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The Merciad, Feb. 22, 1974

The Merciad, Feb. 22, 1974

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The Merciad, Feb. 22, 1974
The Merciad, Feb. 22, 1974

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03/26/2014

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THE
VOL.XLVI NO.161
MERCYHURST COLLEGE
Feb.
25,
26, 27
jg
MICHAEL LEWIS APPEARS
FEBRUARY.22;t974
ISml
The music world can often becompared to a garden. Naturesows the seeds; a vast array ofdiffering potentials. But the seedsmust be nurtured if they are tosurvive and flourish. Unfortunately, this does not -always
CABLE T.V.
|On
Thursday, February 28 apublic hearing
Ion
the Pennsylvania
I
House bill for CableTelevision will
be*
held in ZurnRecital from
10-12
and
2-5.
The?
Cable Television Act,House Bill number 1448 is anattempt
atf
regulating CableTelevision in the state of Pennsylvania for public
interest,
f
The Hearing lis a result ofrecent citizen concern
shown
by a
E
etition
sent
to the sponsor of the
ill,
Representative EugeneGeesey. |
)I
The hearing will consist oftestimony, given
by
signers of thepetition to
a
small
group
of Houserepresentatives. In this way thelegislators
3
will receive inputfrom groups who would benefitfrom
Cable
Television
in
Erie.
|
Some of the uses of CableTelevision to the city of Eriewould
be
'•]
increased educationalopportunities, programming forminorities, and greater interest incommunity activities.
FILMi
SOCIETY
1
For those interested in filmtechnique,
the
Mercyhurst FilmSociety will show six short filmson Tuesday, February 26th at7:30 p.m. in Zurn
Recit
all
Hall.The films,' varying in* style,technique and special effects, willbe shown,
dissected,
and reshown
to
determine technique,
i
g
The evening should |beespecially helpful
Uo
anyonemaking their own!film. Thepossibility for
a >
film workshopwill be discussed.
'Anyone
\
interested in this is urged to attendthe viewing Tuesday and contribute their ideas. g
\
Tuesday's film schedule will
be:
|
HOME OF THE BRAVE by
Mike Bloebaum-3
minutes
I
JUMPROPE by Computer
^Images Corp.-7 minutes
|
U
|
POP SHOW (Mogubgub)-8minutes-
| §|
TOYS by Grant
Munio-8
^minutes-
> t
i
JUNK Y ARD-10
minutes
CHAIRY TALE-10
minutes
MICHAEL
LEWISJ
f
happen, for some seeds receivethe necessities for success while
others®
do
not—and
die.Occasionally, however, a seed
will
somehow nurture
itself,
growand bloom.
>Such
a seed isMichael Lewis.
| #
Michael Lewis
-is
<a
blind
pianist-singer
whose presenthome is London;
bur
whose rootsare in central Illinois. He beganhis musical training at age eightwith the piano and violin. As he
grew
so
did
his talents and
thus
heinvestigated other avenues, such
as
organ and clarinet
Jin
his
earlyteens rock music attracted hisattention and it
wasn't
until he
attended
I
Northern IllinoisUniversity that folk music trulytouched him.
hi
1970
he joined aCanadian
folk-rock
group, MaraLoves. He played with them fortwo years; but then feeling theneed to progress on his own he
SDlit
and returned to solo performing In the, ensuing monthsMichael has indeed progressed,displaying his capabilities beforeesteeming audiences throughout
the
province and his
home state.
jg
Michael Lewis cares about thepeople who attend his gigs andfeels that,
"an,entertainer
has aresponsibility to his audiences,
ana
when
he^forgets |this
responsibility, he ceases to entertain." His audiences can attestto
that.f
On|stage, Michaeldemonstrates a zeal seldom seen
these
days.
His
vocals
are vibrant
and
packed with emotion.
Add
hisexceptional skill on piano andmaterial that fits like a pair ofLevis and you've got an electrically charged atmosphere thatjust won't quit. Says one fan, "hejust
gives
it all he's
got."The seed
is
Michael Lewis; andthe seed
is
blooming.
^Michael
Lewis will be appearing at the
Coffeehouse
on Feb. 25ththrough the 27th. Shows are at
9:00
and
10:00.
;
FILMS
Month Of Man
The Month of May has beendesignated as Creative| Arts
I
Month at Mercyhurst College.
vA§
film series entitled"Civilisation"
will
be
shown during
that time.The confirmation dates from
3
the National GaUery of Art, who
is
responsible for the schedulingof these films, indicates that wehave the entire series of
13
filmsto show. The schedule is as-follows:
I
II
Monday,
May 6
Monday,
May
13
Monday,
May 20
"Monday,
May 27
'{.
We will have the Recital Hall
reserved
i from 7:30 to approximately
I
10:30 on thoseevenings.
