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The Merciad, Nov. 6, 1970

The Merciad, Nov. 6, 1970

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The Merciad, Nov. 6, 1970
The Merciad, Nov. 6, 1970

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Mticuimnte Calltg
*
LV
Itkmic
Vol. XUI—No.
4
MERCYHURST COLLEGENovember
6,
1970
'HURST DRAMA SEASONOPENS WITH
HEIRESS!
Andres,
Federici
Leading Roles
TheiMercyhurst
College Drama Department will present
"The
Heiress"
as
their firstproduction
of the
new
dramat
ic
season^The
play will be pre
sented*
on November
6th,
17th
and
8th
>at
8:15 p.m. andia matinee
on
November 8th|at 2:30p.m.Selected
as one of the
best
dramatic plays
of 1948, the
Mercyhurst production will
be
Dennis
Andres
under the direction
of
iSister
Jude Yablonsky,
O.S.U.I
"The
Heiress"
will
mark the thirdproduction
for
the Ursuline|
sis
ter;
since joining
the
faculty!in1969 and the
^first
since
Hast
spring's musical* success "Manof La Mancha/'
1
£
Suggested by HenryJames'novel, "Washington
£
Square."the
play is setiinja
nineteenthcentury^ background and enact-ed
in a
Washington Squarehome
in
New
£York?
City.
The fplot
centers around
a
young, awkward girl, CatherineSloper, who because
of
her in-
jCbris Tedericii?
adequate social graces
is
des
pised by her father,
Dr.*
Austin
Sloper*
Dennis^ Andres portrays
Dr.
Slopei|
a
dignified
and
Jprom-
*nent|man
yet commanding
fa-
Catherine
Sloperjlplayed
by
Chris Federici,
lis
a*
shy $roung
girl; yearning
foj^fove
and af
fection
undernhe
suppression of
her ^sardonic
father.
Her
re
spond
to the attentions
of|Mor-
**
Townsend,
the!
third leadingcharacter,
islthe
result
of
Catherine's
dfeire
for
freedom fromparental ties.
1
m
Portraying
the
suave, youngfortune^ hunter, Morris Town-send,
is
Louis Fiorina.
In
con*trast
to
Miss Sloper's searchfor love, Mr. Townsend's searchis entirely for monetary success.Aiding the
young "couple"Jis
Catherine's matchmaking aunt,
Mrs.
Peniman. Enacting!
the
part
of
the flighty
\
busy|bodyys
Chrisi
Warnick.
%
p
•Serving
the
family faithfullyfor
afenumber
of
years is Maria.The quiet, obedient and devotedservant
is
played
by
JoyceBroadus.
,
'&
Morris' brother Arthur, portrayed
|by
Bill Fitcher, represents
the
established business-
man,|dry
and contrite.
§
Married
to the
"established'-*
Louis
Forina
manl- is Marian
Almond*
Town-send, perfectly matched
in
dryness and contriteness.Austin Sloper's
fa
voritef sisteris played by Marie Oliviefi,
society's!
woman, wealthy and per*sonable.Liz Montgomery plays
tMor-
ris
Townsend's
widowed sister.She
is
sweet and
typicallylmid-
dlefclass.
X
Tickets
for^the
play will
be
sold prior
to the
performances
for $1.50
per
adult
and|
$1.00per student. Reservations
can
be made
bj|.calling
the collegeat 864-0681.
I
^»^^^^^^
a
^^'W^&^3'^
Front row
fdeft
to
right)—Mary
Pat-Helbig,TerryJPawIyShn,Nancy Ryan, Claudia WeeksSecond row (left to
right)—Rochelle
George,
lAl
Messina, Debby-Bradley.
WHOWHO
Twelve
fsenior|
students
^from
is
essay
editor|
of
the
literary
her
hobby.
In
preparation
far
Mercyhurst College have been magazine,
andlvice-president
of-
her|chosen
career, Debby
is a
member? of
the
students
branchhosen
Jfor
recognition
in the
the?
student
government.
1970-71 edition
of
Who's Who
in
American^ Colleges and Univer
sities.
