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The Merciad, Oct. 24, 1975

The Merciad, Oct. 24, 1975

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The Merciad, Oct. 24, 1975
The Merciad, Oct. 24, 1975

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06/13/2014

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Mercyhurst
Collegei
suf
fered from a temporaryblackout last Thursday andFriday evening October 16and 17 because of a short inthree of six cables providing
>
JNy&f3
Photo
by
Nancy WillisThis is how the halls of
Mercyhurst
appeared during the blackout
black.
?*.
A
by
Dave Wallin
electricity to
the
college.The problem started about10 p.m. Thursday with apartial blackout affecting theSisters of Mercy'sMotherhouse, the MercyhurstPrep
school
and Zurn.Sisters from theMotherhouse called thePennsylvania
^Electric
Company to
report
the powerfailure. Penelec' crewschecked all lines leading tothe Mercyhurst power unit.All outside lines checked out.The problem had to be
in
ternal.
I
Mercyhurst maintenancecrews and
4
a
tprivate
contractor
went
to work trackingdown the cause
of ;4he pdwer
failure.
Theyjdiscovered
thatthree of six main cables hadshorted.
?mIn
order to make repairs onthe cables, it
wasfhecessary
to have Penelec shut off allelectricity
»
coming intoMercyhurst College. All dayFriday and early
i
morningSaturday, crews worked onsplicing the three bad cablesinto the three remaining goodcables.
- -
4
Meanwhile, in order tocompensate for the loss of
power,
maintena nee
*
crewsran a 120 volt cable from themain gate to the switch boardin Old Main and to McAuleyHall
to
operate
the
furnaces.
iLater
on Friday evening,crews were*
able
to connectthe Learning Resource Centerto
*
an independent line andsupply electricity to theboilers in Egan Hall. SinceBaldwin
Hall
and
Zurn
are all-electric buildings, they had no
heat.-
The
LRC was connectedindependently with the intentof housing resident studentsuntil heat and light could berestored. Emergency lighting
in
Baldwin
and
McAuley
Hallswas supplied by smallgenerators in the respectivebasement.
?
The three-way splice wascompleted about 3 a.m.
Saturday*
and completeelectrical service wasrestored. The electricity,however, is
only
f
temporary.The spliced cables could giveout at any time. The new 600feet of cable will arrive fromColumbus, Ohio sometimethis week.It is hoped that the splicewill sustain the campus needsthrough the end of the fallterm. During the break
between
4
fall term and
in-
tersessionithe
cables,will
bereplaced.
J*-
The\lMce
 of
the Mercyhurst Community
VOLUME 48 NO. 7MERCYHURST
Towne
OCTOBER 24, 1975
A Towne
Meeting,
sponsored by
l^the
Representative Union
Tof
Students in which the Mercyhurst community was giventhe opportunity
to|
makeknown their complaintstoward Mercyhurst Collegewas held Monday
nightfin
theStudent
Union.*;-,
A panel, consisting ofMarion
L.
Shane, president
of
Mercyhurst;
William
w-P.Garvy, dean of
thegcollege;
James.
Hallamyer.
president
or
RUS;
Sr. Phyllis Aiello,Director of Housing; WilliamKennedy, Director of StudentServices; and Glen Caruso,manager of Sesler Apartments; was there to answer
the
questions of
the
students.The
f
main issue
5
of
i
the
Meeting Airs [Complaints
meeting was the
poor
maintenance on campus. Thepriorities of the maintenancestaff were
^questioned more
than once and no
ope
seemedto have a satisfactory answerto the question.
fPresidept
Shane mentioned the fact thatmaintenance is
seriously
under-staffed
farta
underfinanced.
He
made no mention,
however,?
of any actionbeing taken to lessen theseproblems.
£
Several students wanted toknow where| their damagedeposits were
iept and?
whythey weren't? being used tomake necessary
^repairs
oncampus. Mr.
^Kennedy
saidthat damage deposits wereplaced in a general fund. Thesuggestion was made by adamageseparatebe used
student to
putdeposits! in abuilding fund tospecifically
?
for repairs.Another suggestion was madethat the students should takeit upon themselves to
care
forthe places
in
which
they live.Mark
^Ruttenberg?#.
astudent, brought up
the'ifact
that students are* beingcharged for
5
damages notactually
incurred?
by
"them.
