Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Merciad, Feb. 26, 1971

The Merciad, Feb. 26, 1971

Ratings: (0)|Views: 9|Likes:
Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, Feb. 26, 1971
The Merciad, Feb. 26, 1971

More info:

Published by: TheMerciad on May 24, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/31/2011

pdf

text

original

 
?
r
Hurst Announces Tuition Hike
by Al Messina
Editor*
On
February
4,
-fl.871,
SisterCarolyn . announced to theMercyhurst College Senate that
a
tuition increase of $250 willbecome
7
effective September,
1971.
This
increase
will raisethe total annual cost of tuitionto $1550.
y
*
. The Mercyhurst President ex
plained?
the tuition
jinorease
asan effect of costs that are rising at a
£rate
greater than the
growth
pncome. Besides balancing the budget, this income willpermit the college to retain itshighly qualified faculty
and will
allow the addition of new andequally qualified faculty. Library facilities and services willbe increased in addition to alarger staff
and?
more books.
Socio-recreational
facilities are
wwvV.'ra:
R.U.S. discusses tuition
hike
being
expanded!
to- insure
thetotal development of the socialas well as the
academic needs
of the students. .
* £
However,
an important pointthat should be
noted
by all -students is the annually contributed services of the Sisters ofMercy which totals $130,000.The expenses would be muchgreater if not for the generous-ity of the
Mercy
Sniujs.
In. fact,one
major ^factor
in the tuition
raise * is ^reduction
in the number of religious
teaching
atMercyhurst. Lay men raust«jbe
hire<l
to replace
the*
nuns whowere teaching, and those whopreviously held administrativepositions.
Mi d
The administration also realizes that any tuition
increaseoanacreate
a*
hardship for somefamilies and therefore encour
ages 5 student?
to consult theFinancial! Aid Office) if
ilhis
should be true in their situation.There was also some apprehension concerning the possiblerelationship between
the
newathletic program and the recentdecision to
<
in crease tuition fornext
year.
"However at a recentmeeting
of
R.U.S. Dean Garvey
entertainer
questions dealingwith
jthe
effect of
the!
Athleticprogram on the latest tuition
hike.Hyi
I
$•
J
Mr. Garvey seemed
toidispel
the fears of the representativesby*mating
it J
clear money forathletics
comes
entirely fromthe activities fee, except thesalary
of!
the Athletic
director.
The
DeanJwent
on to say that
Mercyhursfs
ahtletic,
budget
was rather slight in
comparison
with
i
colleges
which
operatecomparable 'programs.
#He also
stated
&
emphatically, tuition
money fwould
not be
usecf
forathletics and that most athleticscholarships simply involve freetuition, not free room and
board
—which
does«not
cost the col-lege anything. i
HC
Vol XUII—No. 9MERCYHURST COLLEGEFebruary 26, 1971
by Bob Parks
f
Mercyhurst College haschanged significantly in thelast few years. It
has|gone
co-ed,
implemented an athletic program, made a curriculum revision,|instituteda college- senate, and has
undergone ^
major changeof administration.
.10"If
Certainly some of thesechanges are physical andperhaps have little relationship to the academic or cur-ricular structure of the College. But at a recent meeting of the curriculum committee an
attempt "wasmade
to rectify
this
\
situation, i
|
f|
J
!
**$£
Why* the sudden senseof urgency?
First,
the faculty and administrationare receptive, to a curriculum change.
Second,
thestudents'
at;
Mercyhurst,through R.U.S., presentedto the curriculum committee a proposal in
the'formof
a petition
a<
proposalwhich had approximately
£00
student signatures.The proposal
was'not
re
jected by the curriculumcommittee.*
In
fact, thecommittee seemed
Jto feel
the idea
of
\
the proposal
was commensurater with
the needs
and"
direction
of
the
College^They
i
did not
however,
agree with someof the specific
aspects |of
the proposal and intimated
some
kind
of
]
compromise
niust
ensue before
its
implementation could become
a
reality. |
11
The students were represented at the curriculumdeliberations*by Al
Mesh
sina, Betsy Bierfeldt andVincent
Dor
an. , 1
Al
Messina
-|A1
Messina,?
acting president of R.U*S. felt that theidea*
of
,
the proposal
was
constructive. He stated that
"if
the College adopts acurriculum
along^the
linesproposed, the course offering
would ?be
oriented onmore of an
electivej-
basis.
