Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Merciad, Nov. 5, 1976

The Merciad, Nov. 5, 1976

Ratings: (0)|Views: 15|Likes:
Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, Nov. 5, 1976
The Merciad, Nov. 5, 1976

More info:

Published by: TheMerciad on May 24, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/25/2015

pdf

text

original

 
VOLUME
49, NO. 7
MERCYHURST
COLLEGE
NOVEMBER
5.1976
The
'Hurst's
annual weekendcelebration of Halloween wasvery successful again this year.It kicked off with a special
"Halloween
Buffet"
in?
thecafeteria.
*
i
SAGA outdid themselves andshowed the type of quality mealsthey can prepare by servingItalian ;pasta, meatballs,
{
roast
beef
(masterfully
carved by KentKoch), a Halloween cake, cookiesand pumpkin
pie> I
\ \
The tables were decorated withpumpkins which had been carved
and
entered in a contest sponsored by SAGA. Winners wereKate Berry, (third prize), MattHill, (second), and Bridget Beck(first).
! ' |
Students 'remarked
that
thebuffet was really great."It was really
good,"9
saidFreshman Brian France.
|"The
plates should have been bigger tohold all
that
food."\
?
To continue the weekend, all-night horror movies were shownSaturday night in Zurn Recitalhall. "Race
with
the
Devil," TheCorpse Grinders" and "Ten LittleIndians" were
a few*of
the
frightening
flicks sponsored
I
byStudent Government.The movies were well-attendedwith the Recital Hall beingalmost entirely filled for the firstfew movies.
As
the nightprogressed, though, the audiencebecame progressively | smallerand by 7 a.m., only a few die-hards
remained.,
zi ^^
Saturday night was also
'mischief
night'; and there werethe annual shaving cream andwater battles raging acrosscampus,
$&
%
Security was out in force andkept damage to a minimum.
I
There was only one incidentwhen a window in Baldwin wasbroken by some over-zealousmarauders from McAuley.
r^jSt
p
Sunday
night's
costume dancewas a real success.
^
Monsters of all sizes and shapesattended.
$
f*
<3
McAuley Hall produced a 17-person "Campus Caterpillar."Judges for the costume contestwere BarryGrossman,associateprofessor of
politicals
scienceJerry Trimble, dean of
\
thecollege and vice president ofacademic services, and WilliamKennedy, director of studentservices.
\
During the contest the judgeswere assaulted by apes, seducedby Mini
1
Mouse, drenched withwater
by
space creatures, chokedby
4
Dracula,
confronted
by
hookers,?
winked at by Ftran-svestites, and sung to by
5
the
farmer-
i
n-the-dell.
j
Winners of the contest were:
Firsts
prize, the organ grinder,Paula Kelly; Second prize,Dracula and wife, John Ruppand,Sue
McFarland.
Third prize went to the Wizardof
Oz
group led by Kevin Cronin,and fourth prize
was won by
MarySue
Sabol
in an authentic policeofficers uniform.Two fifth prizes were awardedto space bird Ken Meredith, andthe Indians,! Denny Scklzt andJohn Strickland.
f f
Music for the dance wasprovided by "Wave." The groupkept everythinggoing,and playedmusic from top 40's boogie, to
'50's
rock
4
n
roll.
;
All!
in all,
-
the Halloweenweekend was a great success.!
-**••
DISORDER
IN
THE
COURT—Two
of
the
judges of Sunday night's Halloween
Costume
Dance, BillKennedy (rear) and Jerry Trimble (center), escaped the clutches of a troupe of rampagingapes.Buta
third,
Barry Grossman (foreground), was smothered under.
\
f
Mercyhurst
Honors
List Scholars
By
Gee
NeCastro and Chris FillppiThe annual Dean's List Dinner
wasrield
Tuesday, October
26,
tohonor
thoseVstudents
havingoutstanding academic* recordsduring the 1975-76 school year.Edward Gallagher, AssistantProfessor of the Division ofEducation and President of theMercyhurst College Senate, wasthe honorary guest speaker forthe occasion.
SThejdinner
was held at? theHoliday Inn South and was attended by 108 students and 26faculty and administrativemembers.
%
.
F.
?$
Dr. Marion
L.
