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The Merciad, May 12, 1972

The Merciad, May 12, 1972

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Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, May 12, 1972
The Merciad, May 12, 1972

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THE
CIAD
VOL.
XLIV
NO. 14
MERCYHURST
COLLEGEMAY
12,
1972
Kv.'.v.•v* Oct"•
sssSS
2a*£!A
HH
!llliiil«iil«iS«
•x-:-:-:«;
-:-r.wtoy-W; £&-,\
.-•.;:-.-.-..;.
-•-;:>*»wx-xwttS{ffiift8WP*»«-«¥;"•:•:"X>-
••xJSV
FKIPM
HI
XJIFa
Sixfoff the senior
art
majors|who helped prepare
the
Mam n
rial
fnrtfhp
annual PYrwKP'.
Weber Memorial
for
the annual expose'.
Art Exhibit
On Display
By Rich
Ohmans
O.n Sunday,j. May 7.^ ap
proximately
1
200
guests attendedthe formal preview of the SeniorExhibit in the Weber MemorialBuilding. Shown in the exhibit aresome
^)>3
works includingceramics, fiber fabrics, jewelry,sculpture, graphics, drawings, oilpaintings, acrylics, watercolors.and
mixed-
medias.
M
The senior
art
majorsexhibiting works are: BarbaraBraggins, Kathleen M. Caulfield.Susan Jean Forstrom,
Bennie
Greishaw, Michele LaPointe,
NancyjLundstrom.^Cathleen
M.Maloney,
Jay
Marcinowski,oanie McGuire,
dlich
Ohman,Kathyrn . Robertson, CarolynSheehan.i William
|Taft,
Adele
Wison, and Kenneth Wyten.
Tl'he
exhibit is open to the publicMay
11
through the 14th, and
May
17 through the
21st
from 2:00 till5:00 p.m. and 7:00 till
11:00
p.m.each day.
Financial AidForecast Uncertain
By Sr. Barbara
An unusual situation has arisenin Congress which alters
the
financial aid
^picture
for 1972-73considerably. Another
way of
saying the same thing
is
this:
vour
financial aid forms Tare
in
and ready for;decisions, but wehave
no 1
money
to
distribute.Alarming? About
fourj
hundredstudents depend upon this aid toattend
Mercyhurst
§
The problem originated when
an
early House Bill on federal aidto higher education was saddledwith an
amendment
on the Floorproviding that no federal fundscould be fused to
Ibus
schoolchildren topromote*integration.This, of course, is a vital issue inprimary and secondary educationbut does not properly
belong
in a
higherjjeducation
bill. But sinceit
has
been added,
it
has
generated,
lengthy debate and has
hfui
thei* delayed passage
of
legislation.
* | f
For the
anti-busing
advocates,this amendment was an expertlydesigned political maneuver.Their reasoning is not difficult tofollow: the
Higher*Education bill
must be passed by the end of theacademic year, and
so,
with it thebusing rider will
likewise!slide
through. To take a necessary and
well-designed
bill which proposesfederal funds for financial aid toneedy students and add to
it
anamendment* prohibiting federalfunding for busing to encourageintegration seems contradictory.It
is not
surprising then thatlengthy debate has pushed thepassage of the
bill]well
into thesummer months.
Not*
only
is
thef
problem
of
busing
Sstill
unresolved,
but
financial aid appropriations areat the same time at
a
standstill.When this bill emerges from thefloor
the
Houses
depends
to
some extent
on the
political
pressure
you are
willing
to exert
upon
your legislators. We are not,certainly, advocating passage ofthe bill
with
the amendment as itstands, since ideally the busingrider should
be
entered
as a
separate issue.
We are en-
couraging every student
who
receives federal financial
aid
(Work Study, National DefenseLoan, Education OpportunityGrant)
to
write
to his
congressman expressing his ownindividual needs.
Perhaps/with
group effort, some action can betaken
to
free
the
bill
for
legislation and appropriation offunds.I urge you
to
write
to
yourcongressman, using either
the
form letter prepared
by the
Financial Aid Office, or your ownindividual letter. Tell him yoursituation and the effect this delayin appropriation
£of
funds will
have-on
your
^educational
plans.Now that you have voting
pow
ITS,
vour needs
have ««*ven *
moreimpact Jon his decisions.
If he
wants vour vote, he should
act hi
your
behalf.
New[Grading SystemImplemented For Fall
The following proposals werepassed
by the
College Senateduringthe*past two weeks. Theybecome
effective
September,1972.