Some students were moreupset
by!the
fact that thedamagesj;they
paid
for had
notebeen
repaired. Others felt
itfunfair
to be charged forsomeone
else's
carelessness.The panel members sympathized with the students butno concrete
j
solutions were
suggested.
^R^Ms^^|t3ffi!
.1 Photo
by
Nancy WillisAttending the Towne Meeting, panelists and students
dls
some
problem
areas of Mercyharst.
•.
''
RUS
The Representative Unionof Students has
begunjj
to layplans for a long term projectthat will result in
a*|term-by-
term
comprehensive studentevaluation of teachers andclasses.
| |
r
i
Beginning with the Winter
'76*term,|RUS
will hope to
distribute booklets
representing a summary ofthe results of questionnairescompleted by students
in
many"
100 series classes.Following terms will see
Compile Evaluations
Photo by
Bob
RonksleyJeffrey SternMeb, facultyadvisor
for the
RUS
project.
introduction
of questionnaires
to
200,300
and finally
400
levelcourses. Total length of theproject is expected to be two
to
three years.
*RUS
advisor
Jeff
Sternliebsays, "What
we're trying!to
do
is*
provide a source
\
of
feedback
|for
teachers andgive students a way of findingout how other people havereacted to specific coursesand teachers. In planning ourquestionnaire well be lookingat how other schools; havedone their evaluations andpresented the results.''The evaluation will gobeyond the college cataloguecourse description by seekinganswers to students'questions concerning workload, grading policy,
quality
of lectures and or books,overall value of the course,and many other questions.Faculty
i
members will besolicited
If
or their own briefevaluation of their coursesand asked about their expectations of conducting thecourse in the same way nexttime it
is
taught.A section will also beanynotbutprovided to includestudent
comments
|specifically asked
for.
related to the goals and aimsof
this
publication.
t|R
A preliminary
^polling
j ofstudents indicated many wereconcerned
with
possiblereactions from teachers,however, | Sternlieb
stressed
that the
anonymityg
of
students participating?would
be complete. "I don't see anyproblem with organizing thisso that students would haveno
fear"
of
I
reprisals
i
from
teachers;"
| ||j
Sternlieb hopes {that thiseffort will become an officialstudent publication,recognized by the
J
administration, independentfrom RUS, and organized byany interested students.
^
If anyone is interested inworking for
a
student orientedcourse evaluation, come to ameeting on Wednesday,October 29, at 3 p.m. in 114
Zurn.^
Mr.
I
Sternlieb ispresently serving as theFaculty advisor and is willingto discuss any aspect of thisproject.Marty Visnosky wanted toknow exactly what thestudents' rights were
|as
renters!of
-townhouses
andapartments on-campus.
Mr.
Kennedy^
answered!'
4
they're
the same as any
renter's
would be."
Sr.|Phyllis jsaid
the residents were under therules of the college becausethey
a re I considered]
to
[be
campus residents. I
W&
I
The problem of noise at theSesler apartments
-*was
brought up. Some
^residents
felt they are
being-punished
for the actions of summerresidents. Sr. Phyllis said this
was
not true,
If
 or only complaints received during thisterm were being acted upon.RUS president.
fjim
Hallamyer said
j
that thepeople; around the campus
nave
to realize they are livingnext to a college not anjoldfolks home.
%&
B|(
Sr. Phyllis was asked aboutthe rules pertaining todrinking in
the
Itownhouses.
She said that students
21
andolder are allowed to drink inthe townhouses. She alsostated that
*
under-agedrinking is
not!
only againstthe rules of the school, butagainst state laws. Thosestudents allowing under-agedrinking in their townhouses
will be held liable. I
Frank McMahon suggestedthat copies
*
of the roomcontracts be made availableto students and that billing ofrooms should be done throughthe students' mail boxes. Mr.Kennedy said he would act
upon these
suggestions.The problem of inadequateparking on campus wasdiscussed. There seem to beno plans to increase parkingspace at this time. Even withthis definite! shortage ofparking places, the collegehas leased part of
McAuley
sparking lot to the city for its
use,
thus creating a greatershortage.
£
It seems Mercyhurst wasofficially deemed a
"suitcase
college
44
by Eileen DelSordobecause of the lack of
social
activities. Several studentsblamed this on the lack ofinterest on the
part
of thestudents
ftol
attend the
scheduled;?
events; otherstudents asked
9
"whatevents?"
