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The Merciad, Feb. 9, 1973

The Merciad, Feb. 9, 1973

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The Merciad, Feb. 9, 1973
The Merciad, Feb. 9, 1973

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01/27/2014

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THE
"Not
Everything*
«
That
is faced can
be
changed:ButNothing,
Up
t,
] Can
be
changed
until
it is aced
"
3i
-
James
Baldwin
r
VOL. XLV NO. 18
MERCYHURST
COLLEGEFEBRUARY
9, 1973
SHANEANNOUNCESPLANNING TASK FORCES
•-"-i
Editor's
Note:!
The following is
theHext
of aspeech
delivered
by
PresidentMarion
L.IShane
to the CollegeSenate on January
31|
1973. Thespeech concerns the formation oftask forces to help plan Mercy-
hurst*
s future.My first objective uponassuming the presidency of theCollege last July was to learn asmuch about it
as
soon
as I could. Iattempted to do this as diligentlyas possible and still deal with thepressing decisions that
had'to
bemade during | they learningprocess.
|g
My
learning
has
only
begun, butI believe that I can report that Iknow more about Mercyhurst at
the
end
of seven months than I didwhen I first walked on campus.This knowledge has comet fromworking land talking withstudents,
staff,
faculty, administrators, associates, trusteesand
friends
of the College.As I talked
withlalHof
you Irealized that earlier than I wouldwish and long before
f
really feltthat I knew and understood theCollege, I would have to see thatsome decisions were
made*
insome critical areas because thewitching time was upon all of us.During the
pastffive*<yearsf
ourcollege has undergonephenomenal growth and
moved
courageously on to some new
ground:
men students, flexibilityin curriculum, experiments in
learningl
increasing lay appointments! in faculty, administration and trustees.Essentially
I
had
two
choices onhow to make the decisions thisyear regarding the College. Onewas to work primarily within theadministrative-trustee structureand because of
the
\
shortness of
the*
time limit drastically inputfrom outside this process: or toannounce as early as possible theareas in which the decisions mustbe made and secure as broad an
input as
possible,
fSi
believe in open systems ofworking, studying, sharing anddeciding together. For this reasonI have
made?
a sincere effort tosecure
as!
broad an input aspossible in making thesedecisions. The task forces
that
Iam announcing today
are |
themeans that seemed most
efficient
for securing this
inputJEach
task
PRESIDENT SHANE
force whose names you have inthis meeting will be asked to zero
in on
one
of the areas of decision.In those areas benefiting frombroad input
I
have worked closelywith
thejp
Senate ExecutiveCouncil to see that related Senate
committees ^provide
part of thestudent and faculty membershipof each task force. |Input from these task forces
will
j
help
*
me prepare
\
recommendations
to be
submitted to theBoard
of*
Trustees for ultimatedecision in these areas. As Iexplained in my last report to theSenate, these recommendationswill be submitted to the Senatefor reactions and final input.These reactions and input will beconsidered in
the
.final
over allplan that I present to the Board inlate
Aprils |
I t
I f
These immediate decisionsmust
be
seen
in relationship to thefuture of the College. AccordinglyI am proposing to the trusteesthat the periods shown provide
the>time
frame for
.the
Collegeplanning,
j iSfe
I
5?
i
%
Behind this ten-year projectionlies a basic assumption:Change has and will outstripour I ability to meet
it?
constructively unless we begin tosolve current problems
with fan
eye to achieving long-range objectives. This time
frame!
isdesigned
to*
give our College ameans of controlling both theacceleration
andlkind
of changethat Mercyhurst must face.
l.|The
Task Force on basicdirection of
College
programs:Here I hope for
nog
suddenwrenching of College programs;however, I will present
to |
thistask force this week a statementof commitments made by theCollege in key documents; faproposed creed, purpose andmission, and selected
quotations
showing aspects of change thatare emerging for all of us. Thesestatements will be designed toaccomplish
the
following:
1.
Honor the College's inheritedcommitments.!
\
2.
