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The Merciad, Jan. 28, 1972

The Merciad, Jan. 28, 1972

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The Merciad, Jan. 28, 1972
The Merciad, Jan. 28, 1972

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THE
CIAD
VOL.
XLIV
NO.
8MERCYHURST COLLEGE
JANUARY 28.
1972
»«_
>
£.\v*
&
&L
• •j&jt'j
<•]
m
MmMm
rYAyss
EBssm
iSBBra
>;•»••:-•
XvX-X^-X-Xs-C.
JVeed
WHERE THE
MONIEY
GOES
Sr.
M.
Barbara examines list
of
over
70
students whoreceive
jNDSL.
Especially on a privatecollege campus, the Office ofFinancial
Aid*Functions fis
an integral part of the broadarea of Student Services.Where college budget costsfor a
resident
student runclose to $3,100,| and com
muter
costs are now over the$2,000
|&mark,
ewhere
scholarships for financial aidare directed almost solely tolow-income ffamilies, theaverage student at Mer-cyhurst College will undoubtedly feel the financialpressure.To help alleviate thesedemands, the
^institution
itself? has initiated severalaid programs.
I
HonorScholarships
are£
given toapproximately eightystudents, totalling $45,150 inoverall
grants J
As has been
Ijthe
policy for several years.
ByfSr.
M.
Barbara
these scholarships are givento incoming students whoevidence both highscholastic achievement andfinancial need. A 2.5cumulative average must bemaintained throughout thefour years for annualscholarship renewal.The
Assistantship
program, previouslyquestioned in the paper, isquite similar to the HonorScholarship grants, in thatboth high school credentialsand financial need are thecriteria upon
which'the
award is based.: Instead ofworking a set
schedulejandreceiving
directremuneration per hour of
work,-*-the program was
designed for very flexibleassistance in particulardepartments, with at setamount of aid deducted fromthe tuition
In
its first year
of
operation, the program has
seenf
some
^problems
instudent- assignments, but
once
these are ironed out, theprogram will prove to be anasset tor the college community. Presently there are25 students, on theAssistantship programtotalling
$8,050
in financialassistance. At the end ofeach year, the student'sperformance is reviewed forrenewal of the grant.Direct grants to studentsfrom
^institutional
fundsother than Honor Scholarships are being phased out
of
the Financial Aid budget,and replaced by grantsrequiring some type ofservice to the school.
To
date
39
of these grants are fundedfor upperclassmen in
Ithe
amount of
$18,850.p
I
|j
The work opportunities oncampus are governed
|by
quite stringent federal income guidelines, and in
all
cases depend upon properfiling and evaluation of theParents' ConfidentialStatement, obtainable in theFinancial!
Aid
1;Office.
Over
eighty! students are employed by the College WorkStudy Program, earning a
total
of£$30,000; and
.about
forty students are
employed
by the institution in on-
ca in
pus jobs, regulated also
by the
PCS.
4
m
The other
ffederal
programs are increasing insize each
|
year. TheEducational^ OpportunityGrant,
directed
to those inextreme financial need, aids60 students for
a ftotal
of$31,000. The NationalDefense Student LoanProgram distributes $51,000to
75j
recipients this year.Both
programs
necessitateproper filing of the P.C.S.well in advance of aiddistribution.Why is it difficult to get ajob
or*
a
loan immediatelyupon request in the FinancialAid Office? Financial Aidpackages are announced inJune for the followingacademic
lyear,
after theP.C.S. has
ibeen
filed andreviewed. Since the total aidbudget for
1971-72
is committed by
lhe>end
of? June,
1971,
anyj
aid distributedduring
the|yearps
determined solely by the amountof student withdrawal orwork turnovers
t£li
Group' meetings will beheld during the second week
of^Februaryjfor
distribution
©£4
972-73
P.
C.
S. forms; and
Mercyhurst
financial aidbrochures.
}
Announcementsof time
and
place will
be
made
at
the beginning
of the
month. Watch
the
bulletinboards!
i
Anticipate; yourneeds'^ Plan ahead! Hope
to
see you in February.
*
•..».
.-.-.-••
V,
vonakV
Wm
•:-v>.
