Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Merciad, March 12, 1971

The Merciad, March 12, 1971

Ratings: (0)|Views: 11|Likes:
Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, March 12, 1971
The Merciad, March 12, 1971

More info:

Published by: TheMerciad on May 24, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/31/2011

pdf

text

original

 
«>*&£&*0mt isiUgt Lmktfjjf
*r
| by
Jim Casillof ff
"Fiddler on the
Roof*
takesit's title
from|a
passage in themusical.
Without
our traditions our lives would be asshaky ... as a
fiddler|oni
the
roo£.
M
|
I
Ji I £
Tevye,
the?
central
Jf
gure isthe
personification
of all that
f
js
represented toy the term
"Pa
Pa".
Hef
laughs, sings, dances,
andfwhenihis
daughters take itupon
themselves
to
ibreak
fradi-tian| of matchmaking he's bewildered, hurt, and tries to un
derstand!
It's an
old£version
ot
the "generation
gap"j j §
Tevye has a
jjgreat
deal of[faith
in
his God to whom he con-versesf|frequently.
fLitee
most(people, he
&sf
dependent
onj
his
wife
Golde, whether like mostmen he realizes it or not.
'fiddler"-is a
warmheartedmusical, filled with humor,pathos, dramatic
impact,
lacedwith dances
iand
songs. Although its
endingf
is somewhatunhappy, it
is one|of
hope! forTevye
and>his
family as they
leave?
their home for America.
^Fiddler"|
marks
|flie
stagedebut of Mr. (Bernard Solomon!probably^
chosen
ibecause hecomes as
closelto
being a Tevye
a
s
one
could jjfine
in Erie, Pa.What
heHaoked
in a strong musical voice, he adequately compensated in his fine delivery oflines,and demonstrated an expertise in his ability to dance.Golde, the wife was played byMiss Marie Olivi.
fMarie
hasthe talent and quality to
"make
it''
dnithe
professional theater.Possessed
by£a
beautiful, strongsinging voice, a flair for comedy and a
sensef
of timing fordelivering some
oflher
demandsas the Ma Ma.
I
tit
I
The supporting
j^cast,
I feel,must foe singled
|out If
or
doing
an outstanding
joblin
the singing and
dancing
portions ofwhich had they not :been there!the play could
'have
bombed.
Mis
s
Mary
O'Dowd,!
playingT2ELTEL, was a beautiful brideon stage. She is
morepian
capable of
being
thedauightertnum-
ber
*one,
by#her
attention andsensitivity to her lines. Also inthe
female Jroles
as daughters,were Aries Mills
|and
CelesteLfcgos. What's
the|
play |wi|hout
the "Matchmaker"? - Mercy-hurst faculty
produced |a
goodone in Mrs. Mika Nye. A special
nod|for
putting across a sequence in the play entitled, thedream",
were^Ohris pWarnich
who played Grandma Tzeiteland Annette Simon who playedFruma-Sarch. The sequencejust
about!
stole the show.Tevye, Golde who complimen-
Tailor
(Mark
Zine),iThis
writer
and
many others were
terribly
impressed with the handling ofthe roles.
t'
' # T
Miss
Kathy
Short
thef show's
choreographer deserves a
med-
B.
Solomom
tells
M.*01ivieri
a bedtime story.ted
fthe
scenes were also justgreat. -
S
Two male show stoppers who
have|just|got
to be talented asall
fgetf
out were the Rabbi(Jerry Barrow)
and^
Motel the
al.
Her
routineslwere "authentic
and lively, and it took manypainstaking hours of rehearsalto make the numbers shown onstage
flook
easy. Her dicers,Ed PotLasM, Larry Rdce, Bob
1
JMdJ
PmmoltmlO
Jancula, Jim Tromibetti, MarkLloyd,
Tom
Falvey,
Ken$Burk-
hart
were simply fantastic,watch for these people in the"To Life" and "Bottle Dance"numbers. Time and spaceican-not permit the singling out of
all
the
^perfomances
individually, but remember they
are
lasmuch a part of the play as anyof the leads previously mention*ed.