Cathie Jean Kozolowski,
a
senior''
cadet teaching secondof PSEA.
f
Mary Pat
Helbig&is
at
Mercygrade
at
Our
|Lady
of|
Fatima
hurst working toward
a
degreeFive
of
the honored colleg-
in
Farrell, iis
a
graduate
of in
sociology,
leading
ito
a|
ca*ians
are?
Erie residents/ inolud- Mercyhurst Preparatory School, reer as
a
social worker. Infpre*ing Albert P. Messina, the first She served two years
as
SGA paring
£for
social work, Marymale
studentsto
be listed
in
the?
representative, member
of the
Chris Warnickawards publication.Membership
in^the
annual directory,
^published
since
1034,
is
basedSon^an
above average rating fin the areas
of
academicstanding, service
to
the school,leadership qualities, and potential
to
the community.
fChosen
by
*the vote^of
tfhe
Mercyhurst*
faculty
and
senior
class, Erie*
students namedwere, Mrs. Jeanne Emery, Mar-
cia
Jobes,
Cathie
Kozlowski,Rhonda Mahoney,
and
Albert
P.
Messina.
I;
^Resident
students includeDeborah
Bradley |
(Uniontown,
Pa.),
Rochelle
JGeonge
(Cleveland, Ohio), Mary
Pat
Helbig(Youngstown, Ohio), Nancy Ryan (Oil City, Pa.),
Tersy
Paw-
lyshn
(Youngstown, Ohio), Barbara
Smith
(Lakewood, Ohio),and and Claudia
jWeeks
(Brooklyn, N.Y.).f
'%
H |
ABOUT THE STUDENTS
|
, JeanneiEmery was the chairman
and,
organizer
of
the firstcolloquy weekend, Exposure
'69.
An art
major,
in
1969
she
received first prize
intfche
Mon-
roeville/Art
Show. Last
£year
she was
aj
campus
coordinator
of the NSA, dorm council representative* and an
jart
teacherin| the
fterie
NATO programCurrently
sftie
is
almember
of
the
art
clubland
the
student
chapter!
of
the
PSEA.Albert P>Messina,
a
graduate
of
:
Academy$High f
School,
 fts
he
editor
of
the
campus jnewspap-er,
THE&|HERCIADjt jJMessmacameko
Mercyhurst
in
the win<|ter
of
1969 as
a*transfer
studentfrom |Penn-
State.,*
A
history
major,
he was
a^member
of
the
Student
Government
Associa-tion (SGA) and
a
columnist
for
the*
MERCIAD
in his
junior
year.
In
addition- to
his
dutiesthis year asieditor,
Mr.lMessina
Day Students Organization, andthe students| chapter
of the
PSEA. She
wasialso
a
member
o^Jthe
MERCIAD
staff,working
as*
a
reporter and page editor.Miss Kozolowski was
the
only
cadet
chosen
for
Who's
$Who
distinction^ this year.Marcia*
Jobess
comes
to
Mercyhurst College from Villa Maria High School. Her academicmajor
of
elementary educationis reflected
in
her lift
of
activi
ties,
such
Jas
education
^inter-
sessions, councils,
aijd
membership
in the
PSEA.
All
this
is
culminated
by her
studentteaching this term
at
Mont-
clair
Kindergarten in Millcreek.Teaching
isithe
most probablecareer
for
Rhonda Mahoney,Home Economics
majorlnamed
to the list. Among her more
il
lustrious activities
at
Mercyhurst
;is
the
fact.that
she islthephoto editor
of the
year bookthis year. This
is
backed
by
much! administrative experience
husuch
areas
;as ^Spring
Week
end, colloquy, and the Big Sister, Little* Sister Program,A career
insradio
or
television
communications ilooms
in the
future
of
MissjRochelle
George.This English major
is a
grad|
uate off J.F.K. High
Schooljin
her hometown
of
Cleveland.Rochelle
^divides
her
timeamong studies,
her
favoritepasttime
of
reading,
and ad
ministering
thej;
RUS
from?her
position as president.
Ar(|
major iDebbyf
Bradley
is
looking
-forward
to
teachingupon ^graduation.
