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The Merciad, Nov. 9, 1973

The Merciad, Nov. 9, 1973

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The Merciad, Nov. 9, 1973
The Merciad, Nov. 9, 1973

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¥*
I
I
VOL XLVI NO.8
MERCYHURST COLLEGENOVEMBER
9,
1973
Nov.
12,13,14
TURNER KIR WAN APPEAR
What Santana did to Spanishmusic, Turner and Kirwan of
Wexford
are
trying
to do
for Irish
music
in
a sound somewhat likeSeals and Crofts. They
$iave
appeared at the John Lennon
M
0ne-to-One" concert in CentralPark, at the Abbey Theater in
Greenwich pillage
and MadisonSquare Garden in New York.Watch these two
songwritingIrish singers
leave
theirfname on
the contemporary scene.THE
| PLAYEfcS—Fierce
Turner, Wexford-born,nicknamed Pierce
"Ihavent-
gotamiddlename" Turner by
his
friend, is a lanky, wiry, and
honest bloke
of
22 who recalled to
me the
easily incredible accountof his
introduction
to
music whilstan ugly
youngster...
1
I
was introduced
to
music whilst an ugly
youngster...whilst
in a bird cagewhere
me mum
kept me
for
wantof living space ana also, whereunfortunately, four singing
canaries
pecked apart me innerear for
wontfof food...althoughactually
I
picked
up
the music bylistenin to me mum's bandrehearse
when
age
3...I still can'tfigure out how those bleedin'canaries achieved
M-way
harmony."
^pr -
Really and sincerely, Piercepicked up a clarinet whilst anugly teenager
and*
proceeded to
join
his first band - The
JR
fcnowband
at^age
14 (an Irish
showband
is
our equivalent to
an
excellent club band, professionalbut totally unoriginal) and he
managed
to pick up great ex
perience
as a tenor sax man.
«erce
remained with this troupe
[or 18
months, thereafter joining
we
Travelers' Showband
and&gged with
them for
3
years and
then proceeded
to tour Germany
with
the group - Boston. Pierce
[*came
a
rnember
of
The
Arrows
Miowband
and stayed with them
or
3
years.His main reason forfcayuig this outfit was due to the
Jr*
the
showband image did
notallow
for artistic originality.fierce Turner decided to
join
23"
^ ^
Kirwan and to
™ner
the cause of their unique
^writing
abilities which had
^dding whilst
sharing a
JUwrence
Thomas JKirwan,
5Jn June
1948 in
Wexford;
£*y
tells that he was in-mn?Ki
c
?
d
,
t0
m
«sic
by his
mother
s
lullabies whilst being
cnnM^
81
^
and h
«
thought he
cowd
do better. Actually, he fails
?fr?
e
S*
er
»
or
&&<*
he
karnttot^r*
1
*
1
^
to
^
Shadows'
t&*f.
tireless, in
 forth
 cases,
•ghad little effect on
him.TerrIJ
y
! .
an
°therjf Wexford
e^»
joined his first musical
5ggg
at age 14
-
The
58SS
,
1
wM
«
weren't,
an
fi8°.t
t*£
e
*'^
grou
»>
""«"
at the
time they^were
LARRY KIRWANPIERCE TURNER
actually performing two ofLarry's songs. The Originalswere once paid the huge sum ofone pound
sterling...and
they didnot know
what,
to do with it all.Larry was attracted to the musicof Donovan at age 17 and to hisbeauty and
"simplicity
(neithercould play more than
six
chords).He then delved into traditionalIrish Folk music
and
beganlaboriously to turn out his veryown compositions.The call of "big
bread'iluredhimv
to the
5
Johnny ReckShowband and he played many aballroom (interesting conceptthose Irish have - a ballroom!)Pierce joined this particulargroup later on sax. After twoyears, Larry quit during adisagreement of musical policy—which encompasses everything
imaginable.
» gig ^jjfe
Be sure to catch Turner and
Kirwanlin
the Union November
12 ,|13
and 14 at either 9 or 10:00show.
Attention Seniors!!
^Mentor Public
Schools,
Mentor,
Ohio, willThnr«*i
Campu8 from
9
a.m. to 4 p.m. on
pS5Sr
y
»
N^wnbeS 15, 1973 for the
teacklr.
6
°^ interviewing
*
prospective
a
re
^{^wHdates.
