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The Merciad, Oct. 1, 1971

The Merciad, Oct. 1, 1971

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The Merciad, Oct. 1, 1971
The Merciad, Oct. 1, 1971

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THE
*
VOL.XLIVN0.2MERCYHURSTCOLLEGE
OCTOBER
1/1971
LEARNING
RESO
UR CE
CENTER
OPENING
SOON
\
!
Looking about, it does the soulgood, to see under construction,
the
new Mercyhurst LearningResource
Center,f
located nearthe; Joseph Weber Memorial
Library..
Its very structuredeclares
its
permanence and its
versitility*
provides
fori^amultiplicity
of purposes. $
$
To provide for
this
versailityhowever,
.many |long
hours ofcareful planning and deliberationbecame the tasks of a
variety
oi
people.
*
J
h
3
Sister Martin Hinkle, Headlibrarian at Mercyhurst College,and Sister
^Gabriel,
traveled adistance of ten-thousand milesover a two year
period,;
investigating libraries across theUnited States.
i
In particular, their journeystook them to Indiana, New York,Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, andMinnesota.
* ? g5j
The libraries located
in.these
areas
pranged
in architecturefrom cylindrical structure, wherethe entire shelving of the
libraryextendedl
from spokes,
to$
allaluminum building with no ex
terior
windows.*Then, gathering the qualitydata from their trips, they conceived the preliminary plans
foi
the Resource
l
Center.
Sistei
Martin,
|coming
from a familywith background in architecture,drew
?the
\
first'
preliminarysketches six years ago for the
proposeds
building.
They werethen
slightly
modified by thearchitect, Francis
'}.
Pisani from
New
York
City 4 «
*
The versatility of
tire
centercan also be seen
i
in its colorscheme. Beginning on the lowerlevel of the center, the carpet isblue and green and the furnitureis blue, turquoise, and gold. Thisfloor will house all the current
periodicals! which;
will numberabout| five-hundred and fiftywhen expanded, and at thepresent time;
sixteen-hundred
rolls of
micro-film
which will beavailable
in
a
seperate
room.On this lower floor also is theErie Document Center and workroom, to be supervised by
Mr.
Donald Grinde,
of*
the history
department.
Other features in
this*location
are technical services,
a
3
student
smoking lounge,and several storage
centersM
%
On
I
the main floor,; the colorscheme is
gold J
brown, and
green.|
This will house the cardcatalogues,
£
the circulation deskand
iGeneral
books up to theScience section.
\
The main offices
of!
theLibrarian and AssistantLibrarian are located here, alongwith a
jstaff
lounge and as aspecial feature,
a .Faculty
Research Center.On the top
floor,
done in black.
red,||and
j|
gold, can be foundthe Secondary
j;
CurriculumBooks, the Fiction collection,Fine Arts, Literature, Musicand History. This
i
floor alsohouses a Children's! LiteratureRoom,
ten-thousand
children'sbooks
withf
other additionalmaterials.
& # &$£
There are provisions
ffor
aListening room and a multimedia room, both of which will be
View
from Administration
BuildingBy
Bonnie LaDuca
^jmSSK
expanded at a future date,
I
The
multi-media room
will be usedfor taped lectures
H
that facultymembers may choose to recordfor a student's convenience, andother cassettes containing musicfrom around the world.
%
Thisparticular room has
tremendous
possibilities and therefore it isalmost impossible to foresee allof
its
varied uses. J
&
On each level, there are typingrooms, double conference rooms,
and!
study carrels. Differenttypes of electrical units havebeen installed in the carrels sothat in the future, from a
central
control system, tapes and othermedia can be conveniently piped
into
these carrels.
TH
*
The entire building is accented
by;
colorful furniture in comparison
with the
neutral
shelving.
*A11
seating facilities 'areupholstered, and
I
scatteredthroughout the building are
sofaswhich offer
the restless student avariety of comfortable choices.The
architecture*
has a lofteffect where the; ceilings areintentionally high,
*
so that incertain areas on the second floor
one
can
see the third
floor.
Sister Angelica, Miss Yule andSister
Martin,
fchose
the colorsfor the building, keeping in mindthe location of the walls and eventhe amount of light that enters aparticular room.Provided that all is well, it ishoped that the learning ResourceCenter
will
be open
to
students bythe end of October. It is obvious
thatMhe
center has come
to*
be
due Ho
the careful planning of
*
»-
individuals!
who had people
In
mind.
I
SM
f
W
£ •
1 Unfortunate though it may be,most contemporary buildingscrumble away long before theirpurposes
I have I
been t fulfilled,
unless
there
i
is that
J
frequentpinning and
J
patch
|
work andgluing back
together.i ff¥&&^£
However
S
noble their reasonsfor being, a fleeting existence isusually their fate, despite all of
man's
doctoring, while! thosenoble
*
reasons
await *
anotherexecution
*4n more |j
temporarydwellings,
f £9§ S SB|
Undoubtedly, structures today,more often than not,
lack
thatquality of
immortality;
thatpreceding generations took suchpains to keep in mind.