.Debby
has a
three year
"history
of activity on
student
government,
^including
office
or
treasurer and
^RUS
representative^ Miss
Bradley
also
is a
long-standing memberof the
art
club here
at
Mercy-
hurstf
and lists photography
as
Patfehas
been active
in
conKmunity faff
airs
|such
as Y. C.S.
 
and various housing commit
tees.
Around school
she
isdn-volved
in
student - af f atrap-^&d
UL
government,
along
with the col*
loquy
experience.. Another
of the
honored
sUu
dents
is
TheresaPawlyshn.Terry is
a
consistent honor student
in
her
academic major
of
English.
She
hag
participatedon
a
multiplicity
of
committeesincluding concerts
and
SpringWeekend. Looking toward
her
career Terry
is
active
tin
student PSEA,
and
school activi-tioes
at
Iroquoios
where
she
is
student|teaching.
?
Nancy
.
Ryan,
a
sociologymajor,
is
active
fin many facetsof life
at
Mercyhurst. She
has
observed
in the
dorm council^cultural enrichment program,and
on the
finance committeefor the 1970 colloquy.
This
^pros
pective social worker has alsobeen
actives
as a
CCD teacherand
foi^mer volunteer
worker
foi£
the
Bookfer
T
WashingtonCenter.
?2'
Claudia Weeks
is
another
^out
standing
g history
cited.
She
plans
to
use^her
background
in
European history
as
a ^foundation
for a
secondary educator
career.
$
Among
her
^activities,Claudia
is
neknowned
as formerclass officer, committee worker,
and is
presently
a
student
government!
representative.Miss Barbara Smith was
also
named
|on the|Who's
Who list.Upon graduation with
a
degreein American History,
%
Barbplans
on
teaching.
Wihjl%here
at
^Mercyhurst
she
has|
been
active-in thejGlee Club,Sstudentgovernments
and
mostj
recentlyin the student branch
ot\
P
V
SEA
andNEA.
f
Congratulations
to all for a
well-deserved
honor!
 
Page Two
MERCYHURST COLLEGENovember 6, 1970
MERCYHURST COLLEGE,fERIE, PA.
Merciad Staff
Editor
|.
'$
.
ft
i\
'
. IM*
Messing\Associate
 Editor
..
. J.
Bo^^wrks
LtCfj/ouiESton.
M
A........
-pave
Bohde
News Editor
..
.1.
J-
I
i
.
BSZ #ac^?eSjwrf s
JEdtfor
.
4...
Bill
DopieralM
Photographer
.A Debhy
DockestaderCirculation and
Exchanfje
..
f...
Marlene Smith
Layout
Staff
.
.B
Fran Ahearn, Bill
Ohio
do,
|'
f
I
Rita Hadfalvi, Bob BeckStaff Writers Paul Anderson, Rick^Lamb,
I I
Audrey
Rosenthal, Jeff
H elf
and,
m Brendia
Brewer, Carolyn Shade
Staff*.
... 1
CaroUJM^uMincfi
Mark Twos,
f
Eller&Heinrich, Dolores
Krasmski
Chaplains
Chatter
I
Politics
ancfe
Religion
im
America
f
I
by
Father Hiibert j I
•I In a
countryjin whichSthe
separation^ Church and State has
been^such
an
a^powerfulfrprinciple,
there is an
unusualf
situationdeveloping,! Organized religions and the
established
political«part-
ies have jumped aboard the same bus and are traveling the same
road
in
thefpursuit
of their goals.
1
Allaround the country the business
ofl
"American Flags" has
been ~&oomhig$
Cars,windows, school book covers, bars, politicaladvertisements in newspapers,
magazines
land on
television—all
display that true sign of solid
patriotism—the#
American Flag.