M
interested Seniors
labS?
to
make
their appointments for
PlapomT^ .v
as
soon as
possible in the
dement
Office,
Room 2OTMaia
Who
9
Who Named
The following seniors have been chosen for Who's Who for the1973-74 year:Renee Clark, Christine Dodd, Marianne Jacobs, Anne Mashimc,Robert Pettinelli, Julie
Samick,
JaneScura,Georgette
UreoAlexis
Walker,
David
Wieczorek.
ARTSTUDENTS
M
MEET
W
in
I
A
meeting of
25
per cent of theArt students
i
was held on Thursday, October 25. Among thetopics discussed was the coverdesign contest sponsored byMitchell Advertising of Erie. Anaward
off
$100
will
be,
presentedto ANY student who can bestdepict "The Strength of a City IsIts-People'
f
two dimensionally.For further information contactMr. Mauthe in
thejArt
Depart-
ment.lBE^jg^BBpJJip 3flg
The Art students of Mercyhurstwould like
to I
extend a
jj
heartywelcome to
Mrs.I
Susan B.Kemefly.
tSusan
is
i
the
newest
member
of
the|Mercyhur§t
ArtFaculty and has been featured inthe "CRAFT
S
HORIZON"-magazine
*'and;
iS
well-knownnationally! for
|her?sculptural
ceramic forms and graphic
art
prints. Mrs. Kemefly
wil
beteaching printmaking and will beteam-teaching Visual j Communications with Mr. Mauthe in
the
springy WELCOME
SUSAN!!
%
Elections for class representatives will be held at the
nextSorganizational
meeting. This
date9
will be
I
posted
|on
the
} HUB
IBulletin
Board
%
next
fto | the |5
Information Office
in
Zurn.
S££H£!
Wodarczyk
:^'^\}^f^
An exciting Fine Arts Festivalis
in
the planning
for
the month
of
May. Music, Drama, and Artstudents will be encouraged todemonstrate and display theirtalents throughout the month. Ifyou are interested, please attend
the
next
meeting.
* |8
j^'
Mercyhurst ;
;
College
f
hasreceived exclusive rights for theMain Floor Office of the FirstNational Bank
to
exhibit art workwithin the banking facilities. Thiswill be open officially
in
January,
1974
with
a
Faculty Art Exhibit.
*I
If any student is interested in
joining
this art (organization,
.please
attend the next meeting
and
or contact Mr.*Mauthe. The
purpose |
of this group is theenhancement of the Arts here atMercyhurst and to introduce to
thei
community Mercyhursttalent. Students are
welcome
from
*the||entire
college,irregardless
f
of major orbackground. Services outside theArts can
be
used to help us in theearly organizational stages of thiscouncil, to initially! structurewhat will be best for a gatheringof this type.
Any
suggestions (andobjections) can be forwarded tothe Art Organization
in
r
»care
of
Mr.
Mauthe.
!lfi$-£S8SKr
-*'M
This
\
will
be
the] last
Me re
iad until after
i
! I
Thanksgiving Vacation. §||Enjoy the holiday and see you
soon.a
I
Humor;and more.
What happened to the benches in the park? It doesn't look likethe
"seat"
of
the
campus
anymore.For
sale...1978
750 Trident
Triumph...must sell...excellentcondition...call after
3:30...456-1702
or 899-7918.Listen to this: there were these two guys, see (ha ha ha) andthey went to take a walk
in the
woods, see (ha ha ha) and
one guy
said to
the
other (ha ha
ha).
..I
never could remember that joke.
Rides
needed:...to Rochester, N.Y., Thanksgiving time. Contact Sharon
inBaldwin
Rm.
114.
|
1
I i g
...to Philadelphia or area. Share expenses. Baldwin, Rm,
125
Contact Patty
L.
I
*
i f
...to Syracuse, N.Y. for Thanksgiving. Share expenses, Ann.Baldwin
136.
i
%
I%
.Remember
the
gruesome Preston Fish Fights?
 
PAGE
2
MERCYHURST
COLLEGENOVEMBER
Letters
MINUTES
WE'VE
ONWIBEGUN
RUSReports
••$$'-'
f ML!
1 The
Representative Union of
ISamick
moved-
that
f$200.(
OR
*
••.