Link;these
commitments toan
educational
philosophy that
TIME FRAMEPLANNING
July
1
Mercyhurst '761972
19731974
1975
1976
1977
197$1979
1980
1981 1982
'lercyhurst
'82
Zmplementation
of
Ucrcyhurst
'82
Mercyhurst 76 J &' jy-
%.
j
Set a
series
of objectives
for
1976
that will
%•\'
$,
row
*
rom
commitments
inherited
from the past, or deviate from only with approval of college community.£2.
Clarify
uncertain points emerging
from
recent period of change and growth
:
m
Reflect considerations
of what kind of college Mercyhurst should be in1982;or at its centennial
In
20;
84.
Provide
a
framework and opportunity to develop Mercvhurst '82*
\
MERCYHURST'82|
*
f
$
v
1.
In
conjunction with preparation for the Middle States Accreditation visit (currently planned for fall 76) undergo a self study and comprehensive planning of objectives to be achieved bv 1982
/IMPLEMENTATION OF MERCYHURST
'82
%
1.
Work to achieve by
1982
the
objectives
set
forth
in Mercyhurst '82.
2.
Continue self study and evaluation.
t.
will unify much of what we noware doing.
|
?$!#*
3.
Provide
^a ^conceptual
framework for working
out
Mercyhurst '82: that is, the kind
of
college
that Mercyhurst shouldbe in
1982.
This process will takeplace between next fall and ourgolden
anniversary
in
1976.
It willcoordinate a self-study and ourten
year
accreditation by the
Middle |Statest
Association ofColleges.
i
<*
2.
The
|
Task Force onPhilosophy and objectives ofPhysical Education,
Intramurals
and Athletics:
j
%
The Task Force on Philosophyand objectives of a college center
or
student center
j
The visit of
Mr.$
RichardTheibert
last^Thursday
broughtsome new thoughts to all whoheard him, including members ofthese two task*
forces £
and; theenvironmental studies
Sinter-
session J
He recommended thatwe consider combining a studentcenter and a recreational building
in one
facility.
*!&'
f M
For this reason, I am askingthat these two
task,forces
workclosely together to
answer*
thesetwo questions:
M
1.
What does Mercyhurst wantto accomplish in a recreational^
facility? J
jl12.
What does Mercyhurst wants
.to
accomplish in a college orstudent
center? i f
|
A&jstudent
from the
en-j
vironmental studies
inter
sessionhas been appointed to each of
the d
task
forces.
Sister Maura and BillDarrin, who taught the inter-session, are
^to
serve
as?
resource persons for these twotask
forces,f *•kThe
intent in seeking thisfacility is to move from objectives to programs to buildingor buildings.
I y
%
f
. 3. Task Force
on
Optimum Sizeof
the
College:
k
| |
This is a pressing decision thatwill be answered by default if we
do
not attempt
to
face it directly.Mercyhurst
\
is iin
la
^growthsyndrome
that has gripped manycolleges;
las
growth" occurs,budget needs increase, and morestudents and tuition are needed tomeet these costs.
Many
collegeswithout
i
planning suddenly
find
themselves
changing
in
character
because I
they have grown toolarge.
3
i
k
|
This
5
past: month I havediscussed this question of sizewith presidents of ten collegesbetween 1,000 and
2,000
students.No magic formula exists but onebit of advice
was
universal: don't
drift
into growing larger withoutweighing
the
consequences.
fThis
task force
will
be asked toconsider the qualitative aspectsof the question: If Mercyhurstwishes to maintain a climate ofinformality, friendliness
-and
personal attention to studentlearning and problems,
how
large
can
it
grow? *
I
| *
M
Concurrently I will see thatquantitative aspects of thequestion also will be
studied^
Facilities,
space,
budgets, etc.
4.
Task
j
Force on
Administration
of the College:
%
The primary assignment of thistask force will be to serve as asounding board and
I
advisorygroup to the president
on how
thecollege can
limprove
its administrative performance.^Considerations:
t
?
1.
A
i
managementfinforma ti
onsystem.
j§
2. Pro-active
-
administrativeperformance^
^
3.