^AmeriGa^ovjeiitiorileavelit''
signs are embroidered by flags oneither side of thelslogan. This
flag-waving
syndrom'^ is meant tobe a subtle, but effective way of
sayingtthat
anyone who does not
wavelfthe
flag is soft on his loyalty to country. The flag
stadsjfor
most
1
of its users as
a|sign
that they
willthot
tolerate violence inthis country, nor
wilj
they permit those who are
softson
violence torun the country. The backfield of Agnew, Mitchell* and
Hoover,
with
1Jigiri^*tricky
quarterback"
leading
them, has been trying
to
gain much? ground with this game plan,
iLikewissfallfaround theicountuy
the business of selling "Baltimore Catechisms"
has*been
booming. Advocating
a-
return
to
the
"old
^fashioned"
approachesi
to teaching religion is
likewise gfotthem%a eleamsign
of loyalty to the true
Church -andjrts ^infallible
teachings,
C&tifiism
of those
who promote
|within the Church theuse o£$modej(in,
VfetiQani II—oriented religionftextbooks is*?
made
inordeqjto
label these
modern
religion
teachers
as at
best—illinv
formeuoi^tand^^iwdcs^lheretics. Such criticism leaves little doubt
%
(Continued
on Page 3)
Student Gov
ti
HERCYIHURSrR10.&?
by?J<ftf
Helfand
V
Lastpf all,*a smailfgroup or
students took a
seriousUook
atSGA,which*
aft
the.
time* was the student government at Mercyhurst Coll*
egel
fl^waajidecided that SGA. was "ineffectual,? that|it had beenfor some
time$>
and*
that something should be done about
it*
The
fault?
wast believed
tofiie *witjbin
the structure
off
SGA.|
SGA
was :asub-committee
of a sub-committee
oil
the FacultyTSenate. A faculty advisor had veto poweriover any legislation passed by SGA. Ifapproved by the faculty advisor, the legislation would
then
go before the Faculty Senate for a vote. Student government was, at theoffset, virtually powerless*With this in man, a
constitution
was written creating the! Rep
resentative
Union of Students and giving its equal power with
the
Faculty Senate. As was expected, RUS met with a great
deal ofopposition from
the Faculty Senate, and Sister Carolyn appointedsix faculty members to meet with a core group or six students inorder to
findi absolution
that was reasonable to all
concerned,
j
After many meetings and much, discussion, a plan for a CollegeSenate comprised
of %
faculty and,
%
students!
was
presented to
(Continued
on^PagelS),
BETWEEN
US
Paul Anderson
AND
Rick Lamb
The
Revolution:
Meaningless Mess
ago—^Ameri
streets since them in demon- everyone
kept
score for them-perienced Chicago.
Stripe
that
,
stration off
all kinds. Some were selves.
Theibig deference
was
time
Chicago has been| looked peaceful
fsome
were riots,
andj,
thatfyou cotfLd pUay
if you wan-aft
in|many
dWeren*ways. The some even became murders.
ted
m
*>
ut
fo
e
*e was.nofobliga-
RepuMican pairty
in recentThe demonstrations and thejtion.The kids would run after
1
campaign ads has viewed
it
as
peoipjted e monstr a
tingare
'the
cops then the*
cops
i would"Chicago where the American
turned finto
a nightmare."Many people
mighit
feel likethat. We can't say we agree
.with
it in the
wayfthatfthe
Republicans
want I
it to
sound^
Chicagolwas
a demonstration
om
an opinion
he3<i
by
a
large num-
iberjnot
a majority,$but a largenumber, of peoplein|this!country. It was a
fnightmare
allright, but the^ nightmare came
(when
the
demonstrators I
wererefused the rignt to voice
idtheir
grievances.
They'pad ai
cause,they were- dedicated to something they
believed!
in, a gov-
ernmenite
by the. people*- Theygot their heads bashed in.
jjj
That was two
*yea^s
ago and
a lot?
was learned
$by
it. Theso -
c
a
11
e
df
"establishment^
learned to control
Hots
better*
it
alsopearned
not to
let
;
dem-onstrations| be
televised"^
IJve
anymore. The weatherman, andthe
yiippies|leaj
,
neoihow
to nuan-
ipuHaite
crowds better and keepthemselves
out*
of .trouMe. Butthe
people |and
the governmenthaven't
qudite gotten
things^ together. The
peoplefhave Hit^the
ch'an,ging. The one
ftime
peace
freak^..
fare
turndng
violent
through frustrationf
The once
hopeful
young Americans arebecoming
pessimistic
radooals,and theloauseltoo, has changed. There are no longer hopes
olf
growing with the oldiestab-
lished
government. Thehopes,are
jnow
for the destruction of(the
oldlto build
a new.|
i|
These are
not
the
thoughts
of.
all-, some
peopfte
just digthe idea
oli
revolution, its excising. They don't care to build(anything.