HER
EWE
GO AGAIN
Dear Editor,
i m
I'm
sure;that -many
members ofthe "silent majority" were pleased
to ^
hear that the local state policealong with other local and state lawenforcement
l
agencies had
spent$10,000 i
to arrest
565
"big
time"
pushers and confiscate
$3,000
worth
M?
tl
i\\mV\,
<Jrugs
and related
^aripheMlia.'Let Tt
be known thatmost
of r
the $3,000 worth of contraband confiscated consisted of aharmless substance known as
"evil
weed" along with a small amount
of
cocaine. Now,
the
i
state policeclaimed
that £
they were after the
"big
time"
pushers
in
their Monday,October
22
early morning raid. Welllet's
 find
 out if
this
claim is accurateby
looking
at a bit of simple arithmetic.An ounce of
"grass
usuallygoes for about
$20
on the street. Solet us divide
20
into
3,000
so we cansee approximately
how
mam/ouncesof
"pot"
was confiscated. About 150ounces, right? Now let us divide 56into
150
and see what the per capitaamount
confiscated
was;
A
little
less
than;
3
ounces per person, right?Now, the per capita amount mightbe a little higher
(no
pun intended)
if
we consider that 3 persons werearrested for sale only and not forpossession and also
that
\
a
smallamount of cocaine was confiscated.But the per capita amount may alsogo
down
if
we
consider
the
cost of allthe pariphenalia confiscated, pipes,clips etc. and subtract this amountfrom our original $3,000 figure. So
our
per capita figure rests at a littleless
than
3
ounces
per person.
Does
3
ounces constitute! a "big time"pusher?
5
And to
£
accentuate
?
thisuncertainty it is logical to assume
.
that
I
some people^
had!
more thanothers. So does an ounce or two or
even less
than
an-ounce
constitute a
|"big
time" pusher? I feel reallysorry for the poor dude who had tolook really hard to find a couple ofounces for himself and sells one ofthose ounces to a deceitful "narc"who the dud thought was his
friend,
and then a couple of weeks later the
guv
is arrested
for
possession of ahalf ounce of weed.
H
If
you are
wondering
where the other halfounce went, welcome to the
silent
majority). Is this dude a "big time"pusher? I doubt it. iA few other things
bother
meconcerning this type of incident.First of all the motives of Capt.
"Whats-His-Name"|of
Troop E ofthe Pa. State Police are clear to thediscerning individual. I'm sure his
^primary
motive was not to rid the
^'community
of
the
sale of illicit drugsbut to initiate an effective public
^relations
campaign to further his
Iname
and the
name|of
the StatePolice in the Erie community. It was|first and foremost a political| maneuver to enhance the image of|the state police and the
governors
ipa. Crime Commission.
4n
the wakeof
all the
negative publicity receivednation-wide by narcs breaking andentering into people's
houses
who infact have no connections with narcotic rings. Capt.
M
Whats-His-Name"' probably felt it necessary
to
restore some
of s
the public's confidence in
its'local
police depart
ments.!
M
| I
Secondly,
whyj such
a harmlesssubstance as marijuana? Confiscating heroin,
^toluole
or bar-bituates which are either habit
forming
or
physically
l^rmful
mightbe justified. But initiating an expensive and time consuming campaign
against
t
a substance whichmany groups and commissions,including the President's Commission
on
Alcohol and Drug Abuse,have recommended
be
legalizeddoesn't seem to
make
any senseunless
^viewed
politically as mentioned above. Of course there couldbe other reasons, such as the localnarc squads inability' to penetratelocal harmful, in the addicting andphysical sense of the word, drug
rings.
Could this type of raid be acover up for this inability? Appease
the
public
may be the
word.
It seems
like
spokesmen for law enforcementagencies are always saying they willget the "large scale" distributornext. But it always seems to be theso called "big time" pusher they areattacking time-after-time.
|
Thirdly,
and
as usual, state, localand federal
| |,
governmentpolicymakers are given priority toattacking the symptoms of socialdisease, instead of attacking the rootcauses of the disorder. I thinkgovernment agencies
would;find
itmore profitable to concentrate theirmoney and their efforts* on thecauses of drug addiction such asalienation, irrational competitionand cultural depravity. The $10,000spent
by
Qapt.