Instead
of fulfilling a greatnumber of specific requirements,
aistudent
would only have
tojsample
generalareas.
The beauty
of thisidea
is?thatiit penalizes
noone, that is, the Collegewould retain a
Liberal
Artsoperational base, but itwould also be
able
to meet
thes
individuals needs andinterests
of
the students."He also said he was hopeful this would enhance aninterdisciplinary approachto education here at Mercyhurst.
"In
the j past therewas no attempt at coordination.
1
Betsy Bierfeldt, secretaryof
R.U.S.swas
impressed bythe magnitude of the venture.
"This
is not a few in
terested
students petitioning the curriculum commit
tee,
it's the
^student
body.In essence it is a movementnot the grievance of a few/'"For
once
the studentwill at Mercyhurst asserted
itself,
15
commented Vincent
Doran.l
He
padded
that theessence of the original student proposal was to gaincredence for such conceptsas student needs, studentinterest,
land
?interdisplin-ary education.
, |
Doran further stated thatthe
"faculty
and administration can no longer assume to know what's bestfor students*
in
allcases.Students must, at least insome Jmeasure,
SHAREthatjj
responsibility."The original proposalpresented by the studentswas modified amtstrength-,ened | by the
curriculum
committee. Giving muchtime and energy to the
pro
ject the committee finally
passed
a curriculum
re*
form proposal which embodies the following principles:
n
%
*p
1. That 40 courses becompleted for^Graduation.
2.
That the 40 courses be
selected!
according to* thefollowing! guidelines:(1)
LIBERAL
vSTUDIES
.1.
.*
at*
least ten courses,OUTSIDE your
MAJOR
Betsy Bierfeldt
Division, from the following divisions with a minimum of TWO courses ineach division. Elementary
Education
Students wouldconsider
*their ^Academic
Major one of the four'Divisions.
i
;
1. Fine Arts
2.
Humanities.;
4
3.
Social Sciences
4.
Natural Sciences
and
Mathematics
i?
(Intercession courses* do
not^fulfill
this requirement)
(2)|
INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES ... at leastTWO courses in interdisciplinary areas.
v *
(These courses do notmeet
Liberal ^Studies
re
quirements);.
* * 1
(3)
INTERSESSION
STUDIES...
at fleast
THREE
Intersessions
illany field (Majoror?Non-
Major)
.
'*.']£:
(4) MAJOR
STUDIES
.
L
at least
TEN
with no
more
than fifteen coursespRE-QUIREDi by a major department, and with no morethan twenty courses
taken
in
a'
major program. (Major program, includes required
major'
courses andcognates,
major
J
;
interses-sions, and major electives).However, it is importantto note that
>the
above; recommendation
is
presentlybeing considered
by^the
College Senate
^and
it
appears the curriculum committee's proposal
I
will
]
beamended further. A decision is
expected
within twoweeks
J|
H 3??
 
Page Two
MERCYHURST
COIXEGE
February M,
1Wl
MEKCYHUEST
COLLEGE,
ERIE, PA.
Mertiad Staff f
j,
£*
.Editor
"
Al
Meaama
Associate Editor
...*.,/•
Bob
ParksFeature Editor
...*
Jam*
Kamler
News Editor*
Sitt Stohse
Sports
Wftor \
y
> • • •
mi
*>°P
terala
Lai/out
Editor
,.
p«v«
RohdeGeneral Manager
.
Bob BeckBusiness
Manager
.