Shane, Presidentof the College, and Dr. JerryTrimble, Dean of the College andVice President of AcademicServices were among
the
honoredguests. I faThomas Hixenbaugh, a 1976graduate of Mercyhurst, was in
aftendence
for the fourth consecutive year.
jRE
!|S
|
\%
Those
attending
with
perfect 4.0accumulative averages were:Madalyn Brooks, Connie Currie,
John
Schmitt, Judith Skrzypezak,Patricia Tivnan
and';Patrick
Weschler.
\ \
\
'l*B
Following ; the buffet, DeanTrimble welcomed the guests andintroduced
Dr.?
Shane whocongratulated the students vontheir achievements and made afew
remarks*on'the
quality ofeducation.
%
fcf^
ftPresident
Shane |
then
\
introduced guest speaker, EdwardGallagher.
I
| SB
ggg*
I
Mr.
Gallagher
\
spoke
on theimportance of education and said,"I hope that all of you rememberthat, that mind you are trying todevelop
is
just like a computer.
Ifyoutlon't
put anything into it youwon't get anything out of it.
It
is
how
you program it that counts."Gallagher contined on a morepersonal basis. "Hopefully youscholars have more
than
a snort
range igoal
in
J
mind aftergraduating
tfrom
MercyhurstCollege. May your
purpose really
be
that-
of beginning yourdevelopment; as an educatedperson.
%$ \
Sl^r'-IS %$He^l
provided more ^encouragement,;; insight and
per
sonal
experience !l
to further explain what education meant to
him
and what it should mean tothe student.
"It-would
be mydream that you
noronly
seek togain
jknowledge
but that youbecome a critical thinker whosearches
}
for
wisdom
l|
throughquestioning, one who is so openmat you
comeno
know
yourself."
Following
Mr.
Gallagher's
speech,
Dean
J
Trimble
and Dr.William
Garvey
presentedawards to the students.Plaques, decorated with theMercyhurst emblem andengraved
with
the
student's namewere presented to students whohad received the Presidentialaward more than once.
*
Those who were on the Dean'sList for the first rtime werepresented with
afcopy
of RobertM. Pirslg's
-Zen
and the Art ofMotorcycle Maintenance, whichtell's about man's Journey insearch
of
himself.
*
"It uses the motorcycle," saysPersig, "as a medium to expressa universal study of the art ofrationality."
* -,
Elections for the
5
office ofsecretary of the MercyhurstStudent Government will be heldFriday. November 5, in the ZurnHall lobby from 9 a.m. to
4
p.m.Candidates Jeff Best, Pat
Condrin
and Chris Van Waganenare vying to replace
Mary
BethWard, who resigned October 21.
Ms.
Ward, who was selectedMSG secretary last May as a
freshman,,said
the job was in
terfering?
with her classroom
work.
She
will continue her dutiesuntil a successor is elected.The
i
Merciad questioned allthree candidates on theirbackgrounds, past experienceand qualification for
i
the post.Excerpts appear below.JEFF BEST, a senior with adouble major* in
marketingmanagement ^nd
law- enforcement, holds no
elective
office in student government but
maintains
an active
interest?
He
attends
most meetings andfor the past
two
years has served
ortf RJollege
Sedate subcommittees, for Blueprint HI ayear
ago
and currently for budgetand finance.Twice in the past he ran unsuccessfully
for'
%
Student
Government office, for treasurerin the fall of 1975
andlfor
vice-president last spring.
IWiS
I"I'm active on campus and I'mnot afraid
to*
open my mouth,"Best said.
%
- £
Best is dissatisfied with thecurrent MSG administration. Hesays it has failed to tackle issuesother than student activities."Right now the
government
isjust an overseer," he
said.
"I willtry
to
I
get
it
\
more
involved ingovernmental
activities."> >
If elected,
Best!said,
he would
F'tSP
CONDKIN
4
'steer
the meetings, record theminutes without bias and keepclose ties with all channels ofcommunication that inform thestudents."
PfflBSI H
PAT j
CONDRIN,i
a seniormajoring in humanities and
minotfng
in philosophy, views! aterm' as MSG
secretary
as
a
stepping stone between his
four
years at Mercyhurst and
jpost
graduate work in law.