"Whats-His-Name"to
nailla
few ^small-time*
pushers
and users could well have achievedmore lasting long-term benefits if itwould have
peen
used to fostercultural! activities in the HollandDrug*
Action
Center or if it wouldhave been used to finance theVolunteer On-Probation Program or
for Prison
Reform.
t
And finally, the fact that Capt."Whats-His-Name" is going to turnthe arrestees over to the
I.R.S.
forprosecution of income tax evasion iscompletely and constitutionallyabsurd. Who in their right andreasonable mind would
tell
the
I.R.S.of illegal money income. It rings of
self-incrimination.!This
action also
shows
the inconsistencies inherent inour legal system. You can't makemoney illegally yet
you can be
taxedfor illegal income. Doesn't seem tomake much sense does it? Myfeelings exactly. What kind of a legalsystem
do we
live under that has toresort to such illogical* methods ofcriminal prosecution?
|fe
This whole letter? could probablybe summed
upi
in |
one
shortdeclaratory sentence. Mr. Capt."Whats-His-Name"-—
'Get
off ourbacks,now!' •.
j_
JS
Sincerely,Paul
Hanes
i
-
THE MER
CI
AD \
Years of
Service
Published weekly during the college
year,
except Thanksgiving/
in-
tersessiorv Christmas and
Easter
vacations,
and
examination
periods
by the students of Mercyhurst College, Erie, Pa.,
16501.
Mailing
ad
dress: MercyhurstMailroomc-PfestonMall; Box3o.Editor:Assistant Editor:Editorial BoardFeature:
News:
;
.f *£'
Sports:
i
Assistant SportsDrama:
-| |
Business Manager:Faculty Advisor:Cathy Stevenson
Kim Wontenay
o.
Sue
Weiner
Sharon WarnerOario Cipriani
Jack RileyMark Zine
AnneMashinic
Barry McAndrew
Staff;*
Paul Hanes, Peggy Benedict, Toni Loupe,
P*ul
Coram DianePickens, Cathy McCarthy, Dennis
Coam
John
Sullivan
Ann Condon,John Sivok, BIlenfFreitag, Susan
Barrier
Carol Ouariuccio,
||l
Proper, Candy
Yanker,
Marty Keeney, Eleanore Grelewicz.
The Representative Union
1
!
of
Students
met |? Thurs da
y,November
1,
1073
at 7:33 p.m. in
Room |114
Zurn. There were 30members and 2 alternatespresent.
*f
w
Xjil
Wj
Julie
Samick
gave a Treasury
Report.
Jm*to$ J 1 fW
S.A.C.f
f
$3,919.17
Clubs and
R.U.S.
account-
522.72Films
t.
f
|
f 505.48Total
\ %
f
$4,947.37' To date, $4,947.37 has beenspent from a budget of
$29,000.00 |I
Reports from the Senatecommittees
jj
were given. PattyFlanagen and Todd Allen
reported!on
Academic Policies.
An
English
proposal was brought
up.
This aimed at the
duality
ofthe writing ability of students. 1Rich Orient reported on StudentPolicies. How to handle studentcases was discussed. They willwork on forming a new code ofconduct,
especially*??
aimed
atdorm regulations.
1
?![
I
Reports
from?
the flR.U.S.committees were
given J
AnneMaschinic reported
*
onAcademics Affairs. Letters willbe sent to the heads of departments
informing
them
of
thecommittee's
£oaIs
for the year,Mary Needham has
Jbeen
appointed
to
this committee.
|
The Community-Centeredcommittee
will
be working thruPaul Haines,
I
in charge
f o£
M.O.V.E. on campus,
*M
£
||Dario Cipriani gave a report onCultural Affairs.
A
proposal for aCreative Arts Month at Mercyhurst was entertained. It wouldconsist of film presentations,
photography
exhibitions,
J
architecture lectures,
I
etc.
Dr.
Pizzat,
chairman of the
Fine
ArtsDivision, requested an allocationof
$200.00
for this function in Mayof 1974. After discussion, JulieSamick; moved that
* $200.00 ?be
allocated for this purpose. DarioCipriani
? seconded
it.
It waspassed by a unanimous
vote.
" The'Social Affairs
\
committee
has] appointed three new mem
bers.
They are Diane Pickens,Jack Riley and Kevin White.Tuition proposals werediscussed. They are as follows:
v
l.
Beginning immediately allpresent student tuition be frozen
from
now until the
I
time of thestudent'sgraduation.
$$$M
I?I
2. Any
future?
tuition raises
would!
be assessed to the incoming freshman classes and thistuition rate would be uniform fortheir four
years.
I I
>;I 3.
A
limit of the amount tuitionmay be raised during a student's
four
years at
Mercyhurst.
r&p
4.
A limit
on
the number oftimes tuition may be raised overa student's four years at Mer
cyhurst.
|B |
j?
5.
A time limit on the date bywhich students
j
are informed ofany tuition
raises,
proposal.
\
|
The
i final tuition passed by
R.U.S.
was:fe | I |
Tuition may not be raised morethan
10
per cent during a student's
four
years at Mercyhurst. Tuitionmay be raised only twice during astudent's
$
four years.