Pf"
E
Many students were upsetbecause of the
25
cent chargefor having (heir doors openedby the Resident Assistants ontheir floors when the studentsfind themselves locked out oftheir rooms. The students felt
;
this
i
was a form of unnecessary harassment placedupon them. Sr. Phyllis saidthat this was necessary to cutdown on the amount of
extra*
work for
*
the
|Resident?
Assistants;^
| |'«
The accomplishments
ofthis
meeting,
at
present,
seemto be few. Any students truly
interested i
in seeing
d
uniteaction taken on
 th.se 
problems are asked to attendthe next RUS mootingWednesday, October
£j,
at
3:30 p.m.
in
room
U4Zum
 
PAGE
2Ralph Concert
MERCYHURST
COLLEGE
OCTOBER
24,
19/5
DYNAMITE SUCCESS
by Mary
Sue
Sabol
Being consistent
is
oftendifficult
to
achieve;
however*
the members
of
Ralph provedthat
it can be
done.
On
Sunday, October
12,
this(phenomenalrock orchestrafrom the TPocono Mountainsarea returned
to
Mereyhurstfor
the
second time
to en
tertainthestudents
at a
freeconcert.
The
people who tookadvantage
of
seeing
and
hearingRalph'sperformance
r
e c o g n i
Z
e
d
£ I
h
e
professionalism
and
superbshowmanship displayed
by
this band.
The
audiencesreception
was
amazing;
Ralph
t
not
only received
a
standing ovation
but was
called back
on
stage
for two
encores,
in
attempt
to
satisfy
the /enthusiastic
"we-want-
more"crowdsEM'
you
think about
jit,
Ralph's music can't
be
placedinto
one
distinctive category.The band utilizesjazz
and
classical material
in
conjunction with rock
to
create
a
total musical experience."Tex",
the
trombone playerand
flutist,
commented
on
Stage
that
Ralph
"touches
a
lot
of!musical
areas"* andLenie. rhythm
guitarist,!
keyboard player and vocalist,later reiterated by sayingthat their music
is
a
"fusion
of many different types ofmusic,
Ralph has
incorporated intotheir show a very polished,impressive repertoire,consisting of many originalsongs
ana
some of the morerecognisable contemporarysounds.
It's
been discoveredthat
reallyt
no one membercan take complete credit for
Ralph's
originals, Each and
every
person in the bandcontributes his own ideas tothe composition andarrangement of now works,it's quite evident that theyare multi-talented musicians,gifted with an abundance ofcreativity and I resource*fulness,
'; -
<•&
Along with
ftheir
originalpieces,
Ralph's
renditions ofsuch popular classics as
Mc
Arthur
Park*
/
am
the
Walrua
and
Pinbalfj Wliard
w
$ r
e
ores
e n
ted
magnificently. If you
didn't
know better, you could have
sworn
the
orginal artists wereperforming instead of Ralph.And when a band can accomplish such a
feat,
it'srather indicative of theirtremendous musical abilities^
975.
A $5 non-refundable deposit will place your order
idlh
the balance due on or before delivery. You may sign
ir
on theYearbook subscriptions will continue until November
i,
wini
mm
naituice
uue
on or
oeiore
aenvery.
i
on may
sign
up ah the Information Office with
any
member
Yearbook
staff.
', i
# jg^ |
Seniors, there
fs
no
charge for pictures being submittedto the yearbook. All questions or suggestions concerningthe Praeterita can be sent to James Lee,
MeAulov
Hall,Rm.
233 or
RcginaScura,
Seller
322.
I i
1,
f\'
The
Mereyhurst
College Yearbook Staff deeply appreciates the following new patrons for their pledges: Dr.
Mr
L.
Shane. Dorothy Shane, Carol Hill, Saga Foods.
*
James LeeYearbook Editor
THE ERIE BOOK STORE
717
French StreetPHONE 452-3354
THE
WINDROSE
Wast
//*
MERCYHURSTSTUDENTS
1
a
receive
10%
DISCOUNT
4.