,Just.a
note on the sets.
Com
sidering the smallness of
the
stage itself and the many* set
changes,fDennis
Andres and hiscrew
worked!them
to
hew
perfection.A
tip
of the hat
to^
the musicalend,
oapatoly
handled by Mar-ilyn^Schatibel, vocal, instrumental. Here
again
the many hoursof irehearsal paid oft for her,not to mention all the "throathelps"
that|were$purchased «by
the singers in the cast.
i
Who last but not least
puts
the whole** thing together tomaike it work. The little oldwine maker? No,
guess
again.
Yes,
now you've got it. St.Jude Yablousky, O.S.U. | Itseems smash musicals
Jare
getting to toe
a^halbit
with
her*
f
Vol XLIII—No. 10
w:
CYHURST
COLLEGEMarch 12, 1971
|At
the most recent CollegeSenate meeting*^ new curriculum!
was
votedf
into effect
for
the summer of 1971, contingentupon the
k
approval
ofI
the Boardof Trustees. It was indeed anhistoric! moment
in
the historyof
thejcoMege and
a momentu-
ous^step
torward a more flexible concept of education.
vThe
original curriculum pro-
ence) as
^previously
mentioned,each student will
belrequired
to sample 10 liberal studiescourses in five areas. The areas
are:.
Fine Arts,
fPihilosophyf
andTheology, Language and Literature, Social Science, NaturalScience.>;
P
:
The amendment reads specifi-0ally; liberal Studies
y
. .
at
least
Hen courses,
*with
afmini-
P°»al
j^hich
was
^brought forthW the
curriculum
^committeepassedjwitb $
modification
in
l
*W,
oa$-
area* That is to say|
*
original
conception
of
the
Mfcerai
studies
samplef
was
Ranged
somewhat. To
4>e
spec-
f*
:
Insteadoof sampling iihe«k*al Studies
in four
areas
£"«
Arty, Humanities, Social
5cience|iiath
andNaU»ai^ci-new curriculummum of
f
two courses in eacharea.|
Coursesfta
at
major
program
ca»|#atisfy ithe
area re-
quirements,fbut cannotfcount
aspart
ofifthe ten.g
The remainder of the
resold*
tions,as defined
in|the
originalproposal from
the} curriculum
committee,passedjbnanimously.These
iiuafude g
M
msoixrnxxti:
i-
That
m
courses toe completed for graduation.
%
RESOLUTION
H.fAmended.
ORIESOLUTION
HI. At leasttwo courses
dnf
interdisciplinaryareas. •
k £
§
RESOLUTION
IV. At leastthree Intersessions
in|any
field(major or non-major)
I
f
i|
iRESCKDUnON
V. At least
TEN with no more than fifteencourses
IrequirecB
b^
a majordepartment,
and|withfno|more
than twenty
courses
taken in amajor program. (Majorgpro-
gram
includes required
major
courses and cognates, major in-
tefsessions
and
majorie'tectives)iRiESODtmONr
VT. Physicaleducation may toe used to satis-fy
ONE ofsthese
40 courses.
(No
more than one
^course
may! becounted).
§iSrCis important
to note how
ever,
that
the nev Icurricuilum
cannot toe implemented untilapproved toy fee Board
of
Trus
tees.
^Furthermore, it Is imperative to understand that such acurriculum,
M
implemented,would not
Ibe^
retroactive fofc
Seniors. That|is,
Seniors
would
havefto
graduate under
thefnew
curriculum.
}
'
(Although the final decisionconcerning the passage and im
plementation
of the curriculumis still pending,
Ht
is importantto note
that
fall the
^resolutions
passed
with
overwhelming majorities!
*L
T
Calender
A FUNNY PLAYWOMEN'S
LIB
WATERMELON BALLROOM
FRIDAY.{MARCH
12, 8 P.MPASSION PLAY
|
FOLLOWED.