Clarification of decision
making.? } ? ? |§
4. Opportunity for individualsto develop as
the*
collegedevelops,
j
.
i
5.
Improvement of procedures
and
communications. *
g
Conclusion:As
soontas
possible, I shallmeet with each task force for aninitial briefing session. I shallserve as an
ex-of f
cio member ofeach task
forceland
will
*
meetwith each as my schedule permits and
or
upon request.
I*
am tasking that task
force
reports reach me by Friday,March 9, the end
of J
this winterterm. I plan to present the initialdraft of my overall plan to theSenate early
in
the spring term.
My
present thought
is
that once
the
Board
has
acted
upon
the
planin May,
these?
task forces
may
self
destruet;
jiwhen
that occurs Ihope that all of us will have gonethrough a mutually^ rewardinglearning process.
TASK
FORCE flPPOINTfTlENTS:
Below are the
Task
Forces appointed by President Shane
with
the cooperation
of'
the.
Senate,
and thearea with which each
will
be concerned.
ge
Community having opinions or connections
I
regarding any
ot
thes topics areicate your
views
to the
chairman or
a member of any of these Task Forces.All members of the Collegeencouraged to
contra UA
1.
Task Force on
Basic
Direction of College Programs:
David
Blanchtteld,
Chairman •Sister Barbara Brairton
&
Louise Finney
»
*William GarveyJames
LanahanMiriam AAashank
Joseph
Pizzat
Joseph
Sisca
*
Karyn
Smith • *
2.
Task Force on
Philosophy
and Objectives
of
Physical
Education,
intramurals
and Athletics:At Belovarac
tDick
FoxJames
Kinnane
Bob Parks
<
;*3S
Nancy PentakJanet PriceDave Shimpeno, Chairman
Mariene
Smith
%
n3. Task Force
oh
Philosophy and Objectives of Student Center:Jerry
F
edor
<
Phil HerringWilliam KennedyReneeciarkF*
Dario
Cipriani t #Michael Erisman
*
is
Task Force
on
Optimum
Size
of College:Sister Matthew
BaitusDean
William Garvey
jSg
Peter
Schaaf,
Trustee
5-
Task Force on Administration of CollegeJerry Barron •
'
Tom Billingsley, ChairmanDon
Grinde *Charieen Koiupski
\)
Resource Persons
Bill
Darrin and Sister Maura
Smith
• Student* Senate Committee Appointment
F.rank
Hagen
James
McAndrew •*
<f\
Alexis
Walker,
Chairman
*
D
Sister Anne Francis, Ex officioPresident Shane. Ex officioTom
Monaghan
Sister Anne
Picrotti
Sharon
Santia *
 
PAGE
2
MERCYHURST COLLEGEFEBRUARY9,1973
FROm THE TOWER:
.X
DIRTY STORW
by Al BelovaracFeature Editor
9
While
walking*over
to the Parade Street Apartments the otherday, we experienced
a
horrifying ^
premonition
of an
impending
doom*;
about
to
befall
the
unwary inhabitants
of the
newly-constructed
complex.
After the dreadful vision, the urge to runthrough all three floors, shouting at the top of our lungs, warning
them
that the end is near was
suppressed:
only with an extremeeffort of the will. Nobody would listen, the only response would berestrained snickers and humoring smiles. The ghastly revelationwe beheld in a dark cloud hovering over the apartments will godown
in
the annals
of
the
Mercy
hurst Heritage
as
the
(hideousMercy hurst
Mud
Monster.
|
jf
Ik i
* * *
In the vision, we saw that huge plain of dirt becoming inundated
with rain
and
melted
snow,
slowly
expanding,
much like
a
sponge
asit becomes saturated with water. Slowly, ever
so
quietly,
it
proceeded through a terrible metamorphosis, emerging
in
the endas an
insatiable,
muddy morass with a beastly killer instinct. Then,before our astonished eyes, it trembled as the first impulses of lifesurged through its
mushy,
murky recesses. With a hideous groanthat sounded more like
a
chorus of all the lost souls in hell thananything else,
it
lumbered forward. The beast hesitated
at
first,then crept along with
a
slithering, sliding movement as its con
fidence
in its own
deadliness and invulnerability grew until it nearlyequaled
its
colossal
mass.
j;
fe|
* <
I
St
i
t-
'
i
*
*i
r*
^
It
was
a
Tuesday night and the air around the apartments wasfilled with the resonant sounds of thirty-six stereos pumping theirtunes into the cold, crisp
air
outside.
