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The Merciad, May 10, 1974

The Merciad, May 10, 1974

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The Merciad, May 10, 1974
The Merciad, May 10, 1974

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THE
GIAD
VOL
XLVI
NO.
22
May 10,
1
J,j
12
MERCYHURST
COLLEGEMAY
10,
1974
tt
CUCKOO NEST
55
OPENS
The last major production to bestaged in the Little Theater thisyear opened last
night.
Experience
"One
Flew Overthe Cuckoo's
Nest"
on May
10,11
at
8:30or
May
12
at 2:30. Call forreservations at 864-4694 extension
271.
•:IM$M&$.
m
Wmmm
'^-V:->;
/$W-
-WWSjS^^
mmm
.--•vvv-*.*
iiwf^^
GROSSMAN
Joins Law Firm
R.U.S.Wardl
SR.RITA
Election!! 11
Atty.
Barry
G. Grossman,assistant professor of politicalscience at
Mercy
hurst College,will become an associate in thelaw firms of Shamp, Levin,Arduini, and Hain, beginning May
15,
while continuing his teachingduties at the Hurst. I
c
1
\
Grossman, who directs the prelaw program at
',
Mercyhurst,
received his B.A. in Governmentfrom Cornell University, his M.A.in political
science
from GannonCollege, and his Juris Doctoratefrom Cleveland State* College of
Law
in 1973.
J
| J SJ
Attorney Grossman, a memberof the American Civil LibertiesUnion, was admitted to practicelaw before the Erie
County
Bar,the Pennsylvania State Supreme
Court,
* and?
the jU. S. FederalDistrict Court in 1973. He is the
immediate
past president of theboard of
Earth
watch Erie, Inc.At Mercyhurst, he holds therank of assistant professor ofpolitical science, is the director ofthe political internship program,a member of the student policiescommittee, and has establishedthe para-legal program at thecollege in addition
to
his duties asdirector of
the pre-law
program.
4
Married to the former Janet L.Jacobi of Yonkers, N.Y., Atty.and Mrs. Grossman anddaughter,
Rebecca
Graham,
reside !in
Erie at
]
858
East 44
Street.
55 £
1
WARD
A:
|| HS&ILaw
Enforcement
iffijfflljTod Allen | |||||||
Frank
McMahon ?3i|HSj
Bill Glinka |||
§118
JeanKunick | |
*wn
Patty Mullough
I Svoting
per cent
- 33.7 |
Sociology
*5
m
'M
Maureen Flaherty
|
Kevin Koobvoting per cent
- 40
WARDB:Art
RonRatliff
Tom
HubertM
Marty MigliorettiRoy ReevesLucretia Ferrivoting per cent
-15
MusicTommy Roche
&
Drama
*&
Kathy Canarozzi
H
voting per cent
- 40.9
WARDC:Biology
i
|
Mary Jane
McWilliamsfPat
Kozi
*
(Continued
on Page 4)
I
Leaves
Sister
I
Rita Panciera, co-director of the Campus Ministryat Mercyhurst College, leaves thehilltop school this week to continue her
Master's S
degree
Jin
Religious Education at St. PaulUniversity in Ottawa,
J
Ontario,
Canada.
§ SB jssfial
In the
fall
Sr.
Rita will move toBoston, where she will work atthe Paulist Community Centre asthe only woman on a ministerialstaff of
sjx
persons, includingthree priests, a seminarian, and alayman,
a * ^811
T
%
The
Paulist Centre was foundedby the Paulist Fathers in
1945
inan attempt to reach alienatedCatholics who found no identification
I
with 'traditionalparishes through an emphasis onreligion, social action and adulteducationclasses.^A native of
Newi
Bethlehem,Pa., Sr. Rita is
an
I
alumnae ofMercyhurst College, graduatingin 1953 with a B. S. in BusinessEducation. She received her
Master's
degree in BusinessAdministration in
1965
from NotreDame University and holds adiploma in Religious Educationfrom the Divine Word Centre inLondon, Ontario.|
I j
Sr. Rita started teachingBusiness Education at Mercyhurst in
;1957 andl
became thedepartment chairman in 1965, apost she held until 1970. She wasalso the Dean of Students duringthe years 1967-1970. She had been
co-airector of A
the Campus
Ministry
at Mercyhurst since the
fall
of
1971.