BY
LENTEN LITURGYSUNDAY, MARCH 14
CHAPEL—8
P.M.ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM OK
i
AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICYEDINBORO STATE
COLLEGE
MARCH 17 AND 18 AT 7:30 P.M
 
Page Two
MBRCYHURST
COLLEGE
Marc
h|«.
I9li
MERCYHUR8T
COLLEGE;
ERIE, PA.Meroiad Staff
Editor
j>
Al
MessinaAssociate Editor
\
f....
Bob ParksFeature Editor
1
k
...
Jamie
Kamler
News Editor
*
Bill
SachseSpoHs
Editor
g
Bill DopieralaLayout Editor
Jf.
Dave
RohdeGeneral
Manager .
.
.1
Bob
heck
Business Manager
4
.
Cindy GustinCirculation and Exchange
iMarlene
SmithLayout Staff
..
i..
A .
Fran Ahearn, Bill Chiodo,
fi i
Ann PottsStaff Writers Audrey Rosenthal,
*£ H
Dick Lamb,
Brenda
Brewer,
f J
Bill
Fictor,
Jim
Trombelti
Staff
....»..?..
Carol
Meuhling,
Julie
Samick,
&
Ellen Ileinrich, Mark
Zine
ig
Business j
Makes America Great?
by
Bill
Fichter
The MERCIAD is proud to present an exclusive
ihterview
withMr.
-Big
Business, 1971, Henry Peoplebender ...
•Mr.
Peoplebender, who
selects
Mr.
BiglBusiness?
'•We have
a^big
business council. It's comprised of all theGuys that help make this country great.You mean
you jfwere chosen
by Congress?
f
*"No,I mean Ford, GM, U.S. Steel . . . you know, the reallygreat ones."' .
£
'I see.
What didfyou
do to receive
this>distinction.
|"Well, you see,
Mr.?Big
Business has to manipulate
peoplerbet-
ter'than
any other
businessman.
,,
J?
And you did this the best?
L
i"What
do you ihean, did I do it best? I
helped
teet rid of Walter Hickel."
; ^
\
You
mean-you
persuaded^
President
Nixon to fire his Secretaryof Ulterior?
|
"That's
right!"
"Are
you kidding? He was doing it too well! He was breathingdown our necks
with
that
.pollution
control routine. So, we told
Ndxonleither
he
goies
or we go."
F T *
Z
And President Nixon listened to
you?
"Sure! He had no choice. Who else would back him in his crazyschemes?"
|Oh»
Well, can
youlteU
me what your duties are
as.*Mr# Bjg
Business 1971?
|| > ;
f*g
||
J"I
have*to
coordinate all the Big Business activities.^"Such as?
' %
I e & 1§8*
"Well most of
them*are
secret, but
don't£be
surprised
iflyou
don't
se'e 'Ralph
Nader around."
W'
I realize you can't give
mevany
specifics, but can you give mesome ftmfc as to your general
-policy.
"Yes. It will be about the same as always.
They're
here to
sferve
us you know." *Aren't you
afraid that»the public
will
nb
longer tolerate your
polluting
of their laiio^
f
"We
have!that
all worked
out^tooiWfc
realized that someday
^Ihe
public might become aware of this pollution
problem
so wehired some freaks to start
anti-pollution
campaigns."And
thislhelped yo'tift
|"Sure!
Ttoe people *won't
back
thelfreaks
because they think
fhey
are merely subversives. All we did was make anti-pollution
frtn-Amerdcan.
As you
reeall/^Q!ftteed the^ame routine
for Vietnam
and*it*
worked beautifully.
^Remember
the Moratorium?"
£
l|f|
Well, you
ceTteinly*sefcm§to
have control
offthe
country.
"Wefcertainly
do, but don't worry. With us it's in safehands*
*f*
Both
America's
Experience Ghetto
Life
J|
bypokBeck
*
ft
ttefte&itfiiitfiager
Do^you
belong to
fhe
rihajerity of.
America?)