I
Revolution, demonstration*, and
justj
a generally
retoeyiouSy ^attitude
Ms-quite
fashionaible Aiowl
There are
many
ot
ttiese people
awund
and they are changing thestreet demonstrations, considerably. Many demonstrations,riolts,
fwhaitever,
are becoming
likefsipoirrtJs*
We
found
the last riot^iwehapipened|to witness
to be
much
like
aI
football game. The field
was
the* grounds of the Washington Monument,
the^teams
were easy to».
disitinguiSh and
and run
- aflter
the kids,a.
good*
time was
had
by
.turn
and
all.
Those who got hurt didn'tget to
feel
bad because theybecameheroes.The riot
lasted
for aboutseven hours
andl
accomplishednothing. It was
supposed
t0|dis-rupt the
Rob
Hope special taking
ipliace
there, but as we
•wiatched
the show the
next
dayon television,
\
we found^it
hard
to,
believe a
riot was
takingplace at
the
same
time>
ft
Thefpeople caughil^in
the
con$jfrontation
didn't care to
riot,
ithey oame
to get stoned. Theywere
^incited byf aboutt
twenty
thirty
hippies
who
lefit
once(the riot was
underway.f HardJy
anyone
injthe
disruptions knewwhat
theyfweire
doing.
Itjwas
ameaningless mess and many of
the
demonstrations lately are
much^like^thatiThef
new Revolution which
made
fa good* start fe
nowjno
longer a| bright
sipot
. .
p
itlooks
ilike
it's
just
going
to
beanother ugly war. People will,follow and
not
:
know?why?."
LETTERS!TO
THE
JECHTOR
Further reply to
"M
Male'sViewpoint.
>
T am
sorry, I
didn't^i kbmilfc
this letter in time for the
last
issue of
theJVl'erciad,|.but
frank-
ljj
I|didn?fcand
&m
don't*
think
many
^people*
will
read it,
IOK
more
^
important,
stake
it|
the
way
it
is:
meantita
bektaken,
%
I
anal
not going
to
pick apartthe letter
written^byl "A
Male's
Viewpoint." I'll*
leave
that tomore capable hands. All* I
may
feel
for
a^person
with
a?
view-point like his is perhaps aslight
twing^of
disgust and pit-y. Apparently there was no deepthought behind this
letter
W|if
there was
it*^
was done by
a
veryshallow^ person.The saddest thing in
Ithiswhole
situation is that few peo
ple |bother
to oppose this! typeOf thinking, or even worse don'tor aren't capable of even giv
ing ytf
some
thought.
$$
$
iI
guess man. is just a
self^
centered creature.
;
This letter was not written tohelp
buiy
anyone, but maybe
tojphelp di^up|Some
things, thatshouldn't" be buried. It seems
li£e
everyitime these things are
uncovered!
sonteonfe
quickly covers them again.
I»^do
not
appeaTHo
thelmajor-
ity
to turn
theirfheads
and follow
ontol^t
Gru^ade.-This*
couldneven
happen anyhow.
fl|
an*just talking
to^the
few who arefightings:
to
beat
thfo
typ^ ofadea.
fThel
idea^
'That itfs
thecover that counts not what's inthe book!"
I
Unfortunately our society fendto breed too
|many contempt
uous
ideas
like this and
noteapugh
honest
people
capableof fighting them.
*
extending! the hours on Sunday
is-
f
«Wrong*\
i-
:
I ^
.
\L
personally
-.
feel
that this believe is
unfounded!I^ask
y°
u
'
Wtsat
is:
wrong|in enjoying
the
company owa|girl|and
listeningto
a allbum
in your room on aSaturday night. Tell me, am
I
missing
something?Hfl
the female
Jresidentsj feelagainst^this
action,ifine,
thisjis
tiieir|
perogitive and^I
have nosay so in what goes on in Me-Ually,
Baldwin
or Egan. But bythe same token
they
have
nosayiso
in what goes on
here^in\Preslt0n4 ilf
the residents of Preston
iHaill
want extended visitinghours then it
should
be
betweenthe
proper
Authorities and
theresidents themselves,
Not^The
Three
10ther
Dorms
/.
