
fully feel
your absence. Your kindly,
helpful
criticism has been of more benefitthan multitudinous books.The official relationship between us aspupil to teacher has been changed, DoctorRelihan, by your resignation but our relationship of admirer to learned will never change.In our memory you will always be thepleasant, understanding gentleman whotaught us in the principles of teaching. Toexpress our
feelings
fbetter,
let us quoteSwift:
j_
"Whoe'er excels in what we prize,Appears a hero in
our
eyes;|Each girl, when pleased
withiwhat
is| taught, |Will have the
teacher
in her thought.
y
om
2>«
it
ZJo
cJjUS
t
Ash Wednesday marks the beginning ofanother season of Lent. Ashes
wiil
be placedon the forehead of each Catholic with thewords, "Remember, man, that thou art dust,and unto dust thou
shalt
return.
,,
A man made from dust
by|a
SupremeCreator is reminded again of his diminutivesize in proportion to the immensity of hisGod. He is reminded that the ashes he wears
signify
his grief and repentence and
for forty
days he will valiently attempt to rectify themajority, if not all, of his ill-bred habits.It is so much more
effective
and rewarding if each person during the fortv days offast preceding Easter adds something positive to his
personality—be
it strengtheningof will power, cultivation of good study habits,rising for morning Mass, curbing a malicioustongue, or attempting a smile.Forty days in time is short,! yet timeenough to grow in love for the sufferingSavior. Time is
fleeting—take
advantage ofit.
"Remember,
man that thou art dust, andunto dust thou shalt
return"—maybe
sooner than vou think.
w
men
n[-^ublic
czLife
I
A
n Ounce Of Etcetera
By Joan
Imhof
As the new semester slowly begins to crawl out of its wintryshell, most of us are experiencingthe oddity of an open mind andan open conscience. This is theresult of the not-quite-yet forgotten semester exams and the retreat. And quite a retreat itwas—Father Koch really had a knackfor making religion live, didn't he?But, strangely enough, neitherknowledge nor religion seems to bethe issue of the moment. It apearsthat most "scholars" are hopelessly engrossed in that universalproblem (?) of
romance.Tis
a pity,but what more can a poor girl dowith all the recent carnival propaganda, proposing "Sweetheartsin the Snow?"
?
Then, too, while St. Valentinesits behind some snowbank helpingCupid sharpen his somewhat rustyarrows,
coUegians
are rapidlydiminishing Erie's supply of "con-
"Women
fare the |books, the arts, theacademies that show, contain, and nourishall the
world."
With these words Shakespearepaid another tribute to womanhood. Women,their lives, the roles they have playedthrough the ages, and the position they holdin contemporary society are all topics thathave been discussed time and again. Now ofparticular
finterest
to the Catholic
collegianfisjthe
question of women in public service,and in the high political offices.In the January issue of The Sign, appeared the
following
release: "A belief amongCatholics
that Catholicfwomen
have evincedless interest fif public service than their non-Catholic sisters has not been borne out by therecord."
\
The article went on to cite IreneDunne,! the actress, as a member of the
fUnited
gNations, Clare BootMLuce, formerCongresswoman and Ambassador, and MaryH. Donlon, Judge of the United StatesCustoms Court in New York, as outstandingexamples. Of sixty-three
women
who have
I
been elected to Congress, six were Catholics.In recent years the question of a womanpresident has been introduced on the Washington scene. John C. O'Brien, of The Sign,believes "It would be reckless ... to predictthat the time never will come when
oneior
the other major parties nominates a woman,if not for President, at least for Vice Presi
dent.'
And so it is that woman,
sol
long agolifted to a new status in
life
by Christianity,continues to progress in
^varied
fields ofendeavor and finds new ones opening to her.temporary" valentines, Whatstrange ways these earth peoplehave of expressing
their
af
fections
! But I guess it's
aU
in thegame.Thus,following Auntie Maine'sphilosophy, it seems best to "live,live, live." But
withf
Lent justaround the corner, there arebound to be some changes made.At any rate, the figures should beback in shape for the Spring outfits. Speaking
offspring
outfits,rumor has it that the new look isthe "old-fashioned-girl" style.On the more intellectual side ofcampus, seniors have discovered astrange phenomena. In spite of thedrastic teacher shortage, it stilltakes a "heap of trying" to findthat job. Of course, one can alwaysmake a career of
coUege
and help
keep pad's
income tax within theincome!