^»If
J
Clothing
Jewelr
\
Bedspreads
OFFER GOOD 10 OCTOBER
31
i
Speaking
of
ability,
the
hand's
presentation of the
1812
Overture
was
trulyunforgettable. People don'tnormallyexpect
to
heat*
aclassical piece coming from
a
rook orchestra; hereagain,Ralph
is the
exception. Theirinterpretation
was
excellent*
including
the
sound effects
at
the
end of the
piece,
To say
the
least,
the
audience*
was
surprised
and
pleased withRalph's superb performance.^As mentioned previously,Ralph's success
can be at
lrUnited
to the
wide range
Of
talent possessed by eachIndividual
in the
group.
Yet.
they can't do
it
alone,*withouttheir brilliant technicians,Ralph would experience somedifficulties.
The
roadcrewcombines their knowledgewith*fthe band
to
establish
a
balanced, wellblended
end
result, They
are
responsiblefor setting up and taking downRalph's
equipment,
andmaking sure that
everything
Is ^functioning properly.
The
road fcrew
Is a
vital facet
of
Ralph's*entourages althoughtoo often overlooked
by the
viewing public, f 1S#
|^
Aftef personally speakingwith
the
men
who
comprise
Ralph,
tho
impression they
gave
is
one of total love andcommitment
for jtheir
profession as musicians.
MuslQ is
their lifeline;
from
It, they
continue
to
grow
and
to reach
i
out to
peopleeverywhere*
One
I
goodexample
of
this
is
whenftdltiW along with suchperformers
as
Ru/Us
and
Joe
Cocker,
participated
in the
first rock concert
to be
heldTor
the U.S.
Army
at
PortCampbell, Kentucky, it was
a
"first
"
for the
Army
and the
response was unbelievable.One wov11d never expect
the
Army to agree
to a
concert
of
this type.Apparently
t
the
reason
is
simple: music
has
always seemedtobond people
together*
whether
it be
the
military
or
civilians,
in
goodtimes
or
in J bad .JTheArmyrealised
the
value music
has
and wanted
to
convey it
to
their
command,
via
suchartists
as
Ralph. Happeningslike this offer nope that
all is
not lost, even when
It
appearsthat the' nation
Is
scrapingrock bottomit Vverv doubtful that
the
1
Hurst students did not enjoythe* concert Sunday night.Depslte
the
freezing ternperature
In the
tennis courts,the heat generated
by
Ralph
was
|
enoughj
to
keepeverybody warm I Onceagain, thanks
to
Ralph
for a
dynamiteconcert ?
*!
i
]rr Notes Special thanks
are
extended
to the
'Hurst roadcrews
Jim
Kelly, Paul Bsela,•'Plnhead Barrett,fKennyWard, Sammy Johnson
and
Willy Acklln. Also,
our
ap
preciation
to
Therese fromthe Snack Bar
for
helping
to
provide refreshments
for
Ralph*
I :• J >
I
i
I
Misconceptions About Alcohol
It
has
been said that If
It
weren't fori the intoxicatingeffects of alcohol t ha t
it
wouldbe anexcellentsource
of
food.
Is this correct?Alcohol is
a
substance whichsupplies heat energy Heatenergy supplied
by the
highcalorie content
of
alcohol(oneounce yields
i
210
calories)does not qualify It
as a
food, Ifa person attempted
to
sustainlife on alcohol alone
he
wouldsoon suffer from seriousnutritional deficiencies,
A
fobd must
not
only .supplyenergy;
it
must containproteins, minerals
*
orvitamins.
•••*
f
Alcohol cannot form new(issue, nor can
It
repairdamaged tissue, nor does Itregulate
|
or protectphysiological funetions*Hence,
It
should not under anyCircumstances
bo
recommended as
a
food, IThe deadline for senior pictures
Is
Dee,
1
and
all
photographs must be submitted
In
black and white glossyprints,
size
4x9 or 8x10.
Reglna
Scura, Seller 922,
will
approve
all
photographs.
Tr *
Attention Seniors: You may have
"personalized'?yearbooks'for
the small additional fee of sixtycents*Contact James
Lee.
(loom
238
McAuley Hall,
etc
Chem
Dept
Gives
Tests
On Thursday. October
to*
at
4:00 p.m,
the
ChemistryDepartmentwinadminister
a
diagnostic test
of
basicmathematical skills
for
those
students
who are planning
to
enroll in
\
Chem.
in
(Chemistry of
Life)
orChemistry
121 dnorganic
Chemistry 1) In Winter termof this year.