..IM
Cmdy Gustm
Circulation and
Ecodhamfe
Marlene
SmithLayout Staff WrankAbeam, Bill Chiodo,
,\
i
Ann?
PottsStaff Writers
Audrey Rosenthal,DickLimb,
Bt&nda
Brewer
|
i
0M
Fictor,
Jim
TrombeVi
Staff
....
CarotMeuMlng,
Julie
Samick,
" Ellen
Heinrich, Mark
Zine
Hayes
Sponsors
Bill
To
Lower
Legal
fAge
J& Bob
BW*,
tSenefaf Manager
Dovyoft
consider yourself a second
cl*ss
citizen?
|f
Well if you are uftde* the age of
21
a*d
over
the *ge
o!
18
IhJtt's
what your state
eonsidets
y*.
PJHioXigli
you
art
a tfedfrffi
ctass
dfifceft,
at
tlte
age of
W
you
can
be arrested
arA
prosecuted
to
theTfuHest
extent of the law,toe
same
as a 1st class citizen. At age 19 you
can*be
inducted
intotfoe
military, to serve your country as an adult. j
fI
But as a 19 year old, you cannot enter into a lease, operate abusiness, inherit property, establish a
bustffess
transaction or evenapply for a
sctholarehipsloan
without the consent of your parent or
Jegal
guar3ian. | I
'*• r
i-I«
other
wor4s
according to the state
you
are not capable to
ilihink fofc*yoursel£4 Jl
ll*
But in Harrisburg on
February
hi,
1971, State RepresentativeDavid
S.
Hayes, Republican Representative for Erie and Crawford counties co-sponsored a group of 68
biUs
that would
place
both benefits and obligation*
of|adulthood
for
Pertnsylvanians
at
age 18.
j» 1
& k
i JL-f .i
j|
Mr. Hayes stale* "I
along^wlth
the majority
<of
the Republican House members*
%#11
push
fop
legislation to both lower thevoting age to
18 Mn
time for next fall's municipal elections andremove all archaic legal restrictions
on*4he
youth
underfthe
current laws now on the books."
I When'these
tows
ase passed||he -age renuirenfflents
for
s«!rvice
twill be
lowered
for
employment
on stale and local
bodies
as well
as
r
police
and
fire
departments.
.
%
T-hisjj
action taken by the State
BepresentateVes^piroves
to meof their faith in the young of today. People of
Pernisylvaiuatfaare
its most valuable resource and can no longer be reguarded as sec-ond class citizens.?*
5 ^
i
'
I
Erosion
of
Civif
Liberty
/
by
AlyMessina
I
* ^Editor \f ^~
.
••*
American tpeople
are being repressed. When yon understand
Hi
at our nation begins to make sense.
^Indeed America
has not
-
witnessed
the overt oppressions of a Hitler or a Stalin. Instead of
thte
Gestapo we have the
FBI
and
the,
CI
A, Instead of soldiers patrolling the
a
streets
wdtlu
deadly weapons, we have policemen
.'and
national guardsmen bearing pistols,
|m
ace and even rifles. In
stead of ^thehroig
of
'e6&ct
by one man, we toave
anachronistic value
structures which
exited educafiolfral
conditioning
and
social con*fortuity.'It is
eVidentj
analogies such as the aforementioned are not literally comparable. That
isji
to say, America
*is
not a repressivesociety^ in
;a traditionali sense—there
iare
ijfew blatant
manifesta-
(ions
of violence, on the part of civil authorities. No, America isthe
faster
of the/subtle. Instead of genocide we simply
^destroy
peddle,
soch^as
blacks, by subjecting to cruel psychological
sub*
missions. And
irtstead
of publicly
maniputating*the
people we erode
tfoeif^cMl
fijfterties.
#
m
A*
tfo
knock, preventive detention,
wire^appiftg-nriot
tomention
the ^recent^court
decision allowing evidence* obtained illegallyto be used
jn
certain instances.
f
Why? IPs simple. Americans, writes Henry Steele Commager,
noflonger
cherish the
BUI
of Rights. In fact our own president con-
sidersjthe
American Bill of
Rights
a mandatefor^permissiveness.