t
fGUIDELINES FOR GRANTING
CREDIT
IN
EXPERIENCED
LEARNINGThe
following proposal was recently passed by the ExecutiveCouncil and
is now in
effect:
5
I
\
Experienced learning is that mode of learning which resultsfrom non-classroom, off-campus experiences. It is recognizedthat because experimental learning is a valuable and desirablesupplement to the more
structured theoretical;learning
of aclassroom setting, formal academic credit may* be selectivelyawarded. I
-?
J
T
5?
f
 
PAGE
2
MERCYHURST
COLLEGE
MAYll
0,11
974
Letter To The Editor
STUDENTS MISS OUT
Where have all the Mercyhurst students gone? Certainly not tothe Choir Concert. You
wouldn't;
catch 'em dead there. ChoirConcert? What's that?
Only
crazy
people
go to
hear that
stuff.
Well, if that's the case, Mercyhurst students, where were you?You were crazy to have missed it.
A
handful of people constitutedthe audience, and if one didn't count all the grade-school kids that
came,
the Choir would have outnumbered the audience. That has tobe one of the saddest statements that can be made about Mercyhurst.
P
\
I )
Why did the Choir have to go to Rochester to be appreciated?Why did it have a great success there? Do they have a differentbreed of people in Rochester that can appreciate a good thing whenthey hear it? Unfortunately, the Mercyhurst students don't haveenough school spirit to even try
to
find
out whether the Choir is good
or
not.
|
I
j
Not all of it is the students' fault. Some of the blame must beplaced on the Administration. Sure, we can send
our
athletes allover the creation, but when it comes to the Choir...well, there isn'tenough money. The
Choir
has to scrounge around for money to go toRochester.
M
^5
£*
t
:
Maybe people need personal invitations to attend the performances. Maybe the Concert wasn't publicized enough. Maybethe Choir members should have begged
on
their knees for people tocome and hear their melodious voices. Maybe Mr. Brooks, thedirector, should have asked pretty please with maple syrup andbrown sugar
on top
for financial support for the Choir. Is that what
^it
takes to get
this college
moving?Olivia
Longo
J
* |
LIFEATSEAl
Mercyhurst College is considering an intersession program forDecember,
1974,
entitled:
Outward
Bound:
Life
At
Sea.
*
The
objective]of
this sailing! course is to teach real skillsnecessary
for;
sailing competency,! such as piloting, navigation,sailing, marlinspikeship,
weather,
and related marine skills. Butfurther, to teach intangible!
life-style
habits such' as in-terdependency, living
in
close
quarters with others, the necessity
of
physical labor, the joys and hardships of travel, and the pressureand demand of detail and discharge of responsibility.This sailing program is open to all students. If you should havethe slightest
interest
in
participating in this.program,
feel
welcometo attend a meeting on Tuesday, May 14, at 7:30 in the Media Services area on the second floor of the
LRC.
Details, costs, timecommitments, and other topics will be discussed, plus anyquestions of interest that you might
have.
Plan to attend the
meeting—there
is no
obligation.
~
m
A big coup for Mercyhurst College's Creative Arts Month
Program is
the
film series "Civilisation" by the National Galleryof Art
in
Washington,
D.C.
and Time-Life Inc.The
13
films
will
be
shown
on
Monday nights at 7:30 p.m. in the
Zurn
Recital Hall,
 free
 of charge.
Movie
schedule includes:
|
Romance and
Reality—May
6.
Man-The
Measure of All
Things—May
6. The Hero as
Artist—May
6. Protest and Com
munication—May
13. Grandeur and
Obedience—May
13. TheLight of
Experience—May
13.