I
Thisconscious foresight on their part,thus bequeathed
many t
lastingstructural landmarks to mankindwhich seem to silently proclaim,
' Man was
here."
-. ^£i&»I The
Center
was
built not only toserve present needs, but to alsomeet future
education*s growing
demands.
Wj^^g
P^*S
i Years
?from * now >
when new{generations take our places, theyshall undoubtedly look back anasay a quiet "thank you," for notonly
"bequeathing
to them apurposeful building, but
in:
thelarger
scope
of progress, to thank
us for our gift to
posterity. y!*V:'
f*§
!
s^lsfe
....
Ktai?i
s#
3M^
Main
Entrance
i West
Side.
Draft\Retums
For Two
YeaAEncore
View
from Baldwin Apartments.
<&
..WASHINGTON-With
thepassage by the Senate last weekof the draft extension bill, theSelective Service System is onceagain
authorizedUo
induct meninto the armed
forces--but
with
a
few strings.First, the draft will last onlyuntil
f
July
?1|
1973|
fPresidentNixon
hopes Ho have replaceddraft calls with sufficientnumbers of volunteers by then,and the induction machinery willbe put on ice in case of nationalemergency. After that date,therefore,
I8year5
olds will stillhave
to|register(;with
the?Selective Service.
$|
Second. Male college studentsno longer receive automaticdeferments
Hvhilei
in school.Congress,! bowing to pressurefrom college students and othersfor a more equitable
draft,
agreed to authorize the Presidentto end the
f-undergraduate
deferments, a
step he
has alreadypromised
to
take.
Starting^
this past summer newstudents
(not
enrolled in the 1970-71 academic year) will not be
deferedV*
although if they have
started
iclasses they may postpone induction until the presentterm
ends? All
other students areeligible for induction after fouryears in coilege or when they
provides
men
*
torequestedyear, thereach
24
years ofage,whichevercomes
first,
vj£.Third, lottery numbers willapply to all men with the samebirthdate,
?
regardless of
.
thelocation on
their idraft
boards.Requested by the President, thisnew rule will end charges thatcertain draft boards were"safer" than others. Thus all
men v with
the same lotterynumber will be inductable at thesame time. I
^Another
provison
incentive^
for morevolunteer. Originally
byfthe
President last$2.4 billion pay hike ($1.8 billionfor first term enlisted men andjunior
officers)
will go into effectOctober 1, unless the*;
Cost 3
ofLiving Council, which overseesthe current wage-price freeze,
rules
otherwise.
* »
-g-'For a recruit or seaman
recruit J
class
E-l,
average annual pay will be $4,872, as compared with $3,165 at present (65percent increase). At the top ofthe
<7
scale, a colonel or Navycaptain-class 0-6, will get
$26,389
as against $24,850 now (6 percentincrease).Conscientious objectors will begiven two-year assignments to
civilian*
service.
\
The Senate-House Conference Committeeemphasized that this 'work twill"parallel in his experiences, to areasonable extent, the experiences of the young man whois inducted
in his
stead.**
f
The Mansfield amendment torequire total US troop
with"
drawal from
'Vietnam was?
approved in modified form as a
"Sense
of Congress**
title*in
theact.
i
Mansfield's
nine-month
timetable is now stated as
"theearliestj
practicable date** forcessation of
"all
militaryoperations of the United States inIndochina,** and "a date certain... for the prompt and orderlywithdrawal of all United Statesmilitary
forces...subject^
to^
therelease of all American prisonersof war held by the Government
of
North Vietnam and forces alliedwith such Government, and anaccounting for
all
Americansmissing in action who have beenheld by
-or
known to suchGovernment
or
such forces.**
F
The
titlejfalso urges
thePresident to
k
negotiate
t
withNorth Vietnam "a ceasefire byall parties," the withdrawal datecontingent
omPOW
releases and
the *
accounting of MIA's, andwithdrawal of
U.S.Itroops
from
all
of
Indochina.
The
Senate t
passed
the com$
promise bill by a vote of 55-30 onSept.
31.
The House vote on Aug?;
4 was
297-108.
 
PAGE 2MERCYHURSTCOLLEGE
OCTOBER
1/1971
NATIONIN TRANSITION
by Al
MessinaSome of the most recent works
of
Americas authors
and
scholarshave expressed a deep sense ofdespair about the present as wellas the vfuture. The view ofAmericans of an ongoingprogress and an inexorable faith
in
better tomorrow seems
to
havedissapated.- A new perspective
has
emerged.