TVJMusic, Lenten Drama
Off
Entertainment
To those whose Lenten plans yet allow entertainment for theirleisure time, the month of February offers some fine suggestions. |Good news for music lovers is the Erie Philharmonic's presentation of a
Kern-Hammerstein
program on February 10 and 11 at 8:30.
Included
in the program
wiU
be music from "Showboat," featuringsuch favorites as "Ol' Man River" and "Make Believe."Because of many requests, N.B.C. will repeat
"An
J
Evening
With
Fred
Astaire" on February 11,featuring Miss Barrie Chase andthe Jonah Jones Quartet. From8:30 to 9:00 the same
-
evening,the network presents "Meet Mr.Lincoln," a semi-biographical playcommemorating Lincoln's birthday,
i
The
fBrie •
Playhouse aims toplease theatre-goers with a rollicking comedy, "The HappiestMillionaire," beginning February
17.
in
keeping with the Lentenspirit, "The Betrayal," depictingChrist's trial and condemnationbefore Jewish and Roman courts,opens
there *on
March 3. §
CBS.
brings to T.V. Shakespeare's "Hamlet" on the "DuPontShow of the Month," February
24.
February 26, the same network presents the New YorkPhilharmonic Concert.
Jit
We
See
Jt
YOUR EDITORS RECOMMEND:... that retreat resolutions be concentrated on during
Lent,
... that students maintain a "studious" attitude this semesterand avoid last minute "cramming."... your choice for the nomineein the "Personal AppearanceContest" be carefuUy selected.... that all readmittance cards bereturned on time to the office.
Ups
and downs are common ineveryone's Jlife. Some can takefailures, some can't. The nexttime you feel Uke complaining,turn for inspiration to the wordsof wisdom found
inl
February'sCatholic Digest:
jffi
A certain businessman, whenever someone comes to
|his
office bemoaning his misfortunesin business, love or life in general, takes him! aside and inviteshim to study a framed, hand-lettered sign hanging on the wall.It reads:"Failed in business, '31
\
%
Defeated for legislature,
'32
Failed in business again, '33
Electedfto
legislature, '34Sweetheart died, '35Suffered nervous breakdown,
'36
Defeated!
for speaker,
'38
Defeated for elector,
'40
Defeated for congress,
'43Elected
ito congress, '46Defeated for congress, '48Defeated for senate, '55Defeated for vice president, '56Defeated for senate, '58
.
Elected President of the UnitedStates, '60And the name beneath thisrecord of misfortune, crowned byfinal success? Abraham Lincoln.YOUR EDITORS THANK:...the Administration for allevi-| ating the buUetin board problem.... Sodality's change of meetingtime to the Friday 11:10 period.
Jl
... D.S.O. members who gaveschool students the opportunity
jto
see our school
atjjthe
Open House.... all
C.D.D.ers—present
and future.
J
.
,|those
named to the Dean's List.YOUR EDITORS BID FARWELL:... to Dr. Michael J. Relihan withthe assurance that "out ofsight" is not "out of mind."... to Joan Connors and Charlotte Gray.YOUR EDITORS EXTEND:...welcome to new
students J
and
senior^
cadets.g
... best wishes to Mary EllenSmith, Joan Maloney, and JudyMcMinn who have entered thereligious life.... congratulations to Sally
Fleck-
enstein, Berley
Schaaf,
ButchRyan, Carol Allen, Mary KayGarvey, GeorgiaLoomis,andPatty Carlile on their engagements.
..\
a
salute to
the11959
WinterCarnival Queen.
"Irreverence
is the greatest sin of thetwentieth century. We have become the mostlawless nation! on the earth," states KarlAdam in a recent magazine article. Disregardfor
"insignificant''
laws is the fault of mostcollege students. Do you jaywalk
?
