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The Merciad, Oct. 28, 1977

The Merciad, Oct. 28, 1977

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The Merciad, Oct. 28, 1977
The Merciad, Oct. 28, 1977

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07/06/2014

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i
y
Bukowski Campaigns HardFor County
Council
Seat'
The days are quicklyfading,and November 8 is fast approaching with the generalelection of city and county officials.Gary Bukowski, director ofplacement, is the Democraticcandidate for the fourth
district
seat on the newly formed CountyCouncil.The Council will consist of oneexecutive and seven councilmen,each
'
representing theirrespective district.Bukowski comments withenthusiasm, "Hopefully, this willpromote better representation ofthe people." He continues, "Thatis the main reason I wanted tobecome involved, people will nowhave a real input/
1
He
explains that the power willnot be with each individualmember,
but
with
the council as
a
block. The power of veto allowschallenge and flexibility indealing with the problems of thecounty.
t
The goal of the council is toprovide the citizens of Eriecounty with a better, morepersonalized form of govern
ment;r
It has the
potential
to
reachthe people and make
realchanges.Bukowski believes hiseducation, and experienceworking in an administrativecapacity are importantqualifications in securing
this
goal. He stresses,
"I
am goinginto it with an open mind, to tryand overcome the biases."
This
emphasizes
a
need
for newideas. Bukowski
1
; explains, "It'sabout time younger peoplebecome involved in government."
I
Campaigning involvesnumerous mailings, door-to-doorapproaches, and participation invarious functions.
Bukowski
admits that it is relatively toughfor a new name to raise funds.But* he reveals, "Since theprimaries, I have a little more ofan edge, I have developed a lotmore contacts."
%-
t
u
fcRepublican
candidate
DennisM. Karlee provides the competition for Bukowski.
,
The
election
is close, at hand,but who knows the outcome? Hisexperience, ideas and enthusiasm make Bukowski animpressive candidate for CountyCouncil.Gary Bukowski
candidate
for
Erie County
Council.
VOL.
50,
NO. 6MERCYHURST COLLEGEOCTOBER
28,1977
In
his first formal address tostudents here, Tom Thompsonsaid, Cooperative Educationprograms nave spread
"like
aweed"
to
more
than
1,000 collegesin recent years but remainlargely untried in liberal artsschools like
Mercy
hurst.
£j
Thompson appeared beforeabout 45 students in Zurn 114 onWednesday, October
19,
speakingand fielding questions for about20 minutes in an
open
forummeeting sponsored by Mercy-hurst Student Government.
"From my
point of view it wasa
good
meeting,"
Thompson
said."I think a lot of things came outin the open. They asked a lot ofgood questions considering theyprobably
didn't
know
anything
about (Cooperative Ed.) beforehand."Cooperative Ed. is a federallysupported program in whichstudents hold paying
jobs
in theirmajor fields while attendingschool.The college this fall got a$50,000 study grant. Thompson,hired two weeks ago as programdirector, is charged with draftinga plan which must be
submitted
to the Senate Academic PoliciesCommittee by January 1, 1978."We'll have
a
pretty good idea,by then, if it will
pass/'
he saidWednesday.
!$
Liberal Studies
ObstacleAn obstacle to acceptance,
Thompson
indicated, may be thatCooperative Ed. is not normallyassociated with colleges likeMercyhurst.Although
the
number of schoolswith Cooperative Ed. has risenfrom
52
in 1960 to over 1,000today,
"only
a
few have
bona
fideliberal arts (curricula),"
he
said,
"and
those that do are verylimited."
L
; ;
Thompson said that would notprohibit a successful programhere.
k
At Northeastern University inBoston, Mass., Cooperative
Ed.
isoptional in
the .liberal
arts andmandatory in all other departments, he noted.Northeastern, with aCooperative Ed; enrollment ofover 7,500, has the largestprogram in the U.S.
|
In an earlier interview withThe Merciad, Thompson said hewill invite on campus
speakers
from
Antioch
(Yellow springs,Oh.) and William
Patterson
(Wayne,
r
N.J.)
colleges—two
small, liberal arts schools which
have
established Cooperative Ed.programs.
Thompson
«
bega
n Wednesdayby outlining the three basicschedules students could followwhile rotating between job
and
classroom. The college, he said,
"can
have all three going at oncewith no difficulties, and withoutlosing or changing Intersession.He said that among severalcalendars he is working on, oneincludes two Intersessions.
*
SchedulesThe traditional, or alternate,Cooperative
Ed.
schedule
has
thestudent switching between workand school for varying lengths oftime. Thompson said employersprefer a
6-and-€