«E«
.•»-.'
vvi
.V.'
S5SS
.-.--:-'
B*>
tfc
New
Summer School Schedule Proposed
Phase
According to an announcementmade by William P. Garvey,Dean of the College, a revision
of
the Summer School format wasapproved at
a
meeting of DivisionChairmen held last
week.
Principle feature
of
the revision[the addition of a four-week
*ssion
to follow the Traditional
sixi
weeks Session that has constituted the
College's
SummerSchool program to date. 'Theaddition of this
second
Sessionoffers the
Summer
School studenttwo options, i.e., attendance atone or the
Mother
of the twoSessions
oi\attendance
at both.Successful completions of bothterms, according
to||detcrginitiations
made by the chairmen,would constitute a summer term.'*Thus," explained Dean Garvey,••the student has the opportunityto accelerate his
program
to thepoint of
i
graduating in threeyears."
While'£
the*
six-week
Session will continue to offer
coursesliu
the traditional mold,the
four-week
Session is
viewed,
as a opportunity
to
induce
Intersession-Type
courses intothe Summer School curriculum.Slated for further discussions isthe possibility of stipulating a
four-week
summer session for an
inter-session
requirement.
g
Students interested in the
program
may
* pre -register "f
inMav.
M<
2
PROPOSED SUMMER SCHOOL SCHEDULE
Option-One six-week session-80
min.
classes
June
8.
1*
July
One4-week tsessioD-100
min.
classes
12—•
 Registration-—6-week session*!13—6-week session begins
4—No
classes26—Classes
end
}•
JulyAugust28—Registration—4-week session31—4rweek session begins25—4-week session ends i
m
SAC
Controversy
By Gary Dudenhoefer, Entertainment Editor
*ssss
Studentsat*5ACmeeting discussed possibledioices|(orspring-weekend concert. AlexTayterandJohn Denver were chosen.
The last issue
of the
Merciadcontained what
has
become
a
highly controversial articlewhich questioned the competencyof the SAC
and
Mr. Phil Herring.The direct result fof this controversy
was a
highly chargedSAC meeting onMonday,January
17.
I
§It £ became immediately
ap
parent that there were
two
factions present; Thetmajorlty
of
students
in
attendance weremembers
of
?the "established"SAC. Also,
a
vocal minority oidissatisfied students, apparentlyprovoked
by the
previouslymentioned article, came
to
voicetheir opinions.
(Continued
^
on
page
3)
 
PAGE 2
MERCYHURST
COLLEGE
JANUARY
28A1972
Over The Hill Gang
SM
Locker
Room]Proposed:
By
Sporty
By David Blanchfield
Dear Mom and Dad,Sorry it's been so long since I
.''last
wrote but my student aid jobis keeping me very busy. I work40 hours a week for the Dean ofParking.
It's
a great deal
financially
too.
True, I only get
68
cents an hour but my contractsays that
1
have the right to attend all Mercy hurst sportscontests for free until I'm 65.Actually that is part of what I'mwriting about—I wonder if youknow a real
good
lawyer.You see
J
just read the smallprint in my contract, (it was anunusual contract, just three lineslong but with
80
pages of small
print).
According
to
page
80
of thesmall print I have to go to
al
Laker sports contests
until,I'm65—if
I don't I forfeit my degree. Ialso think it says I then have topay back the
68
cents an hour tothe Dean of Parking. Isn't that
Iunconstitutional
or something?Also
when
you count the varsityping pong matches I end up going
to
a game a
day—in
fact I have tohurry up and finish this becausein just 20 minutes
"Over
the HillGang" is playing the city
sanitation
department.I hear the motto of the game,by the way, is the same as thecampaign motto of
* Nor
man
Mailer
when he ran for mayor ofNew York City,
(all you
truescholars
can
look that
one
up.)The Dean has me working fulltime on a very important task,crucial to
the.
morale of thecollege.
I'm
the
student hi
charge*;of dedications, every month
l|
have to think up justification forhaving| two dedications eachcomplete with champagne andhome movies. For some reasonour administration seems Hogroove on champagne and homemovies, last month I really did a
'*»•
spirational was it that when theyshowed it at Bonner high school,the entire senior class chose toenroll at
Mercy hurst—that
wasquite a breakthrough for theadmissions
staff.