The Pursuit of
Happiness—May
20.The Smile of
Reason—May 20.The
Worship of
Nature—May27.The
Fallacies of
Hope—May
27.Heroic
Materialism—May
27.
THE
MERCIAD
Years of Service
Published
weekly
during the college
year,
except Thanksgiving/ intersession,
Christmas
and Easter vacations, and examination periodsby the students of Mercyhurst College, Erie, Pa.,
16501.
Mailing address: Mercyhurst
Mailroom,JN'Mton
Hall,
Box 36.
85
Editor:
Assistant
Editor.-
Editorial Board
.
Feature:
News:
f
1
Sports:Assistant Sports:
business Manager:Faculty Advisor:Cathy StevensonKim
Wontenay
Sue WeinerSharon Warner
Dario
CiprianiJack RileyAnne MashinicBarry
Mc
AndrewStaff:
Diana
Pickens,
Cathy
McCarthy* Denis
Coan,
John Sullivan,Candy Yanker,
Martin
Miglioretti, Tod
Allan,
EleanoreGralewicx.!
Spiritual
Guardiansj»|||^
WHA T'S
WR
ONG
\
WITH\M.
U.
?
Spring at M.U. used to be fun. It's notanymore. Why? Because 1,200 studentshave divided up into
125
different cliques.Each individual
memtjer
in the
cliaue
isdedicated fully to his or her (or their)select
group
and
is
completely oblivious tothe aliens.
Do
you honestly think that yourfriends are the ultimate in
people
and that
no one
else really matters? Or are you socaught up with your boyfriend-girlfriendthat people you used to consider yourfriends
no
longer play an important part inyour life? We hope you're happy because
in
a few years, your
so-called
friends won'tbe around. Don't you know that you don't
know
what
you've
got
'till
it's
gone?
W^
We,
as your Spiritual Guardians, wouldlike you upperclassmen to remember howit used to be and tell an underclassman so
hell
know
M.U.'S
students used to havesomething to offer, especially during
Spring
Term. And if it's been so long sinceyou've had a good time, let us help you torecover your memory. Remember
when?
l).
Good Time
Charlies—when
carloadsof students drove to Fredonia and tookover.
I
V
&
2).
Tuesday nights at
Grays—wheneveryone
there
was
from the Hurst
and one
was lucky
to
ind
 a seat.
3).
St. Nick's
Grove—the
baseball
games and
FUN.
I
picnics,
4).
Townhouse 2
parties—we put.theseinto
a
distinct category because they wereunique. Each party had a different theme*and if you were lucky, you could even getyour
picture in
the
paper!
ffiHHrjB
*g
5).
There were other parties
too—not
asingenious but
they were
still fun.
I
6).
Hanging out in the Student Unionbecause that's where everyone got
together
I
to talk about anything andeverything. It:
f
MAY
CREATI
VEARTSMONTH
This week's calendar of activities
t
includes g
iewejry,exhibitions and
print
makingexhibitions on display daily in theZurn Hall Gallery and LearningResource Center Galleries on the
Mercyhurst;?College
Campus. Allevents during Creative Arts
Month
at the Hurst are open to the publicfree of charge except where noted.
.
»
.
. .
1 SUNDAY/May
12DRAMA PRODUCTION: "OneFlew Over The Cuckoo's Nest/*2:30 p.m., Little
Theatre.? •?9
MOVIE: "Sleuth", 7 and 9 p.m.,Zurn Recital
Hall.
I
*JEWELR YJ&
EXHIBITION,demonstration, all day (Sundaythrough Saturday), Gallery, Zurn
Hall.
Ed Higgins, assoc.
prof,
of
art, MSS University of Wisconsin,exhibition director. ?SATEL
LITE
SENIOREXHIBIT, 3 man show, PatrickLally, Ken
Burkhart
Jr., LarryWalczak,
First
National Bank.(Through May 31).
W
1
MONDAY,
May
13CIVILISATION FILM SERIES:
"Protest
and Communication,""Grandeur and Obedience," "TheLife of Experience,"
i7:30
p.m.Zurn Recital
Hall.