^
£j"
Condrin called his educationalbackground
f
in j politics his
Strongest
qualification?, for, the
iob.
*
j*
s <
"This
is a good opportunity
for
me,"
he
said.
"I plan to go to lawschool
and
since this is my senior
year,-1
want
to
j*
get involved ingovernment, especially studentgovernment." |Although he had never held anelective office in MSG* Condrinran for vice-president last springand lost a close decision.
(
"I saw another opening withthis position," Condrin
said,
"anddecided to
try
for it."His aims if
elected:!
•.^"Keeping
the representatives
together—getting
them to attendand
making
sure they're in-
formedjon
what kinds of thingsare going to be discussed."
I
"Keeping in touch with
j
anypublications that will inform thestudents."
g
§§
:
>M
i
The job will be "almost
like
Dublic relations,"
Condrin^said.
"The
big thing government
has
to*
do
is involve the studentsmore." he said.
"There
are a lotof
major
/decisions made withtheir money."
<
'<
I
CHRIS VAN WAGANEN,
a
jr.elementary education major,feels his journalism experiencewill be an advantage if he isVAN WAGANENelected.
j
X
2>
"This! is primarily a writing
job,"
he said, "and I think I'mqualified."
'f
fi
i
Van Waganen has been acontributor to The Merciad forthree
years,'first
as a generalreporter, last
>
year as sportseditor and currently as a specialassignments news reporter.
^:This
fall
he
began
his
first termas a Student Governmentrepresentative and was named tothe Affirmative Action subcommittee of the Senate. He ranunsuccessfully for secretary lastspring.
,
Van Waganen says he
j
was"shocked"
by
a*polrconducted
recently in one of his classes,during which only three studentscould
{identify
their StudentGovernment president.
*&
£
14
That
really got me," he said.
"We
could be making decisionsthat affect their everyday lives,"
Van
Waganen places particularemphasis on familiarizingcommuter students
with
government functions."The student government
represents
the {residents," hesaid, "and it's about time itrepresented
the day
students, too.They're left out in the
cold."
1
p
¥t
iff
*
0M£f*
f
*
t*
• < < < »
*
t*«1M4 * 4»*|fi<.8lfr**lVAV
/.W.'.
^*,',V*,r,
*.*•/»> *.'..*',*» -,-.*.*'
m
*
«*
rf
* fl
*
* r
#
\
Uf.U>« H4MMMtIM•«*I
M-A
M»HMfrt»
fc
*•
*H'
VVVifc&VMdA * "
*"•>•*• ••-•<!»
V.V "'•'-'
f
v '-'*-
V
*V
T**»*
 
11
ft 1
£M#*M
111
|J-I
*
i
i
»
i
PAGE
2
THE
MERCIAD
NOVEMBER
5,1976
I've seen the course offerings for
Intercession
this year
and
they don't
look
too
promising,
f
U^
Most!of the>courses
offered, themselves, arevery appealing, but for a student looking to fill acertain
requirement,
as most seem to be, it'salmost
hopeless.
:.%
M I |
Why can't more major requirements be
of
fered during
Intercession'instead
of
so
<many
elective courses?
|
J
j|
|
So
many *
members of the student body don'teven bother to register
for
Intercession because*of
the
poor course
offerings
that maybe it should
be
discontinued altogether. IThere has already been talk of doing: awaywith Intercession
and
possibly going to a twosemester schedule,
i |
'
|
';
I am totally against
this,
as
I
know
many otherstudents are. One of the reasons I came to Mer-cyhurst was because of the trimester schedule.
But,
if the course
offerings
don't improve in thenext
few
years, I can't see any reason to continuehavingIntercession.!|
I
The Mericad would like to congratulateeveryone who had a part in the planning of the
events!for f Halloween
Weekend. The entireweekend
was
a great success.
H
t'
The Merciad would also like to
wish
puck toeveryone in "Brigadoon" and
we
hope
the
'Hurst
community will show their support to these hard
working
people,
f t
Letter To The Editor
?
Table Tennis Cancelled
Due to the
lack of respect for
the
publicizing
of
intramural sports,
the
Table Tennis
Tournamentwill be cancelled. To my disgust, some Mer-cyhurst students have taken
the
sign-up
list fromthe StudentiUnion
walls.-If
this behavior continues,
the] intramural}sports
program,will
become
non-existent.