I
The
projected |increase
in tuition
should!
be
|
available to
Ithe
students. Students be informed ofan actual tuition raise within oneweek' from
the
J
decision Afterdiscussion of House Bill
No. 233
tolower the
drinking *age*in
Pennsylvania, lit was decided that
R.U.S.
would send a telegramsupporting
this;
bill to ourRepresentative
\
in the House.Letter
will
be available for theindividual to sign himself andsend into the House in support ofthis bill. Volunteers for this were
f
fMENUS?FOR
f
THIS
WEEK
Nov. 8, Thursday. Lunch - 1. Hamburger 2. Ham-Biscuit
^
Casserole 3. Tuna Salad Plate.
^Dinner
- 1.
Fried!
Chicken
2.
Swedish Meatballs
3.
Pancakes.
* II
Nov. 9, Friday. Lunch -
l.
Grilled Cheese 2. Turkey CroquettesI 3. Fruit
Plate|
Dinner
-1.
Chopped
Steak-
2.
Breaded Fish
3.
Omlet.
I S
I *
Nov.
10,
Saturday. Lunch
-1.
Fish Sticks 2. Hungry Jack Biscuit
3.
Scrambled
Eggs. Dinner-1.
Roast Beef
2.
Chicken Halves.
S
Nov.
11,
Sunday. Lunch -h. Scrambled Eggs 2. Luncheon Meatsand Cheese 3. Bacon 4. Waffles. Dinner - 1. Turkey 2.
Boef
Stroganoff.
§ |
\ \ \
']
It
Nov.
12,
Monday. Lunch
-1.
Sloppy Joe
2.
Tuna a la King
3.
FruitPlate. Dinner
-1.
Ham
2.
Lasagna
3.
Waffles.
|
Nov. 13, Tuesday. Lunch
-iUHoagies
2. Chili and Fritos 3. Egg
f
Salad Sandwich.
I
Dinner
-
1. Roast Beef 2. Fish and Chips
3.
Pane
kes.
s
|L
|
Nov. 14, Wednesday. Lunch - 1. Turkey Salad
Sandwich
2.
Macaroni and Cheese 3. Mexican Flounder. Dinner -
1.
Roast Pork
2.
Beef
Chop
Suey
3.
Meat Salad
Plate.
^^
Nov.
15,
Thursday. Lunch
-1.
Pizza
2.
Tuna and Noodle Casserole. 3. Ham Salad
Sandwich.^Dinner
- 1. Salisbury Steak 2. Beef
Pot Pie
3.
Cheese Enchiladas.
f
Nov. 16, Friday. Lunch
-
1. BBQ Ham 2. Tuna
Salad*Sandwich
3.
Fruit Plate. Dinner - 1. Veal Scaloppini$2. Fish
3.
StuffedCabbage.
i
& c | |
Nov. 17, Saturday.
Lunch *
- 1. Hamburger 2. Ham Omlet
3.
Tomato Rice Casserole. Dinner
-1.
Steak
2.
Shrimp.*Nov. 18, Sunday.Lunch;
-jj
1. Scrambled Eggs 2. Pancakes
3.
Sausage Patties 4. Luncheon Meats. Dinner
-|l.
Riga
toni
2.
Ragout with
Beef.
If v :, | j 4
Nov. 19, Monday. Lunch - 1. Hot Dog 2.
Eggplant-
Parmesan
3.
Julienne Salad Bowl. Dinner - 1. THANKSGIVING DINNER BUFFET. |
> i
Nov. 20, Tuesday. Lunch - 1. Grilled Cheese 2. Chili and
Fritos
3.
Fruit
Plate.
M
It-
*On Sunday and Monday, November 19 and 20, there will becookies and coffee
in
the
dorms
around9:00
p.m.
£
Menu subject to change. £y.
* |
Rctiviti
November
NOV.9NOV.tO
Union
OPEN HOUSE
NOV.12
IStereo
& 4
Channel Demonstration!by MACE Union
11
a.m.
- 4
p.m.!
Turner
&
Kirwan Union
9 &
10
iSign
up for
Ping-Pong
NOV.13
SSh
Koiupsw, Alexis
WaitedRich
Orient,
Daun Miller,
Rosie
Scott, Todd Allen
and
UiFficfa
6
The
Executive *Council
yM
njeet
Tuesday, November
6
197^
at
6:30
The Senate will
£t
Wednesday, November
14 197*
*J
1:00
in the
Redta^Hall,
RUS
members
will
meet
before haS
at 12530 in front of the
ReciS
Hall. Proposals from committeeshave
toResubmitted
by
Monday
Novembers,
1973.