Nixon'has
intimated he plans (and is being successful) to counter-pose
this*
weakening of
the-national
fiber
by
more third degrees,
mofe
wire tapping, longer jail sentences, a tougher Attorney General, and a conservative Supreme Court. Without question, all
can
see Nixon is a ftfan of
his
word.
w
*
'WP!
Professor
Melvin Rader perhaps said it
best,
"Wh«t
some people fail
to
realize is
tha%the|greatest
violatoins of
civiif
iberties
occar
against impbpula* causes, but that the
effect
of the
erosionsjnttffeivH Kberty is upoft
usall.**
?
Question
of
Priorities
\ry
Biff
FtcMer^Sometimes
a newspaper canbe filled with
«foo many
edttor-
jials
and not
enough
news.
I
Therefore, in order
to
help prevent
this
inbalance
from
occur
ring
in the
-Merciad,
I shall de-
vote
this
coliFmn
to news. Thenews
*
am
aWout
to relate
fs-a
little
o^er
eleven years
old,
butit still has
ftfe
lllavor.
It is re
garding
war. A war that
5s
eleven years and seven monthsold. (the first U.
'S.
troops were
kited iTi combat oh
July 8,1959.) This is, of course, the
Vtetnam
conflict,
now referredto as the war in Undo Chirfa.
^'^he^news
4s that this escapade in Southeast Asia is costingUsmoney.(Now
you
may retortthat you have heard this before
•altd thiat
I
am
wasting spacetelling you. But, suppose I toldyou that? if the wart
werei
endedtoday, we would still
.be
feelingits financial effects over a
ceflj»tury
from now.
That would j
be
Something wMch
you have
m
heard before. In fact, it
is
so
me
thing that will probably not
re
.
ceive too much publicity.According
to^James -U
Q
ay
;ton, associate professor
df
his!tory at the University of Utah*
"The
expenditures for veterans'!benefits over the next centurywill be at least fifty percentmore than the initial cost of thewar
itself."
Using history as
a
guideline, in regard to our otherwars, Mrs. Clayton has
calculate
ed that if the war in Vietnamwould have come to an abrupt I
end
in 1970,
thepfinai bill (j^f
eluding^
veterans^pensions) |
0r
Vietnam
wouldfbe
approximate.
ly
3-30
billion dollars. This
is
quite a
sujmto
,pay for anythingmuch less a war. f I
\
Even
fifbiwe ^disregard
this
hypothetica-l
figure, the
amomft
of
money^already
spent on
Viet-
»
nam
staggers the mind.Com-pared with governmental
spend-
ing
during the same
period,
-\
(fiscal
years|1960-70)phe
war inVietnam
has
 
costSten
than!oreMedicare,times
fhree
times more than
housing
and
community
J developmentand sixteen times! more
vthan
was spent for support for education. In fact, WE HAVE SPENT
MOREkMONEY
IN
^ELEVEN
YEARS
UN VIEETNAM
THANWE
iHAVE
SPENT
m
OUR
EN-
TfiCREl<HISTORY FOR
HIGHER
IEDUGATION.
J
^
Aon
erica is
a#*great 'land
of unequalled achievements. But,
when
one of those, achieve-
fnents
is allowing
arr
undeclared-war to take financial priority
overj,
educating*
Its
people, I
wonder how'long'^America
canremain great.
LETTERS
TO THE EDITOR
Destr
Mr.?Editor:
§
I would 'like
to inform youthat Reed and Barton
Silver
smiths
%Ve
announced^
the
opifnlhg
of
theit
iStTh
AnnualScholarship Competition; with
nearly $50,000 in 'scboiarshfpSi{ a ndlf
awards.