Up until thenthe best they could do was enrol 198 per cent of the Bonner boys. Iunderstand the school is askingUnited aircraft to work on aspecial plane. It's supposed to bea miracle
plane—large
enough tobring the entire Bonner
&
seniorclass to visit Mercyhurst and yetsmall enough* to land at ErieInternational
Airport. Isn't it
amazing ?$
what
m
Americantechnology
can
do? HSl^^Y^The second reception I plannedthat week was even better if you
can> believe
that
I
It
I
was
the
dedication of the newest buildingon the Hurst campus. Designedtastefully in the shape of a
cane
it's the locker room for the
"Ovei
the
Hill
Gang". Not
only was it
the first time a locker room (inthe
I
shape
of|
a cane) wasdedicated with champagne andhome
movies
but I also hear it'sthe only locker room in the worldwith a direct pipe line to theKohler
jbeer
factory.
It
alsocomes equipped with individual,initialed oxygen masks— nothingbut the best for the "Over the Hill
(.ang
good job, pulled off twodedications in a* matter of two
days:
So
good were my ideas thatthey gave
me
a
bonus—said
Icould
stop
attending Laker gamesat
age
64
instead of
65.
*
$
On Monday
of|
that week
we
dedicated the new laundry shutein Preston Hall (the old one
was
destroyed the
night
they had torescue the crew team. It seemsthe entire team tried to
go
down ithead first and
gthey
fall gotstuck between the secondfloor and the basement. After thechampagne they showed homemovies
offthe
crew's first raceafter the accident. It was a veryinspirational movie seeing
all
those boys hobbling down to theboats on crutches.? So in-Besides the federal governmentpicked up the tab under theprovisions of
a
bill designed to
give
unlimited assistance to thosein the words of the
bill,
"Over theHill."!
Our?
boys certainlyqualified. Have to go
now,
they'reabout to face the sanitation
department.
Don > forget «»a
boutthe lawyer. fcYour lovingson.
Sporty
*
'§*3rlBl
From The Editorial Board
I
Responsibility
i Of jThelPress
The People
Student
Raps
'State
Of The Union'It
is
the responsibility of thepress to report a fair and accurate account of
"relevant"
news to its readers.
("Relevant"
to The
Merciad
is that whichdeals either directly or indirectlywith the
Mercyhurst
Community.) Included within thatresponsibility is the obligation todistinguish fact from opinion.
News!
articles, *those' whichrepresent
fact.fare
presented to
(he
readers as an unbaised reportof an event
sand
are placed onpages which are
designated/for
such articles.
j
\
5
Articles of opinion belong
oh
the
editorial
page as either a letter tothe editor or
*as
an
eaitonai
statement. Even on the page
which
is designated for opinion,there is a responsibility to assurethat the
'opinions
expressedare not limited to one-sided attacks
von
\
an
'|
individual's
character.
.-
v
j ^,It
is the policy of thisnewspaper to withhold printing ofany articles^ "which'-• aredetrimental
to
specifically
namedThe purpose of a newspaper
is
to
^publish
5
facts, thereby in-
forminguts
readers of the truth.Newspapers, in {general,
*also
print a column entitled Lettersto the
Editor"
which serves as asounding board for writers whofeel
jj
the need to expound theirphilosophy on a particular issue.
News,
however, should not beconfused
\
i
with
|
opinion.Specifically,I am
referring
to thearticle
"The
State of the Union"
THE MERCIAD
Second class postage paid at Erie, Pa.,
16501.
$3.00 per year.Published bi-weekly during the college, year, except Thanksgiving,Christmas,
and
Easter
vacations^ and
examination periods by thestudents of Mercyhurst
Col leg
S""
Editor
>
Associate Editor
§
Assistant EditorBusiness Manager
Student ConsultantFaculty Advisor
aSbv
.-v-w..^
ft
\ i %
%\\
fe§fS«i
Vincent
Doran
Bob
Parks
r
Julie
Samick
m
Cindy Gus
tin
*•#'
*>
«
Al
MessinaBarry
Mc
AndrewEditors: Bill Dopierla,
Sports>
Oary'OotJen^befer,
Entertainment;
'\
Bonnie
La Due
a, Feature; BiirSachserNews; Mark Zine, Drama.