}
B.
F. Skinner, the author ofBeyond Freedom and Dignity.asserts that
American
jiculture-nutured on 19th century ideas ofthe free, autonomous man-hasbeen doctrinaire about theconcept ofcontrol;
*V»r
Skinne*are
necessary
r
ofwe ar£
to survive.
?
Eric Toffler, hasexpressed his concern in
dif
ferent I terms.!
His
book, FutureShock, is about
what*happens
topeople
|when
they are overwhelmed by change and about
the ways in
which man
adapts-or
fails
to adapt-to the
future.Others have pointed to war,racism, poverty,| or* the Ireper-cussions
jjof
an uncontrolledtechnology. The
list Us
endless.But perhaps what plagues us
most
is that which we understandleast-transition.
There
seems
to be
a need
to
seein
^abstract
and generalterms
America's
recent transitionaltrust.
The * trust]
of
:
course ispervasive—it^
|
effects outeconomic, political,philosophical, and culturalperspective. More importantly,however, the transitional trusthas occurred in a very
short
duration. It is these two factors-rapidity and
pervasiveness-that
makes the transition
imost
dif
ficult
to
assimilate.From an economic standpoint,
American
enterprise was until asearly
as
40 years
ago
governed bythe principle of unrestrainedfreedom| or autonomy. TheAmerican economic system, inthe tradition
of*
19 centuryliberalism (free enterprise),to the individual{(farmers, in-
etc.)|
the
respon-the growth of
'the
nation
in
economic terms and theextension of that wealth to thebroadest base possible. The NewDeal, however,
\
changed
thatconception markedly^ Part ofthat responsibility was thenvested*
in
government.
Fori the
first time in the history ofAmerica the national government! decided to share, in
mo
uncertain terms, the respon
sibility?
for the? economicdevelopement of the nation. Theshift was rapid and pervasive.The government
beganf
to makeconcerted efforts
to
stimulate theeconomy^ when necessary, and
restrain it when
warranted.
|&
The concept of governmentalsimply leftcapitalistsdustrialists,sibility
Jfor
responsibility thrust itself intomany other areas
of
Americanlife
and did so with
great celerity.Not only is there
governmental
subsidy for the poor (welfare),
but
since the
195*
Supreme Courtdecision! Brown vs. Board, ofEducation the Federal government has sought educationalquality through desegregationprograms. Again, an elementalshift has occurred, and occurredmost rapidly.
'
*
On the diplomatic levelAmerica has emerged in thiscentury
as
a
first rate
power with
E
a
transcedent
responsibility to
all
^ot^ntT^eople^bf
the world,especially those who are hungryor experiencing internal politicalupheaval. The reasons for thisemergence and the exaggeratedscope of America's concept ofresponsibility* are irrelevent tothis consideration. The essentialfact is that this emergence hasmarked a
^fundamental jandS abrupt
shift.
£ J
Traditionally, America hadbeen a nation of strongisolationest tendencies thatventured into international affairs with extreme^ caution~
and
reserve, and
did
\
so
only
a*few
times all of which
were
limited induration.
In 1918 Woodrow
Wilsonspoke
of
revolutionizing the worldby example. It is evident todayAmerica
Jhas
merged theprophecy, the hope, theprojection, with the reality. Thetool,"however,
is not
example, butrather i
America'a direct
presence.
^f *Itg isf the^cultural
sandphilosophical matters, however,that
have *received .the
greatestattention as of late. HerbertMarcuse and Charles Reich haveprovided much of the analysis.Their works reveal an initialbreakdown!
offcthe
traditionalAmerican values of discipline,hard work, materialism,! accumulation, the
faith
r
intechnology and the harsh
Puritanism
that has manifesteditself
in
a punitive mentality
 
It isessentially these
values—and
mild variations-that havegoverned America for most of its
national
existence.,
|
t
Diametrically! opposed
Lis
the
* 'counter
-culture" of Marcuseand* Reich. The counter culture
!has
become increasingly moredifficult to identify. Many wearfaded jeans, long hair, and listento underground music but fewerhave assimilated
thef
"anti-ethos"(anti-achievement,anti-discipline,
etc.)
of the genuinecounter-culture. Yet one| factremains. It was not until;
the
lastdecade in American history thatsuch a concerted and zealousattempt has
been^made
tochallenge
'&
the
M.
traditional
THEMERCIAD
Second class postage, paid atErie/
Pa., 16501.
$3.00 per
year.
Published bi-weekly during the college/
year,
except'Thanksgiving,Christmas and
Easter
vacations/ and examination periods by the
students
of
Mercyhurst
College.*
fgS »ysft
C
..*-
Editor
£
Associate EditorAssistant
Editor
Business Manager
Student
Consultants
Faculty
Advisor!