AM
you have to do is matchReed
it
barton fterlmg
silver
^patterns
with leading fine chinaand
crystal
Iparlferns. Yourchoices are then compared withthose of leading
wome*r*s
magazine
^editors
and
Ahe
choices
whkrh
toiost closely match
fhose
of the editors
are*the
prizewi!n-
ners.fThere
are
IfO
(prizes in
aH—i«K*u<Kng owe
$1,000 scholarship, one $500 ^oUarShijp; one$300
scboiarship
and seven $100
scholarships ^hrs merchandiseawards
oft sterling, china
land
crykal^ worth
$75.00 eachh-allavaftalble
to
tl!te*woAen dn%iis
campus.
Tjhe
competition is open onlyuntil March
3lst.
You
may^ee
the actual sterling featured inthe competition
and
obtain yourentry blank form
froim
Marilyn
.
Wefa,
McAuley
213, 866-9810.
Deat
Editor:
0
A note of thanks to all contestants that made the tourna-J
menHa
success.
A
special thanksto the beautiful people
of$And-
sera Fami-ly
Pool
^ailltwho
overlooked the economic*
1
angleof this undertaking and chargeda minimal rate that allowed thetournament to be free of further financial problems. Theideal
'conditions of ^he taibles
and surroundings
Coupled^
v/ith
great assistance in
the|
technical aspects, provided for twoflawless afternoons of competition. Although the
concept!
of"pool
tbair*
frightened
the finale element, the posh decor atAndsers must be rated G forgeneral audiences for all agegroups of both sexes.A. J. AdamsTournament DirectorDear Editor:I think it's time someonespoke
ap
or the boys at
Preston
Hall. I'm
stfre
everyone on this
campus is
aware of the
I
incident" on the second floor next
to fthe
statue. The very nextday, as
Jl wandered
throughEgan Hall,
tlie
voices of mostevery person was chastising
the
boys
ito Preston Halli
Does anyone
kftowfor
sure it was a resident of the hall? Since
wfren
isone guilty until proven 3mno-cent?
%
'i
It was discovered severaldays later that
it^was
not a
dorm
resident. The name of the
individual?)
Unfortunately
|
it
wasn^t
devulged due to the codeof the underworld. This codereads
that,?"even
if the innocent
must
suffer, it is
' to
ugh"
n
one
cannot inform.
Thistis
most unfortunate because a lot of
realnice^guys
must bear the
stigma
of guilt innocently.
<
It is
qtilte
true, that manyacts of
"juvenile
deliquency"
have Aee»
u
committed
by theseboys.Isn't this also true cf girls,school
foittned
thanks
ed
to the
Mercym>rst.
and even visitors to this campusby memberss of other schools in
g k
was my good
^pleasure
tohave several* dorm residents
oi^
Preston Hall assist me over the
•long
weekend in preparationfor a concert
in-Zurn
Hall, andthe
^congregation
of
the-JSifctetf
of ferie as hosted by the Mercy-
hu»st Orderrof Sistcaw
of Mircy.
'Pu'blicty 5 would ^ike
to tenithese boys for
thefir tftne
andeffort. They
i
represented
thisto tone
putoBC
and
$er-
|
admirably.
\
A
gain,to Preston Hall.
.
A DiplomatEditor:
2 - -
i
.
^.This
letter is primarily direct-
Fma!6
faction of
fa
haVe witnessedan increasing movement of
ho*
tile ^feedings
and treatment di
rected
at the
guys
from
other
schoolfc, especially Gafinon,white socializing
ki
our StudentUnion.
S
will admit that I haveseen some bad behavior
on
their parts,
^but
what's
the^ur-
pose of it? From previous
yearsthereof
been a definite declinein the number
of Gaimdh
students
coming
to the Student'Union. One
pr >afele
explanation for this is hat the inhos-
pitafcee
atmosphere is discouraging them.
I've
further heard from
u
that*
many
resent
sharing
the
entertainment and facilities
pro-
vided
by the student activity
fee.