arrangement inwhich the student works for sixmonths then attends school forsix, but said others are possible.The parallel plan, in which astudent works part of the week
and
attends clsss
the rest, is mostpopular at community colleges.The
final
plan commits thestudent to a regular schoolschedule and a summer job.In all three, Thompson said, adegree program is completed infour years. And, he added, 60-70per cent of
all
Cooperativestudents are hired by their employers following graduation.
J
Questioning thereafter wassharp.
^I
Thompson said he felt "100 per
cent
of
the job
experiences should
be
for
credit along withpay,"butacknowledge it would be difficultto find them in fields likehumanities, history, art, lawenforcement and social work.
\
Freedom
In
Design
by Gary
Wesman
Thompson said there wereenough job opportunities in theErie area
to
support the program
but
added that
some jobs could befound in students' home regionsas well.I Asked if Cooperative
Ed.
wouldrestrict a liberal studiescurriculum, Thompsonresponded that plans call for jobexperiences to count for up to 18
credits—the
same as Internshipsdo now.
He
said
he
is writing
a
proposalto expand that to 24 credits.In several of his answersihompson emphasized that eachcollege division will havefreedom
-
to design its ownprogram."I would like to involve all ofthem," he said "if they wouldlike to."Thompson also said eachdivision would be responsible forsetting a grade point averagenecessary to qualify for participation.
,
"If all goes well," Thompsonsaid,
"(Cooperative
Ed.) couldstart as early as summer (1978)or next year."He said it
would
be "verydifficult"
to
involve seniors
in
theprogram, juniors slightly less so.Sophomore's and freshmen, hesaid^
"would
get the first
op
portunities to take advantage of
it."
Local College InstructorsGet Grant From Allegheny
Cultural Resource Overview ofthe Allegheny National Forest, a$29,000 grant from the National
Forest
Service, was awarded to
Ms.
Joy Kolb, Charles
Kolb,
Dr.Renata Wolynec and BernardWarner, all local area collegeinstructors, under the employment of
>the
Northwestinstitute of Research.The money awarded will beused to study
775
square miles inthe Warren, McKean Forest andElk County.According
to Ms.
Kolb, lecturerin sociology, all four instructorswill work together to formulate a
land
use
preservation plan whichwill be given to the NationalForest Service, a division of theDepartment of Agriculture.Included in
this
plan; will besuggestions and recommendations in terms of whatlocation might require
extensive
survey, establishing of prioritiesin research and recommendingdisplay of artifacts.
\
Other
s
suggestions arerecommending protective sites,areas which should' not bedisturbed
'because
of culturalsignificance, in terms of anthropology, an outline of publicrelations pamphlet, which would
by
Lisa
Manendo _
ri
^^
enhance the educational value ofthe area and a guideline for acultural resource managementplan.
'
During this project, all fourinstructors
will
be
responsible fordifferent
sections
of this plan. Dr.Wolynec, assistant professor atEdinboro College, is projectdirector and co-ordinator of database. Dr. Wolynec will beresponsible with the history andanalysis of the entire area.
"*
Warner, head of appliedbusiness systems at Edinboro, isin charge of "Generation
of
Predicted Model Using
*
Computers".
Based
on
research
foundand environmental variables,Warner will develop, by using acomputer, a map which willdesignate where the best ar-cheological sites can be found.
Kolb,
an instructor at BehrendCollege, is
director
of ar-cheological field survey. Basedon the computer map. Kolb willsurvey and test these designatedsites to see if the predictionsgenerated are valified and ifneeded, modify these predictions.
Ms.
Kolb, ofMercyhurst,isdirector of cultural resourcemanagement evaluation. Kolb isresponsible for the collecting andanalyzing of sites, site preser
vation
and
will look
at the
policiesof resource and
environmental
protection, by law and bytradition.According to Ms. Kolb, "weinstructors will
benefit
whileworking
on
this grant because ofour varied backgrounds, we willreceive different perspectivesfrom each other.
;
"Students will! also benefitbecause the instructors will passoff to them, knowledge gainedthrough their investigations."
}
Ms.
Kolb has had other ex
periences >
in
the field of anthropology, at
.
Bryn <Mawr
College, she received a grant todo cultural
anthropology
inUganda.
.^
-* While in Uganda, she studiededucational policies in a co-edschool with a mixture of tribalbackgrounds,
how
three different
faculty
groups (British USO,American Peace Corps andUgandan) interacted amongthemselves and their relativecontributions to the
students.
••
Anyone interested
1n
applyingfor a job to work with the instructors will
 find
s
list of jobs onthe bulletin boards of Ms.
Kolk,
Main
110
and Len Cyterski, Main
.201.
 