*
r
A
re-election
will be
hefa
for aHistory representative.Constitutional amendments
wep*
voted
OIL
They^were
passedby an
unanimous
vote.
AmenoVments
passed
were:
alternates
be
elected for each department the
officirs
of R.U.S. to be
votina
members
of1
the
Senate and toeliminate Article XIII, Section BFreshmen nominations
were
discussed. The decision of onlyfreshmen being eligible to
vote
was passed by a vote of
31
to
l
Nominations
£will
be held,Novembers,
1973
^withto.
each
department.
One
?
nominee
from
each department will be eligibleto run,
while
?
only
one
representative from each wardwill be elected. Elections!themselves will take place inZurn lobby on November
15,1973
j
8:00a.m.
to5:00p.m. 'The Executives Boards fromGannon, Villa Maria and
Mer-
cyhurst are invited to a dinnerand: meeting at Behrend
on I
November 8,
1973|at
6:00
p.m.
J
The
possibility
of
concerts will
be
discussed.
$
|
%
The next
R.U.S.
3
meeting isscheduled for November
15,1973at
7:30
p.m. in
Room
114
Zurn.
All
jare welcome to attend.The meeting was adjourned at
8:43p.m.
I g ^
t
|||gj
Respectfully submitted,
^^g
Maria
nne
Jac
obs
^
SgK
Secretary 8
jgf;
Request from
the
Unionf,
PLEASE PLAY YOUR
POOLfMATCHESI
THIS WEEK
I
RESEARCHASSISTANCE
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^Topics
FREE
Learning Resource Centercyhurst Campus
Thousands
of
Topics$2.75 per pageSend for your up-to-date, 160-jage,mail order catalog. Enclose$i.wto cover postage (delivery time is1 to
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days).
| ^
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INC.
11941 WILSHIRE BLVD.,SUITI!#2LOS ANGELES. CALIF. 90025(213) 477-8474 or 477-5493
Our research material Is sold forresearch assistance oniy.
NOV.1!
Lou Gehrig"
OPEN?
HOUSE
NOV.14NOV.15
Union/Turner Union/Turner& KirwanKirwan
 
^MEMBER
9,
1973
MERCYHUKSTrr,,,
Fnr
w^
NIG
wnfwo.
x*
*>u
rr
u/ir^
*
i
(
C
ODING
TO
THE
....
AIO
OF
THE
***** 8iHSI°
AN
D
ANY
OTMCR1HSAD5
WHO
ARff•UCRS/flLip
°UT THE FOLLOW-BLEND
f
/M>fiw
PAGE
3
Who
KnOckin^8J
lurst
Hi
ghway
~
PartjII
M
My
Have
you
ever contemplatedthe reason for those
big
iron gatesat
the
entrance
of M. U.? We,
as
your Spiritual ^Guardians,through extensive research, have^discovered that these gates wen >I used during
the
cold
war for
protection against snow warfare,
and
not
for the
protection
of
the
student
as you
might, havethought. After
the
crisis,
the
gates were kept
up
in
order
to
give
the
student
the
illusion
of
security. The students saw* rightthrough this and foiled
the
plans(the typical
M.
U.
student is
so
astute). So
the M. U.
gatekeeper
had to
come
up
with
a
new
ruse.The result marks the origin
of the
M.U. security patrol, which
we
might add is not much better.
We
would like
\
to
present variousexamples
to
back
up our
argument,
J
f f
^
f;
1Sally Student,
for
instance,recounted
to us
the
events thattook place on the night
of
January19,1972. It was
a
cold and drearyFriday night
and
Sally
had
justreturned from
a hot
date.
As she
trudged through
the
snow (whichincidentally should
*
have beenshoveled) in search
of one
of
themanysecurity guards who watchover
our
campus,
she did not
realize that
one of the
manyweirdos
who
lurk
in the
grotto
,
bushes was watching over her.
As
.
Sally approached the bushes,
the
masked stranger
got
ready
for
his fourth mugging that night.Sally was found
in the
snow
by
a
fellow studentand twasttaken
to
our excellent! health servicecenter. (HerJ problem
was
diagnosed
as a
severe case
of
heat rash*and
a
lime
in a
cocoanutwas prescribed).
It was
toter
to be
found that,
at
the sameume Sally was
i
rescued,
the
security guards Swere alsodiscovered playing pokerMn
the
warmth
of
Preston Ibasement.