* *;The shows and dates
are:
f
The
Frozen
World,
May 1
The
Great Thaw, May I
.|
Romance and Reality,
May
6
Man-The Measure of All Things
May
6
The
Hero
as
Artist,
May 6
>
Protest and Communication, May
13|
W
Grandeur
and
Obedience, May
13
The
Light
of Experience, May
13The
Pursuit of Happiness,
May 20The
Smile of Reason,
May
20
•*The
Worship of Nature
May 27The
Fallacies of Hope,
May 27
Heroic
Materialism,
May
271
This distribution program hasbeen made possible by matchinggrants totaling $181,056 from theNational Endowment for theHumanities and from XeroxCorporation. Normal rental feefor this series would be $2,000 to$3,000, and purchase price would
be$7,000a
set.;
f
*
Under the program, which beganthis fall, the films are beingdistrubuted to colleges anduniversities
with
fewer than
2,000
undergraduates.! Approximately
400
institutions can participate inthe program each year, with anestimated
?
3,000,000
annualaudience.
%
Each college will receive thefilms in sequence, one a week.There will be two showings ofeach, both without
charge—one
for the college
anemone
for the
local
community.I Senior students
&
>
haveapproval! to
'request
exemption from finalexaminations in the Winterand Spring terms.
*
Theseexemptions for seniors may
be
made
on
either a class oran individual student
basis
atthe option
of the
instructor.
This was approved by thefaculty on March 2,1966.
*
Academic Dean:William
P.
Garvey
\ %
RUS President: Alexis
J.Walker
|
\
Lastj
week's! front pagearticle "STUDENTPOLICIES"
concerning
\
thequestion of dormitory hoursstated that a ruling openingthe dormitories had beenopened for
24
hours visitation
as the result of a petitionfrom the
McAulev
men. Thepetition was received by the
Student |
Policies committeewhich reviewed the matterand reviewed
|dormitory
hours to the||followingschedule: Sunday,!Monday,Wednesday, Thursday, 1pan. to
1
a.m. and Tuesday,FYiday, and Saturday,
I
p.m.to 2
a .m
I
at the 75 per centmajority vote
f
off eachresidence
hall
on campus.
S
Spring
COLLEGECENTER
# •
REVIEW
1
On January 10, a meeting washeld
* bet
ween the board oftrustees
and the
Beaver associatedevelopment concerning thebuilding of a college center hereat Mercyhurst; The
Beaver
associate development has beenhere
over*
the*last two weeks
interviewing
friends of the collegeto undertake a campaign^ inraising money for the building of
the
college
center.
'
|
jjl
Meanwhile,
\
President Shanesaid that the task force composedof students, faculty, and administration has completed thework as to what programs wouldbe housed in the college center.Mercyhurst has already appointed
an
architectural firm whois standing by ready to beginwork in designing the buildingonce the green light is given. Aproposal has been submitted to
the
Kressge foundation asking forfunds
to
aid
in
building
the collegecenter.
The
.Kressge
foundation^response to the proposal waslooked at
favorably
but, statedPresident Shane,
"We
will nothave a definite answer untilMay."
j
|
,'
President Shane said, "I ampleased with the effort ourcollege task forces and associatetrustees committees have contributed to bring us closer tovthecollege center. I
believe
that theplanned center meets basic,social,
*
education, andrecreational needs for Mercyhurst
at this
time,
f
I
I
The next scheduled meetingconcerning the college center will
be held in
the
beginning
of March.
Planned
Ik
|
by
Kim
Wontenay
A*new
course,
$
entitledAdvanced Child Psychology, willbe
offered*!
by
%
Mr.
^Strenlieb
spring term. The class will meet
two
hours a day two days a week
with
a class limit of fifteen. ChildPsychology is a pre-requisite
torthis
course.
%fy.
">&
Mr. Sternlieb
,
describes
thiscourse
as
.''serious
study for thoseinterested in child
development."
The seminar-based class will notbe simply a continuation of childpsychology
but™will ibeffa
theoretical approach to some
issues
in
child development
as:
f
a) the evidence for stages ofdevelopment,
<
p||
jjj
b) the question of trainingchildren to advance* fasterthrough the stages of development,
I s
t
c) is intelligence based in infancy
and^what
evidence existsfor intelligence
in
infancy,
|
d) the universal,
cross-cultural
approach
to
intelligence.
g#
Each
studentywill
be requiredto do some reading for seminardiscussion, and
gsome
readingscommon to the entire class with
most
readings coming fromjournal reports on experimentspresenting evidence relating tothe major issues to be handled inthe course of study. Each studentwill also be involved
in two
majorprojects,
one
common project forall students and the second, anindividual project in experimental methodology. As thiscourse
is new
this year
nut will
be
offered
every year from now on,any interested Senior shouldcontact Mr. Sternlieb. Also, anystudent who may be interested inthe course but is not sure or hasquestions,
contact"
Mr.