.
Staff Writers: Mary Hoffman, J.D. Havrilla,
Bob
Pettinelli, Pat
LyonAl
Beiovarac, D. Vernora, Sports; Thomas G. DIStefano,
Kim
Wontenay, Sue Weiner, Maureen Hunt, Rick Lamb, Feature;Gerald Barron, Entertainment; Tom Heberle, NewsStaff: Cathy Smith,
tjKathy
Holmes, Christine Cebula,
Roseann
Schiavlo, Carol Alco,typist; Annette D'Urso, Mary
Popvlch,
proof
leader;
Dianne Guvda, Jon DeGeorge, Tern* Grzankowskl, Layout; Fran Adhearn,
Dave Rohde,
|Bonnie.
Clymerl Amparo
Alvarado,
Art;
Carol Kress,
Shelle
Lichtenwalter,
photographer
A
Mary
Tupek,
Circulation; Dario Cipriani,
advertising
manager;Bob Beck, editorial assistant.
*t
*&$£.-
"S
-2
Responsibility '.
. .
4
members of the
lacademiccommunity..unless
such' members are notified in advance andgiven an opportunity to prepare adefense if one is deemednecessary." The Merciad hasattempted to follow this policy.Unfortunately, we are not above
humannes
in that we do makemistakes (i.e.
- "The
State of theUnion'*
No.
7,0.8).
®
Our mistake was a grossviolation of our own
}
editorialpolicy/Worse, it was a causticattack on an individual'scharacter—Phil Herring,Director of Student Activities.
>The Merciad wishes?
to
apoligize>
to
Mr.j
Herring andassure him that
it^will
not
occur
again.
• -
*
i
For a rebuttal of "The State ofthe Union", please check ThePeople
Speak,
f
"Student
4i
aps
"The
State of the Union".
S
Beginning February
1,1972
The Learning ResourcesCenter
will
be open from 5-7p.m., Monday throughFriday.
(The
maintenancestaff
will
be working at thistime.)
t
*>
'
\'
by MJ.T. Barron. Such adeclarative, title necessarily
*
implies. a news story. 1 feel,however, that it should have beensubtitled
".
.
.my
misconceptionsof such" jj
To clarify
a few
'i
of thesemisconceptions:
if
First, the need for a moreexperienced
'Student
ActivitiesDirector became apparent toBUS
members
after several
of
last
year's
fiascos and the
general
dissatisfaction with thecoffeehouse. It was felt that sucha person working with
BUS
andany
other
interested
I
students
(SAC)
would create! a socialatmosphere that has never been
known on this
campus.
j^
It is still felt that this is indeedhappening. It is highly improbable that Mercyhurststudents are extremelydissatisfied with the entertainment and management ofthe social activities.
If
this
is
true,
would someone care toexplain the successful popularityof so many of our
social
activitiesthis year?
;,- | |.In
case it hasn't hit Erieites
yet,
the general trend is a nostalgic
one,
as was evidenced in theMerciad
itself.
The
"oldiei
butgoodie" hits of the late
50's
andearly ISO's
are(
an entertainingaside from the constant hard rockwe saw last
year.
*
Secondly, the coffeehousefinances are Indeed a good topicfor examination. The treasurer'sbooks and financial reports areavailable to anyone. All you have
to
do
)s
ask.To
clear
up one
statement,
several thousands of dollars havenot been spent already
this
year.
I*
or the first term,
$1,500 was
spent. The total coffeehousebudget for the entire
f
year
Is$4,r>oo
as compared to
$0,000
lastyear. Taking into
account^that
more people are satisfied, with atleast twice as many social events,at half the
cost,
it is really
dif-
ficult
to say that BUS has made
a
big
blunder.Thirdly,as is stated in the
BIS
constitution. "Any
%
student
orgroup of students..