Homogenious, flat,sterile, and expensive.. If youdo,,
you
are living in an almost total*
ly ^mechanized
and
d6hdrfiahized
generation,
riding^to
the churchonly
fouii
blocks away,
fiding up
two flights of stairs instead offWalking, becoming fatter and weaker, expounding about everything
Unden
the sun and knowing nothing.
M>,
f
| Living
[in Suburbia
as
a
gf&ti|>
of
Supier
Bigots and Liberals
^Wthithe
"average" American in the middle. The "average"
isffesilent
bigot,
, iS
. ,,, .
&
^
..
.
&Z
?
Their mass
|ftligra*ltdfi*Td
the
"**otrtfer
zone" proves
th&ir
desire to escape
tpWrt^tfte*
 "Black
Bleftietftt"
Kfdtllig
too outer
Subtfr-
bia
gives them a
feeling
r
of security provided by*building
and zoning codes plus a fltifftbet
ot trter fieCessary
requirements governed by economic fcictorsfTheir
hopgis that ftheift
isolated living
winkeep
them and their children distant from the problems bf the inn
eity.|What
they don't realize is that their "upper ghetto"
laving
iscausing problems too.
£ .•%.-• ji ±
BETWEEN
US
Brendia Brewer
AND
Rick «
Lamb
student!
Activities
wh
does
g6?
;
Every year the
students
at
Mercyhurst,
as in all
otHer
colleges and universities across thecountry, pay an activities fee.Here the cost to each studentin addition
to
(their'tuition,
is$125.In recent weeks, and especially since the winter
week
end} fiasco, voices have beenheard asking, "Where, did inymoney go?" One student askedme
why
the
hadipayed
$125 for
activities}yet j
he still
had^to
buy|
tickets
J to go see the TimHardin
concert,
4
According
t
to
Mr.
£
Kennedy,
s
free} concerts
wouldI
be impossible
iconsider
ing the
financiallbreakdown
ofthe $125 each student pays.
£&
5
Holding
Ithe*average attendance of Mercyhurst to 685 stu
dents,,'the
students paid a total
l)o
you
thinkrtheyffe trying
to*
tell us something.of
?$75,625
for this school
year,
Needless to say, one can
remain
pretty active on $75,000. How-ever, thefe: doesn't seem to
be
ariy great or
extreme'amount
of activity on this campus.
This
leads one to inquire as to
wherethe^money ia
going.
If**.
First, $1
frofti
each students
$125^pays
for brochures, mail.ing of
*
films,
announcemenU
and special publications. Second, $14: pays
fer^thelhealth
series| available to all the
stiK
dents.Most of this money
goes
to pay for salaries. Another
$25
is taken to support the athleticprogram. This- comes to about$17,000 which buys uniforms,supplies, lockers, etc. The U-braryftreceives^the* largestamount
f
of
money?
from:youractivities fee. It gets about
$26
of your $125. The most immediate
benefit |
to
^the } students
comes to us through the
cul«tural
series and the movies that
are£
shown,
I
accounting
for
about $20. (The
Yearbook
demands $10
andtthe
newspaperneeds $4 from everyone. Whatremains is the only relatively!loose money which can be usedby the student body for
person
al preferences. This
issthe
$25
eacht
student
Epayf
to R.UJS.
However,!even this!money
istightly allocated
I
and thus
its
use is tightly regulated.Someone suggested
to^me
while I was writing
4
this* articlethat each
^student
would'^have*to participate in two spoTts,
a*
tend all the movies, keep everynewspaper,
join
every club oilcampus, get sick onee
and stedl
four books
frotti thefflibrary &
order to enjoy
Mis
|125.>
Thfc
is a bit extreme. For we
all
know how much we appreciatethese "activities," don't.
1
we?
LETTERS
TO THE EDITOR
Deart Edit or :£
The
^Mercyhurst
Chapter ofStudent
PSEA recently+receivedstate-wide recdgfidtion
in
Uar-
rifcburg
for its outstandingraemibershif>. This year 101 stu
dents joitied
the
ofganizatibn.