I can't see the sense in
this
because the entire campus
has
(Continued on Page 4)
/
 
i
February
26,
1*71
MERCYHURST
COLLEGE
Page Three
f
nging
»*•
bitott
ssor
i.
Effective Teaching';
$
Primary Responsibility
y
1
I
t
I
i
it
1
li
fe
I;
i]
II
ji
0
0y Fred^rickf
H.
Burfchardt,
president
J American- Councilof
teamed
Societies.[ Not very long ago a
prof
esse*
c0liP
ld
be described fairly simply
as
a
scholar engaged
in teach-1
L
n
g.
in
those days the studentLas at
the
center of the con
ception
of a
^processor's
vocation, and the
psychodogical
andphysical conditions for'com*
municating
with students wererelatively good.
;| • 'B Jn
the past forty
years^
however, as a result of changes
lYiknowledge and
its organization,and as a
result.;of
developmentsin education and its relation tosociety and
work
affairs,
there
have^been great
changes
in*oufrJpondeption
%pt
*the
role of
 
the
professor.
Besides increasingthe complexity
fof
that role,these changes have aiso worked
as
centrifugal
forces
drawingthe professor away
ffcom
hhe
student
aftfl'Weakening
the tiesbetween them.
^Perhapsj^he
most powerfulforce
has;
been the greatin
creased
in the specialization
jof
'knowledge* One "consequence ofthis trend is
that,
the professorhas
comfe
to identify himself
more^and mo^e^with
hisJdiscip-
line and
his
professonal
peergroup.
JHisr college k
or
university
competes*, with
his professionalcomrirunity
for
hds
time and[energy and loyalty.; Communi-
[jaticn with jhfs
students
rrowcomptetesgiwith communteationpwitt)
his
peers;
?
Ifteiease intspeciaHzation
hasalso
ancreasedjthe
significanceof ^research. The
postt£oni*jthescheter'Jticcuffles
in the judg-
meit
of his peers
is now .as
im
portant as
^judgment*
ofghispilege |admiHistrationjt
Profes-
|sional
recognition is^agrtpowerfulSpree which ^1
suspect
operatesjttet
as strongly in
stiroMatiftg
research
a*
the
a'tteged
"publishor perish" pressures of
univer
sity administrations
;
and
depart
ments/
|
A
second
trend
|which^has
changed the role of the
profes-
sorilias^Jbeen
the success
oty£he
ideal of
service
to the larger
cordimunity—an
ideal energetically fostered by the great pub-
Ire universities
and
fnow
gener-
<ally Receipted
by
all.
The
jpro-
lessor
Is now not only
a
learned
&&n|%ho
transmits his know
ledge
to students; he is
ateo
an
expert sought
after
.by
industryand
government.
Moreoversince the war it
ha&
been considered
a*
major
responsibfiifcy
of out
universities*'to helj>
theemerging nations
wfth|their
educational*
develfo|wrient.
So
lonfeasf service
of ttiifc
kihd
remainsan academic
idteat—and it
ishard to imagineiit as defer/eas
ing—and
so long as the
increasein
the teaching profession remains
Hat
its
present!
rate, it
wKl
obviously
act
as an import
ant cause
of absenteeism and di-
vision of energies and loyalties.
A^thSird
change in
rolefts due
io the increasing^ complexity of
academic
administration
as*a
result of which
th^jprblessor
nas
•become
more and moreed
iru
committee
workvand
a|ness in our institutions but alsoof
fncreased
sophistication about
|the
t
eratiofts-hip
between 3
the
, curriculuiri
and all the
btlter?
ac-
Itiviues opttlte comtaianttyt
which
|make
up ahAstntoffon*of
learrr-
sing.
Even Jh dmall
institutions
pike!