4
I
'^^^%
i
PHYSICAL
EDUCATIONELECTIVES
I
That students be permitted
to
take sfx credits
as
electives
in
physical education which wouldcount toward the* graduationrequirements. If la student
is
required
I
to take
a
course
in
physical education by his majordepartment,
he
may count
a
maximum
of
nine credits
in
physical education towardrequirements.Recommendations: (1) that theprogram be evaluated at the endof the first year, (2) that studentsbe permitted and encouraged toaudit physical education
courses
at
no
cost and
no
credit^
^
k
p
Passed:
5-3-72
GRADING SYSTKM
i *
ThaUhe
system for grading at
M ercyhurst
be:
|gfj
4.0(A)
I
^2.0(C)
3.5
(B+)
1.5<D+>
3.0(B)
1.0(D)
2.5(C+>
f
j
0.0(F)
, Passed
4-26-72
PASS-FAIL
jj
i
I
That
the^grade
scale fortpass,pass-low.
fail
be:
,;
PASS: 4.0.
3.5,3.0.2.5|2.0J3
Represents acceptableachievement of course objectives
atMercyhurst.
I PASS-UOW:
1.5.1.0
§y.Course credit given. Course
is
counted as one of the 40 required
I
FAIL: 0.0
<m$
%
?
No
course credit givenRecommendations:
(O that
the
indicated I
limits represent
a
schoolwide policy and could notbe altered
by
individual
in-
structors.
(2) that[
studentswishing to exercise their option oftaking
a
course
Pass-Low
Pass-Fail would state their intent
in
writing in the Registrars Officeon or before the sixth week of theterm. Decision cannot
be
reversed.
coBthat
instructorsneed not know who has chosen toexercise this option and wouldrecord
all
grades
in
jjtheir
numerical form for all students.Transcription
oflnumber
gradesto
Pass-Low Pass-Fail
would bemade by the registrar on
report
forms.
(4)
that course offeredonly on the
Pass-Low
Pass-Failbasis, i.e.. Intersession. studentteaching,
etej,
would be recordedas such directly by the instructor.
^g|£
Passed
5-3-72
INTERSESSION COURSES
S
1
That Intersession courses maybe used interchangeable
>as
regular term courses and
may[be
used to meet Liberal Studies andMajor requirements unlessspecifically stated otherwise. It isunderstood that students shallstill be required to attend
theirIntersession
periods.This regulation
is not
retroactive
for
courses
taken
prior
to
June 4*1972.
i
, i
Passed
5-3-72
SA^I»
•IW
.-.J
Jim Zielinski and Mary Ruscitti are two of the first riders to enjoy
one
of the two
new
tandems. The bicycles can be borrowed
from
thestudent activities office located in the basement of Zurn Hall. The
bikes
were bought with
funds
from the Students Activities Fee.
 
PAGE
2
MERCYHURST
COLLEGEMAY
12,11972
I
by Rick Mitz
GOOD
BUMOR
MAN
He's the Laughter Man. And heisn't that funny. He doesn't have
to
be.
i;
T:
fe
Dr. Harvey Mindess, a UCLA
psychologisti andf
author whoteaches a class
in'humor
on theside,believes that humor can beused as therapy to help us "get
away
from taking ourselves sodamned seriously. Humor," hestays, "helps
us
to
see
ourselves*in
the proper perspective." Hesuggests we "use humor as
J
acoping mechanism and toalleviate
our
tendencies tobecome pompous, inflated,egotistical, self-righteous and allthat crap."
| 'gII
It was "all that crap"
that JI
was most interested in. I'm nottoo knowledgeable
about;
tendencies and proper perspectives,but I
do
know a lot about the crapthat students put themselvesthrough as we are taught, dayafter day, class after class, tohandle life stiff-upper-lip;, style.Pressures have
been
put
on us
hot
to
.j laughi? .at anything—pur
own
personal
problems
orS^lhe
problems of the world. Would you
dareSlaughJ:'about*
ecology?Racism: The War? Our collectiveguilt says they're definite no-no's.And would you dare
to:
laugh atcollective
guilt? i
W
"The whole
bit*
of*
reallybelieving that what you stand forand
what*
you s
are doing is themost important thing in theworld," Dr. M. says. "Well, itmatters, but not really so muchas we think. What upsets us agreat deal today will be forgotten
•two
weeks from today."It's
in
college," he adds,
I'that
students .are. taught to takethemselves
too
seriously."