Atthe
last meeting, ten of these
mamlbers iwerfc
present. Where
wete
the other01?^
(Mr.
Don Creole, President of
Erne
PSEA, spoke cm
Tea«her
Negotiattons,
ia
itopic whichshould be of importance to allin
the^ield
of education.
*Mr.
Creoila^is
a busy
man.^Yet
hehad the time
If
 orbits. We,
apf-
parently, did not haye time for
Iron.
I /was embarrassed. Aren'tyou?Mary Lou
Dutko
Dear Editor:One
of it
he major complaints
regarding
this
journalistic
endeavor, known as the Mereiad,
is
that the paper Jacks properfemale - representation. A person then may ask
himself,
arethe males
,«so
powerful as tohinder enthusiastic young women
|from
participating in this
^xtra-ctirriculur
activity? My
answerfto
this
^question
is that
•there -daren't '^any fenthusiasticyoungi
women to hinder. Thegeneral apathy toward the Mer-
Hkenthe £h&td,#he«ubar&B
have a High teen
pregnancy
rate,
and
a|drug
praWeia.
The only
difference
is the
eeonomic
elevations. '
;f
'
|Aswte manlft thefeuburb
sets back
inithe
evening and"I'm glad I
don'tfiive
in a fehdtto,"
hejshould tWfik
twice.
ciad
from the female sector ofthis campus is unbelievable andquite disheartening. The
#*
just don't seem to exhibitij»-
terest*
(Most of them) Theyseem to have only eomplaint$|no constructive criticism.
Grant^ed,
thereiare girlsfwho
do care,but there
areri't
many.
In
my dealings with the Mer
eiad,
*I've
found the staff
*
ways glad to accept
assisten^
in any
form JI
the girls
would
only
oflfer
their help, they could
easfly Ibecome
an iritegreHP
3
"of the newspaper.
No
one cafi
Improve things by merely testing on his
Gather)
|»steriali^
*htis
is tto* age
of ^Women's
iMi;
Everybody's eqaal>
N<^fefris
ha^e*fo worfc^as
hard
aswe
guys. You've come a
I
o!
*
way, 'baby,
Ibut
why stop now.Observant
Male
*
"*
/
 
X
M*rch
12,1971
MERCYHURST COLLEGE
Page
Three
Studentl
Affai
rs
Consider
d
Open Do
MERCYHURST
ART
rm
i
k
ft
if
ji
!i
m
!
JS
Q
I
i
J
it
f?
ii
We,
an
interested componentof Mercy:: .rstCollege, realizing that
there"
is a
iSEinite
social problem in the school, feel
tfoat
some change must occuron campus in order to
produce
a much more meaningful social relationship. Therefore, wefeel that the following proposal
wilt
help to alleviate this
pitob-
; lem.
«
Dorm
self-determination
in
E
the following areas:i Open dorms from
12:00
a.m.r to
14:00
p.m. daily. |
2
£"l*his
is what is suggested
f for
Preston •Hall." The other dorihs,
tlridgf
the self-determination policy, Will be
sallowed
to choose this forthemselves.
a
3.
No hours
for freshmen? after|lst
term;
%
On Feb. 24, 1971 the Student
Affairsf-Committee with all?
resident counselors and residentassistants met together
to?
dis
cuss the
labove
petition. Therewas also a. gathering of inter
ested ^students
at the meeting,who gave voice to the somewhat ambiguous terminology ofthe petition in the area of a
"lacking
social problem."Through the efforts
fof
Sr.Maura,
Srf
Ann, Sr. Barbaraand Sr. Elizabeth, a more concise
and specific definition*was
finally determined. In essence,the definition was {this: Social
p
interaction*, between males andfemales in each
other's
rooms| for
the
specific purpose of enjoying each othes company"
|is
desired by* at least 210 students
I
who affixed their signatures
Ito
the petition.