-The
steady drone wasperiodically broken
by
a sharp
peale
of giggles and laughter or the
piercing
snap and hiss of
a
multitude
of
pull-tab cans. This wasparty night! The jubilant revellers
of|the
evening had not
the
slightest hint
of?
their impending doom as the surging, throbbingmass
of
mud and slime
menacingly'approached
the defencelessbuilding.
||j& fg
5
^**
f
|
Suddenly, with
a
crackling explosion, the electricity abruptlyshut
off,
and the music slowed to an odius, mournful stop. Aneruption of laughter mixed
with
curses
flew from
all
the
windows
asthe doomed residents unkowingly lambasted the inadequacies of
the
school's power
supply.
£ |1
|g|
| *In
an
instant their vexation turned
to
horror as slimy mud pouredin through every crack, door, and window, surrounding, rushingover
the
scrambling, screaming students. They had
no
hope
against
the
mushy,
grisly
oozeiNo
one
escaped
its
sticky,
deadly clutch.
*
*
*
Almost as mysteriously as the beast was coughed up from thebowels of the earth, it settled back down, drifting into a contented
sleep
now
that it had satisfied
its
gruesome appetite, but not beforeit had made an ominous movement
in the
direction of
Baldwin
Hall.Only a sea of congealed mud remained, and scattered about couldbe seen fragments of stereos, records, and crunched beer cans, the
only
part of
the
entire building that had been left undigested. Oddly,enough, there was one record that had not been damaged in anyway, mysteriously left unscathed
on top
of a muddy knoll. It was arecording of Pete
Fountains Greatest
Hits.
M
^A horrified public
and lamenting families called for an immediatefederal investigation
into,the
unearthly!incident. J'After^several
months, the answer was uncovered. A research team from
M.I.T.
discovered that there was only one way in which the beast mighthave been prevented from developing. The
secret
i
weapon
wasfound
tolbe
the
common,
everyday blade
of
grass which, whenplanted
in
abundance,
miraculously
soaks
up
moisture
and
preventsthe birth of mud beasts. If Sessler Builders had planted the weed,the awful beast would never have had
a
chance, land thirty-sixstudents might
still
be
alive.
I
it§
* * *
#
As
it stands, there is
no
grass in that area, and the vision
we
sawwill remain imprinted
on
our minds until something is done.
We
didour duty.
We
saw the premonition
and we
gave the
warning.
It's allin the hands of the fates. Parade Street Apartment dwellers, whenyou
journey
to your classes through an ever-increasing mass ofoozing mud, remember this column and heed our warning before
it's
too
late.!
J? 3
Wh
J '£ Jsl i &
i
THEMERCIAD
I
Years
of
Service
Published weekly during
the
college year, except Thanksgiving,
in
tersession, Christmas
and
Easter vacations
and
examination periodsby
the
students
of
Mercyhurst College, Erie,
Pa./
16501.
Mailing
ad
dress:
Mercyhurst
MailrooHall,Box 36.Editor
J
Assistant EditorEditorial BoardNews
j
Feature EditorSports
j
Layout |3
Assistant
Layo
CulturalBusiness ManagerFaculty
Advisor
&
Bob ParksTom Heberlelathy Stevenson
.1
Belovarac
•ario
CiprianiIon DeGeorge
r
erri Grzankowski
'Sue WeinerMarlene
Smith
$
Barry
Mc Andrew
Staff Writers:
Dave
Hor
fovarac, Gary Bukowski, JudySmith,Andrea Kupetz, Joan Bucher, Pattie Beck, Sharon
^Namer,
A.
j,
Adams, Paul Hanes,
Maureen
Sulliv
an.