Sternliebin his office on second -floor,PrestonHall.
? * r
SCIENCE/MATH
*
M
Career opportunities
are
im
proving -in
the field of naturalsciences and mathematics. Whilethe numbers are not high, still itis encouraging to realize thatthere have been bona fide opportunities for
employment
forgraduates in the science andmathematics area which
we
havenot been able to fill because we(Continued on Page 4)Students interested in summer employment should contact thePlacement Office
within the next
few weeks.
|
%
j
XEROX will be on campus
to
?
interview
students March 1.Interested students should contact the Placement Office for anintment.
The
Erie
Association for Retarded Citizens has
announced
plans forthe Third Annual
Ride-A-Bike
for the Retarded scheduled for Sunday,April
21,1974?Proceeds
from the ride
will
be used to aid in the
con
struction of
a
gym and
swimming
pool
for the retarded
citizens
of
Erie
County-
> 3?*
A
k
"
We need YOUR
help I
The success of the ride depends
RIDERS.
H &?
T
'3
W-
on theThe rider must
i
Find a bike in good working
order.
Enlist sponsorswho
will
pledge
c
or
$—
per mile. Ride the specified route
on
April
21.
Collect the
pledges
after completing the
ride.
Return pledge money
to
the
Dr. Gertrude Barber Center.
1«|
GET INVOLVED!! GET OTHERS INVOLVED!! Contact theAAerciad. Also Cathy Roberts at the Dr. Barber
Center*
456-5345, forapplication forms or any further information.
^ T
 
PAGE 2
MERCYHURST
COLLEGEFEBRUARY 22.
1974
\
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR:
Dear
Editor:!
As expected, after only a two week stretch,
my
snowmobile has been banned from the Hurstcampus. Many of you might ask
me why
they
would do
such a thing. I can only give you the reasons
given to me by
a select few sisters
who shall
remain anonymous.
1 IThe
most grievous reason given
was my
eroding of our campus hillsides.
I was
told,
each time I
ride
across a hillside,
I
*
will leave a path
o Mr re
vocable erosion never to be repaired. What ourknowledgeable sisters failed
to
realize is that a snowmobile rides completely
on
top of the snow
on
an
18-inch
flat rubber track. Should this track ever hit the grass, it does absolutely no harm. I even offered to show the sisters a bare area on campus that I have run over literally hundreds of times.There are
no
tracks whatever visible.
I find
our dear sisters' argument highly ambiguous. If my mind
serves me
correctly,
in
a very recent printout
by
the college
which
listed a number of
proposed
grants
to be
awarded,
our
environmental studies group feel they need
anew
tractor. It
would
seem that four
heavily-bleated
tractor tires would tear up the hillsides far worse than a flat rubber snowmobiletrack.
i
Z
w
K
i k
j ^A
second reason
given
for my snowmobile being banned
was
the fact that "you're a
polluter."
Thisis without a doubt a contradictory argument. They accuse me of being a polluter, but want a newtraqtor. My snowmobile has
only
a
one-cylinder
engine. Your tractor, depending on the make, wouldmost likely have a
four-cylinder
engine. I could, I suppose, get some satisfaction out of the fact thatmy snowmobile will only be
25
per cent the polluter your tractor is. Might I suggest, with our environment as first priority, instead of a tractor you look into a few new wheel barrows? Being theenvironmentalists
you
are, I'm sure you'll
be
overwhelmed with this suggestion. Just
think—no
noisepollution,
no
smog from your big four cylinder engine and
no
ugly erosion marks to scar our campushillside. Remember,
no sacrifice is too
great
in
the respect
of our
environment.^
J
I
*
I ride a snowmobile strictly for the lack of any better recreational facility on our campus. For theamount of money the students pay to attend this college, I can not help but expect, at the very least,adequate recreational facilities. I'm not asking for superior facilities, just adequate. I'm sorry, but Ican't consider our recreation complex in the basement of Old Main anything approaching adequate.Sure,we have an indoor tennis court which can accommodate up to eight whole people, out just try
and
get a
court.
We
need recreational facilities on this campus and they re not being provided. Moneyis being channeled into useless and purposeless efforts. To open an old wound, we can use as
an
example,
<4
Mercyhurst
Park"—
a useless nothing. I can't make myself believe that I watchedtruckload after truckload of earth being hauled
in to
construct a hill in the park.
A hill
that serves nopurpose and
does
nothing. This
"park"
does nothing more now
than it ever
did
before as a parking lot.It's merely a walkway between Baldwin and the main buildings on campus. Wouldn't it have beenmuch more useful and far
less
expensive
to
simply construct a small wall around this lot for use as
an
ice skating rink?