$8
,
Just -what
*
enjoying eachother's company" really means,
is
that young red blooded
Amer-
* lean
men and women?- want
f
obe
together duffl£ %mes
of
p*
stress and relaxation. Whether| this means talking, ^studying, or
F
listening to music,
etc.,''
will
Nrary amfcng
those dijtectly| involved at the time
iand j>lace* mutnaHy
convenient.
At thetime these comments we're
manifesting
themselves, it wasthought by some that an "unspoken
f
activity| might
take
place, or that personal privacyof others might be violated.These are excellent thoughts tobe considered. Therefore, itseems that a degree of curtailment is evident in the
male,
andfemale dorms
to ^assure
this
d
°esn't
happen. Both male andfemale
mernibers
are quiteaware of this fear, and
'rti surewill
go along with later restrictions
thatfwill be
imposed.
|The
meeting
itself,
eventually
brokefdown
to just the studentaffairs committee deciding
the
issue of self determination, andanother
f
meeting will be heldprior to a vote on any conclusions arrived {at
by|the
committee.I might add in conclusion thatthe meeting was excellently
ruii,
with
comments solicitedjinalphabetized
order so that noone was slighted.
Some£
excel
lent!*
comments were put forth toclarify
rthe
reasoning
ibehind
the petition.
;it
was thought or-
OUTLINESFUTURECOUNCILPROGRAM
!>
After three successful meet
ings,
the
Meroyhurst
StudentsArt Council
(MSAC)
has been
cCficially
Initiated?' This heworganization has some very exciting
.plans for
the present andfuture! no
tonly
involving artmajors
<but?all
Mercyhurst stu
dents.
A committee of r class representatives were elected as wasthe president. They are GloriaLeon, Sheila Sullivan, MaryMeehan and Kenneth Burkhart.In separate balloting
RichardOhman
was chosen president ofthe council.
% iininally
by some that violencewould be coming
i^the
petitionwas
ignoredj—now
really. Onlytime
-will
tell the final
outcome
of this, in the interim everyoneis calm and looking to the committee forguidance.This is notan issue to be taken lightly, Ihope the committee bears
this
in mind, and
frorti
time' to timekeeps the
President
ibody up todate on. its -progress.
RATED
Brewster
Mc
Cloud
s
\V%
W»:-
I*
I
4
t
A
J
A
i
if
D
i
iBREWStR MCCLOUD
is anexcellent film brought to us by
the v makers
of
MASIL^
Tlie.
story concerns itself with
Brewkter? (Biid Ctfrfcj
a youngmart
liVing^in
a fallout shelterin the AstrolDome. Brewster'sdream is to fly and we see himworking on the wings whichwill give him his freedom. Anumber of
1
murders have beencommitted on
people {standing
in his way. This introduces
dif
ferent characters such as thisaccomplice (Sally
Kellerman of
MASH
fame).
-Sfhe
detective,thee,police, a not
soflnnocent
young
girl|(Shelley Duvall) and
even Margaret Hamilton andher
tubby
slippers^
mi
The
plot-
begins at
such
opposite directions that it is hardto imagine
its
unification in the
alotted
time.To add eveh more mystery,the only
duetto
the murders
Is
bird droppings (symbolic?)Technically
jthe
film
has,
alot
gdihg
for
it.
The
character
development *is
excellent.
Thefilm-: has
enough
seriousness,but the pure
comedyiis irt
iioway Chidden. Even the photography, which is not outstandingadds
a
new dimension.As the murder's identity
be
comes la
little
sticky
the!film
goes into a car chase,
the;
bestsince BULLETS
Brewsteh
is riding in
a jl
Road Runner, what
else.
I I
Although slow! in a few briefspots,-? the
final
N
segments areworth they price of admission.Brewster does fly, but hisdream is
hist
down
fail.
Ant!
now 5
all the characters are in
troduced:-
to show each* true
character!
This*
is
the most unique
ending
I.
have
fever seen.April
l,
1971 is the date? ofthe first major event on
the
MSAC agenda, a film festival.The only admission charge willbe to
.bring
in something bluein association with the letter
"A.**.