Dr.
rMindess
is the author of anew book on humor
j
called
"Laughter
and Liberation" that'sabout as funny as the Dead SeaScrolls. Through
247^
pages, hetakes humor, plops it down on acouch, analyzes the guts out of itand, as we finish the last chapter,Tonsils (instead of Appendix),leaves us realizing that we just
might fbe-in
big trouble as weperform the
Jwake
over oursleeping
senses
of
humor.g
|He's right. There are tons ofexamples to prove it:
ithe
divorced lady who laughs thather ex's new wife looks just likeher..
.the
final examination that'sso unbelievably hard it's funny. .
.buying
red jockey shorts andlooking
the
other way as the clerkwrites up the sales slip.
I
.trying
to
find
tons of examples of thingsthat are funny..
.guys
with
BAs
inchemical engineering working asjanitors after graduation.
^.meeting
your professor the sameday of the
exam|when
you saidyou'd be at your grandmother'sfuneral (whom you've already
"killed"
five times in the
past
four years)^
lHaving
thatprofessor meet your
grand
mother.
Writing
a serious book onhumor. Potentially, all are crisisexperiences, but, as Dr.
M.
wouldsay, in the right perspective:funny.
|There's
been a lot of talk-mostly
humorless—about
thedeath of student.: humor thatpooped out with the Thirties andwas laid to rest with indentedbottoms that sat on flagpoles andswallowed goldfish. In
this
era ofecology, swallowing fish is
?no
way to preserve the balance ofnature and sitting on flagpoles is apain in the neck. Well, thosethings weren't very funnyanyway, but the attitudes thatbrought them about^were.Nothing was taken too seriously.College
life—so
they tell
us—
wasjust like in the moo-vees: wouldthe college football star get goodenough
grades Jto
play in Saturday's big game? No one
cared J
but it gave them something! tolaugh about. f"We're all very touchy
about^
our sacred cows," Dr. M. says. I"We
become?
so serious
andg
committed
|that|
we refuse tolaugh at
anything fconnected
toour Cause."
His
answer
is
simple.
,;j
"Just enjoy. Stop analyzing. It's
saferfto
be straight, but a lot ofgood things can happen to you ifyou dare to be just a little bitcrazy. Humor can be a liberatingdevice."§ The | problems of the worldmight not be
solved ^through
Dr.
Mindess's
philosophy, but theymight be more easy
to
copewith.Read his book if you can laughup
$7.95 J
And if you're ever outLA way, visit Harvey
Mindess.S
He's good for
a
laugh.
THE
MERCIAD
Second-class postage paid at
Erie,
Pa./
16501.
$3.00 per year.Published bi-weekly during the college/
year,
except Thanksgiving/Christmas and Easter vacations, and examination periods by thestudents
of
Mercyhurst Collegcs^frrT^
Editor
%
*vv.«/
AssociateAssistantBusiness!
Student ConsultantFaculty Advisor'
V
Vincent
Dor
an
«
£
/
mm
\
NHN
[\
H
Bob Parks
Julie Samick
Cindy Gustin
r*£2*'
•^>*
Al MessinaBarry Mc Andrew
Editors:
Bill Dopierla, Sporfs>v6*rv!/Wg^ptobefer, Entertainment;Bonnie LaDuca, Feature; Bilt5e€fcserttews; Mark
Zlne,
Drama.|Staff
Writers:
Mary
Hoffman,
J.D. Havrllla,
Bob
PettlnjIM,
Pat LyonAl Belovarac, D. Vernora, Sports; Thomas G. DIStefano, KimWontenay, Sua Welner,
Maureen
Hunt, Rick
Lamb,-
Feature;Gerald Barron, Entertainment; Tom
Heberle,
News
Staff:
Cathy Smith, Kathy Holmes, Christine
Cebula,
RoseannSchiavlo,Carol Alco,typist;Annette
D'Urso,
Mary
Popvlch,
proof
reader*
Dianne Guyda, Jon DeGeorge, TerrI
Grzankowski,
Layout; Fran Adhearn, Dave
Ronde,
Bonnie Clymer, 'AmparoAlvarado, Art; Carol Kress, Sheiie Llchtenwalter, photographer;Mary Tupek, Circulation; Dario Cipriani, advertising manager;Bob Beck,editor a+ass is tant.