.shall
be
givenvoice but no vote at a meeting ofthe
Bepresentative
Union ofStudents." No one has ever beendenied this constitutionallyguaranteed right. At the meetingin question, those present wereasked for their opinion on eachtopic under discussion. Each timeno response was heard from thestudent who supposedly had somuch to say. Freedom of speechcan be safeguarded. This doesn'tnecessarily mean that those towhom the right is extended will
make
use of
this
privilege.As of this writing, SAC has metwith interested students in anattempt to iron out some of thedifficulties. Perhaps if studentstook
the
time to ask the questionsof
the
proper people, unnecessaryconfusion and rumors could beavoided.For the silent many who arestill
dissatisfied:,
maybe the
fiddlers
are still fiddling, andperhaps Rome is still burning.But Rome was neither built norrebuilt in one day.
|
Dedicatedindividuals are
>spending
countless hours constructing a variedand desirable social atmosphere
on this
campus.
Et tu
Brutus?Betsy
Bierf eldt
President, BUS
 
JANUARY 28.
J979
MERCYHURST COLLEGE
Tlu>
Advisor
System
PAGE*
Lincourt Interviewed
The past advisory system atMercyhurst College has proven tobe inadequate in meeting thedemands of the increasingenrollment of students. Thus, anew system has been specificallydesigned
by
Mr. John Lincourt, ofthe Philosophy Department, toimprove
the
consultationprocedures between the studentand his or her faculty advisor.As stated in the AcademicCounseling Handbook forAdvisors, the aim
.of
this innovative system is to
"help
the
student
select and complete
awell-balanced
and individualizedcourse of study. .
.Frequent
evaluation by student advisors,
faculty*
advisors, and theprogram director, underlines theself-corrective character of theadvisory system, and insures for
%
By
Bonnie Laduca
the students at Mercyhurst thebest academic guidance thecollege can provide.*'In regard to the
1972-1973
schoolyear, Mr.
?
Lincourt is recommending
that
special attention bepaid to the incoming Freshmenclass, Special Students, andTransfers. According to thisrecommendation, a certain coreof paid Advisors, numberingabout fifteen, would be assignedto these three specific groups.
-In
this way, the advisors would be"responsible" to these threeproblem areas. Of course, theentire adyisory system
is
currently just in the
beginning
ofits transition. Mr.
Lincourt's
hopeis that the system will eventuallybecome more "streamlined" aseach problem
\s%
carefully
resolved.*
Its success
.
depends
«to
??The advisor system, designed by John Lincourt, is
hoped
toimprove the consultation procedures between the student and his orher faculty advisor.??
i
I
:$3B$
i
* %S t
SIC...
(Continued |from page
1)
The first event of the night
w
a defamation of "
The
State of The
I'nion"
as the "most
flagrant,
violation of journalistic ethicsI've ever seen.** This remark byMr. Herring set the tone for therest of the meeting — ratherviolent. The meeting was intended to
be a
planning session for
upcoming!
activities
which
quickly degenerated into a verbalbattle of charges and
counter-
charges.
jfefThe first!question
raised wasthe competency .
|
of
the
^established"
SAC.Theminority expressed its
.
opinionthat the full potential of thecoffeehouse was not beingrealized.
It
was further statedthat the quality of entertainment(in the form of performers appearing at the coffeehouse) waspoor and getting worse. Thischarge was
quickly
counteredwith an accusation by
the
i'SAC
that the dissenters did notrepresent a
"majority"
ofstudents and therefore were in noposition to dissent. This raisedone of the most vital issues of thenight: who does speak for themajority?! This question wasnever resolved.
*
fH
The, question of competency tochoose performers washighlighted by the discussion ofwho best knows the Erie musicscene. The first charge was thatthe SAC has a tendency to "fallinto a
Irut"
with bands, asevidenced with the overexposureof Isaac Aaron and Eddy Cee andThe Bees. Secondly, when asked,
only
two of approximately twenty
SAC
members present stated thatthey were from |Erie. The
minority,
most
of|
whom werefrom Erie
and?
involved withmusic in
some
i
way,
offered
to
advise the SAC on their choice ofperformers. This suggestion wasmet favorably by Mr. Herring,but disdained by the rest of the
SAC.