Maybe
someday we'll see handball-squash courts, a
pool
or a recreational complexor
something—-anything
related
to
recreation finally appear
on this cam
pus.
| |
£
\
It's
too
bad that certain
people
are
too blind to see
that recreation and environment
go
hand in hand.Our environment is there to be enjoyed. The environmenalist movement is not flowers and treesplanted in an old parking lot or phony hills. It's getting out and enjoying what is within our grasp.Although recreational facilities may
be on
the way, at this moment, the Hurst has next to nothing tooffer.
I
have
only
attempted, with the snowmobile, to take advantage of what very little
we
have andto give myself and many,
many others some
form of recreation
during the long
winter.
I &
|
Happy trails
to you
and yours, -1
tBill Chatenka > >
Dear
Editor:
1
m
In my last article, I talkedabout a student GrievanceCommittee, and I felt if we are toreplace a system there ought tobe a better system to take itsplace. At least this seems logicaltome,
r i W
Also,
we students fund over 75per
cent
of the money used
by
thisadministration, sol doesn't itseem only logical we studentshold over
75
per cent of
the
powerat this college? We should nothave to ask for this power, we
should J
be given our rightfulpower by
fthe
administration.Does it not seem strange to youpeople
that a
if you have
at
ustcomplaint about
*
a faculty oradministration member you can'treceive help
by
a legal arm of thestudent government?
A legal
armof the student government that ischaired
I
only by
students—we
don't
jwant
faculty or administrators to advise us. We
need only to look
at the placementoffice of this school to see how
politics
can even find its way intoMercyhurst.
(How
about itDean?) This administration mustbe walking ] around with closed
eyes,
they must only care aboutthe money we students bring thisschool. Again, Are the Studentshere to serve the Administration,or is the Administration here toserve the Students?
How
long canyou people stand to be given theshaft? TheBeacon,a free voice ofthe student has been cruellycrushed by the Dean and hisfollowers. Must this
be
allowed?
&
Andrew
Cameron
SB.
7-an
Editorial
Mr. Cameron:The Executive Board of theRepresentative
Union
of Studentsresponds to your letter printed inthe February 15th' issue of theMerciad because you asked forour involvement. We also feel aneed to inform
you off
currentactivities of student governmentand the adminstration of thiscollege of
which?
you are ob
viously not
aware.
Z
First: We have not, in any
of
I
our frequent meetings, encountered
£
a
|"flagrantdisregard...for
the students" onthe part of the admininistration.
Br.
ShSBeTSf
'particularly*tSn^cerned with the needs andfeelings of students and
has
consciously included collegians in*all aspects of his administrative^endeavors. We, as a group, meetwith Dr. Shane immediatelyfollowing every R.U.S.
meeting £
informing him of our concerns,activities, discontents
g andl
complaints.
He,;
in ?
turn, hasshared with us his own concernsand activities and spoken to our
negative
items honestly
.m
"Second: The Executive
BoardS
of R.U.S., individually and moreoften collectively, has met withDr. Garvey
oii
f
numerous occasions this year, particularly^often in the last month. Althoughour comments and discussionshave not always been positive wehave been
treated?with
respectand
never|
with
"a
loud, harshvoice" In order
to
respond
to
yourletter, we investigated the
cir
cumstances of
the
situation whichyou
communicated.!Finding
thatyour comments were not anaccurate representation of themeeting, we see no
need*to
ad
dress the
issue further.
>
Third: The RepresentativeUnion of Students of MercyhurstCollege will not form a grievancecommittee?
as
we have enoughcommittees at the present
time
and ample channels throughwhich to communicate complaints. (For your information,the Student Policies Committeeof the College Senate,
predominately^composed
ofstudents, can serve
you in
dealingwith actual cases, or refer you toanother committee
more
relevantto your needs.) The true "power"of Mercyhurst College is held by
the
Board of Trustees
and
only bythe Board. They also are heldlegally responsible for the school.Students could not
afford!
norwould they wish' to hold thisresponsibility. We are, however,represented by a voting member
of
this body.Fourth: If you truly believethat the administration would askyou to leave the college becauseof your letter to the editor, youhave very little, if any, understanding of the atmosphere inwhich Mercyhurst operates. We,as students, have always beenpermitted to communicate freelyand
honestly.?
It is we who are
guilty
of not availing ourselves of
rthis
opportunity. |
i
| The
Executive Board
I of the
Representative
Union
of
Students
%
Alexis Walker
|
'
f |
Frank Barry
Marianne
Jacobs
m.
Julie Samick $
EDITOR'S
NOTE :|The
followingpeople compose the StudentPolicies
Committee.