. .
1
Open Dormitory Policy
I jby
Bob Becl^^ertain^dibnnu*on thisjca«n<p-us^fee»l| that
in
having a open
down on
Saturday night
andl
The
Wind rose*
Decembeislth
 
N
~.\
November
?6,
1970
1
'4
Ik
STUDENT
GOVERNMENT
(Continued
fromfPage
2)
thelFaculty^Senate
and approve^ by both the Faculty Senate and
fte
studapt
body,
~tTl*e purpose^of
all
tljis was
to create a student government
w
ith*an effective
means of both initiation and passing legislation,
•phis
was
af
the
etod oftlast
winter term. At the
present
time, we
arelstUlfWaiting
for RUS to
innate or^pass
some legislation. Wedo have a
soffee housed
we've finally done away
 \yith^antiquated
dress codes; dorm
hours
j^iave
tf>econje more realistic. But the
credft
for theseMmppovements, or at least for their initiation, mustgo where it
J>elongs
.
1
. to the office
ob
thetDean, not to RUS. Whatabout a
r-eductjonljfl
theology requirements?
Is RUS going to wait
4it^Mi|^af^eyisuggests thatjjtoo? And
wha#about%all*week-
endZ^Vasn't
it;
grea£?: True it
wasgthe
responsibility of the Junior
clas$f f>ut Jnaj&e
p/itt^
a little
prodding
from RUS,
Mercyhurst
could have bad a fall weekend.
RUS
was
createdlto
act, not simply to^reac*. It was
cheated
to do things for the studentsat$Mercy-
hursfcuot
tajwaft until
something
goes
>vrong*and
then try
tolfixSt.
Hfprcyfturst
te*chaiigipg.
It's,
going
Jo
continue to change. Last
year everyone
was
rather
apathetic about changing
Mercyhurst's
name to Glenwood
 ColJ8ge.frDoes thag'apathy
still exist? It will
untij RUS^bothers^to
ask somebody about it.
|
News flash: Mercyhurst.may not have a concert spring
week
end
hecause^of
a lack of
funds^to^et
a really top^group. Is
BUS$
going
toswait ufl&jl s§ring$weefcend
and
tljen
say
tfiere
isn't enough
^ money?
Why not plan some
fund-raising-programs
NOW so thatwe
don'^have^hat.problem?
Why
notlplan
SOMETHING now . . .
i
t
i
anything, RUS, just
soithat
we
knowjyou're
there.
i
i
i
CHAPLAIN'S CHATTERf
^(Continued
from Page*
2)
4hat^the criticizer
is
vebfy
afaraid
thattraditioiialj
Catholic teach-
ings
are being changed or updated. Such people* cannot bear
suchchange—their
inner
peace^is
founded on their
security affprded by
their
faithl
To
change in any way the presentation or
praise
of
thatlfaith is
devastating to such people.
Tttieirfpresent
activities
loonrtherefore as*aflarge
personal defensetmechanism.
%
And so in|religion, as in polices, there is
a.marked
turningjLwa&fjrpiQ $h$£complexities
a social group becomes necessarily
invoiced injj\y}ien
f^e^omJfipd%significatit
place in
ife
style.
-ThereIs
a^im
f}$$
there
is
\
jggtong retj!rn«to>
a ffidre simple, lesscon*
ffasxqg.
more
tfa<|itipna{, safer
Ufelstyie|for
the social
groupings
Uafled-^
tjn^e^--Jtgtes ^of ^jgprica
or
tM
Catholic
Church*fn
America. That
freedpm i in ?such
a
life-style
is*
dlntitifehed^
there
V 1
£aa|>e
no.
doubt
%
flip
Vice«J3*esid£pt.
goes
about,
slaying the Christine* Jorgen*
seas^his
flarjy.
groups
i|ke
P40.P.E.,C.ftfE.D.O.(Radically
rightagroups of concerned
Catholics) go around hunting safe colleges
a^4
unsafe
Religious
educators
to?
applaud*
or defame
as-
the«ase.
niay
fee,
Repub}ip§ps |y^i^th#ir
political eyes on'
the
South
and qn the -Wue-aollar
workes. The
Chur^r"
authorities matoerpleas-ant noises when the
PresidenUleans
towards supporting privateeducation
nvith
more federal monies.