Staff:
Tom
Frank
Paul
Doran,Maureen
Hunt, MarieKanicki,MaryGriswold, Gail Stevens,
Tom
Rictor,
JirmPrez,- Sandy Nickerson,Maureen Connors* Sylvia McCray, Judy Flynn, Peggy Benedict, Fran
DanielS.I -
2:
•*&"
"v
"thciCJCLSSiCCLI
reunion
THREE PERSPECTIVES
College
and
Employment
Television, newspapers,
parents
and teachers
all
drummed it into our heads during fouryears of high
school...don't
drop
out...you'11
never get a good job.
So,
like good little
kids
we
packed
up
our money and went
to
collegein search
for
the
good
job.
M
But many ex-students
are
finding that college really doesn't
mean
instant employment.Two Mercyhurst ex-patriates,a graduate
ana
a
one-year dropout recently gave
then'
views onthey college-employmentsituation.The one-year
man, who
majored in Business, quit schoolfor several reasons. Financialproblems plus the feeling that hereally was not getting anywherein school were
the
major contributing factors.
I
Looking
for
employment
is in
itself
a
full-time job and outsideof
a
3-week
Christmas job,
our
one-year
man
has not
found
work.
m
The options
left
to the one-yearcollege man include trying
to
findwork here (in Erie) or at home,return to school, or just take off.
by Cathy StevensonNews Editor
Injjhis
own words,| "It's verydepressing."
*
With the war over, returningveterans will further destroy jobopportunities.
M ^ 2
The one-year
drop-out is^now
trying
to
return
to
college.
He
feels that he will now take school
more
seriously J
\
Si
The sad
Ipart
is
that aftercompleting college,
all
that j
hemay have is a sheepskin diplomaand
a
collegeToaiuo
pay
off.Our '72 Mercyhurst graduatehas found that
it is
experiencethat counts.He was refused
a
job
at
Mercyhurst based on the fact that hewas inexperienced and has eventold his qualifications were
not
good enough
to
merit
an ap
plication
to
another
job.
The college graduate evenapplied to the Air Force due
to
the lack of
jobs
but later changed
his
mnd,
i
|
At the
moment, the Mercyhurstgraduate is working part-time as
a I
teacher's aide
at the
Middle
School
in
Erie.His future plans call
If
orreturning to school to obtain hismasters,! but without work,financial problems are inevitable.The college graduate blamesschool,
to
some degree,
on-the
lack of preparation students need
in
seeking
employment.
?
He would like
to
see
useless
elective courses dropped in favorof courses which
are
morerelevant
to
what students will
need
later.
* ™ *^
p
* ^»
Another
help
for students wouldbe
an
apprentice program
for
each major. The
-Mercyhurst
graduate found out too late thatthere was not
anything
he wanted
to do
with
his
History major.The college graduate also feelsthat school placement officesshould get
away iffrom
the viewpoint that all college students aregoing to be teachers and expand
to
help
more students.
I
,
School may
not be
what
we
want or expected, but at least it issomething.
It
may also
be the
only job you will get for
a
long,longtime,
i 3
HAVE YOU HEARD?
After hearing the news
of
theend of the war in Viet Nam, thisperson thought
"It's
about time!Then,
I
sank back into my Mer
cyhurst?
existence with
my ten
page term papers and my subjective-objective-perspective-dejective tests.
Collegejthen
is
a
community in
itself.
And what
a
community-with
all its
fratparties, beer
\
blasts
and
homework somewhere
in bet-
by Andrea Kupetz
ween, we Vforget
the
outsideworld. The earth orbits once
a
day while we
stuff
our faces withSaga food and try to stay awakein class. This person offers
no
demands or lectures, but only
a
hope that we will all think of thatoutside world
at
least once
in
awhile and remember that
not
only are we here to have fun, butto learn something. Learningcomes
in all
forms. Even
if it
means we've only gained
in
dependence
or
can
say*
4
I love
you
world and
I
want my life to be
a
good one." And when we receiveour parchment (or whatever it isdiplomas' come
in,
these days)
we'll laughjjas
we think
of
ourgreat?;
times
in
college and whoknows,
>maybe
we
11
evenremember
the
day the war endedin Viet Nam
and|
wonder
if
weheard
it
before
or
after thatparty we went
to.#
ACTIVITY SCHEDULE
February, 1973
Lakers
vs.