Bennington and Satan| Lawrence,
dedicatedto
teaclr*
Sfeing* v
t'fte
Individual
student, asur^t^ngiry,
^terge &tito&t$Jbt
time is spent in committee work
(by
the
members^of
the
facultyExcellence ih tej&hlhg mtist
be
* irettognteed
and
rewarded|more tfoan
ft
isfat
fcre^eftt. It
fs
no doubt more
difficult!
to
ob-
tairoa
dependable and
o/bjectiv^
evaluation
o|
at
professor'steaching capacities
than it^jss
ofhis
-iresearch
and|
publication,but
it i»
not impossiible. In
factsome^of our
liberal arts colleges
tha^jprafee
the quality of teaching
iiave worked*out
quite
ire*
liable measures |of assessment.These
Evolve
to an
importantextent?
;
the:^part?icipation of
stu-dentji,
whgchf
is no doubt
.whythef^^bas
been
lafreiluctanceito
adopt
themJibut
the
farct|ls
that
"s-tudtents arefe^paible
ofc^
intelligent
fan<fe
responsible judg^ments about teaching and
can
be
'of
enormous assistance to.a.
teachier
in improving the
ef-
feetipeiresssof
his instruction..multitude
v
of
functions which were unheardof
ferry
years ago. Althoughthese duties
are*
often remote
from^nis teaehing
and scholarly
concerns
they.: are none the lessimportant in
creating *the
conditions in which
bis
teachingwill
goj on
and they often havea
direct
fcearfng on whether
ornot
lit will
be
effective. This
rlfccred$ed
administrative
role*
ofthe
professor,Mt
should be noted, is
no
U
only
the«result
of-big-
g|^In^errcouraging andyyecruit-
administraSve3F
lgi
...P^
1
1
5cfiolars, more
f
emphasis
must*ibet
placed upon
thejnotivations
and
other
3>sy-
.
etiological, social, an^
mofalchafacteristics
that
make?
forgood teaching as well as goodresearch.
'W-
'
'. %
Our graduate schools tare notentirely
immune? fromf
thecharge
thanthey
l^im
out youngspecialists^
who
to&Ve scarcelythought
of^
teaching as a vocation. More
must Ib^done
to stim-
Ulate.a
consideration of teachingin the
training? ol
scholars. Effective teaching
does-
nc«t|follow
naturallyfrom-
^competence
inscholarship,* nor is it
simply
anendowment which
*
one either
lias or -
hasn't.
Something canbe done about it
and mote
willhave to
Ibe*
done about it ifteaching is to
ibe
restored
tolaCentral iplace in|the
vocation ofthe
professor.
i'
Finally, teaching and learning
mustlibecome
a
much
more^vig-orously
/prosecuted IfieJd
of research than it
has-been upw
toflow,' Although-
ipsychodoig.y
hasmade
enormous
progress as ascience,
educational
psychologyhas
 fceeirc!
elatively unsuccessful in
fattra'c'ting
the interest ofthe more talented research men
In
that field.
RAT€D
Five Easy
Pieces
directed by Bobi'Rafelson-
Five
Easy
Pieces deals
with a mart (Jack
Niehoteorit
searching for
something;'he really
does not know.Coming from a family of professional musicians, he becametheir black
sheep^byjcutting^the
ties with
them?
and his
talent*
Disgusted with work in
thejoil
fields,*:
he
suddenly
quits ^his
job,and returns home to visit his invalid father. living with Rayette(Karen Black), whose aim is to be a professional country
singer,
he is caught
in>a
decision
between
the down to earth and the
elite*
. The movie tries too
hard
to
bejgood •
that it
tends
to bore the
the audi^woefe
Technically,,
ifcgftas t<Jb much gofflfg
tor ft.
Tlre*beau>tiifully
photographed total hor.izonal shots, which
^tend
to set amood,
become
so frequent that
it
does not get its point across. Thenumber of unnecessary segments leaves the viewer wondering ifheiis to find
the^poptilar
"heaviness" in
them
or not
TSiere
are foe
many
introductions
to^'smaller
characters. Two movies could easilybe made out of this one film'sinformation.
'
I.