<
r
|
"The times—they
are
a-charigim"™e*Tjasip
problem^,a| I see
%
is that the people
within the&country
a.nd
within the Chujph
are
so^busy injtfinding
security and peace in
Jheir*own personal
livesttat these great ciyic and ecclesiastical
changes overwhelms
them,
^he
Cftnfusjon,the loss of
diSredaonjlthe ins;pcurity"and the Hftceijtainty whichtthese changes
cause within people.
lalL
issue into
ia
growing!
fear.j
We
haveicome
much
closer^
§nd|perj}ap^, reached
!
poj^jvhjjn
the
fear
mu^t scream qutJwJien
people must say,*^ex*
reinember me,fg*ve
me a
dianc^fp ^catch
up.
^Attjeast
explain
to^ne whaWis
going on.
I'milost
and
%m
scaJ:ed|
,,
As^aembers o£ftne*or
both social #oups, the US.A.
and tjieCathWidtaGhurch (6r»any organized**alth ^fpr thatrmatte|;),j^e|Bhpiild
consider se»iousl^
whether
we
feel
thatl^
^wii^g
back tQtt
4i
pre-fr^e-
^om
times"
is*just>around*the
corner.
IfjSUGhJis
our Qpjnibn,
\fs
^me*to
take
artstand
for the better approach to
tlje
human life-
styie
envisioned
bytGod and iannounced^in
jits
fulnessAby
the
Hfe«»d
words
of
-ffesusl* 4
i
f*^
have come to give you life,
%ife mo*e
abundantly."
MI
no
^ger
call youMaves,
but^r#id§."
f'W^havefbeen
given the
free
dom
of
tile soh#of
God.**
If seemstto
me that if we
loveiour countryland*our Church^wewill
not
allpw^eitfcer^to cqntiftpe
on
the^presentKiwad #hey seem
to
^S^^'fefi-^l^tw^^
wpfcontinfcefc tof struggled sdde^y-side^^^se
J^pljp^hC^fe*abl^
tpilive^with
ithe
compIexitiflHB#and
ris
^ of freedQni as
they, their
nations
and their
religions
evolveto the full realization
of their
potential greatness and beauty. Fear
^ust
not win over
jUstice,yldve
and understanding.!
MERGYHURST
COLLEGE
HHAYHOUSI
OPENS WITH
"SHOT
by
/CIS
n
s
|r
Does this
worid
seem to you
like
it^
fupside
(town?
I'll letyou
in on
a little
secret—it
is!This issue's
review^s
a little
different
because the
^subject
isdifferent. •JhrougH'' the courtesy
*>f
the BlsielMayhouse, I attended the opening night perform*ance of
<
«A£SSfofc
In
Tlhe
Darif."
I
would say tttatiiittte
an
excell
ent-second olassitplay.4I jusitify
my reaction because the
aud-
4ence invoivemeni
didn'tIfcro-
yoke
a^tandipg
ovation
oft
opening
^night.
NoiWffor
a
;
liMe#
background
albout
the play.
M
A S»iot
In The(Dark" was taken from the
sitoryiwriltten
by Marcel Achardrand
adaipted "-for the sta^e by?
HarryKurrife.
Presenter %y me
Erie
'Oiviic
Theater Association, tide
OErie
production Was directedby
Williami
Oohen.^ Special ar-
rangemenitsr;for
the
presentation
were
made# withf Santuel
French,
ifac.
The
settings
a^d
lighting
i
arrangements! weredone by LesterfWeatphal.
IWith
the exception of
|Mar-
igaret { Gatferight |and
i
Vejjnon
Kidd, the
oast
is
composed^
oftocal talent.
Miss Gathright,?a
native of Tampa, has had previous
experience on$
Broadway
and $
in* numerous road shows.
Mr.»