Exceed thespeed limit? Place person to person calls toa non-existent person at home to let
your
family know that you arrived safety?
These
infractions fall into that much-to-be avoidedcategory of irreverence for law.Order in the lounges, class rooms, in thehall, depends upon each student's respect forlaw. Respect your neighbor and you will respect law. Respect her by
keeping?the
fiveminute limit on the phone, by emptying yourash tray so that she will not
need
to do it, bykeeping the silent hours to that she can studyto pass that important
test.a
YOU
can
reawaken the spirit of reverence in the nation.
'Taxation
without representation is|tyranny!
w
That was the cry of our forefathers and a cause of the Revolutionary
ItWar.
Today Americans are well representedin city, state, and national governments. Wedo not have tyranny, but we
stiH
have taxes.Taxes have been gradually increasing innumber and amount and there is every indication that
\
they* will continue to grow.Federal, state, and city governments all havethe power to tax. Inheritance, school, property, luxury, and hidden taxes on articlesthat the public buys daily, bread, cigarettes,gasoline, etc., are only a
few
of the taxes thatAmerican citizens fall victim to yearly.The
federal
income tax was increased tocover the expenses of World War II. The warended 14 years ago, but the cold war has
keptf!
taxes high.
jlIL ^
However, this
sitation
is not one without remedy. The least the American peopletoday can do is appeal to their governmental
representatives—city
aldermen, state senators, and members of Congress;' These menwere responsible for the passing of the taxbills; it is only through them that we
cam
appeal for a reduction in taxes.
$
Nature sometimes exercises her powersin strangely |prophetic ways, lake for |ex-
I
ample
Jthe
demonstration of extreme winterweather which she gave on January 6, 1959.Coincidentally,
that
was the day of
Mercyhurst's
ground
breaking
ceremony. Thewind tore at the gowns of 300 shivering collegians as they watched a shiny shovel angrily fight the ice-packed ground. §Indeed, during the ceremony it was
dif
ficult
to concentrate on anything other thanone's freezing extremities. However, Naturemay not have been as cruel
as
would appear.After all, the planning and preparation whichpreceded that simple shovel-lifting were not
I
bright, easy, "sunny day" types of work. It'san extremely difficult task to get the construction of a building under way, andperhaps Nature was just reminding us thatthere's much work to be done before we'll berelaxing in those lovely new lounges, the oneseachclass
i
has pledged to furnish
J
Need shesay more?
?J y f
*
get well wishes to Mary JaneCorrigan and Rosalie Bablak.
4* THE MERCIAD
<
t9j|^fe
Mercyhurst College, Erie, Pa.
(
yU£±3LJS&
Member
of
r
;
*•'PRESS
Associated Collegiate PressPublished Monthly
f
Editor!
±4$
Mary StarkAssociate Editor
^_
Mary Lou
KeUy
Assistant Editors
jj.
Mary Anne Koss,Theresa
Proulx
Editorial Staff Susan Avery, EleanorCavanaugh, Elaine Curtis, Marlene Hahn,Peggy Hirsch, Joan
Imhof,
Mildred Manzione,
Adele
Ontko, Kathy
Re
id,
Virginia /Rossoni
Agnes Siracusa, Mary Jane St. George, Margaret Topping, Mary Alice Zimmerman.
 
February 11, 1959
THE
MERC!
AD
Three
Reporter-SpyCollects InfoOn New Dorm
Recognize this girl? She is aspy. In her work she has unturnedmany interesting things for theMercyhurst student body. As amatter of
fact,
she may be anotherNancy Drew.
Secret SleuthFor past few weeks she has collected all the secret informationabout the
new J
dorm, McAuleyHall. By keeping her eyes and earswide open, she found out much.The construction company movedin on January 12 with train and
all.