%
?We
had
ho
record of names,
therefore could
not
have
set
up
a
schedule
for play. fThe intramural program is for the students,and if this is an indication of the desire and needfor such a program, I can see no sense in trying
to plan
activities.
|
Janet Price
i
Director of
Women's
and
Coed
Intramurals
Guest Editorial
Political Survey Contacted
/Both students
and
members
off
the facultywere part
pf
a random survey conducted lastFriday;concerning
^whether;they
felt America
was
economically and politically
liberal
or conservative.
T M ii I
The majority polled
(18
outpf
26)
agreed thatAmerica policies on politics and economics areconservative. And
12
of the
18
thought
Ghat
conservative was dominant on a
nation-wide
basis.
The
remaining six
felt the conservathre
trend
on
a
Ideal
and sectional basis.
M
V
%
d
Meanwhile, the vote was closer when thosepolled
were
asked whether or not a
change
in
theWhite House this year would reverse the tide
of
the agreed on conservative trends in economicand political politics. The vote
hoe
was
15
to 11affirmative.
*
|| *
j
F
|
A
commanding
19
out
of
26
thought that a person would have to be
"ultra
liberal
minded
to
rt
and
vote for
a woman
for
President in
:
su
I960'.
Guest Editorial I
Political InterestApparent At
'Hurst
The
atmosphere
on
campus during
the
last
fewweeks
has
been
an encouraging sight.Students were campaigning for the electionson Tuesday. Buttons, stickers, and posters wereeverywhere. Some even worked for the politicalparty of their choice by telephoning anddistributing literature in Erie.
r
fin
1972, the
26th
Amendment
was
passed,
granting
18 to 21
year
olds
the right
to
vote.
The
voterturn-out for this
age
group was disappointing,giving youth the stamp of being apathetic.;If today's youth
don't
care, it is certainly notevident
at
Mercyhurst. Students are aware of theproblems
in j
our
country
land realize that their
vote does
count.
|
Contrary
to
the general
public
opinion,
today's
young people are interested in the future of ourcountry. If
anyone
needs
proof,
they
can
find
it
at
the'Hurst.
f
>'
Letter To The
Editor
Too Much Waste
Somehow
or
1
other life has
'shown
me thatthere's certainly a lot to be thankful for. Oneexample of this is the incredible amount of foodwe
intAmerica
have
at>
our disposal. I can'timagine ever going a whole day without
eating—it's
hard enough passing
up
dessert.
Butwhat about the millions
oTpeoplein
countries sounderdeveloped that "home" is a space
on
a
dir
ty sidewalk, and food is bits of garbage? It's a
terrible
shame that, though each
\
humanrequires a standard amount of nourishment,what this world
^provides
is so unfairlydistributed.
\
I
Even here in
the jjUnited
States, in Erie to bemore particular, there are so many people who
would give
anything
to
have some of the food westudents throw away here at the
'Hurst.
Thispast Thursday, the day of
"Halloween
SpecialDinner," I happened
by
that
"Emmaus Soup
Kit
chen" on
4th St.
I was shocked by the reality ofpoor, lonely men and women consuming what'sprobably their only
pineal
of the
day—bread,
peanut
butter,
and
soup.
I
One
man said
to
me
that that was
the
first
he'deaten in four days. Another man told me, as hepicked up a donated child's coat, about hisbrother's twelve
kids,
and
his other brother's sixteen. Quite stunned by the actuality of all this, Iwas then reminded by the kitchen worker that
•n:
 
hungrier
•nil
there are
so
manypeople who won't accept
the
favor
of free
So
anyway, it's
a£lot
to digest, if you'll pardonmy expression. It can't be dented that
we
throwaway
food
in
inexcusable quantities around here.
We
can't solve the world's hunger problem, butat least we can stop
Staking for
granted andwasting what's put before
us.
The cafeteria
ser
vice is good about not
throwing
stuff away andwill donate left over food
to the
Soup
Kitchen. Sowe should
tone jour
eyes down to meet
oilr
stomachs and
hopefully
over to the
coffee
housefor the canned
i
•:•••
drive. VarietyNovember 9. Also,
participating
nnl
the
canned
*
food
drive
itself,
November
7-9,
would be an excellent way
to?help
the poor in Erie to havesomewhat of a
dinner'to
be thankful for onThanksgiving.
|
*
pKittyMegnin
?.