\i
Any complaint or need can be brought tothe attention of this committee orits members. They
are:
fe
I
Paul Doran (chairman)
^
Mrs.
Bender
Mr.
Davis
: *KenBurkhart Clare
WhiteMr. Grossman Karen
Schnltz
h
Mr.Sternlieb
Rich^
.it
Mr.
David
ThoS
1
£
uchtenwalter
Dr.Weigert
J^anKunick
Each year a certain number of teachers at Mercyhurst receivenotice. Who passes judgment on the faculty? Must the decision tofire come only from the hallowed halls of the Administration? Orwill the recommendations of students finally be taken into consideration
in an
orderly manner?
;
I
& %r BBsE4 Since
students are the only people on campus who observe ateacher's work from
day to
day, it is reasonable
to
say that students
have
a
sound basis
for evaluating
the
performance of faculty.
£flf
|
IgCollege
students, who have spent thirteen to sixteen years inschool, tend
to
know whether a teacher
is
effective,
well-prepared,
knowledgeable
in his
field,
and
receptive
to
student viewpoints.Evaluation forms are an
inadequate
means of communicatingstudent views of teachers to the
adm inistr at
ion. Also, these formsare not used for interdisciplinary courses, the source of many
complaints on
teacher performance.
\
§> * |We
support the Academic Subcommittee of
RUS
and the FacultyPolicies Committee in their efforts toward arranging for
students
toparticipate in the decisions of hiring new teachers and dismissing
ineffective
ones.
f -*£
j|&
J
§|fep
The Academic Subcommittee is currently working on a proposalwhich would authorize students
to
sit
on
divisional boards and so totake part in
the
interviewing and selection of applicants for teachingpositions.
|* *
U|-?
The Faculty Policies Committee is preparing
a
1
"
method
J of
evaluating teachers which would make it possible to review eventhose with tenure. We ask the Committee to include some definite
provision
for student
in vol vem ent in the
procedure.
$Students make a college.
We
can
help
make it better by having asay in
hiring good
teachers and
remo ving
incompetent
ones.
8It's
a John Welsh, JohnRyck, Mark MusialPARTY!
M
M
(often
^imitated;
neverduplicated)
£
Friday
22,1974
Third Floor
Sesler
Apts.
"
(GreenDoor)*
1.00
admission
25c
a shot
I5>/2
kegs
and6
qts.
whiskey3
taps!
i(no waiting
in lineJ for
this party)
Everyone*s Invited!
New
*
COURSE
OFFERED
This Spring, I will offer a newcourse, one which has not beenpreviously offered at the college.The course: "Persuasion andPower", will deal withpropaganda, brainwashing,communication, theories of socialpower, obedience to authority,and attitude change. The coursewill be constructed from severalauthoritative sources in each ofthese problem areas. I imposeonly one restriction; that is, thatall
persons enrolling in
the
course
have had at least an introductory
course
in psychology.
.g
THE
fit
Dr i John
StewartSITTING AROUND
TOGETHER.!
LAUGHING
ANDSHOOT-
&ING THE
BULL.
FEELING
GOOD.!DRINKING
BEER.|
BEING.
:
WITHPEOPLE
I
LIKE.
fWHAT MORE CAN I
ASK?
BEER
AND BULLSHIT-
*TERS,
| |WHAT A
COMBINATION!THE KEG IS OUT ON THE
\
WINDOW
LEDGE,
5 51
KEEPING COLD IN THE
J
SNOW,
1
i'
&THAT'S THE WAY TO
GO!
LIVING
CAN BE A
BLAST,ATI LEAST AS LONG AS
3
THE BEER
LASTS.
&g&
BUT AFTER
THAT,*UFEl IS IJVSTING 4 * 1 |BECAUSE!'£OF4JL
THES FRIENDS BEHINDTHE
KEG>
1
|3
by Mary
Michener
THE
MERCIAD
Years of Service
Published weekly during the college
year*
except Thanksgiving,
in
tercession Christmas
and Easter vacations* and examination periodsby the students of Mercyhurst College/ Erie* Pa.,
HS01.
Mailing address:
Mercyhurst Mai
room,
.Preston
Mall,
Box
36.
)
The|
Merciad acceptsarticles in the informationroom.
,. .•
wSL
ERIEBOOKSTORE
452-3354
ErieBike Shop
1161 Buffolo
Rd.
\\
Erie,
Pa.
Safes
&
Service
Ph.
454-2930
&—«•
f
x
i^
Editor:!
Assistant Editor:Editorial BoardFeature:
I
News:
|
Sports:Assistant Sports:Business Manager*.Faculty Advisor:Cathy Stevenson
5
Kim Wontenay
|Sue
Weiner
Sharon
WarnerDario CiprianiJack RileyAnne MashinicBarry
McAndrew
ACTIVITIES
Feb.