They put up five little greenbuildings near the location of thenew dorm. They don't seem to bedoing much excavating though —probably because the contour ofthe land doesn't require much excavation;!Cement PouredJust the other day the menstarted to pour cement for thefoundation. She supposes theirnext step is laying bricks, andthen the installation of the plumbing, heating, lighting, and all othernecessary items
for
the new dormitory.Minus ExtrasTo the spy's surprise, they planto have the beautiful new buildingready for the Mercyhurst girls tolive in when the 1959 fall semestercommences. If everything goes asplanned, the girls will have theirmodern, convenient rooms in September. The first floor may not becompletely finished,
.
b u t shedoesn't think the residents willmind living without some of theextras for awhile. After all, theywill be in their new dorm.Her spy work is constantly goingon. If you see her snooping aroundthe campus and have a question,just ask. If she keeps this up she'llbecome an authority on dorm construction.
Cadets GetAssignment
The change of semesters meanta change of residents for cadetteachers the Misses
 
Garvey, De-Matteo, Nientemp, Wiesen, Goodwill, Moore, Plunkett, McGinty,and Lally, and the
MesdamesMorehouse
and
Z biernowski
Returning
from
teaching j toclasses at Mercyhurst are
|Mary
Kay Garvey, Terri DeMatteo, and
Mrs.
Morehouse, who formerlytaught grades six, three, and two
respectively^at
St. George's whileAngela Moore will teach secondgrade at St. Luke's.Nancy Plunkett is now teaching fourt grade in Franklin, Pa.She replaced Mrs. Donald Zbier-nowski, the former Mary LouLittle. Mary Margaret McGintyhas been assigned to second gradein Franklin, while Martha Lally isteaching in Sharon. In addition tothe semester change in assignments,
two
seniors, two juniors,and thirteen sophomores will teachthe entire year.The cadet teachers' program wasbegun in 1955 with 18 girls. At present there are 23 girls teaching invarious schools both locally andout-of-town and 24 attendingclasses at Mercyhurst.
8
E
I
I
K
J:
I
Dr. Michael J. Relihan, former teacher training director at Mercyhurst, columnist in the Lake Shore Visitor Register, and editor ofthe Alumnae News, works previous to his resignation on January 14.
Doctor Relihan Resigns;Saddens Entire School
A friendly smile, constant interest in his girls, an educator of educators, and gentlemanliness with an innate sense of humor are foreverthe characteristics that will endear Dr. Michael J. Relihan toMercyhurst. On January 14, the student body heard with reluctancethat Or. Relihan had officially resignedDr. Relihan, a native of Sharon, Pa., received his elementary education at the Immaculate Conception School, Youngstown, Ohio, and hishigh school and college training at Pittsburgh Catholic College,! nowDuquesne University. After having taught for four years at his AlmaMater, Doctor joined the pioneer faculty of D'Youville College, Buffalo,New York, in 1909 where he taught
Feb r ua
ry
March
Calendar
February
10—Philharmonic
Night.
11—Ash
Wednesday;Dr.
Pleege's
lecture.
15—Sodality
Mariology Workshop.
20—Family
Forum.March
3—Seniors'
Spaghetti Dinner.
6-8—Seminary
Dramaticpresentation.
10—Illustrated
lecture by AliceCurtayne.
12—Evening
of Music by the Gleeand
Cecllean
Clubs.
15—Erie
Symphonic Choir.
^
ttKOtutctaa
On March 3, to aid their dorm
fund,
the Senior Class will sponsora spaghetti dinner for the entireschool in the dining room. Admission fee will be announced.education, Latin, Greek, chemistry,and mathematics.In 1917, another pioneer facultyat Seton Hill College, Greensburg,Pa., gained Dr. Relihan as a teacher. The department of educationthere was organized by him.The educator came toMercyhurst in 1927 where he hasbeen professor of
education
{anddirector of teacherjjtraining, professor of Greek, and director of theplacement bureau.
In
recognition of his outstanding work. St. Vincent's College inLatrobe, Pa., honored Dr. Relihanin 1934 with the awarding of Doctor of Letters to him.Not only has Dr. Relihan been a
full-time
teacher with innumerableother time-consuming tasks but hehas been a regular writer in theLake Shore Visitor Register as thecolumnist for "Your Child inSchool," and has often contributed to the Merciad.