PRINTMAKING EXHIBITION,demonstration, all
da yvGa Her y#
Zurn Hali.kMs. Susan Kemenyffy,
director.!
8•£&
TUESDAY,
May 14
EVENING OF SHORT FILMS, 8p.m. Media Room, LearningResource Center.
^
WEDNESDAY, May
15?
BALLET EXPLORATIONSFOR ADULTS, 11 a.m.-noon,Weber
Hall,
Mercyhurst College.I
STUDENT
BALLET PERFORMANCES, 8 p.m., LittleTheatre..
32*
4
j FRIDAY,
May
17
VOICE RECITAL: Sr. HelenJean Sullivan, professor of Music,8:15p.m. Zurn Recital
Hall.
THURSDAY,
May9 J
m
DRAMA: Opening night performance of. "One Flew Over TheCuckoo's Nest" at 8:30 p.m., LittleTheatre.
£
j.
FRIDAY,
May
10
i
"One Flew Over The Cuckoo'sNest", 8:30 p.m. Little Theatre. ISATELLITE
SENIOR
EXHIBITION OF ART, Opening at6:30p.m. First National Bank, 10thand State Street.
5 *
^SATURDAY,
May 111
v
"One Flew Over Cuckoo's Nest"at
8:30
in
LiHIe
Theatre,
i
BALLET
I
EXPLORATION
|for
Children at
1:30-2:30
p.m. Weber
Hall.
%
W.
# 1 5k
h
pi
PIANO CONCERT BY DAVIDHOLLANDER, B.M. EastmanSchool of Music, AA.AA. ManhattanSchool of Music, at 8:30 p.m., ZurnRecital
Hall.
| S3 *
#
£
-'*-&
ARTIST IN RESIDENCE GARY
JUR YSTAi
pa
inter,
assist,
prof,
ofart at Keuka College, all day, in theStudent
Union
of Zurn
Hall.
Those were the times when M.U. wasalive
and
people communicated withpeople,
everyone knew everyone
else; eachface
In
class had a name and you knew
what
it
was..>j> J ' *** ^
^3§Kr^
We're not advocating one continuousbeer-blast this term; what we are advocating
is
that
all you
apathetic people atM.U. get your rears in gear, come out ofhiding, and MINGLE!
*
Remember,summer's Just around
the
corner and when
you
return
home
we
hope you'U have
somememories to remain
with
you.
"tijjfffj ^
We're sick of
everyone
complaining
that
there is nothing to
do;
then when someonedoes try
to
have
a party (e.g., the Big Boyfund-raising campaign),
no
one
shows
up.
B
So
everyone,
the
next time you're
sittingaround bitching that there is nothing
to do,
remember that
it's
your
own
fault. Collegeis what you make of it. Nothing gets done
while you're sitting
on
your
bum!
Sifffljn
Constructively Criticizing,
&j£>fli
B Your
Spiritual Guardians
|
|PB
m
P.S. If you can't think of anything to do,we've devised a
list
to
start the
ball
rollingand if
you
don't take the ball and roll, mayGarrett •Kenilworth slap you with histypewriter ribbon.
(
fcjp^lB!-El.
Miniature golfing
party. ES^S'
--^K
2.
Co-ed sof tbalI
games.
M 8j£
3.
Community
picnics—includes
sackraces,
egg
toss,, water
balloon
toss,
etc.
j*yi
5 4.
Camping
out
in Garvey
Park.
*
15.
Ted
Mack amateur hour
in the
Student
Unon. JKS^^^HJX'
1
|E1B«*&_¥^
16.
Skateboard
contest—come
on Dart!
7.
Bonfire at the
Peninsula—sing
aroundthecampfirc.
1
Ssi.*'
f
Ifc?'-^
P
8.
Roller
derby
in
Garvey ParkSEs^
B
9.
Go outside every night at 10 andscream to the school and all
its
students apleasant GOOD NIGHT. (Please wait forthe
chimes—tha
t'
s
your
cue).
s^JB&*if
10.