Fri.22
44
Jacques Brel"
8
pjn.
Little
Theater
f
Last Day towithdraw from classes
(or whatever)
So.t.23
"Jacques
Brel
M
Lakers
vs.
Walsh (Away)Lakerettes
vs Thiel
i
(Home-2
p.m.)
Staff:
Diane Pickens* Cathy McCarthy, Dennis Coan, John Sullivan,Candy Yanker, Martin Miglioretti, Tod Allen, Eleanore
Grelewici.?
Sun.24
"Jacques
Brel"
Matinee
2:30?
Movie -
"Slaughter-
House
5"
I
7&9RecitalHall(I.D.)
mon.25
Mike Lewis
(CoffeeHouse)
9 & 10
Tues.26
7:30-6
film SocietyFilms (Zurn)
Coffee
House-Mike Lewis
9&10Karate-11
a.m. lp.m.(Union)
\ \
Wed.27
Mike
LewisCoffee House
9&10 ?
 
""
FEBRUARY 22. 1974
MERCYHURST
COLLEGE
PAGE
3
Jacques
Br
el"
CAS
T SPAR KLES
by Susan Weiner
Faculty
SingsjfBlues
"Jacques Br el lis
Alive andWell and
living
inParis"is notyour
ordinary m
usical.In fact, the show can moreappropriately be called an essayon
life)
in song and spoken interludes. iThe^
Mercy hurst
production, under the skillfuldirection of Igor Stalsky, infuses
this
essay with vitality and truth.Satire and irony are dominanttones throughout the show.
Almost^
no aspect of humanexistence I escapes
Brers
sting.Problems ofJovers, hypocrisy,war and even death are subjectsof
Br el's
caustic insights.
|
Serious strains
i
providecounterpoint to the satire. Brel's
lines
encompass themes
jfrom
aloneness and the wait for death
to |
shattered dreams and theconfusion of the world.The show opens with a strongcombination—the* striking
poses
of
the
performers,
the
lines
on
theDevil, and the imaginativelychoreographed and directed"Marathon."Once aroused, the audience'sattention
is;
held by the dazzlingperformance of
the
four players.David Green laces his songswith an absurdist tone which
points
up
the meaning of
his
lines.His portrayal of the unhappy
"stiff"
in
"Funeral
Tango*makes the scene one of the finestpieces of theatre
in the
show.
The
lighting for the scene and themoments when the
^audience
literally laughs along with Mr.Green are
satisfying
touches.
|
He gives a saucy rendition of"Jackie" as he expresses Brel'swish for personal
fulfillment.
ButMr. Green's ability to createcharacter and to move anaudience are most
powerfully
feltin "Amsterdam", a story ofsai'ors.. '
I
Linda Johnson's dance delightsthe eye in the interlude about adancing girl, Brel's first seriousnote on ideals. Ms. Johnson'srepresentation of Timid Frieda
and the
child
in
"Funeral Tango"are especially fine. Her singingsolos are few but
well-executed;
however,
she
might breathe moreemotion into
* Sons
of."
./
I
David Held dramatizes each ofhis scenes exceptionally well. Heenlists his outstanding singingability
to
convey the truths abouthuman nature between the linesof his songs. Mr. Held's portrayalof the honest soldier in "Statue"(a fine dramatic device) and ofthe betrayed loverin/'Fanette"
are
especially impressive.Mari Gardner, a dynamic forcein the show, sings
"Old
Folks" ina' very touching scene whichaccentuates the
dimension
oftime with pale green lighting andthe repetition of Linda Johnson'snotes and David Held'smovements.*
t*r«
'k>t>i
Ms.
Gardner performs each ofher scenes beautifully. Her mostpowerful song is "Marieke", asensitively directed scene of awoman anxious for her beloved toreturn.
\
& L
Under the expert direction ofCecily Gallagher,
\
the fourplayers harmonize as a quartet.A notably effective scene, whichdemands that their voices aloneexpress Brel's theme, is "TheDesperate Ones."*
i
f
I
"Carousel" is
one
of the sceneswhich takes full advantage of theintriguing and pleasing set.Although the scene
|is
artfullycomposed and ends on a frenziednote, it lacks the whirlwind effectwhich the words lead you toexpect.
i $ I
!
After all the satire and seriousstatements
on
life,
the audience is
ready||for
a little sincereidealism, which the final songprovides.
|
&g
JL f
.
j
As I
said,
"Jacques
Br
el" is not
your ordinary
m usical. But then,neither
is
life.
•- rj
This
is
an interlude in
the
soles
on administration offices. T.M.Cat asks the
f
question: Is thefaculty really concerned aboutupcoming dismissals among their
ra nks(
See
editorial.
Page 2) ?
Prologue. Last week, Istationed myself in
the?