A redeeming
aspefcfcof
this ilnVi,
is anSnteresti&g
scene play
ed wath
two female
nitcfr-frickefrs oh
their
wayfto ptoliutioA ftiee
Alaska.
*Khese
characters are
only
seen* on small
poWion
of the
story,put
their
inipactf
is telt
to
the final act. Another redeemingpoint, is
fhefihterestSng
blend of country and
ciassicai
music,
tl
feel
the
most
beaufiful moments
of
tfte fllm^s whflte
Bob (Niehol*
son)#is
playing a beautiful classic.
Ae camera
shows ttvefmarty
.poririaits
of his musical ejfnirV.The scene is handled
wHJi
t*ie
rightamount of
Bighttand
sound that when the selection is completednot only does Bob,
butitfise
audience is
brought
back to earW,
-Although
the fitl'e
couloT%tfggest?a"lewd situatJbUy
It's name
re>
fers to the familys talent.Although
the?movde
does drag, the sudden ending comes at theright time. Not only is Bob disgusted, but the audience also.
f
Stf
ft
'twere
not for
Nidholsonithe
movie would be a
disaster.
He
.handles^the
character
With
the
right
amount of
Cfudenefcs
and
hon>estylhatSWis
a
commendable
job.
'the
"Os^r"
nomination is
possible
for
hiS
performance.
Lenten'Festival Thenve
I
Call
To
New Life"
A*
festival
for
Lent?
!*
newal jn-ogram will
be highlighted by contemporary shorthaveseason^ Lent
ess,
according
Hilfeeft,
coHege
chaplain. To stress the
poisitive
andfper
sonal elements!
of
f
the season, Father Hllbert
indicated,
the*
SafftrtRtf
rtght
iand SurtSay
Itiornft^
Masses
Wftl
feature,
begiftnl«rg|Toji
March A,M^e»lftFestlval^
basedlBy
CISCAN
renewal
Good
I siohal lexperience ratherlftranfjtost a
verbaSoiie, Brief
colttr
films, as well as pesters^
barmefi
and graphics
Will
all
bescofribined
with
thei
Scripture reading of eachSunday to create a
uniqufe *mrf
toniempftrai^
Rtn*g*fcai
service.
| ^g »
"Lent Festival*'
wHf
be celebrated at
«ie|Colfege
onthe
Third,
FottrtlH
and
tFifth
Sundays of
Leftt^
as weft asEaster Sunday.
* f
I
* I
Theme for
the^Lent
Festtvai" program is
"a*call
to KeW
1
life."-It
emphasfeies^ positive
look^at
the tradi-
tionarlenten
theme of
repentance
and£co*versfcii. **Fe»-tival" announcements suggest
tnat
Lent is a
tfanetft
re-
birth, a chance to examine attitudes and actions in orderto live a more Christian life.
I
The
wtihi
the
HENt
FESTIVAL
KfT
is a
set of
ftlttrone-minute color film parables that [unite the Scripturetext of each week
jwith
real life situations. In the filmtor the Third Sunday of Lent, forexaatapfe,a
-group
ofchildren create and wear imaginative
paper
masks. The
F
J
scene dissolves into a
jquick
series of human actionsfollow
uffctn
the
dear
recogni- masked by hatred and violence.! Theconcluding
\
query:"What have we done to God's image?" encourages view*ers to re-examine the basic values by which they live.
wfiat? tjie ^above
points
,boi]
down to is
tjieiactionjthat
would
follow
upon the
dear
recognition that effective teaching is
still
the
resporisibility
of thescholarly'profession.If thisrecognition is achieved we willbe tfell on the way to a restora-tion of
.the
vitality of the idealof he scholar-tea
ohe%
i
|The LENTjFESTIVAL Rft
was created by
fhtfFkAflk
CISCAN COMMUNICATIONS
1CENTER,
a group ofpriests, sisters, brothers and laymen of all faiths
inter*
ested in communicating the Good
^News
through ^contemporary media,
i
'h
v
i
m
/

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->