I
f
1
All
students
who
areplanning (even tentatively)
to
take either
of the
aboveChemistry courses
are
urgedto take
the
test,
which willlast approximately an
hour,
il The purpose
of
the test
is to
helpstudents whosemathematical
i
preparationfor Chemistry
l«r
weak.Students
who
performunacceptable
on the
test willbe referred
to the
remedialmathematics laboratory,]where they can obtain*/re*
of(hatt>v,
the help which they
need
*
to
bring
their
mathematical skills
to an
a< ceptable level before
the
chemistry courses begin
In
January*
$
Anyone
who has
questionsregarding
the
test should callor
see
Sr,
Mary Charles
Wfescmer,
310 Zurn
or
884-4491or
Dr.
Robert Ulesslng. SOUZurnor
mm
iai7.< ^3(in 1st in
n.q
dinner
senior
A
dinner
for
Seniors will
be
The annual Christmas
h
Senior&[
^
ecemher
12
this
yen i Interested .Seniors may
sign
Up
dt
the
It US
door
or
cull
and
leave your name
with
one
of the following:
I
(effete
I'Vrro,
Ant,
1121,
0SS*
06644 Paul ToraldoiApt. 182,H04-0M1or
Sally
Schisminos,
Apt
121,
iron
ri022<
Deadline date Is
No vein
her 11!
COMEWRITEWITH
WORK
FOB
A
"FIRS1ClASS"
PAPER
Till MERCIAD isl preserrfly recruiting staff members
{for
the
1975-76school year.
''
AIL positions open.CALL Carol Quarlucclo
at
866-1954
or
attend
on
organizational meetingThursdaysin
the
Mercladoffice,4<p.m.
304 Old
Main.
 
OCTOBER
24. 1975
MERCYHURST
COLLEGE
Committees Appointed
Sr>
E
Y
mord
p
°Y
d
°<*
PAGE
3
ass
rSa«-»»&:
^SSJSSiSL^
Wil1 b
t
use
1
when a
Pwblem
is
.prraeraea to
a committee
member wUl
be-
mitten
m^
y
hf
e
IS
b
f
r
of
Colle
§
e
Senate
or
StandingOom-
-
cSn^mSl-
that
y
?
ar
p
f?
b,em
concerns.
^solutSls
U di8cussion wUI
oo hoW
to determine possibledefiriteacUoa
6
Pr
°
blem
W
|
taken
to
*
Se
"ate
for
Recom mendations for Standing Committees
Academic Policies:
Ex
Officio, William P. Garvey; AlanBelovorac,
(A);
Linda Schmidt,
(P);
Andrew Roth,
(F);
Nancy
Borowski,
(S);
and MartinVisnoskv,
(S).
ifLong
Range Planning:
Ex
Officio,
Wihiam
P.
Garvey;Louis
Need.
(A);
Sr.
Maura Smith,
(F);
Paul Jurkowitz,
(S);
Jeff
Best.
and Ray Forrester,
(S),
I
LearningfResouree
Center: ExfOfficio, Joanne Cooper;Fran
Bingnear,
(A);
Detmar
Straub, (F); Judy Wieezorek,
!
(F);
Linda Looney, (S);
and
Joan Portka, (S).
*§j
Admissions: Ex Officio,
John
Riley;
Wendy
McCabe, (A);David Thomas
(F);
Anthony Lucas,
(F);
Sally Gorndt,
(S);
and
Richa
rd Zywotko,
(S).
2
Affirmative Action:
Ex
Officio, Marilynn Jewell; GaryBukowski, (A); John
Stewart,
(F);
Elaine Pederson,
(F);
Renate
Ferro,
(S); and
Nancy
Willis,
(S).
]
Campus Life: ExfOfficio,
Sr.
Phyllis
Aiello:
SEdward
Higgins,
(F);
David Bethune,
(F);
Mark Ruttenberg,
(S);
Sue
Berardinelli. (S); and
David
DeSante, (A).Christian Life: Ex Officio, David Blanchfield,
Sr.Lloseph
Mary Korasky.
(A);
Bob
Blessing,
(F);
George Offutt,
(F);
CannineDeCarlo, (S);
andKathyl£elleher,
(S).Budget:
Ex
Officio Willis
G.
Cardot:
John Nesbit,
(A);
David Pines,
(F); Sr.
Patricia Whalen,
(F);
WilliamGlinka, (S);
andLoriLoeffler,
(S).
* !