Wheeling/
at
home!
5:00
p.
m.
at
Tech.
%
LINCOLN'SBIRTHDAY
VD
Dance"
Jail
Bait"
i.D.S
9-1Flic-
'' Bahama
Island-
700
Ad
ventures"
All
invited who areinterested
in
trip.
H
P-m.
Room to be
an
nounced.MikeMorycwith
a
•littlehelp fromJon
Ims.
DanceRunt"*Bring
ID's.
"River
9-1;
 
FEBRUARY
9,
1973MERCYHURST COLLEGE
BUTTERFLIES
ARE FREE
Andrea Kupetz In {Lead Role
?*»
PAGE
3
Andrea Kupetz
as
"Jill Tanner"
Andrea Kupetz was delightfullysurprised
when she
got the lead in
"Butterflies
are Free."
She
thought she could do it becauseshe
believes
in
herself,
but
she
never expected to get the part.
Andrea
is a
.freshman
dramamajor who moved from Fayet-teville, North| Carolina and nowmakes
her
home
in
Erie.Andrea said that to be a dramamajor
you
have
to
know
what
you
want,
believe in what you do, andbe very determined if you aregoing to make it. She has beensure of what she wanted, to be aprofessional actress, since junior
nigh
school
when
she
had leads inplays every
|year
1
She took
?
a
couple;*years of
drama lessonsand used to go to the theatre inher town, where she was exposedto a more professionaltouch*Inhigh school, the absence of playsUntil her senior year made herdesire even
stronger.
l
w
Mercyhurst was Andrea'schoice of a college because it wassmall.
fShe
wanted a differentenvironment from her cold highschool
days.
She wanted a warm
friendly
place where the teacherscared and she said they do here.
This
summer Andrea had planned
McAuley-Fund
Success
by Sharon Warner
The McAuley Fund, a productof
the
McAuley Dorm Council is anew; organization on campus,designed
to be
"a positive force
in
creating better living conditionsin
the
dor m i
tory.."
» ||
The fund, begun
at
the start ofthis school year, was firstpresented to McAuley Hallresidents in an attempt to securefor them those "luxury items"such as pool tables and a coloredtelevision, that they would not
otherw
ise
enjoy. iThe Council consists of threedorm ^representatives, the
resident
assistants
|
and "threeresident directors.
6
Money for the fund is obtainedvoluntarily from McAuleystudents, who have each donated
$10.
from the standard damagefee that each Mercyhurst student
must
pay.
fAny item to be purchased byappropriations
from!the
dormfund must meet the unanimousapproval
of
all nine of theselected representatives. |
. ;
While
.there
has not been
adequate
time to make anycandid judgements on success ofthe McAuley Fund,
}
it
seems
already to have offered aworkable solution on how toobtain communal items thatseem impossible to receive from
the
college
itself.
JMcAuley residents to date are
enjoying
the benefits of a 23-inchcolor television set, a
pool
table, aping-pong table and pinballmachines
and_the
unquestionedsuccess of a Christmas party that
is
still being talked about.Still more purchases and wantsare
in
planning stages, such as anoutdoor
movie
to
be shown
on
theMcAuleyPatio.£
WQLNotes
The
What.
When, and Who ofStereo
!H.:i
Mercyhurst forFebruary
10-16
Ih.Saturday, February
1010-12
p.miOFF THE
11EC011D
with
Gene
ShawSunday, February
11
j|
8 p.m. THE ROYAL INSTRUMENT with LindaMazotta > *
*
i&
9 p.m. TRADITIONAL
I
AMERICAN FOLK
SPECIAL
10 p.m. PROMENADE CONCERT^ with Barbara |Ann
Hewitt^
I m
W-
II
p.m. FIRST HEARING
i
Monday, February
12
. 8
11
a.m. STILLBREATH'S WARPwith Stillbreath; featuringDIALOGUE ON
&THE
ALLEGED DEATH OF GODand THE
UDOQi
WHO
WOULDN'T BEFp
t
4
p.m.