•••••Mdm^.l
i
Guest Editorial
Presidential ElectionsImportant To Students
This
year's Presidential election
will
be the
fir
st time that an
18
year old can be a part of thisdecisionmaking.
k
*
*g*
|
With this in mind, I thought it would be quiteinteresting
j
to
report
what these young
•'voters
have
to
say.
Their
answers
to
the
question,"Howdo you feel about being able to vote your firsttime in a Presidential election", were quite interesting. The question was asked to
(
Hurst
students.
I
J|
I
|
I
Darlene Keith, a junior print journalismmajor, was quite excited about voting her firsttime. "I watched
all!
three debates and readvarious articles on each of the candidates so Icould
come
to
a reasonably intelligent decision.''Joyce Haffey, a junior
psychology
major, feltvery honored. She said she was taking thisprivilege seriously.
"I'feel
that I am well informed on important issues and feel I can make
a good
decision."
1 f ;.§
f.
I
These are just some examples of how theyoung voters of today are concerned
on
how
their
country
is
being
run.
| > *
.
i
^
>
\
|L
Another psychology major felt voting is oneexample of why America is so great.
"Voting
shows that America is
different
than other coun
tries.
We (people) have the right to choose whowe want to be our
leader—this
shows thatAmerica
is not
a dictatorship."
M
Bob
Derda,a freshman communication major,felt the same way. "I
think
it is a privilegebecause I
feel
that a vote means a voice of thegovernment. Voting is democratic. I say thisbecause
the
people run
the
government."Many voters looked on voting more as anobligation, their duly, rather than an honor. Asan art student put
it,
"I feel that! I should do
something—that
I
should
vote.'' *Some students were very straight forward intheir response. Such was the case with KellyConaway,a communication major. She felt that
j'it'sfidiotic
if somebody doesn't vote. It's greatthatyoucan."
JjjL
1'
. ^^ . . ^
When asked her feelings on voting, Mary AnnFerraro, a freshman, said,
"It's-the
Americanway." Both she and Carol Snyder felt that sincethe 18-21 age group is more liberal
than
^conservative,
this
year's election will! make a big
difference
in
this
year's
vote.These responses show that
18
year olds are not
'scatter
brains' as many of the older generationcalk them. These young voters have shown thatthey are responsible
adults,who
are interestedand concerned
in this
country.
&
1
f ^
|$-
Carol
Snyder,
a freshman business major,feds that
'the
adult vote is stagnating.. I thinkthat
young people
are
more
aware of what's
hap
peningtoday.
;
1
jj f
f-
I
By the time this article is in print, this country
will
elect a President. Although
who
wins
is
quiteimportant,
it is
equally
important that the people
were able
to
decide
on this crucial issue.
|Some
people, unfortunately, will not indulge
in
this privilege.
It
is important that everyAmerican vote. Perhaps Bob Derda sums it upbest. "Either vote or
keep
your mouth shut fortour years."
I
I.
i LisaManendo
THE
MERCIAD
The Voice of the
tfercyhuftt
Community
Editor
News
EditorFeature EditorSports Editor
*Copy
Editors
Art
EditorPhotographerMelissa McMurray
£
Gary
Wesman
J
BethBealTerry KellySuePettit
Judy Holland
TrisnaSeltzer
Maureen McCafferty
S
' BobRonksley
*
*
* c
WRITERS
AND CREATORS:? V
News Department: Gee
NeCastro,
Chris Filipi, Nadine
Belovarac,
Richard
Frasca,
Jim
Defner,
Chris VanWagenen.
* • *
-
*k.
••*•£
ft
»
. '
f
.
*
Feature Department:
j
Cathy Klines, Kathy
Aguglia,
Darlene
Keith, Esther
Schierher,
Dan
Theveny,
d
Sports Department: Boh Derda Jr., Donna Walker, MikePhillips, Richard Birmingham.
^»
'*?*
m.
M
E<*fc
Henderson
Business
Manager
*
;
Cheryl SturnClassified
Section .
|*
$.