1
fAthletics:
Ex
Officio, Richard
Fox;]Dan
O'Connor,
(A);
,Janet*Pricef
(F);
Ed
Blanchard,
(F); and
Valerie
Feno,
(S).
|
{ }
Administrative
Practices and Operations: Ex Officio:
Dr,
Marion Shane; Thomas Monaghan,
(A);
Dave
Palmer,
<F);
Barb
Weigert£
(F) Joe
Castrignano,
(S); and
Mark!
Hoak, (S) WM;
jnent
Advises;
Overseas
LOOKING AHEAD *
A career overseas
may or
maylnot
be for you. But
whether
or not
you choose
to
work abroad,
the
chances
of
your being
j
employed
by a
multi-national company in the
U.S.
at
some time in your
lifef
or at
least having
-close
business relationships withmulti-nationals
are
strongand becoming
stronger,
i
i
Multi-national companiesare creating
a new
kind
of
business executive. Such
a
person
is
less
and
less
a
creature
of-
one
country
or
environment
and is
mpre
and
more
a
citizen
of the
world.As comfortable
?in
Brussels,or Singapore
as in
KansasCity.
The one
who
can
speakseveral languages,
who un
derstands
"international
finance, who
is
familiar withreligions and cultures
on a
world-wide basis
this is
the
multi-national
executive
of
today and the future.
jln
considering!
an
international
career,!
a youngperson should assess himselfor
herself
carefully concerning
J aptittide for
in
ternational living. There
is
much
glamour surrounding
the
stereotype of
interna
tfonafjliving, which does
not
comethrough
on
a day-to-day basis.The kind
of
person who tendsto
be
successful overseas
is
the
one who has an ad
venturesome
spirit;
who
doesn't mind inconveniences,fcdirt and health hazards;
who
Careers
is patient with delays,
and
with* people
who are
lessmotivated
and
think
dif
ferently than
he or she
doesabout almost eveything;
one
who has
as
little prejudice
ad
possible?
toward|
different
races, colors!
and
creeds.Anyone
who
tends
j
to
*be
prejudiced in the
U.S.
will
be
a disaster overseas.Additionally,
I
one
v
must
be
able
to
live away fromfamiliar
scenes.
While
a
l
bachelor's
in
Business Administration
is
desirable,
it is not
essential.People with just a
liberal
artsbackground could pursue
a
master's degree
in in
ternational business.
For
example,
the
AmericanGraduate School
of
Inter
nationa
1
Management!
combines
international
studies of culture, geography,politics, economics
and
history with intensivelanguage
and
world businessstudies; resulting.*! in
a
Masters
of
winter
national
M a na gement
degree,Another route might
be*
fora person
to
acquire businessexperience
in
this country
and
then
*beJ
trained (usually
at
company expense)
in a
foreign language
to go
overseas.
FightingCancerHer Game
is
Mereytamin
is a
serumproduced through researchby Sister
Eymard
i*Poy
dock,which literally stops
the
growth
of
cancer. Cancer,
a
growth which results fromcell division that
has
lost
its
controlled
mecha
among
the.-
most painfuldiseases today.* With
her
serum, Sr.
Eymard
stops
the
unnatural ceil
division,
thus
halting
the
cancer
in the
body.Sr. Eymard, prior
to her
studies
at
Mercy
hurst,
^has
had additional studies
at
the
National ((Science
Institute
in
Microbiology
in
*
Durham,
N.C;
J
Tissue CultureTechniques and Bone MarrowTechniques
at
Roswell Park,in Buffalo,
N.Y.;
andjjmanv
summers
of
research
at the
St^;
Thomas Institute
in
Cincinnati!
Ohio.
.
S
%1
She is also a member
of
the
Pennsylvania Academy
of
Science,
the
InternationalOceanographic
*
Foundationand
the
International Society
for Cell
Biology.Sr. Eymard
is
currently theProfessor
of
Biologyfand
the
Director*
of
.Biological
Research here
at
Mercy-
hurst J
She has been
teaching
on
the college level ever since
1947.:
I
$ *
Receiving
a
bachelor
of
by Darene Keith
SisterEymardPoydock.arts degree
at
MercyhurstCollege some years
ago,
she
then continued onto
the
University >
of|
Pittsburgh
to
earn
her
M.A. After obtainingher masters, she then went
on
to
St.
Thomas Institute
!