Vincent DoranBob
Parks
Julie SamickCindy
Gustin
j&
Al MessinaBarry
Mc
AndrewEditors:
BUI Dopier la /
Sports;
Gary
Dudenhoefer.
Entertainment;
%"
BonnieLaDuca,'Feature;Bill Sachse, News; Mark Zine, Drama.StaffWriters:Mary Hoffman/J.O.Havrilla, Bob Pettinelli, Pat Lyon
Al
Belovarac/ D; Vernora, Sports; Thomas 6. DiStefano, KimWontenay, Sue
Weiner,
Maureen Hunt/ Rick Lamb/ Feature;GeraldBarron*Entertainment; Tom Heberle, News
Staff:
Cathy Smith/Kathy|
Holmes,*Christine
wCebula, RoseannSchiavIO/ Carol
AICQ,typist;
Annette
D'UrsO/
Mary Popvich, proofreader; Dianne Guyda, Terr) Grzankowski, Mary Griswold, MarieKanicki, Jon DeGeorge, Lay-out; Fran Ahearn, Dave Rohde,Bonnie
Clymer,
Amparo
Alvarado, Art; Carol Kress,
Shelte
Lichtenwalter/ photographer; Mary Tupek, Circulation; DarioCipriani/ advertising manager; Bob Beck/ editorial assistant.
A
merica-Love
And Dissent
Over the past few
years?this
country has been experiencingmany outbursts
\
of seeminglyuncontrolled energy. Tills energyhas
been
directed, "mostly,towards problems found
in
\
thiscountry. People are dissatisfiedwith these "problems." Oftenoutbursts have been^ pointeddirectly
against
the government.
by Rick
Lamb
They seem to have had their
origin in
the
anti-war
movement-which rallied for awhile but nowseems
to have lost
its glamor andis dying a victim of its supporters' boredom. Along with thisanti-war movement came
>
theromantic air and rhetoric of
revolution.Thef
revolutionarymovement was carried, for the
FINISH
American values. But beyond
this,
the challenge is in the formof
i
polar (complete
5
opposite)opposition and
has|thrust
itselfinto the
forefront®without
avisable interim! or adjustmentperiod.
i
Philosophically, America'stransitional phase can be explained in many ways. And it isprobably here that this analysisis most incomplete. But;essentially this transition can be foundin thef general attitude ofAmerican society.
,;
Specifically,
America
has historically been anoptimistic nation with a firmbelief in the efficacy of themachine
and
the unrelating
progress ^and
growth that it ensures. Today there is an overwhelming apprehension aboutthe future. The machine andtechnology both seem to havecreated new and more pernicousproblems, problems which threatthe
very^existence
of man him
self.
The result? Autonomy
has
given way to mild controls, whileprogress has been superceded by
the need to
survive.
The
importance of this analysisthen is not to Judge, or to
cast?
acritical eye
on*
the^ particularareas of
America's?
transition.The purpose is simply to bring
them into
awareness
in
a generaland abstract sense. What we can
be certain
about, however, is thatthe future will
r
probably bringuncertainty.
J 1
mostpart,by those who werere
mantle
atheart,
had
littlevested Interest
In
society, or theso-called^intellectuals.Thisgenerally young minority carriedits
"banners proudly,£
unfortunately
the banners
appear tohave gone
into
storage as theircarriers became disillusioned
with
the results of
their
efforts.
X|
< The
sucess of this revolt wasdoomed from its beginningbecause
|
it lacked certainnecessary dements.
Firsts-itssupporters came well
armed with
words
but that was about all, and
revolutions are neither
fought norwon by words
alone £
Secondly,the number of supporters^ wassmall, and although a minoritycan throw a whole country
into
astate of
&
revolution, the
revolutionary
minority of peoplewere satisfied with the status
quo.
The cry from'
the
populacerose loud' and strong againstthese heretics of freedom. Theywere outraged by
the?
insolenceand arrogance of the young toquestion, criticize, and dissent.To them| the
act
of dissenionwas an inexcusable crime in it
self.
That- anyone could bedissatisfied
with his
homeland, tothe extent^
of|
taking hisgrievances to the streets, wasbeyond comprehension.These people are beginning
to)
change their ways, however, and!their right to dissent
is
being used!to voice their greivances.
While j
giving a speech last
week,
the*
President
was picketed. Thepickets were not the usual youngpeople but
theS
members of theAFL-CIO. They weren't there tostop
a "War
or ban the bomb, butrather to have
their.money
leftalone. This is not by any meansthe offerings of a revolution yet itis such things as this
which |
revolutions arise
 from.
 Economic
v*
deprivation is just the thing thatcould provide the
\
rhetoricianswith the receptive audience theyneed. Revolutions are not foughtby the masses for
ideals-they're
fought
 for
ood.