FacultyLounge* for? an afternoon ofeavesdropping. I hung a largesign reading, "I am
here
as a
reporter,",
above my chair tonotify teachers that I might use
any
newsworthy material.
No
one
objected.!
I
;
£|
The first teachers 8 to comedown for coffee were BruceMcAndy (English),
.Pirouetta
Vetronio (French), and Gary
Brossman
(no introductionneeded). They formed
a*
littlegroup.
fPirouetta
began theconservation. |
| |
1
|
"All this discussion on studentsparticipating in dismissingteachers makes*
me
J&
feel,
well...This
might sound terrible,but sometimes I wish teachershad the power to fire-students,even whole classes. Studentsdon't seem to feel responsible fortheir work anymore. I don't know
what to
do
about it."
P
f
H
Bruce
had pan
answer."Sometimes you justhave-towalk out on a class. If they don'tprepare
an
assignment,
there's
nouse in
wasting
your time."
|
Chomping on a bagel, Garyagreed. "Sure, Etta. Besides, ifyou would do it, the class wouldprobably be shocked into havingevery assignment done on time,and! even typing your lecture
notes for
you.
| *
f
After taking another sip of teafrom her saucer, Pirouettacontinued. "And their spelling isIn order to make Friday'sedition, articles must
be in on
Tuesday
by 6:00.
g
LettersfTo
Mig's,
Farm
M
-'*
tt
Sir,t adjurethee,thou old serpent, bythe judge of the quick and the dead, byihe maker of the world, by him who
has
the power to send thee tohell,thatthou depart quickly from this servantof God, who returns to the bosom ofthe church with fear and affliction ofthy terror.
I
adiure thee, not in myaffirmity, but by the virtue of the HolyGhost, that thou depart from thisservant of God, whom the Almightyhath made in his own image, and if youspit up on me again, I'll hit you withthis bottle of Holy Water.
|
Fr. Lankester AAerrinS.J.Northern IraqSirs, *
|
So,
you so-called "peace freeks"think that an occasional turn-on is themost harmless way to cope with
the
world? Well
the poke's
on you! Arecent study conducted at JohnsHopkins University has proved thatbeyond a shadow of a doubt, therepeated ingestion
*of 'j
tetrahydrocannibol
(THCJf.
the
euphoric element of marijuana) canresult in a distinct inability to operatea typewriter. So the next time youaccept that crude wrinkled cigarettefrom the friendly stranger,
youhg8
m6try7k)9hgrRbh
.• ;u34
f6g
+V2V2
1;
hg.\
Jh6TTf cgH3cR.$
J/\Ah76jju8&(99
fdRRr6cc+9ot
Sir,
£
Fascfnating; * my
Tricorder
registers an atmospheric compositionof
16.1^
molecules of nitrogen persquare centimeter on
?this
planet'ssurface, which is, of course, able tosustain life as we know it. Yet thesurface appears desolate, with sparseclusters of vegetation in the less rockyareas, which appears highly illogical.
i
SpockUSS
Enterprize
SIR,
2
Why don't you go tie your ears in aknot, you cosmic dildoe.Dr. B. McCoyUSS EnterprizeSir,
;In
regards to the "letter
to^the
Editor" printed in last week's paperconcerning the, quote,
"flagrant
ANTLER'S
Red,
White AndBlueberry
disregard the administration holds forthe
students,""it
seems that a gooddeal of the members of this school'sadministration is greatly misunderstood, and that we are only tryingtp make this a better learning
in
stitution where the students may
grow
both morally and intellectually.Besides/ we all know; that AndyCameron picks his nose and eats theboogers.
;-r '; ^j
James Fisher. Erie, Pa.Mig, J.
I
Hey, what's happening? We were/just sitting around getting
really
wrecked in Vihce's room when Petecame up
with
this really far out
idea
for a cartoon, about how he's the
only
one who gets caught setting the floor
on
fire
and putting plastic explosive onthe toilet seats and got thrown out ofAAcAuley. And Russ thought of another
one
about how you can show Al and theSecurity Guards getting*
high
inPreston's basement. We came up withsome others, but we were toodestroyed to write them down. Hopeyou can use these little gems. Peace,love
and
Woodstock.
',
The Far-out Heads
InMcAuley
Erie, Pa.
Sir, I
Hey, how about adding a little grosshumor to your article, like, for instance, "Around the Block in
8a
Dayswith the
PollofMarching
Band," or"Acme Abortion Clinic - no fetus canbeat us,"
or*
J.