EileenBaugbFaculty Consultant
|
3 * William
ShelleyTypists! Mary Anne Cochran, Jill Green,
Dehbie
Floyd,
Lynn
Marcatouli.
Melanin N»«h i
u
a
M.k
A
.j.
m
*
*
i
*
i
 
. . .
NOVEMBER
5.1976
David Held PortraysBrigadoon's Albright
David
iHeld,
better known bysome as
Tommy^Albright In
themusical Brigadoon is a person
of
many talents.
« J
Mr. Held has appeared in manyshows throughout
the area.|At
Mercyhurst he took part in 1776,Spoon River Anthologies,Jacques
Brell
and Apple Tree.David is a theatre major atMercyhurst.
At?
present!
he isinvolved with the ContemporaryChristian Ministry
of
)
the Artswhich involves
fi
music, drama,and
|
dance. He ifeels a
f
goodbackground
in*the
theatre
will
enable him to spread the word ofGod through these art forms. |Being a 23 year old freshman,David comments on -his
ob
jectives,
"My
overall objective inbeing here is different than itwould have been five years ago.Most important to me is that Godis glorified
through;what
I
do.'jy
Among
his*
accomplishmentsoutside the theatre
are-
com-posing original
pieces
of music toperform for the ContemporaryChristian Ministry, as well asdirecting original multi-mediaproductions and plays. He alsoplays the viola and teaches voice.
Mr.
r
Held
hopes the Ministry
will
eventually become a full timeactivity and possibly spreadworld-wide*
When
asked
what
theMinistry would consist of, hepointed out there are "endlesspossibilities."
Concerning
his role as TommyAlbright in the production ofBrigadoon at the
'Hurst,
Davidadmitted that
hisfrole'was
dif
ficult and was working hard togive his character depth.
M
What he likes most about
*heshow
is
"working
with the people,of course there are hassles, but
it's
interesting and a challenge."In conclusion he remarked,
"It'sreally
nice to watch
everyone,especially^ freshmen, grow andbecome involved in
*
theircharacters."
-f-
t
3
Practicing their roles in the
up-coming
musical "Brigadoon"
are
(left to right), David Held, Debbie Kenny, Chris Wodarczyk, Tammy
Roche^Fererowciz
and Fred Null.
THE
MERCIADPAGE
3
Maggie Anderson (Sally
Malafronte)
cries over the death of HarryBeaton (Tom McDermott)! in one
of-the
most moving scenes in the
musical
1
v.
*2re
h
s
.
i
iit,
*
f
i
Easier Than Plastic
9
By
Mark
Win
response to the pleadingrequest of
one
of
my
readers, thesubject for this
week's
article willbe the ever-loving Jade Plant, orthe CrassulaArgentea,*as it isbetter
"known
in plant circles.
Names
aside, from
the
standpointof care it is one of the best all-around house plants.
*f
Native to Zululand in the Natalregion of southeastern Africa, theCrassula Argentea is an easy-to-grow succulent
thatii
grows from18"-30"
jitall and'has
1-2 inchsmooth rounded or oval leaves,
often
edged
in red.
Having been afavored
house
plant since the 19thcentury, the Jade Plant will liveindefinitely indoors, bearing, with
age,
pink-white
jj:
flowers in thewinter and spring. Many are used
in
dish gardens and often take theform of miniature trees, growingto heights of 10 feet or more intheir nativesubtropical?climate.The Crassula Argentea will do
bestiwhere
it gets four or morehours a day of direct
sunlight,!
orwhere it gets artificial andnatural light averaging 1000 foot-candles over 12 hours a day, but itwill also grow well in curtain-filtered sunlight and in brightindirect light, such as thatreflected from light wall-attention
Briggs
apartments!!The plant prefers night temperatures of 50 degrees to 55degrees and day temperatures
of68
degrees to
72
degrees, but willtolerate a range from 40 degreesto 100
degrees,-which
will result
in
a more subdued growth patternthan when exposed to optimumconditions.Let the soil become nearly drybetween thorough-waterings, forif the
soil
is
kept constantly moist,the
leaves ^
and branches willbecome mushy, limp and even-
Nlclaz
tually fall off. Feed establishedplants
*every
three or fourmonths, but
waifr
four to sixmonths before feeding newlypurchased or potted plants.