The
working manwill not hit* the streets for
rab
stract ideate but for the securityand comfort of his family. If theability
to
provide for his family is
threatened,.he
could possibly
provide the
masses needed by therevolutionaries, whom
he *
nowhates.
|
..
The
possibility of
this
occurringis very slim, but perhaps in exercising
his
right to dissent the
working man will
understand anduphold the right of others todissent. He may even fully understand his slogan
Americalove it
or
leave it,", and find thatlove of one's
country
s
may
causeone to
questions
it and even
demand
change.
18-21
YEAR OLDS:ARE THEY iSUBCITIZENS?
This summer the SupremeCourt passed a bill which wouldgive the right to vote to over 18million Americans. This group ofpeople is the
18-21
year olds. It isa large minority of people and it
could
have a significant effect onthe
"national
scene, but it
all
depends on how
welt the Jyoungpeople?
utilize
their
new Con*stitutional right
A
iThe.
young I
adults in thiscountry are still
%
beingdiscriminated against in anumber of ways. Therefore, weshall
not
applaud
the
government
too much
for their action. Let's
look deeper into the
situation.
p
Are we as
18-21
year olds being
denied
our rights
i
that 'were
written by* the founders of theConstitution? The answer to this
by Tom
Heberlequestion is yes. Yes,
In
a way weare not treated as adults. To bemore specific, we are what is
known as
"subcitizens." Here area few examples;
*any
personbetween the ages of 18 and 21
cannot sit on a grand
Jury,
run
foroffice, sign contracts
involving
property, marry without parentalconsent, and purchase liquor andcigarettes (legal, age variesaccording to the state ofresidence). In the areas I havementioned, the 18 to
21
year olds
are not
considered adults. Yet, on
the other side
of
the
coin, they arearrested on adult
J
criminalcharges and, if convicted sent to
an adult prisons
.,
Another: existing^ law whichrelates
basically
to
the'young
isrelated to marijuana^ Marijuanais a phenomenon
of fthe
youthculture. Of those personsarrested
in
New York
City in 1969
for sale* of possession ofmarijuana, 60 per
|
cent
Swere
under 21 But an amazing
s
factconcerning this is that
96 per
centof all the
offenders Mwere
arrested
for'the
first time.
t
 Yet,the penalties
.are
as severe for
thent ;as
for the habituallenders.
Take^for
example
case
\
involving a 20 yearTexan* who was convictedselling
two
joints. He was foundguilty and sentenced to 50 years
in
prison,
Fifty
years
in prison
forviolating a law that
has;,
not
proved
marijuana
to be
harmful.
.. The
initial
justification for
the(Continued on Page 4)
of-
the
old
for
 
OCTOBER
1,1971
MERCYHURSTCOLLEGE
PAGE 3
THE COMMITTEE SYSTEM:CAUSES
SLOWiLEGISLATION
Wanton Destruction
Is
the
committee system
a
stifling one
for the
PennsylvaniaLegislature?! With
the
2000 billsintroduced each session,
it
wouldbe impossible
for
the members ofthe House and Senate
to
considerthem with J any duel respectotherwise. Although
it
\
mayappear that
the
Legislature onlyworks
a
few hours
a
week*in fullsession,
it is in the
standingcommittees that
*
the
*
actuallegislatingpsaccomplished.Stating
his
opinions on*" thissubject,
Sen.
JackGood
(R.,
Beaver) says "the committeesystem is a designed
to
expeditelegislation
and to
report
out the
best,
possible bills after considerable study
of
the "relevantfacts."
N
| f #
The committees number 21
in
the House and
23
in the Senate.The respective chairmen actually command a substantial
amount
of power
since
they can
determine Hhe
future of a bill.Each piece of legislation,
upon
introduction, Ms referred to theappropriate committee by theHouse Speaker or the SenatePresident Pro-Temp.
:;
Themajority party controls all of thecommittees and also the
com
mittee chairmanship. Thus, oncea bill is committed, the
only
wayit can return
to the
floor Is by theconsent of the committee or by a
2/11
vote
of
the
General Assembly.
J
Is this
^unfair
to the minorityparty and to the people of. theCommonwealth? Sen EdwardHoward
(R.,
Bucks) thinks "theactions of the committees shouldbecome more visible and that the
entire
system should be used forlegislative
expedition
and notpolitical partisanship."
^
He says"the present type of operation ispartially
^responsible
for thechaotic image of. the Pennsylvania Legislature. It| also
misleads
the
people
i
because itallows their
representatives
tointroduce bills
with*no
hope ofpassing just to impress a certainsegment of his
constituency.''
f
If the bill is reported out ofcommittee,
it|is
given a secondconsideration at: which timeamendments may be proposed byany member of the
body.