OFF THE RECORD withI
Pat Newbold
i.
f|
'l
:
M
10 p.m.
OFF THE RECORD with
*
Denny Woyteck
g ?11
p.m.
NOCTURNE
£•
Tu esda
-
F ebr u a
ry
13
11
a.m.
STILLBREATH'S
WARPwithi
Stillbreath
featuring
THE
NOVEL
Part
1
and THE
DOG WHO
WOULDN'T BE
4
p.m.
OFF
THE
RECORD10 p.m. OFF THE RECORD
f withPJ.Lovett11
p.m.
CONCERT HALL
Wednesday, February
1411
a.m. STILLBREATH'S WARPwith Stillbreath featuringTHE
NOVEL
Part
2
and THE
DOG WHO
WOULDN'T
BE
4
p.m. OFF THE RECORD withBarbara Ann Hewitt10 p.m. WOODVS CHILDRENwith Jim
Zelinski11
p.m.
NOCTURNEThursday, February
15
11
a.m. STILLBREATH'S WARPwith Stillbreath featuringTHE NOVEL
fPart
12
and
Y E S T
E R Y E A
R
-
T
H E
RADIO £ADVENTURES
OFBATMAN
m
AND
ff
THESHADOW
'M
4
p.m. OFF THE RECORD withPat
Newbold •" |
10 p.m.
OFF THE RECORD withGary
Dudenhoef
 er
11
p.m.
Tl
IE
VOCAL
SCENEFriday, February
1011
a.m. STILLBREATH'S WARPwith
i
Stillbreath featuring
SHAW
IN
CANADA.
\
4 p.m.
OFF THE RECORD with
G.T.Barron
¥
?10
p.m.
OFF THE RECORD with
G.T.
Barron11 p.m. KEYBOARD IMMORTALSHere's a taste of what these
shows are all a
bout
m
FIRST?
HEARING: Everyoneloves to match wits with a critic.First Hearing is a stimulating
series which allows
the listener todo precisely that—to become a
critic-for-an-hour,
to share thediscovery and evaluation of
a
newpiece or performance with apanel of professional reviewers.Heard every Sunday at
11
p.m.
PROMENADE
CONCERT:Since before the turn of thecentury, London's Royal AlbertHall has been the
home
%
of theHenry Wood Promenade Concerts.These hours
of
the mostfamiliar classics have become a
regular*;
feature of BBCprogramming in Britain. Now,WQLN Mercyhurst is pleased topresent this series to the
Erie
listener every Sunday at
10
p.m.on attending a drama workshop,but instead is going to visit herparents who are in Greece. TheAcropolis was one sight she was
not
going
to
miss.
W
After graduating
from}
Mercyhurst, if she feels ready,Andrea would like to go to NewYork and try acting. If shedecides she can't
do
that,
she will
go
into
amateur theatre.
One
wayor another, it will be drama of
some
kind,
f
.gg$;
>
Andrea was assistant stagemanager for "Dark of the Moon"and she thought this was a very
valuable
part of her training. Youusually see the finished productand
don't
realize how importantthe technical work is, and howmuch
time
and
effort
goes into
it.The most important thing toAndrea now is her
I
part in
"Butterflies
are Free." Like
life,
the rehearsals are both good andbad,
but
you learn from themboth. Her main objective now isgiving
100
per cent of
herself.
Shemust prove to herself that
she
can
Andrea Kupetz
believe in the character. She alsowants the audience to believe,because she wants her friendsand
it
family to see her not as
herself,
but as
the characterJill.
j
Black
History\Week 
|
The Black Students of Mercyhurst College wish to invite allmembers of the College to participate
in
the celebration of BlackHistory
Week,
here February
nth
to the
17th.
The
events
will
begin with a speaker,
Mrs.