Another issue of
note
was theopinion of the SAC that they, asMercyhurst students,
f
had
theobligation to provide
en-tertainment^soley^
for /
Mer-cyhurst.
disregarding the
resttf
the Erie
community,
f
statement was met with thecharge of chauvinism; the SACcountered by stating that sinceMercyhurst students
arej
paying
$125
a year in activity fees, entertainment at the college shouldbe primarily for their benefit.The minority granted this point,but stated that the success of amajor concert would depend onsupport
from
the Erie
L
,
com
munity.
?
*
There were other suggestionsmade, but the overriding tone-
of
hostility suppressed anycooperation which might havetaken place between the twofactions. Finally, anothermeeting; was
called
£
for thefollowing Thursday, at whichtime the issues raised were to beresolved. §Thursday's meeting proved tobe
much
less antagonistic andmore productive. A notable turnof events was the absence of mostof the
"established'/
SACmembers and a sizeable increase
in
the
numbers of the "minority,"which
should
technically becalled the
"majority"
of Thursday's meeting. The meeting wasprefaced with the suggestion thatthe topics of discussion
be
limited,
to concrete suggestions and thatidle criticism be eliminated. |I The first suggestion was that afilm series,
independent
of the.usual Sunday flicks'- beestablished. Gerry Barron statedthat there is a wide variety ofinexpensive films available,ranging from experimental tovintage films.
He
suggested thatthese films could be shown in thecoffeehouse between acts, andthey could also be packaged into
"film
festivals", such as anevening of
W.
C. Fields features.This idea met with general acceptance.^The next subject was that
of
concerts,at which time
*Mr.
Herring announced that plans hadbeen finalized for a May
concertfeaturinglAlex
Taylor and; John
heavily|upon
the cooperation ofnot only the faculty
.but
on thestudents themselves. Eachstudent must therefore throw
ofl
any passive attitudes {andbecome involved in a reciprocity
with
his or her advisor.
'
In addition to being the initiatorof the Advisory Program, Mr.
Lincourt,
along with Mr. RobertJ.J
Tolan,
is
in]
the
process ofadding a new dimension to ourPhilosophy
Department.?
Giventhe increased enrollment,
f
therewill be demands placed on the
department*
in the sense that weare going to become a ServiceDepartment."
59'
•& :?jai
As such,
Ithe ^Philosophy
Department is
presently
offeringa Philosophy of History course toservice the History Department;future innovations . includecourses such as
PhilosophyI of
Law to service the Police Scienceprogram, and Philosophy ofScience to service the ScienceDepartment,
etc.
U
This approach will enable thestudent
to be
more cautious aboutmany of his unproven assumptions and also offer him thefundamental •• ability to not only
analyzer
subject matter, but tosynthesize as well.'*
t
v?^&
In the
near
?
future,i
given
the
anticipated expansion,
;
a"Philosophy major will emergenaturally" as a necessary part ofan entire
education.'
:
Denver. He asked for support inthe areas of tickets, publicity,and other small
points
which needto
be,worked out.JHe wa§
againmet with promises of
support.
-\
The subject of performers atthe coffeehouse was again raised,and the general concensus wasthat
people
familiar with the Eriemusic scene should be in chargeof providing the talent.?Also, thesuggestion of having concerts inthe indoor tennis courts wasmade. Mr. Herring stated thatthere was administrative opposition to such an idea, but thatthe possibility could
be
explored.
|
Another suggestion was airedwhich had
also
been mentioned onMonday but was met with generaldisfavor. This was the possibilityof getting Doc Watson, one of the
country*s
foremost traditionalfolk
.
performers, for
fa
-
smallweekend concert and a guitarworkshop. This suggestion wasleft open
Iuntil
the details
*
ofmoney, time, and place could beworked out.Finally, if the powers, that bewill permit the expression of aneditorial opinion,
let
I
me state itthus: the issue of student activities on this campus iseverybody's business.Throughout the
past?week's
battles, the
SAC
has begun
to
takeshape as what it should be: asounding board for all students tocome and express their opinions
with
regard to
What
they wouldlike|to
f see
on the activitycalender. This article has beenan attempt to inform studentswith what has been happeningrecently with the
SAC,
in the hopethat the general quality of sociallife on this,
cam
pus can be improved. By nature, only a fewstudents can be involved in theactual execution of suggestionswhich have been made. This is
the
reason for the existence of the
SAC.