It againreturns to Committee for theirapproval. Finally, it reaches thefloor for a third consideration anda vote.
Ji fUpon passage,
it
moves
to the
other house for more
of
the same.Disagreement results
in
*aConference Committee composedof three members
of
the "Houseand
the
Senate. Their reportmust be received by
a
majority ofeach
of
the bodies
and
then sentto the Governor for his signatureor veto,*iWhile slow
and
tedious,
the
A\
m m
mm
system does provide,
in
theory,for
the
careful screening,
suf
ficient public ^attention,
and
ample time for complete
un
derstanding
by
each votingmember. However, many timesabillnever getsany!of thesebecause
it
does
not
strike
the
pleasure
of
Ithe committeechairman, f Sen. Robert Rovner
(R.,
Phila.) stated,
"the
Cor
porations Committee
has met
only once In the
10
months
of the
current5session." Does
Sen.
Mahady (D., West) Chairman ofthat committee really think thatPennsylvania's corporations
are
that unimportant?Perhaps
the
most legitimatepractice
is*
to Shave
all
of £ thecommittee chairmen standelection before all
of the
peopleofthe <Commonwealth
the
nexttime they crush
a
bill on personal
whim. I
l
r
.
:
I
:
THE
PEOPLE
SPEAK-
Upon reflecting* on
the
article"A New] Year of CompetitiveSports"which?appearedin; thisyear's first issue
of
The Merciad,I felt compelled
to
speak
for/:
a
segment
of
"fl the
&
M sports;specifically volleyball
and
basketball.
The
women involvedin either of I these teams wouldlike
to be
able
to
say|that they,
too,
are
part
of the
college'sathleticprogram,?whichindeedthey are. They also give up hoursof their time
for
practice gamesand are entitled to recognition
as
a Mercy hurst team.
A
team thatis active in* athletic affairs
on
campus.
I:
|
%
*
$The sports editor stated that
he
would look
at
athletics from
his
"limited vantage
point"
( em
phasis added).
He
certainly^wascorrect.
Not
only was
he
limitedin
the
amount
of
sports outlookthat
he
gave,!
but he
actuallyexcluded
a
complete segment
of
the college's athletic program.
It
is high time that women's sportson thiscompus
be
mentioned
in
the college paper.)
||
I
am
hoping that thisincidentwill
not be
overlooked. Both girlteams this years
are
promisingexciting seasons
and The
Mer
ciad's readers should
not
bedenied informationabout
)
themWhen
The
Merciad advertises"Support Your Sports^-
Be A
Laker
Booster,"
let
it
include
the
women "Lakers" as well.Alexis Awlkerf(Ed. note-
The
Merciad willattemptto*keep
its
readers|in-formed
of
all athletic endeavoursbothmen
1
*land women'sthroughout the
year|
It
should
be
pointed out that Mary Hoffman,
a
member
of
the* Lakers WomenBasketball team,
is a
member ofour Sports,
staff.
Anyone
who
would
be
interested in writingarticles concerning our volleyballteam should contact The Merciadoffice.)
%
1
the decency
to put it out in an
ashtray rather than littering thehalls and floors with the remains.Candy and
gum
wrappers
are
also being 1 profusely scatteredalong the stairs.
* |
?
Another? area
of
abuse
is the
cafeteria where
it is
becoming
a
popular practice
to
leave
the
trays
and
dishes sitting
on the
tables.
The
people who work
in
the cafeteria are
t
not paid
to be
busboys. There are also studentswho use the same tables after you
do.
So why not
take
the
tray
to
the dish room ?
|
b
Have
you
looked
at
BaldwinLounge lately?*
It is
beginning
to
resemble
a
city dump. Popcorn,candy wrappers, potatoe chipbags,
and of
course cigarettebutts
are
constantly left
in
pilesall over tables and strewn
on the
floor
of the
lounge.
It is
really adisgrace: Why can't the ashtraysand trash cans
be
used
as
theyshould? .&$£•
$
4
f
iThe appearance of the school ingeneral reflects
a
lack
of
respectof students towards
the
collegeand towards
*
other students.
The
only solution
to
the problem
is to
become aware. Don't be
a
guilty
party.
|
1
%
If
^
§g
If
you
are not one of
the
culpritsdon't become
one by
your silence.This is your school, protect yourinvestment!
£$
Don't
\
stand by
closed-mouthed*
and Swatchstudents litter the
campusllYou
owe it to
yourself.
It is a matterof
self-respect,
t
Barbara
A.
Bradley*
Is
it necessary to
drop
cigarettebutts all
through
the halls andstairways of Egan, Old
Main
and
Zurn
7
If you make the effort tolight the cigarette at
lgast
havePermit
me
to introduce
myself.