Paul Getty giving hisgrandson a set of
stereo
headphonesfor his birthday, or an iron lung in aRallegh coupon catalog, or a picture ofMayor
Tulio
unloading ErieSanitation's first truckload of deadbabies with a gold pitchfork, or otherneat
o
stuff like that.Bob Sutherland
WJET-TV I
by
T. M.
CaUSpecial Reporte
r
atrocious. The other day someonehanded
in ?ai
Frankenstein
storywith
the sentence
'He loved
her invain/ and the last word wasspelled Ve-i-nT'At that point, political scienceprofs Ben Benuthe and Miguel
Erinsam
joined
the
group. Miguelpicked up the discussion. "But,Etta,
J
don't
you find the
freal
problem is getting people to readtheir texts? Ben came up with asolution during Intercession, buthe won't
tell me what it
is."J
|
After a few encouraging wordsfrom
k
his colleagues, Ben told
than
what to do.
"You I
justdistribute a bunch of suckers tothe
class
on the first day
and
have
them?staple
one after every 50pages in their books. It
j
worksevery time."
\
f 8 B
-4
Bruce McAndy had a question.
4
What's
to prevent
the
class fromtaking
thei
suckers withoutreading the pages?"
I f
"Nothing/'
Ben
replied. "But
if
they
do
that, they won't be readyfor their unannounced quizzes."Music professor Sr.
JeanellenStaff
 note and theatre
arts
director Harvey Shakespearecame into the lounge, whileHarvey [adjusted his
scarf,
Sr.
stattnote
noted her troubles overher music students. "If I hadn'tinsisted
on
having that time clockinstalled,
the
music
majors
would
still* be getting away with less
than
40 hours a
week
of practice."
g
She
turned to Harvey. "How
do
you keep your drama students so
involved
in
their work?
" 35
"It's quite easy, Sister.
If
theydon't come to rehearsals on timeor study their lines or read their
two
plays a
day, I
just make themwatch
re-runs
of
Gomer
Pyle."The group was still engaged inlively discussion when I had toleave.
BS
I
f
IEpilogue. When
I
told!
mycolleagues about the discussion,there arose two opposing conclusions. There are those
who
saythat I
the entire scene was spontaneous and genuine. There arethose who say) that
IBruce
McAndy wrote the dialogue andHarvey Shakespeare
directed,
theteachers in aput-on. You
;
willhave to decide -the
a truth
*
for
yourself,
vl
>f
| i
§
Seals
by Jack Riley
I
A
little
man
dressed
in
red, withan old brown cap pulled down tohis ears, entered the room andintroduced himself
las
JimmySeals. After gesturing us to movein closer he
announced
his"buddy" would be along shortly.Dash Crofts fired into the room,quipped a joke, and sat down.They made as if you had knownthem,: for years, and what wassupposed
to*be
a
"press
conference" turned
out to
be more ofa conversation.The first question stemmedfrom their next playing site(which they didn't know untilhanded an itinerary) to theirmusical
background.
?
Seals nervously
*
picked at thechair as he explained how he had
been
on
the
road
since
he
was
nineyears old, at which time heplayed
the
fiddle.| JJimmy and Dash met in JuniorHigh in Texas where they playedin a group that lasted throughouthigh school.
t %
||g
In
1958
they became part of the"Champs", whose hit "Tequila"sold six million copies and kept
them
popular
enough
to
be able totour the world for seven years.Crofts played drums for
Hhis
period and also for a small stintwith
*
a
group
called*
the
"Dawnbreakers
.
*
W
This,
along with the finding ofthe Baha'i faith, led to the soundthat
we
know
as "Seals
&
Crofts".During this transition periodDash began playing the mandolinand together with
*
their
tremendous "harmony
\
they
usedmusic as a vehicle for expressingthe truth.-
i
Both?
men in talking
of
theirreligous beliefs were so in
teresting
that you forgot theywere so famous as singers. AsDash Crofts
said,-
"It helps tokeep a realistic view of
life.
I get
sSSSKS-
^**^x\wWW«^«v*WkW.Ha^.
Sat.
Feb.
22
Feb.
23
Patti
1922JE. 38th St.
864-0715
up in the morning just like everyone
',of
you." Unity is a basicBaha'i principle, and it's evidentin both the music and lyrics of
"Seals &
Crofts".
%
They walked
on
stage one at atime, sat down and without evenlooking at each other, broke into"Hummingbird". Their sound isintricately produced and yetinately simple. The concert was amasterpiece of
work
with a blendof jazz, rock, country and blues.Their music, like the men, is
honest
and lively.
i
Jimmy Seals and Dash Croftsappeared
at*
the Erie CountyField House onFebruary
)
fourteenth before a sell out crowd.For those who attended I'm sure
you
know
what I mean. For thoseof you who didn't, don't pass upanother chance to see one of thebest concerts of your
life.
1
RESEARCHASSISTANCE
Thousands
learn
FR EE
Resource Center
FREE DELIVERY
f
with
a
minimuml
purchase
of
$
5.00Mercyhurst Campus
16501

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