The burden of suggestionsnow lies
with
YOU,
the individualstudent. <•ThisTuesday, February 8 at
8:15
p.m.
^n the
Zurn RecitalHall, there will be a per-fomance by Mack McCray,classical pianist. Mr.McCray will be available forinformal meetings with thestudents and will conduct amaster class
\
workshop
in
piano
Wednesday afternoon v
TUutofyca
a
on,
ttacUndtoMmeH,
By-A Senior '38
I This is but an echo of appealmade to you in an article of aprevious
issue—has
it had its
effect?
I wonder. But, that I maybe more definite, I confess that itis courtesy for which I plead;courtesy
f
to one
\
another,
\
andespecially to those of us who are,as it were,
'on
the way out/ Ourdays are numbered. Those who
established!
the foundationof our castle of college memorieshave left us, as we shall soonleave you. Your task, in turn, isnow to place the finishingtouches, the pinnacle, on thatcastle. Will the pinnacle beworthy of the foundation?! Wecannot say, for that remains with
you.
B
;
|JBBaB^ f
%
I Some
day,
when
you
have takenour places, you will realize justwhat the little things you do maymean to us. Then you will
want
the things that we want
now.
If, attimes,
we
seem to want things ourown way, bear
with]
us;
j forremember, it
is
our last chance atthose things which will come to
you I
again. If, sometimes, we
seem
\
a
trifle
'touchy'
on thesepoints of courtesy, we mean it foryour own good. You
are
foursuccessors, you file in as webreak ranks, you carry on for us!It is not long since we stood inyour places; we understand yourposition. Some day you will understand ours; some day, soonerthan you now realize. Then, you
will
desire as
we
do
now.
mm
S
How manytimes
1
navel
you>*neglected to hold a door for a
;
Senior to pass through?
11
is
not
the act itself that matter!. But welike to be favorably
i
reminded
once in a while that we areSeniors.
We
are not so
sophisticated that we
do
not feel abit honored by your little extracourtesies.«»{•Or..--yi^
--'
And
again,
did it never occur toyou that Seniors have
8:10*ers
nearly every
^morning?
We'vewaited four years for those first
places
in
the
cafeteria line and wehaven't died of hunger yet.
Youll
come into your own, too, some
day—provided ^
the
L unv
derclasswomen don't get there
first!
f I
gAnd
another gentle
reminder.^
up-and-coming football scrim
mage
has
nothing
on the rush forthe
mail?
between j periods.Perhaps you haven't noticed butit's the Seniors who "only standand wait"
;Maybe
it's force ofhabit, or maybe it's
.temporary
claustrophobia, but then againmaybe it's lack of considerationon the
f
part off the un
derclass wo
men. You don't haveto be an
A
(student
\
to
^make
Mercyhurst want
to]
rememberyou. A few C'si are welcomeprovided
one
of them
is
Courtesy.
^
Our memories of Mercyhurstwill depend to some extent, uponyou. Are
you'with
us or against
us? 9
t SPBsil Vg$
S88BJ'
Hopefully yours,
^ffi^^j^
am
A
Senior'38
m
Sl&dOTSs
Fraternity Mere?
Sigma Tau Gamma, a nationalsocial fraternity,
soon *
hopes tofound a chapter here. Hailingfrom
St.
Louis,' it has
74
chapters,with the Pennsylvania region itslargest, with fourteen chapters. Ifa chapter is started here, brotherchapters would be Edinboro andAlliance Colleges. Sigma TauGamma
|
will hold
f
anorganizational meeting onThursday, February 3, 1972 at 7p.m. in Room* 114 Zurn Hail. Allinterested
men
are
invited...comem
eet the
Sig
Tau's!
I
Barbato^rPizzeria
1707
STATE STREET
1
521-2158
FEATURING DELICIOUSSUBS & PIZZAS TO GO
629
SHOP
j
THE STORE WITH MORE PANTS
Levis
UP-TO
THE
MINUTE STYLINGWITH
NEW
FLARELE6
IN
A
RICHSELECTION
OF
COLORSAND PATTERNS
v
W
STA'PREST.
FLARE SLACKS
thaac
tmd&bn
»IM!
»I»H.I AT JIVIMTM

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