If you have the
funds—have
a party
(with
a
theme—let
one
of
the
girls
who
lived
in TH 2
last year
help
you;
they're always
full of
ideas!).
*
Rf
9E3&*
PPS.
Your Spiritual Guardians volunteer to start things moving followingthrough with 9 on Sunday night, May 12.
Come rain
or
shine,
j
-• f
I
I
PPPS.The word fori today
jis
Imagination. If you don't like anything onthe list, think up some other ideas, thendon't Just talk about them, carry them out!
And
well
try
too!
S $
PPPPS. Good night school! (That's incase you live too far and won't be able to
hear
us).
%
THE LORD DESCENDS
SBBKr^
|J b y
I
Underdog
^HB^^K
I Note:
Underdog
disguised as an
angelI of |
the
"left
wing**
ac
companies The Lord throughoutthe academic halls of MercyhurstUniversity.
His
purpose: to see if
T.M.
I
Cat's
^revelations
are
correct.sEt
t
On the first
day...Underdog
meets The Lord in the FacultySecretary's Office, Preston Hall.
They
have been drawn togetherby the "spirit process." From
here,
the pair travels through thedark ana
emptyf
halls.. Theirfirst stop
is|
the
Health j Office
where they encounter a
group
ofMercyhurst students waitingpatiently, occupying their
time
reading posters concerning VD,pregnancy, and pneumoniacaught from streaking. And TheLord saw what was being doneand he
said..."Desperate
ills callfor desperate remedies."On the
second
i
day...Underdoj
and The Lord ascend to
secoro
floor Main. Standing outside thePlacement Office
they £
overheara senior psychology! majorseeking assistance!
fne'answer
tothe senior's
rplea
is loud
g
and
clear:
"What kind of degree is
that?"
Underdog consults theschool catalog: "The Placement
Office
serves the students byoperating as a type of em
ployment
center where studentsand alumni find information toassist them in seeking gainfulemployment in their chosen
fields.
The staff establishescontacts with prospective employers, giving the students theopportunity to meet recruitersfrom industry,
government^
andschool districts, by arrangingappointments and interviewsthrough
I
an
*
active
on-cainpus
recruiting program." And TheLord saw what was being doneand he
said...''Never
trust to finepromises." |On the third
day...Underdog
and The Lord encounter adesperate! situation- in
1
theAdmissions
x
Office,
gj
"SirGalahad" and the; rest of theAdmissions court are in deepcontemplation. They are trying todevise new strategies in order tomeet their year-end quota. AndThe Lord saw what was beingdone and he said..."Men catchmore
[flies
with
a;
spoonful of
honey|than
with twenty cans ofvinegar."
f s
* W %
On
the fourth
day...In
responseto a
;
controversial issue theBeacon Press is stifled, never torun again J And The Lord saw
what
had been
done,
and he
said..."It
is too late to lock thestable door when the steed isstolen."
f ;
|
IH
On
the fifth
day...Underdog
andThe Lord travel to the office ofthe Academic Dean to find himsurrounded by the
Press*'
TheDean has prepared a statement:
"Thei ^School ol |
Inter-
Environment
all Temperatureswill qualify our students todetermine the proper oil temperature in which
Ho
fry frenchfries at McDonald's. Thisprogram was developed because
of
*
an
j
insurmountable need
lor
personnel in the
s
area." And The
Lordfsaw
what was being doneand he
said».."Ii
you have brokena
bowl,J
say it is a bowl, if you
have|broken
a dish, say it is adish."On the sixth day...
Under
dogand The Lord pass throughPreston and Zurn Halls again andagain, in desperate search for afaculty member or student. But
alas—it
was Wednesday and allsearching was
done
in
vain.
|
On the seventh
day...Upon
theadvice of The Lord, Underdogdisguised as a student, enters theBusiness Office. Unable
to
pay hisbill, Underdog is stripped of hisright wing. Underdog and TheLord say
their-
last farewell inTullio Field. And as The Lordascends a final proclamation is
made..."He
who walks withcripples, learns
to
limp."