I'm
Joe
Kowalski,!
president ofthe Outing Club at IndianaUniversity of Pennsylvania. Weare interested in
establishing
contact with
'organizations : anIndividuals
in other colleges anduniversities
who
share a commonlove for challenging outdooractivities.
^
;
To
this end, we would welcomeone or
two
representatives (goodswimming ability required) fromyour school to join us on ourOctober 2nd white water rafting
expedition;
down
j
theYoughioghenny
*
River atOhiopyle State
Park,
lit
would be
a-perfect
time for an exchange ofideas
of;;
mutual'interest
and Iassure you a
really*great
timebesides.
qp f
i|p
Since, its inception this pastspring, our local outing club hasrafted and canoed some of themore mountainous parts of theLaurel Highlands | whichencompasses
most!
off
Southwestern Pa. Our program wasclimaxed at the end of thissummer by a most
successful
tenday white water
canoe-camping
expedition unto
fthe
CanadianWilds.
i
Wg3
\
jj
IDuring the| coming year wewould like to continue more of thesame while expanding our hikingand camping programs and learnof other -wholesome outdoorprograms enjoyed by ourcollegues at
other
colleges and.universities.
We
would be happyto share our
activities
I
byscheduling joint programs withgroups or individuals from otheruniversities and colleges. Wehave thoughts of sponsoring aspring
^workshop
for outing clubleaders if the interest is
suf
ficiently high. I
Jl
£-?A
If you do
not
now have
a
functioning outing club
on
yourcampus,
I or
one
of
my collegueswould appreciate the opportunityto visit your campus to help assistyou
in
organizing
one
on]yourlocal campus this fa)).
We can
provide movies, slides, talk
and
chatter, sample charters, etc.& Myi personal motives
for
thisoffer
are
simple.
I
would like
to
share with my collegues
at
neighboring colleges
ana
universitiessome of the activities I have beenpriviledged
to
take part
in as a
member
of
the IUP Outing Club.^jI would like
to
see an associationof Outing Clubs formed
in the
colleges
and
universities
of
thisstate
and
neighboring stateswhich would
offer*
new
and ex
citing activitiesto»participatingclubs and serve
as
avstrong forcein directinga
*
constructiveconservation program
in
Pennsylvania.* j
|
MIf your school
|
plans
to
sendrepresentation
to
our fOctober
2
float tourJplease contact
me as
soon as possible.].
| ;
$Thankrfyou forj your Ipatienceand time
in
permitting
me to
aceeasonsNot Enough
byAlMessina.'.(Editorsnote:
The
followingarticle was originally written as
a
letter
to the
editor
of
the*, ErieTimes, but because of its length
it
was not submitted.)
'_-
This article Is In response to theeditorial, "Wanton VandalismMust
\
Be Stopped", which appeared
in the
Erie Times
on
Monday, September
13. In
thiscase,
I
find it unfortunate
the
Erie'Times;>resorted
to a
provocative
and
unsupportablepiece of journalistic literature (ortrash). The real tragedy howeveris
the
effect this kind commentarywilthave
on the
mindsof citizens predisposed
to be
naive
and
ignorant enough
to
aceept
it.
.dm
The
article, which I wasi concerned with the disturbance afterthe Academy-Tech Wfootballgame, was replete with
a
numberof spurious arguments, most
of
whichwere Jclearlymisleadingand erroneous after carefulexamination.*
11^
beganJ
by
utilizing
a
scapegoat argument,calling the disruption "the acts ofa I relatively
few
younghoodlums"
and "a few
wildyoung teenagers
who
decidedthey
are
above
the law."
Therefore, without
any
positiveand convincing evidence
as
to thecause
of the
disturbance
the
author simply scapegoated
it as
the work
of
some "wantonvandals" and
*
hoodlums."The ^article went
on to say:
"Erie police have promised
a
crackdown
for
this weekend'sfootball schedule,
and we ap
plaud this."
The
presuppositionoperating here
is
that punative,disciplined action
is the way to
dealwith
|
problems. Thishowever doesn't treat
the
cause,butratherthe symptom. The factof
the
matter
is a
crackdown
by
police?* will only
|
serve*
to
momentarily
and
probably
un
satisfactorily control suchbehavior,
not
change
it
markedly.
The
suppression
of
such behavior will not onlyfail
to
get to the root
of
the problem
but
will undoubtedly cause thatbehavior
to
manifest itself
in
other forms.
*
Those implicated could likelyproject the fault on someone else,or give excuses (rationalize)
for
their actions. They could misplace their aggression;
and
decide
to
take
the
whole matterout
on
someone!else,
or
simplyidentify with someone engaged insimilar behavior. The point
is, a
punative measure
or a
crack
down"
is
S perhaps
the
least
ef
fective way
|
to deal! with suchdisturbances,jand will
in all
probability accentuate Itheproblem.
|
§share these thoughts with you.Sincerely,Joseph KowalskiPresident, IUPOuting Club
1286
Washington St.Indiana, Pa. 15701
!