!#*>*
Poor Salty! This never wouldhave happened
if a
securityguard had pulled
out of the
gameearly enough
to
let her
into
the
dorm,.4&
*
&i».
E*
Another story was related
to us
by Debbie Dorm. Read along
as
she tells
us of a
harrowing
ex
perience
she had
just last week."I was just lying
in my
dormroom
all
safe(?)
and
sound, whenthrough -the back doors
of
Baldwin
an
unidentified male
of
approximately
age
30—and
ob
viously inebriated—entered.
I
heard
him
as
he
sang "Roll
Out
the Barrel
0
at
the top
of
his lungs.I knew Something had
to be
done,so
I
called Baldwin Desk
and
toldMiss Vicky that
I
needed
a
security guard right away. Miss*Vicky quickly dialed
the
securityoffice I and
a
1;sleepy
voice
an
swered. Vicky explained
the
situation.
The
guard said
he
would be happy
to
oblige,«but
the
only available security guard wasguarding
the
Library
at
die timeso
no
books would
be
stolea
He
said
we
should call backtomorrow when
it
would
be
moreconvenient."
*
These
are
only
a few of the
tragedies that occur
at M. U.;
there
are
many, many more.
So,
as your Spiritual Guardians,
we
ask you, the student body, to bandtogether
to
protect
one
another.Remember, if
ypu
dorrt
do ft,
nobody
eke
will. I $
k
\
Protecting you behindtypewriter ribbons, ?Your Spiritual Guardiansand Secretary!
P.S.
Loneliness
is not
having
a
drinking buddy!At^thistime
I
would like
to
send
our
sincere
get
well wishes
to
KathleenMcCarthy
on her
illness.
If
you
know *Kathy |brighten
her day.
Send cards
or
letter
to
Apt.
112
M.U.i
S.0.C4PUTS\F00T
DOWN
growing
p....
*
OPEN HOUSE
I
Child Development Laboratory, located
in
Baldwin basementuoUow the walk toward
the
Sesler Apartments
and
look for
the
sign above
the
door
in
Baldwin basement)
for all
students,faculty, administrators and friends. Tuesday, November 13, fromito4p.ni.
I
%
I
Dial 814/838-3544Eries Leading
I
|
Industrial Supplier
Of.
Electronics
,
*2631 West Eighth
St.
After
my
encounter with
the
a(
*^
s
^H
on
rJ»Pd faculty on
the
subject
of
the proposed highway,I thought
it
would
be a
good ideato take
a
look at the grotto and tryto envision at |what point
the
traffic would
go
underground.
As
I reached
the
^jarea, severalbobbing placards
met
my eye.
"SOC/
T
they said.
I
asked one
of
the demonstratorsi what
was
going
on.
4
'We're
protesting
the
rape
of Mother Nature. Too muchnatural beauty
has
beendestroyed
\
on
this 5
campus.Parking lots, asphalt parks, it's
a
disgrace!"^
A
d|
)\
In the
background, near
the
shrine,Sr.;
Kris
ten was intoningGerard Manley
!
Hopkins
to a
congregation of
freshmen
Englishmajors:
pJp
0 if we but knew
what we
do
I
P?
When
we
I
delve
or
hew-Hack
and
J rack
the
'green!
|
^§,
&
,& M
"Are
you from
the
paper?"
a
commanding voice demanded.
It
was
Sr.
Maureen.
She
told
me
that
the environmentalist group isgoing to fight the highway "evenif
it
means setting
up a
24-hourguard and digging foxholes. Here,have
a
SOC button."
I
asked herwhat "SOC" meant
"'Save
OurCampus.' I thought of it
myself.
I
think it has a certain punch
to
it."Growing serious, she said,
"and
ifwe all don't act now, there won'tbe
a
campus to save."
>'
I noticed
a
suspicious characterwalking
in the
circle among
the
demonstrators.
He was
conspicuously I well groomed
*and
wore a camera around his
neck.
I
decided
to be
very direct.
"Are
you
a
spy?" He laughed (rathernervously,
I
thought)
and
identified
himself. "I'm
Shutter Bug,a representative
of
Varden's.
I
was sent
to
keep close tabs
on
developments. We're going to sueMercyhurst
if
they take out thisgrotto.