'
Paperbacks
Needed
For
L.R.C
The
L.R.C.'s
newest project isthe development of a leisure
reading;collection
which will belocated on the upper level
-east
wing. In order to make this newarea
a\
reality,however, thecooperation of the entire Mercy-hurst community is neededdonate
new^and
used paperbackbooks. Leisure reading is a vitalAn alternative approach Isneeded to achieve our goal of
1000
books by the end of May/Therefore,! we appeal
to
| our
patrons t
to keep in
mind
thisproject when they are springcleaning or packing
up
to
go
homefor the
summer.
Books may beleft at the main desk, circulationdesk, any time the library is open
Leisure reading-a part
of
the educationaljprocess
but much
neglected
j.
segment ofthe educational process. (Ourfiction collection is of thetraditional nature and cannotfulfill the same needs as a contemporary paperback collection.
)|
We
cannot afford
to
wait toadd such a service to the L.R.C.and yet we cannot afford topurchase the necessary
titles.5§&
PRISON REFORM
Dear Friend,Last year a large number of usprisoners
||g^|
formed the
IMPRISONEDf i
CITIZENS
pUNION
in an
effort
to change thecountry's barbaric prison conditions.
Some
of these unlawful con
ditions
Jare: Prisoners being
gviciously
beaten and even killed
i
by sadistic prison
{'guards;?
the
^indiscriminate
use of chemicalMace on defenseless
*
prisoners;lack of proper food, clothing, and
-'medical
treatment; depravedabuse of the mentally ill andyouthful
offender;,
operatingtorture devices
-
such as: thesweat box, wall chains, wristclamps and undergrounddungeons where prisoners areforced to sleep on the cold concrete floor; where their screams
J<
cannot be heard as they are beingbeaten by a GOONgSQUAD, and
wherefi
they are held in-
gcommunicado
from everyone,including their families, friends,
^attorneys
and
{Religious
Ministers. £
g
These violations are committed
by |
the very same people whohave sworn to uphold the law but
^|who
have instead created
such
tragedies as Attica and the
CRIMETFACTORIES
that theycall Correctional Facilities.Early last year a large numberof
us
prisoners
'formed
the'IM-^PRISONED CITIZENS UNIONto
correct!
these Gestapo conditions. We filed
a|civil
RightsClass Action
In
the U.S. DistrictCourt at^Philadelphia,Pennsylvania and we hope to overhaulthe? entire prison system inPennsylvania as well as in
all
other states.
&*
*Sg SOME
OF
THE
11.C.U.'S OBJECTIVES
ARE:
1.To ouster all sadistic and in-• competent prison employees.
2.
The elimination of all torturedevices.
'i
3.
Proper food, clothing, andmedical
treatment.^
*
4.
To:
eliminate all racial andreligious discrimination.
5.
The right to
^pursue
our
|#
political beliefs^ withoutharassment
f''.
6. Enfranchising the prisoners so
'that
they
will
be
able
to
vote.
:
7.
To support any legislation thatiwe feel will guarantee to allstarting
now.
^|& B H
To paraphrase Goethe,
"Tell
me
what a man reads, and I'll tell
you
what
he is",
might have someinteresting implications
Iif
theanswer turns out to be only therequired
assignments.for
coursework. To turn off society andwhat it Ms reflecting
jj
through
current
i
publications with
\
the
People
citizens a decent wage so thatthey may live in dignity andtheir kids can
go
to bed with afull stomach.8. To assist, within our capacity,any movement or
groupHhat
is trying to bring a speedy and
J*,
peaceful end to the Vietnam
War.
g|
^^p !fili
We of the Imprisoned CitizensUnion do not kid ourselves! Wefully realize that our opponents inthis battle.| possess enormouspower, great influence, and that"holier than thou"
image
,\
while
we
prisoners!have
nothing but asocial stigma that has prejudicedmany people against us.However, with the help ofprogressives! and enlightenedcitizens we' are hopeful ofreaching our goal.
X
If
you
would like to help us without task, then will you kindly fillout
the|coupon
below. THANK
YOU.
| H * ..
£._
ij
Sincerely,
Dominick CodispotiPrisoner,
C-8204
?
c o
Imprisoned CitizensUnionP.O.Box473l| IPhiladelphia, Pa
J19134
excuse of not having enough time
\^fy
to do anything but homework, is
-S^
really
defeating
the vocation of a
f
student.$$*
Wu&iE3&#$
:
''''^'
 
Currents ca mpus S
senate
-^--
decisions
I
reinforce the premise
^that,often
meaningfuleducation^";^takes place far away from
501
E.