}>
When
necessary, repot at anyseason, but the plants generallylive for years while rootbound. Agood
sigm
that your Jade Plantneeds repotted is when it
is
so bigfor
its
pot that the pot won't standup by
itself.
This is a good sign—for if potted
in too
large a pot, theroots will tend to rot, and theplant die.
g .fe * *
v^
*Forf
best
results*when
repotting, use a mixture of one partloam, one part peat moss or leafmold, and
one
part sharp
sand;
toeach gallon of this
mixture J
add
lVfe
teaspoons
of 120
per centsuperphosphate, one tablespoonof ground limestone, and twoteaspoons of
5-10-5
fertilizer.Otherwise, use a packagedgeneral-purpose potting soil.Propagate at any season fromstem or
f
leaf cuttings, Stemcuttings are very
successful
if thecutting is placed lVfe" in moist,
sandy
soil to take root and grow.Another 'relative
1
of the JadePlant which has enjoyed immense popularity is
the 2
Silver
by
Detmar
StraveRagtime is
anj
exciting, contemporary novel
about'
theragtime period in Americanhistory at the turn of the 20thcentury.
It {interweaves
the Actional story of a
typical;white
bourgeois family living in* NewRochelle, New York, with thetrue-to-life
biographies
ofpowerful and popular
figures
ofthe time.In the central plot,
*Doctorow
tells of, the joys, sorrows andintrigues of an upper middle classfamily.
He jjowns
a flag
factory
that is prospering in the late 19thcentury trend towardnationalism.Mother
*
advancesthe humanitarian impulse in thefamily by taking an abandonedblack girl, Sarah, into her house.When Sarah is courted by anintelligent young
black?
man,Coalhouse Walker Jr., the whitefamily gets embroiled in a conflict which is racial in origin butwhich soon escalates into fullscale anarchy.
3
J
Among the actual historicalpersonages*
who
appear in thismarvelously fertile novel are J.P.Morgan, Harry Houdini, "Red"Emma Goldman, and HenryFord.
The
most
fascinating of thisgroup of characters, however, isthe persecuted wife of
the
wealthy Henry K. Thaw,
Evelyn
Nesbitt Thaw.
(Of:
campus interest,
incidentally,*is
that factthat the gates leading intoMercyhurst College came fromThaw's English estate). Evelynhad been carrying on an affairwith the famous New York architect, Stanford White, when herhusband shot White in a
crowded
night
spot.
Ragtime concentrateson
Evelyn's
pathetic downfallfrom wealth and power to obscurity and ridicule as a ''fallen'woman.Ail in all, Ragtime is asuperbly written,
tersely
i
styled
novel.
Hi
'offers
an oddly criticalyet nostalgic look at
this
crucialperiod
|
in the American experiment. Any; student with aninterest
in
history or literaturewill
find-.this
book a thoroughlyenjoyable experience. A copy isavailable in the College
Library
M
Dollar Plant, or CrassulaArborescens.
fits
boldly fleshy,broad obovate,
opposite
leavesare gray with reddish dotting andred margin. It makes abeautifully contrasting plant todisplay with
*
the
Crassula
Argentea!
}
I;
W-
INQUIRING REPORTER ASKS:
Z.
>/9*
/
W
YS
•ft
m
J
,/
m
>?
«%
**"
wtw!
W'
w
^M
vm
F
/
'/-'..
**"
z
•m*
,*m.
f
DarlaMalone
There should
be more
about
aAnmistrative
policies before
they
are
finite™'
Freddie Pope
•%
feel there should be
more
about
wha# activities
thestudents enjoy doing.* and thedifferent
activities
they re
involved?
in so that otherstudents can join.
S3
fpmi&
m
"
w
V*
-.'-•
*fc•m
Patty
Polochak.
t
There is definitely a big improvement
over I
ast year
but
there should be more activitiesoriented articles.
L
.
,-.i%
'*
"VMM***.
V'
«•*'
I
Ken White
s
More student opinions shouldhe
printed
about the way theschool is being run.
"
p-
•\Mrt
NS
*•
P
i^
w
*
*
I
%*^«
<*•***
d
Marilyn Coyle il ^^
I think there should be morehumorous articles to brightenup the Merciad.
PHOTOS BY
BOB
RONKSLEY

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->