UnOhio
and
received
her
Doctorate.'*fv
;
Sr$ Eymard
has
earnednumerous honors S includingadmittance tojtheiTri BetaHonor Society;
the
Board
of
Directors lof
the
AmericanCancer Society;
and
generalPhoto by
Bob
Romk levchairperson
of the/
CancerPrevention Society. siShe
was
also added
to the
"Who's
Who
in
America"
for
hersignificant?contributionsto cancer research.The|Mercyhurstfaculty,administration
and
studentsare certainly proud
of Sr.
Eymard, Also grateful
are
the many people
who
havecontracted cancer
and now
have a hope
to
cling tojMereytamin. & i
L
And!
ThenHeat
look
Are
Much
of
America'seconomic future success willdepend
on the
ability
of its
multi-nationals *
to
competewith
the
companies
of
othernations.
i
AlNOTE
OF
INTEREST
IN
THE EDUCATION DAILY:
Recruiters
iWant
Business
Grade
in
Suits,
Survey
Finds,
Pity
the
nervous
job applicantwho appears
at the
interviewwith long hair
I
and
|
dirtyfingernails;
who
disdains
suns
or, if *
female,brassieres;
who
wearssandals, fidgets with pencils,avoids direct eye contact withthe interviewer,
or
speaks
in
iargon.
Pity
the
applicantespecially
if he or she is a
fine arts major;iThe
composite picture^of
the
job
applicant least likely
to be
admired by recruiters
in171 major.?
industries
&
hasn'tchanged much,
nor
has J
theimage
of the
ideal applicant.He
is
clad
in a
suit; neat
and
preferably with short hair;intelligent, relaxed,Jcordial,enthusiastic, sincere;
a
business,, engineering,computer
orf
physicalsciences
gradua
te.
|
|
If
The likes and dislikes
of
lob
recruiters!
in
industriesranging
from-accounting
and
aerospace
to government andutilities
are
documented
in a
survey
by Jan
Anton
and
Michael Russell
ja
for
Hayward State University.They
sampledpnore
than
100
recruiting officers who hiredmore than
three-fourths
of thecollege
{graduates
for
theirfirms
and
institutions since
1972.1
The report noted thatalthough
the
data
was
compiled
in
1973.
collegeplacement officers nave beenemphasizing
the
samequalifications
for
applicantsfor years.
"What
used
to be
thought
of as
just
oilman's
opinion turns
out to be
solid
fact,"
says
the
report.
* *,
Copies
of
Employer
Attitude
and •
OpinionsRegarding Potential College
Graduate
Employees" cost
$4
and;*are' available from
the
Placement
Center. HaywardState University, Hayward,California
94342.
-
1
RECRUITER ON CAMPUS:Ernst
and
Ernst, Tuesday,November
4,1975$Accounting
Majors
preferred,?
W
?
*
Amet
lean
Institute
TEACHERS
card
information
CHECK AREAS
OF
INTEREST:
LAVER'S FLORISTS
and
GREENHOUSE
t\
AMta*
ttvito
AM
. '
Art
Miltory
tlAlntft
CISMICHI
cw)H/*iui<i
C«*monMfrfc»l
CommuhlflAllan* Art*lifth LJ
ffituf*
owe
§ Become
a
tutor
and
earnextra cash while helpingyour fellow students.
For
more information contactKaren
J.
Gilmore, Preston
202,
ext.
277.|SIf you
are
suffering from
a
sagging Q.P.A., give
it a
boost! Get
a
tutor! For moreinformation contact Karenatthe above address.
very
occas
/
Q
Summer Program!
Q Aoademio
Year Program*
n
Please contact
me
for*
an Interview
&-
§
tfW.
f
IA
tf
&
*
%
EAST
AV£
>v
PHONE
454
V
Frtftcftliftf
uif«
1
OMNMUM
(wMMM LunQuao*
A
CivJIlMllonSpanish
I«ngi/uyP
4 ClvilliAlion
MtfHllO
i
*»»yt"*u« a OMNlfUM
.
Malum
Lftnuutg*
A CMMiafion
HunmnltlfiMu«fc
Orltnul GivSllMtlOfl
PACifl*
0lu^*«H.ii«..„|.hy
aoftUflti laft n««atrditiffir
mMtHimi
CvHXAfDtTfi«ntr« Afl«
Tntology
Olhtr
Clata Of

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