'*$&
38th
Street!
The liberalized and
f
7
integrated student
wouldi
!
bev<|L
familiar
with
the
"Future
Shock"
:
;\
of
"Crisis
in the Classroom" and
x>
the ••Greening! of America"
^
during the "Summer of
'42".
If
$g
you
aref
not conversant with
>V
••Boss" fiandi rSiddhartha"
";
v
because* the books
*
are not
^
available and not because of the
••
I-
am-
over
worked"
J
syndrome,
^_
than the development of the new rfpaperback collection
will,be
of
^H
special
significance
to you.
|>
zSfalk
These titles may
bfe
gathering
dust on your {bookshelves, so
^
please bring them
to the
L.R.C. so
*
-t
others can share the wealth.
f£ri
Let's
see
"The
Godfather" "Steal;^This Book and "The Clockwork
W
Orange" while we are taking fe&'The Electric Kool
AidfAcid
'M
Test" so that
"The
Female
j*3
Eunuch" and
iThat
Man Cart-
&jj
wright"|can|enioy"The*
Las^jWhole
|Earth| Catalog",
jf.
The^d
L.R.C
JLeisure Reading project$g
cannot achieve
the}
success
itK
warrants
m
unless
Meveryone
W
cooperates.
^JHBBSSffi^SK*!
TEACHER EVALUATIONS"
PRINCETON, N.J.-A newprogram that allows students toevaluate the performance of theirteachers has been developed byEducational Testing Service(ETS).
}.
Besides allowing students a
chancel
to express their viewsanonymously aboutf courses andteachers, it also gives instructorsan objective way to monitor their
own
performance and progress.Called the Student InstructionalReport
(SIR)g
the program is aneffort, to improve instructionbased on responses to an ETS-designed questionnaire suppliedto students by the collegesthemselves.The questionnaire wasdeveloped by ETS researcherswith the aid
ofj
college facultymembers and students^ It iscomposed of
^questions
aboutspecific teaching practices andmore general topics
i
includingsuch queries
as:
?
Didjjthe
instructor encourage
is
students to think
t
for
themselves?— Were the course
^objectives
made clear?
*
How much effort did students
*
put into
the
course?
Were students informed of
how
»
they would
be
evaluated?!
*a
The
includes
questions
i
r
about astudent's
reasons {for
taking thecourse and the grade he expectsto receive. In addition,
an?
in-
structor us
jfree jjo *
includequestions of
his
own to
learn moreaboutf factors unique to his
particular!
class. The questionnaire results are reported foreach class as a group, not forindividual students.
v |
Ml
Student evaluation of teachersis not a new concept. Theprocedure
has
been
used for sometime at various institutions,
S
but ETS says SIR should providean
instructor£with
information tocompare his
performance
withothers in his
f
discipline on anational scale. The program isavailable to institutionsthroughout the United States andCanada.
^&
More information about SIRmay be obtained by contacting:Institutional Research Programfor Higher Education,Educational Testing Service,Princeton,
New
Jersey 08540.Initiated by ETS in 1965, theInstitutional Research Programprovides
colleges
and universitieswith a variety of methods to usein evaluation and self-studyprograms. .
j&
An Open LefterOo
the|
Erie Brewing Company:
On behalf of the senior class ofMercyhurst College I would liketo offer our sincere gratitude tothe Erie Brewing Company andthe gentlemen
who
provided theirservices
on
Tuesday evening May
2.
mi
If
The entire evening was filledwith a general sense of happiness—from the tour to the
festivities
of beer and dance. Ourguides deserve a special thanksfor their
open friendl i
ness
$.
May this tradition continue
in
the
years
to
come.
* ^
Sincerely,Vincent
Doran
Editor
S
 
MAY
12,
1972
MERCYHURST
COLLEGE
Women Beware
PAGE 3
THE
MER C
YHURST11
y
v.;
.• ,.-.
vV
..
"TURKEY JOHN"
On Wednesday, May 2nd atapproximately 1:15 a.m., a bandof eleven marauding outlawsinvaded the sanctuary of
McAuley
Hall. These deviatesraised havoc during their three-minute raid by
startling
fromtheir sleep the women of thesecond and third floors. Thedistressful damsels were subjected to untold tortures and
humiliations—such
as knocks ondoors, boisterous "whoop-whoops" and garbage sprawledon a section of the third floor.You can
imagine
the fear andterror these 18-20-year-old girlsfelt; away from home, some forthe first
timeJ
Fortunately, therenegades' stay
was
brief.