Margaret Peters,
3
p.m. Sunday and a "Soul Dinner" at the regular dinner hour.Black art
will
be
displayed
in the Zurn gallery through the week
by
student artists
and
other African
worksi#
Edinboro, Gannon and
Behrends
colleges will sponsor otheractivities during the week. Transportation will be provided forthose
who
wish
to
attend,
i
if%
|
The week's activities will end here with a dance on Fridayevening. j. |
Imrafg
I
m,
f
|.
j
#
One of the main purposes for this celebration is for both black
and
white
students
to
become aware
of "blackness"
not
merely asa color, but
more
of a
tradition and culture with a future and past.
We.
designate this coming week as "Awareness Week." Pleasecome and learn and support Black History
Week.2
MHJBB
j 1
SENIORS:
Brochures
will
be available to better acquaint Seniors withNorthwestern University Graduate School program
for:
Business Administration 2Hospital and Health Services Administration< Public Management
J,
£
This information
can be
obtained in the Alumni Office.the
The
music
is
as light as Schubert,Strauss, and Tchaikovsky; it is,in short, the best loved music of
the
concert stage.
••
[
CONCERT HALL: A series oftaped concerts from London bythe BBC. You'll hear
j
classicsperformed
by
the best orchestrasof the world every Tuesday at 11p.m.
f
I-
5
fe
*
:
"
WOODYS
CHILDREN: HostBob Sherman brings you themusic and words of contemporary folk
^artists
everyWednesday
at 10
p.m.
?|
THE VOCAL
-
SCENE:| Aweekly stereo hour of music andcomment drawn from the lyrictheatre
and
opera
stage
by
authorand broadcaster George Jellinekpresented each Thursday fat
il
p.m.
by
WQLN
-FMercyhurst.;
%
KEYBOARD
IMMORTALS :Ever hear
a
Vorsetzer recording?Well, your chance has come atlast! Every Friday at
11
p.m. we
will
present
original
recordings
of
such great romantic pianists as
Rachmaninoff,
Debussy, Strauss,
and
Paderewski, made more than40 years* before
the'advent
ofmagnetic recording, and recently
transcribed'with
loving care intostereo. The process, as will beexplained, is every
J
bit asphenomenal as the performancesthemselves.
I
B
And from Stillbreath's hour of
experimental
educational radio,
these special
programs...Dialogue
On The
Alleged Deathof
God:
Canadian
^philosopher
and 1972 Massey Lecturer Dr.George Grant's suggestion
that
God is
dead^is
discussed andchallenged
$
by Lebanesetheologian
Dr.
Charles Malik.
Dog
Who Wouldn't
Be:
Series
of
three
f half-hour«
programs
If
oryoung audiences or for anyoneever owned by a dog. Thesestories are based on the tales ofCanadian author Farley Mowatabout his boyhood pet, Mutt, whowas not content to be just a dogbut a remarkable and fascinatingpersonality more human thancanine.
_L li
1The Novel:
\
Series
jof
threeprograms in which high schoolstudents question three well-published Canadian authorsabout their works and the pur-
pose
of fiction.Yesteryear-Batman landShadow: The legendary radioadventures of these two famouscrime
fighters live
again!
:
V
Shaw In Canada: Adocumentary^ on the annualfestival at Niagara-on-the-Lake,Ontario, devoted primarily to theworks of George Bernard Shaw.
The
founder of the festival, BrianDoherty, acts
as
host and guide inthe program which examines thehistory and aims, present statusand future expansion plans of theShaw
Festivali
And
last
but
not least this week,
our WQLN
Wanted List...
]
WANTED-feminine jocks-the
announcing variety.
WANTED-copy
writers-all
sexes-we need your
fluent
pens.
WANTED-comments, critic*
isms,|
programming ideas, andpositive reinforcement.
1
For any and all of the above,call
WQLN-FMercy
hurst at 864-
0681
ext. 218, or come visit us on
the*
3rd floor
of
Old Main.Remember, we're your radio
station....;
H.
/
.••
%••
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\tf
\\
a
4*
131
•*T.
1
utter
uno
i/

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