BookjOfRevolution' TellsFight For Freedom Story
America's fight for independence, the story of the Revolution,is described in
fulllin
the BOOKOP THE REVOLUTION, edited bythe producers of the historicalmagazine, "The American Herit
age."
Bruce Lancaster, author of morethan a dozen historical novels andhistories, and Dr. J. H. Plumb,Cambridge University lecturer inhistory, provide narration for thevolume.
It
is especially noted for
its*
numerous, revealing illustra
tions,
some of which have neverbefore been printed.|Approximately! 180 interveningyears have dulled the realism ofAmerica's struggle for independ
ence.!
The authors, by casting alight on the little-known facts ofthe Revolution, revive the spirit of
this
L
struggle. The
flack
of manpower in colonial forces is seldommentioned; however, it is believed,as the BOOK OP THE REVOLU-
TION
states, that only one-thirdof the provincials were patriots andonly one-sixteenth of the eligiblemen belonged to the state militias.Its six hundred illustrations reveal much of the dramatic emotionof this period extending from lifein the colonies and England priorto the conflict, to the defeat of theBritish eight years later.The nature of the book is suchthat it may appeal to everyonedesirous of a knowledge of theircountry's struggle for self-government.Ed. Note: This book may befound on display in
the
library.
Older
Sisters
In SchoolAre Boon To
Freshmen
I
"Sisters, sisters, there were never such devoted sisters
..." In
fact,they were so devoted they both chose Mercyhurst as their home awayfrom home.
Jj
Having an older sister
hi
the same college can be an asset to
n
freshman.
Three £
members of the freshmen class are among the fortunate few for they have, in addition to their junior "big sisters," theirown big sisters.Sue Bye, freshman, and her sister Joan, a junior class member, arefrom Lockport, New York. It saves transportation lack of companion-
Six Conduct
Soci Study
The professional managementof Catholic agencies impressedJulie
Kuhner.jj
one of six juniorswho completed a study of socialagencies inland around the Eriearea. She based her observation onthe
fact
that the Catholic agenciesemploy only personnel who aregraduates of social work schools.In addition to Julie, Mary JaneCorrigan, Carolyn Heyl, RoseMarie Laskey, Joan
O'Malley,
andMary Anne Schubert completedtheir study under the direction of
Mrs.
C. H. Lund as part of theircourse in fields of social work.In the future the class will makefield trips to Gannondale Homefor Girls, St. Joseph's Home forChildren, and Polk State Hospitalfor the Mentally Retarded. Threeof the girls will continue theirstudies under the supervision ofSister M. Daniel of Mercyhurst
and}
will participate in a threeweeks' observations at accreditedagencies this summer.ship on the long way home.Alice Jalics' sister, Maria, is oneyear ahead of her as a sophomore.Originally from Hungary, theycame to this country a year and ahalf ago and now reside in Cleveland, Ohio.The third member of the double-sister trio is Rita Quinn, a day-hopfrom Erie. Her sister, Eileen Quinn,is a member of the sophomore
class.
Two other freshmen also had
sister-upperclassmen
but due to
transfers
and illnesss are at presentunable to name themselves amongthe few. Rita
Corrigan's
sister,Mary Jane, is on a temporary leaveof absence from the junior classbecause of illness. Margaret Ryan'sfreshman sister, Elizabeth,
trans
ferred in September to IthacaState Teacher's College, Ithaca,New York.When everything seems to beheading in the wrong direction,these freshmen will tell you thereis absolutely nothing like havinga member of your own familyhandy when needed. It certainlyis a convenient arrangement.
"COKE"
M
A
REaWTCMO
TRADC-MARK.
CO WRIGHT O
V>&*
INK COCA-CO A COM PAN
V.
Ice
Lucky
us...
today
is
the modern Ice
age.
Lots and lots of it in refrigeratorsready to ice up the Coke* And whatcould be more delicious than frostyCoca-Cola. •. the real
refreshment.
With its cold crisp taste andlively lift it's always Coke
for The
Pause That Refreshes I j
IE
ALLY REFRESHED
...
HAVE A COKE!
Bottled under authority
of
The Coco-Cola Company
by
RIE
COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY

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