RESEARCHASSISTANCE
Thousands
Topics
I
FREE
I
loaning
Resource
Confer
Mercyhurst^Campus
16501^
..,.:,«.»ii**-.*
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(nk
tfiii'W*T«*-*
v
*
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RESEARCH ASSISTANCE,
INC.
11941 WILSHIRE BLVD., SUITE #2
LOS
ANGELES, CALIF. 90025(213) 477-8474 or 477-5493
Our research material Is
sold
forresearch assistance only.
» 0 *
*
» 0
* t
\
UtM
a a
 
MAY
10,
1974AAERCYHURST COLLEGE
i.--v
PAGE
3
>
Mhos (ardour)ethos(ardour)et
This Friday
ETHOS (ARDOUR)
was createdof
searching
goals.
I
Untilcompanies,Ethos
(Ardour)
under!
the premisefor new musicalrecently, recordpromoters, and the industry ingeneral found it hard to acceptgroups performing anything butconventional material.
However
with the emergence and rise inpopularity of a few
^British
"progressive" acts, the publichas become increasingly aware
of
a^niusic
more sophisticated,more subtly textured than plainol'rock-n-roll.
f *
Ethos (Ardour) has beenperforming its own material forthree of the past four years;gaining
considerable
recognition,especially in Ohio, Indiana,Kentucky, Illinois and Michigan.(Early in their career, the bandwas known as Atlantic.) Theyhave appeared in concert with:The Byrds, Richie Havens, Poco,Chase, James Gang, Flash, AliceCooper, Little Feet,
Steppenwolf,
Black Oak Arkansas, Barnstormand Joe Walsh, Quicksilver, Yes,King
Qrimson,
as well asheadlining many college showsthemselves.
L \
The compositions of Ethos(Ardour) are often long anddescriptive I tone poemscharacterized by
*
carefularrangements of many interactive moods.
Thefrange
oftheir material borders on themodes of jazz, rock, classical,and particularly electronicmusical expression. Yet their
Culture
And
Education!
fAre
you looking for an in-terdiscipli
nary ^
inter session? Doyou like to
travel?!Are!you
interested in learning about theworld behind the Iron Curtain? Ifthe answer is yes, pack your skijacket and come along to explorethe
^
excitement^-and
color ofMiddle
?
European Culture andEducation.From NovemberDecember 21 youFrankfurt, Berlin,Budapest, Vienna,Kitzbeuhel, Zurich, Heidlebergand Munich. Some highlights ofthe inter session will^be;,|theBerlin Wall,
the
Opera House inPrague,^ the site ofdefenestration, the Danube Riverrunning between Buda and Pest,
the
winter and summer palaces
of
the Hapsburgs and a ski holidayin Kitzbeuhel. Schools and,universities will be visited in allcities. Approximate cost fromNew York is $800.00. For furtherinformation, contact Mrs. Jewellin 206 Preston or Dr. Weigert,Third Floor Old Main.
/
23 until
will visit
Prague,Salzburg,style opens into moments ofacoustic and vocal delicacy.However, the emphasis of effectis electronic,
jIn
addition to thebasic set-up- of
drums,£
bass,guitar and organ, the grouputilizes
two
Mini-Moogs, one ARP2600,two Mellotrons (full chorus,trumpets,
pipef
organ? Violins,cellos, flutes), and a Moog drumsynthesizer. Ethos (Ardour) wasthe first American act to employ
t wo I
 synthesizers live, 1971, andalso the first to incorporate aMellotron, 1971? With the additionof the drum synthesizer in September, 1973, Ethos (Ardour) isthe only attraction touring todaythat features all four membersplaying separate
keyboard
instruments.Ethos
I
(Ardour) consists
of:Mike Ponczek on Hammond B-3,piano, Moog synthesizer,Mellotron, chimes, theramin,electric
12
string, and vocals; BillSharpe
on
acoustic, electric
6
and12 string guitars, mandolin,special pedal effects, Mellotron,and lead vocals; Stephen Marraon bass
\
and acoustic guitars,flute, mandolin, piano, ARP2600,and! lead vocals; and
Mark"
Richards
on
[percussion,
drums,Moog drums, Moog
synthesizer.