The other prerequisite isfor the art
majors
to bring anon-art major OR twenty-five
cents.
These are short filmsthat will prove very interesting.Also conceived was the Student Merit Award. Art work nolonger than
2V
2
feet by 5 feetwill be judged by a designatedpanel with emphasis on ^presentation. This competition will beheld every two weeks. Charge:ten cents. Prize: year's subscription to a leading art maga
zine.
Other local and national
•competition
will be madeknown, as well as the StudentArt Sale and raffle.
| |
The Senior Thesis Show willbe held in the faculty
j
loungethis year. The date of the opening has
net
been announced.MSAC would like this to
be
thehighlight
of
the art student'sfour years of study.
The
Mercyhurst Show
of^studentiworkTwill
open March
21,
1971
aUthe
EriePublic Museum.It was brought to the attention of the council that one ofthe lagest
^departments
atMercyhurst, the Art. Department, has no
^graduate
^placement. By next year
this shduld
be changed, hopefully,
it
willbecome a function of the Administration.
The
i
MSAC willalso try to gain access to
thisinifor
mation.The announcement of a guestspeaker
coming
to Mercyhurstthis year was of particular interest. It is planned to obtaina nationally known artist thecaliber
of.
Segel, Warhol orWyeth.
|
*
*!|
Other functions of the Mercyhurst
Student
Arts Council
is;
the planning of field trips tomuseums, art
shows?
and forsketching and painting. Workshops
will be
initiated forMercyhurst students
and-
inter-ested high {school, students. TheMSAC is also organising a
fres-rnmen
orientation, nd initiating an arts magazine library.Any person not at the meetingand interested in helping thisnew organization is asked
to
contact any
member
of thecommittee.
"TT^^TT
Winter
Weekend
[Minor
Fiasco
Erie Book Storeffrenchi
by Bill SachseNews EditorThe cries and lamentations ofthe
Monday-mdrntng
Quarter
back
are
ctften most trHtati|tg
to fyhose
ucttiaily irttfoived "to
an
unsuccessful
endeavor.
However, these same should not ibe
»totally
disregarded,
asjw
moreoften than not
there Ms
a grainof
truth $n
what is
being
jsaid.
^Any*4iarangue Ion thte jni-fated|Winter Weekerid4971
wfll- proveto follow this pattern, but perhaps
an
^objective,
non-partisangview
rcan.serve to establish
4a
different!
possibly more
-
successful,^
fonhiiia
for
futufc
events.
f
x
U
Much can
beisaid
concerningthe /choice of
entertainment
at
I;
this
year's^
weekend.
Not muchof this is good.
^he "iWiday
fligfitttjazz con
certinas tnore
<*i£ffi
ltiieljrfvety
fine.
The
fffroblem
is
.that lin>
one,
noW
even
the%.organizer*
of
the
^weekend,
knew anything
£bout
them. It is
-
quite possibleand most probable that exclusive musician's circles knew of
,
the^^DeJeririette Ja^z
group butno
one
would divulge any in-fbrihiation. Possibly ftielr
recdM
I
doesiS't
f past
'lend
itself to
i<clty»
Another
Was tlje |choice
ofTim Hardih.
It
is admitted thatthe number ofmusicians
-
available on a given night is limited but discretion should bepracticed at all
times.
Tim
Har
din has a history of poor con-
tert^sin tfiis
area. He
Ishiot
ihetype of fromancy musician
cfc-
siredi at
rsuch?
an affair.
Nett
time,
be more careful
in
^mak
ing selections.Another problem,
se6fhingly[tndn6T
yet
of catastrophic
j$rt-
portions, is that
oh
the lori'gweekend. Each dorm
student
who can
stakes
advantage of
evexy
opportunity to leave,
Erie.
A tour day weekend
is peftect
lor this.
*
These
weekehd
emigres are the main target Of
thesocial
weekend. It
appears
thatterm weekends and long
week
ends Should be two seperateentities.
(Continued on Page 4)

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->