It's the
most lucrativespot
for
picture
portraits
on
campus."At that point in time,
a
studentwearing flowing locks and flannelshirt approached us and asked us
VISIONS
FROMSi/iiiwos
I
R.P.HJ
A Fine Quality Pioneer
Sound
At
A Low-Mace
Price
,p
'on»*r
SX 424 Receiver•2 Lafayette 333 Speakers
«BSR
260 Record Changer
* "We
Magnetic Cartridge
&
J%5|Save $60.00
MACE f RICE
$279.95
This
is the
first
of
articlesregarding what's happening
in
and
out
of
*
Erie. ^It will includeeverything
and
|l meaneverything.
It
will
be
recommendations, bitches, and generalcomments.
It
will
not
include
the
flowery crap that our local criticsuse in their rhetoric.Tiltell it likeit
is
(what
a
trite expression).You
can
agree
or
disagree—Idon't care.
If
you disagree, backit
up
with facts.
I'm
open
for
suggestions. This
is
strictly
my
opinion and does not represent thefaculty, administration
or the
Merciad. So prepare yourself
for
some above ground goodies nextedition.
BOOKSTORE
Calh 452J3354I by I.M. Cat, Special Reporter
|
to;sign
a
petition
to
keep
the
grotto.
He
mumbled somethingabout
ft'
being
his
experientialresearch project, it was then thatI caught sight
of
the
well-knownlawyer
who
is
currently makinghis homes
at
Mercyhurst, GaryBrossman,J.D. (whichstands
for
"Juvenile Delinquent
1
' accordingto Barracuda "Bany" Trout).He was about
to
leave
the
grottowhen
I
called to him."Have
you
become involved
in
the project,
Gary?"
was my
firstquestion. "Not
yet. I'm
justlearning what stands
are
beingtaken. Sot
far,
only
the ad
ministration,
|
which
is pro-
highway,-
and the en
vironmentalists,
who are
anti-highway, have spoken out."
I
asked
Of
he
would
be
willing
to
defend
the
administration
if
the
SOC group took
it to
court.
"Yes.
I believe that everyone
has
the
right to legal counsel in a court
of
law.11would have defendedRichard Foht.
I
would [ havedefended Spiro Agnew. I jj wouldhave even defended EgarFreepickle." Edgar Freepickle?What did he
do?
I
asked. J"You can jj read it*
all
in the
district court ^decision,Freepickle
v.
Joker
^
Flats,Montana,
1890.
Edgar ran a picklefactory
and
would dump
the
wastes from
the
factory into
the
i
P<
SK?>'°?
*****
for
Joker Flats.The juice
was so
strong
r
tha tpeople grimaced every time theytook
a
drink
of
water. Even
the
animals grimaced. This went
on
for years until "the townsfolkfigured
out
the
source
of
theirproblem land
ran
Edgar
out
of
town."
| *
ji"Incredible," I gasped."But true. Incidentally, that'show
we got
the
*
expression'sourpuss. r
$
I
was
still pondering overGary's story when
I
bumped intothe superintendent
of
the grounds,Mr. 5 Gum tree, who] was rakingleaves
in
the
grotto. "Well,
Mr.
Gumtree,what
do you
thinkabout this highway project?"
He
seemed rather perturbed.
"I
justhope the state won't expect
me to
plow
the
snow
on
that highwayduring the winter.
^
%
f
So there you *have
the
newsfrom president
to
janitor.
All
reactions aren't in
yet
since newstravels slowly around here.
For
example, just before
I
filed thisreport,
I
asked a pair
of
freshmenhow they felt about having
a
highway on campus. They just staredat me, then at each other. Finally,one said
to the
other,' "Let's
get
out
of
here. ?Ma ma warned
me
about people like that."
Ah yes,
the trials of a reporter.
i
EDUCATION PARTY
November 14, Wednesday
at 8
p.m. in the Education Lobbyon 3rd Floor Old
Main.
Talk session
or
 all education majors.
TV
A chance to ask questions and find out what the educationdepartments all about! from other students. All Welcome!!
ErieBike Shop
1161 Buffalo
Rd.Erie,Pa.
Sales
&
Service
Ph.
454-2930
\v
V
Northwestern Pennsylvania'sNewest Young Adult
Nighttfob
HAPPY HOUR DAIVi7 to 8:30 p.m.
.
WEDNESDAY-"DRINK
&
DROWN" NITE
|
.THURSDAY-LADIES NKJHT
Dancing on
tilt
only
"lit
-up"
dance
floor
In North
western,Fa.
Amutementt
Munchies •
All legal Beverage*
PRESENTABLE ATTIRE REQUIRED
1

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