kalimba,fany primitive;]
andotherwise weird rhythmic sounds
and
lead vocals.
i
The name, Ethos (Ardour),means the universal or objectiveelement in
a";work
of art. It is aconcept from the criticism of art,
and jit is
a new musical groupwhose music speaks to audiencesthat can appreciate a soundbeyond
the rock
of today.
| JpSee
Ethos today at
3
p.m. at the*Hurst outdoor concert. TheGrotto Concert will be moved intothe Union
(8
p.m.) in case of rainor snow.
Congratulations
To Mary Ann Gavrille forbeing named outstandingstudent contributor to theSpecial Education
^Depart
ment. Mary
Ann will
serve asnext year's president of theCouncil of ExceptionalChildren.
%
?
What
5
My Line?
By
T.
M. Cat, Special Reporter
The Senior Exhibition of Art inthe LRC has attracted a fancifulassortment of connoisseurs andwanderers. Here follows my ownportrait
of the
group. |The first thing which caughtmy eye at the exhibit was thesight of a man circling a
life-size
statue of Aphrodite. Evidently,the artist noticed this spectacle,too, and approached the man. Itwas Math prof Max Cuppe. Heturned to the artist and
said,
"Isthis your statue? I calculate thatthe circumference of
\
pointsaround the
widest*
part of thefigure locates the center of thecircle in the space! betweenAphrodite's arm and waist. Thisplaces the center of gravity
in
the
chest^
area, well above normal.And yet the statue stands unsupported. It's
an amazing
feat!"
The
artist, mouth agape, staredat Max,
then
I
mustered enoughvocal strength to
sayj"I
neverreally thought of
it
that way."jM|Over by a wall, a group of menhad assembled and appeared tobe discussing a
?
painting. Imoseyed over to
Hhe
paintingbeside it and
eavesdropped.
Biologist Sonny Scalon wassaying, "I thinkrepresentation ofstructure
a
of theit s a
fme
the cellularesophagus."Psychologist Stu Confederatedisagreed.
"It
looks to me like anink blot replica of a car with asmashed
fender.'
I
^Historian DavejRennie
spokeup."I think you gentlemen aremissing the point. The paintingdepicts the historical movementof man from the iron age to thespace age. See the plough in the
left
corner and the satellite
on
theright?"'You're!
close,"I
said!
PadreWhiteplain.j
"But {the
picture
really
L
shows
the interactionbetween God and
Man I
throughnature
finj
the| context of anevolutionary process."
- !
|But drama prof Greg Corralskilaughed and said, "I think you'remaking
.too
much of this.Remember this is the apatheticgeneration^It's; probably asurrealistic rendering! of
la
Budweiser label." j
At;
that point, thelartist, RayMaucaw, was walking by. Padrecalled to him and asked what thepainting represented. Ray lookedat the group as if surprised bytheir bewilderment. "Why, it's adesert with a cactus here andthere,"
he
replied.
k
Turning away
to
hide my smile,I bumped into art historian Joe
Smoca.EiMHe SKI
was
••&
un-
FARM WORKERS BOYCOTT
by
KathyiSummers
9H|
WKm
A
boycott of non-UFW head lettuce and grapes is in progress, insupport of
farm
workers
who are on strike in California
and ArizonaThe United Farm Workers of America, led by Cesar Chavez, arestruggling to re-gain contracts with the growers which expired in
1973.
These contracts were won after an extended strike and consumer boycott. However, when they expired last year, the growerssigned
"sweetheart"
contracts
with the Teamsters' Union. Theworkers, themselves,
had no voice in
these contracts and respondedby going on strike. Due to the availability of strikebreakers, asuccessful consumer boycott is necessary for the farm workers toattain the justice they deserve. The UFWA is asking for secretballot elections for the workers to choose what union they want to
represent
them.
f
iBlP ffffSBiffl
FACTS ABOUT FARM WORKERS & 3K&&J—800,000 children work in
the
fields | j j | Ik 980
per cent of
these
children never reach high school
15
per cent have symptoms of pesticide poisoning
95
per cent of their
housing has no plum
Ding
&.