On October2nd,'we
are
marching
on
Danbury
|
FederalPrison-and on prisons around thecountry-to unite ourselves withthe Danbury Resisters
and
otherprisoners.
?
£ ?On August
6th, the
DanburyResisters released |a statementand began
a
fast
and a
workstoppage which,
infjFr.
DanielBerrigan's words, "called
at
tention
to the
duplicity
and non-
accountability ^of
|
the FederalParole Board,".andwhich
M
dared
to
link crimes I againstdomestic prisoners i
to
crimesagainst Vietnamese prisoners."They
demanded:
j1| Major reforms
of a
parolesystem that has recently boasteda 12.6 peri cent decline
in
parolegrants.^
||||
I
£ C
\
*£
2.
An early review of the paroleapplication of Fr. Philip Berriganand
a
parole grant
for
Fr.DanielBerrigan, whose poor health
has
_
This
is not to say
that
law en
forcement officials should justignore such behavior, but that theanswer
is not
simply one'of
en
forcement. There
are
othermeasures,
all of
which
are
longterm, which must be undertaken.I* will propose
one of
thesemeasures later
in
this presentation. £
*
.5
What
is
most disconcertingabout
the
editorial
in
question
is
the authors simplistic approachto
the
problem,
a
problem certainly too complex and ingrainedto
be
solved
by a
police
crack
down.
The
main thrust
of the
article, aside from the scapegoattechnique,
was to
criticize
the
unwarranted violence
and
destruction of the disruption.
The
difficulty here is that the editorialis critical
of a
kind
of
behaviorthat American Culture
has,
|consciously
and
unconsciously,Sperpetuated-violence,
and
prideSn physical strength.In other words
the
ethic calledinto question
is
A
the very ethicreinforced
by
Americ's ? mostinfluential^ institutions-thefamily,
the
school,
and the
government
The
youth
of
todayhave been taught
one
very im-|portant less on-pride. /They havefbeen
taught*
to'„
he
strong-nothumble,vindictive—notconciliatory. They have been taughtto punch any
"S.
O. B." that callsthem
a
name
or
looks
at
them
in
an odd
way.
And all of this is donein the name
of
human dignity andpride. Still more, they have beentaught|an exaggerated sense£ofjloyalty
to
institutions (school,family, government).
And it is
|this doctrinaire loyalty and pride^extended
to
institutions that^ultimately manifests itself
in the
use of this
fist,
the clublthe brick,and the gun.
'. *
If
all of
this seems vague,
let
me
be
more precise JI happenedto
be at the
focal* point of Hhedisruption
at the
stadium.
No, it
was
not a
racial disturbancebegan by
a
number of disgruntledblacks,
but
rather
an in
ter scholastic rivalry ignited
by a|
few "profanities.
It
wasf un-5fortunate that institutional andiself pride
had to be
defended
by
the use of fists and stones, fSo
to
blame*the whole disturbance
on a few
"hoodlums"
and
"vandals'*
is too
simplistic
a
view.
And to
seek
to
rectify
the|
situation
by a
police crackdownwill
in all
probability
be
coun-^terproductive over tine long term.
|
The tragedy then
is not, as the
editorial stated,
the
"senselessand wanton vandalism
of a few
young hoodlums'*,
but it is
conceivably part
of
&
the
prevailing ethic
of
-Americanculture-pride,
and the
violenceemployed to uphold
it
fled Danbury doctors
to
predictcontinuing physical deteriorationso long as he remains in prison.
3.
An end to
U.S.-funded tigercages used
for
political prisonersinSouth Vietnam.
%
Demands issued
by a
similargroup
- the
Committee
ton
Prisons
of
South Vietnam
-
havebeen added as our own.These include:*
l
v
The
end of
U.S. funding
and
staffing
of
prisons
and
"interrogation camps
for
politicalsuspects in South Vietnam,
|
2.
The release
of
all those whoare sick, disable,, and
are
beingheld withouttrial^orwhosesentences have now
expired.
The October 2nd date coincideswith
the
non-elections
of
SouthVietnam in order to make clearerthe connection between
the
political use
of
prisons in both the
U.S.
and
South
|
Vietnam, gaudmost especially,* imprisoning^ ofactivists
for
peace
and
justice
in
both countries^
;
|K ??£For. information
on the
demonstration
at.
Danbury^
Connecticut!
Contact
:j^^B|
*
Boston: f 617) |266-6697; Congnecticut*.& (203) 2757-8651;
New
York: (212)691*7410-5
m

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