Justice did prevail however.
"SPORT"
Mercyhurst's
crack intelligenceservice tracked down thesecriminals withindays.
A
hearingwas arranged within the week.(The fastest bureaucratic movehere since the crackdown oncampus speeders.)
f&
The court, under the judiciouseyes of E.
W.
Kennedy, chairmanof the
Student|
Affairs HearingCommittee, was held on Thursday May 4th at 4:00 p.m. Boththe prosecution and defensepresented arguments. After anhour and forty minute discussiona verdict was reached. Guilty.The
punishment—three
days ofhard
labor.—16
hours ofdedication
to
Sr. Maura's ecologycrew and eight hours of
strenuous
tasks under the masterfuldecrees of the Student Affairs
2feffe*&Af«&»-
Btt&ttM
f**W
f*%
^\
I
\j
&VJ
33868
M%gm
EtfKSQi
It
MURPHY
ft
JOHN WALSH
629 SHOP
THE
STORE WITH MORE PANTS
Levis
UP-TO-THEL
MINUTE STYLINGWITH NEW FLARELEG
IN A
RICH
$
SELECTION OF COLORSAND PATTERNS
STA-PREST.
FLARE SLACKS
Sbaacumdifon
JTATI
lt«II»
At
HVimM
By Vince Do ran
**,.,
i
«3*£
wv*
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TOM RUSSO"COXIE"
JJsMk
MIKEEMICK
Volunteers needed — Committee to Re-elect thePresident. Help at your schoolor home,
f
Contact:§• Volunteers to
Re-elect
the President1822 Spruce StreetPhiladelphia, Pa. 19103
V
\
IWAME
"OBIC" O'BRIEN
Director.Following is a list of
the
^convicted:Bill "Coxie"
Lonergan—also
known under the alias
u
of"Foxie"; "mad-dog" and "mod-dog (when
|
wearing - bell-bottoms)"; 53150.
I
I
f
%
Dave "Sport" Collins—onetime notorious author of the now
defuncted
column
"Sporty's
Believe It or Not"; 15190
|
Steve
fBrandon—often
seenwandering the halls of the 'Hurstlate at night with a basketball inhand; 10640
|
f||
?
J
| |5
Mike
Emick—see
descriptionunder "Steve Brandon"; 22650
3
John Ball—see^ descriptionunder
"MikeEmick";
07940 ; V.Pat
"Murf"
Murphy—known
tofrequent ping-pong establish-
|
JOHN BALL I
i
ments
(BEWARE, this man is a"hustler");
59072 -'^fRpiMH
A Tom
iRusso—currently
theprime motivation of the BaldwinApartment
jet-set;
76371i
-£jffl
Bill "Waggs"
Wagner—a
recruiter for the National
Guard;
(Sleep
tight—your Guard 5
is
awake
tonight):
91720 |I
John "Kid Gloves"! Walshcurrently being managed by oneE.W.K. and "The
Wimpper*|
forthe newly formed boxing team;93045
I * ^isill^l^i? * "?
John "Obie"
O'Brian—Irish
wizz from "South Philly*;
"The
weaver
from
Textile
• * 62401
feJM•I
John
vill^
u
^^J
Johrt^
Mishanec—a
perennial fiStcfi-
hiker?
to
Villa and points
westf
57480* f
*M
SB? I
WAGNERBRANDON
-«<•**-*
vrrrr^r;
Both men were
in
the "fields" at time
of
photographs.
KEEP ACOOL,
COOL
HEAD
WITH
K«
W
^
rw
^
X*
PM
S3
Ec
fc«
<*S
N*
<s^
S8«SS
SANDWICHES AND LUNCHEONS
ALWAYS AVAILABLE
6
RAY
915 EAST 26th STREET
Now
Open
On Sundays
—Till
10:00
p.m
\
FAST
AND
COURTEOUS SERVICE
CALL
!
CENTRAL
DISTRIBUTORS
3030 iPINE
AVENUE-ERIE, PA.
PHONE 455-4663
OWNERS-TONY AND JEAN TETUAN
DISTRIBUTOR FOR:PFEIFFER AND
DREWRYS
BEERALSO ALL OTHER
V
POPULAR BRANDS OF BEER AND SOFT DRINKS

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