—125
per)
cent higher infant mortality rate than the nationalaverage
§|
—1.9
rooms
per average house
—$50
or
less a week to
support a
family—life
expectancy
is
49 years
s
.What does a UFWA contract mean for farm workers?
On
March
30
Almaden signed a new contract with the UFWA. It is the bestcontract farm
workers
have:
|
—base pay rate is
$2.85
an hour, retroactive to Jan. '74, and toincrease each year.
6
paid
holidays
t
—10c
per hour
-
per person
to
the
RFK
medical plan—paid vacations f
f
—strict pesticide control
—time
and V
2
 for
 Sunday work?
5c
per hour
-
per
person to
the
Juan De
La
Cruz
Pension Plan—grievance procedure
and much
more.The success of the Almaden contract is attributed to the
Gallo
boycott
and
the
unity
of the Almaden workers.Farm workers sacrifice their lives to harvest the food we eat.Now they need our cooperation. Will the Mercyhurst communitysacrifice their daily salad for farm workers?
News From
S.A.C.
i
l
CONGRATULATIONS:John Voikas - The best ping-pong player in the spring termtournament
ut
NEWS.A.C.OFFICERSNancy Pentak
-
Chairperson
Sue
Montebell
-
Asst.
Chair
person!
Roanne Genovese -
Secretary
A
portable basketball net and hoop was just purchased for thepark.
\
\
a
characteristically clad in
T-shirt
and velvet slacks. I asked himwhat the significance of his outfit
was.I fig!
?
"Well, 1 was wearing a blueflowered shirt. But someonecame up to me, exclaimed overits artistry, and insisted
on
buyingthe shirt.
In
fact, I just called mywife..."
|
I
"To
have j her bring yousomething
to
wear," I chuckled."No,"
Smoca
resumed, "to askher
Ito bring
my three otherflowered
j
shirts.
I
Someone seisemight
want to buy
them," too."
r
Seeking a little normality, Ijoined business
proi
I
BettyDeMonte and Phys Ed instructor
Faye
Cost. I remarked to them,"It's nice to see
somef
nterestfrom people one doesn't usuallyassociate with the arts." Fayeanswered, "Yes too often peoplethink of us as leaning over abankbook or running
around j
agym.
But
j we've had a liberaleducation as well." jAs I walked away, II heardBetty say, "You're right, Faye,this painting would make a lovelydrapery
design."
<1
2 ]Before leaving I
the
] LRC, Istopped in the reference room toread about Goya's life. My experience at the exhibit had leftme in that
kind
of a
mood.
*
Wd
In J
the room, I
found |
danceinstructor Ankara Bedouin neatlyfolding; what appeared to be ablue flowered shirt. I blurted out,"So you're
the
one!"
£
1 "Yes,"
hei
answered. "Thismaterial will make two pairs ofballet
slippers—for Sheryl.andmyself—for
our
%
guest appearance in Pittsburgh
this
summer. We wanted somethingspecial for
Hansel
and Gretel."Gingerbread, anyone?
«
*PoetVKorner
HOW
How
can
I say I need
you,If only you could see, what
you mean to
me,
^Sure J
the world's a bigzoo,
I
But, that's
not
the way it has
to
be.
§;
Relax, think about all the
facts,
~-
I
Get off this
kick,
about beingan
ordinary
chick,
I bent over backwardsland almost broke myback
;;
You've got so much to
choose
from,
- ?Take
your Pick
I
TonyBetzlife
goes on, from day today,
We
keep changing inour own
|little
way,
Pushing too
hard
to
find a
thing to
say.
J
Shouldn't let things bother
me too
much,Especially, when peoplecriticize and curse,For these could
be
far worse.J
Tony Betz
ERIEBOOKSTORE
Call:
452-3354

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