Kidd
g
hails from
f
the jSan
Francisco
BepeiitoFy
Theatre.Among
thefi resU
of the >
cast,
'Willijam fFrazier
is
i
outstandingin
his
portrayal ontfSevigne.Rounding out the past are Gary(Payne, Becky Moran, Stan Taylor, YvonneCefee,
and'
BenWil-
-bur.4:
*
The
iplay
itself revolves
arouSd%ne
solution of
a'murder
iwhich^ occurred at
Monsielir
!Bea^l•evers
,
"(Vernon
Kidd)
es:
tate J
The victim, a
low cj£ss
Spanish chauffeur, was
|sup-
iposedly mOtdSredfby*hte
lover,Josefa the
maid/* (Margaret^
Gathright).
The^
three ^ct
pliay^takes place in Sevigne's pffice,the local magistrate.
As.--theft
story
continues J
the
nuagistrateoiscov^rs
that there's
«hanky
<panky| going on at the
Beaur-
evers
estate. But, if by chance
a^
Beaurevers is guilty
Sevigne
'ffffill lose
'Ws^joi|>.
^
Wliy^
Th
^
Beaurpvers
are
tl^e city's
most |imi?ort4i|^people.
f Theirsancestry ;isfteaced>
to (railing
famines
of|
early ^France; in(fact,
Madame BeaureversJ
is
a^
direct
descendant of Attiia the
y
Hun. The
magitsifcrat's question-?
in gis typical
cpurtrootm
flang*|uage and^concern, but the con-iversation is
sipringledpwith
bed
side humorisms.The comments throughout the
ipiiay
are
isoaiial
commentsalbout the
cortflidt
between up-
iper and flower
classsociety.Ofcourse, because of the Beaur-evers'
fistandinig an
the city,
ttyey
can't be
accused^
of any-,
|but
because Josefa is
|alowOty
peasant, only she couldhave done it. Well, didn't she?Ail
in j
all, the play was
-iwell
done. It's a fairly good play,but not good
forjcomiplete
aud
ience
approval.^ I think that's'
wiiy
i|
didn't get an* ovation.If you ever get a chance to seeit done* it's worth your while.
Page
Three
ANNOUNCING
BEGINNING
Ntewl Directive.
..
THE
SEVENTH OF NOVEMBER
Win drose
HEADLINES
DISTINGUISHED
GARMENTS
FOR DISTRICT NEEDS
SIDELINES
ORIGINAL
ART WORKSHANDCRAFTED*
ITEMS
«.
PARAPHERNALIA
*
lto
j.
5.
-for approximately SHmonth^)Mercy
hurst is
goingf
to be myhome. And just as my original
iho^mfei tftere
are
nights
of fiin^
fy
summary:Love
yourfeelf.
0ow
might
aswell, you're not going to geta trade tun.
f
fi. Dft>lomacy,
dgrry
this wordon your nose.
No^
sweet>talk
or brownie^poiflfts^It's
efifec?tive^nly wh.en
h^onest..
Phoneys
are as^clear
^elass.
and nights
|of
boredom^ I feel
itoo ^many tpeople
are taking a
neigative
attitude
towards
the.
institution,
i
.
And^now
I ask why.
Kirst
off,the
-rfrosh^were a ^ttlie ^ypfif
about even coming
to
college.Second,neiw^friends aren't
good|as thelpld
buddys. Theseare ^problems; but in reality
they
can be solved by a simple
methodi
I have
^Trumjps Laiws'f
7.
To
l
quote
a
t
well
known historical^ figijre
?
"Do untoothers^
-^1
•% &
As^ou would Have
them do
I
u^p
ywiy'W ^
CJooHtiuck.
:l
.
.
r.
derivedt
1.
Saw
hello
vto
whoever you
<meet,tevenial
you don't knowi
hdm^>r hefe
*% .
4The fworld
would
belp
drag
2.
ReLax.
I'm|not
going|to
biteyou
ilonly
said 'iheMo."
3.
Be
a
little more understanding of
peopde's
differences.
.The Avorld
would be a drag
iil everyone
v
iooked,
talkedand
acted
ithe same,
W
:
JDon't
voice
uncpnstructive
opinions
about;i
anyone.
^Look
at
yourseif^first
#
Shop
|
for
Values
This
Issue

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