I
wpoints
R
28.1977
utsideme
Would you
boy
an
oven from
a-former
dean
of
Mer-cyhurst? Dr. William
P.
Garvey recently entered the
ad
business, selling appliances
for
Arthur
F.
Schultz.
Dr. Garvey appeared in the October 24 issue of the ErieTimes,
u
?
:?i
;
Commented one
observer,
"How
can he dothat?"
It's
notthat bad when you think about it. Dr.
Garvey's
appearancein the Times is a step forward for
Mercyhurs
t
ana
a step up
for
the appliance business.
* .. £
Rumor has it that Dr. Garvey has
alloted
space for Arthur
F.
Schultz's
new warehouse. Appliances
will
be stored
in
Preston,
Zurn
and Baldwin Hall.Personally, L think
it's
great. It's about time
for
Mercyhurst
to get out of the
college business
and
intoappliances.
> 1
Look at it from
a
consumer standpoint. Appliances are
a
growing business as of late.
B
J
1
v
Everyday people are waking up
to
freezers that
don't
freeze, ovens that don't
cook
and
blenders that don't blend.Think about
it,
Mercyhurst can employ all 2000
of its
students, faculty
and
administrators.Picture for example Sister Phyllis selling toasters door todoor around
6th
and State
Street. £'
,;
Better yet, picture Mike McQuillen sitting back
in
hischair smoking a
pipe
and telling a representative of the MidEast that freezers
are an
important
commodity,;
to
his
growing
country.
> ->S
At the end of Mike's sales pitch, Dave Bethune points outthat an order of
2000
freezers would not only come with a
10
per cent discount, but also would
cool off things
in the MiddleEast.
- *
»*
.
,r:
-
p
- +M
What about Linda Schmidt, as
a
public relations personfor Mercyhurst Appliance Corporation. Linda could travelfrom city
to
city in a
Micro Wave
Oven that has an engine.
I
could
see
that
increasing sales
by
at
least
a
million.
Mercyhurst could even develop group salesmenprograms, with such favorites as Drs. Bud Brown,
Robert
Cisek and Jeff Sternlieb, who would have the responsibilityof selling lamps to Las Vegas and air conditioners to NewYork
City.
\
Couldn't
you
just picture
Cisek's
sales pitch.
"Life's like
alamp,
you
can either turn
it on or
off."
At the same time Bud throws in "That's very logical."Finally, Jeff
Sternlieb,
using a little mixed
up
psychology toconvince the buyer that Mercyhurst is the place to buy lam
ps
and air
conditioners.
£''
^ '
Linda Parish
would also
be
an asset
to the
Mercyhurst
Ap-
pliance Corporation. There's
a lot of
restaurants
in
this
country
and
her kitchen appliance
sales
alone
would
be
goodfor at least
two
million
dollars.
Yes,
Garvey really
"hit
the nail
on the
head"
as they say.
-
Picture it on national television. "Mercyhurst ApplianceCorporation,
a
subsidiary
of
Garvey Industries presents:Garvey Hall of Fame
Playhouse."
Picture, Dr. Garvey
doing
a
sales commercial from his office in
109
Preston. There on his desk is the product of
the
century. It's a toaster, but not just your ordinary toaster. Onthe contrary, it's something much more. What? It's a
"Gar-
vster
210Medium
Special."
s.
The Garvster,
a
new concept in making toast because
it
uses solar heat
to
make
toast.
£
Picture
the
slogan 'for Garvey Industries. "Garveymaking machines
do
more,
so
man
can
eat more." Touchingisn't
it.
I
By the way, any faculty member interested
in a
newwasher or dryer, Dr. Garvey will be taking orders from 9a.m.
to2
p.m.
in room
109
Preston.
<
The first fifty
faculty
members
to
purchase either
a
washer or dryer
will
receive
a 25
per cent discount.The Garvey Blue
light Special
will be held from
1
p.m. to1:02
p.m.
Persons purchasing any Maytag washer will receive, freeof charge, an autographed copy of Dr. Garvey's new bookentitled, "My Life and Times Selling Hoover Vacuums
to
Russian Immigrants." (Introduction
by Dr.
Al
Lewis,author
of
the paper, "Law
of
Therodynamics, Applied
to
Sears Kenmore
Dryers.")Dr. Garvey will also have a "Garv-a-ware" party to beheld
Monday,
October
31 in
Zurn
Recital
Hall at
8p.m.
The New York Yankees won the
1977
World Series in six
games.'Rightfielder
Reggie Jackson, who, along withmanager Billy Martin, sparked most of
the
controversy thatsurrounded the Yankee ballclub all season, almost single-handedly
won
the final game. Jackson nailed three homers,tying the immortal Babe Ruth's record for the most homeruns
in
one World Series game. Jackson's
"slug
fest,"
believe
it
or not, even left Howard Cosell speechless. AndCincinnatti Reds pitcher Tom "Terrific" Seaver, broadcasting the series for ABC, must have been thankful
he
wasn't with the opposing Dodger organization and pitchingthat game,
because
as
"psyched"
as
Jackson
was
that night,
he
would have
hit Seaver,
too.
I
In the world of professional
.ad
collegiate football camethese upsets.
The New
York Giants defeated
the
WashingtonRedskins for
the
second time
this
season last
Sunday.
And on
Monday Night
Football,
the
Los
Angeles Rams trounced theMinnesota Vikings
by
a score of
35 to 3.
But Minnesota has acollege team that was responsible for what has to be themajor upset of the year. Minnesota surprised themselvesand most of the world by defeating
no. 1
Michigan
16
to
0. Noone
on
earth
won
that
football
pool.Minnesota Senator Hubert Humphrey
is
back
in
Washington, D.C. Humphrey,
the
stalwart
of the
Democratic party, is dying of cancer. But the courageousformer vice president and unsuccessful candidate for thepresidency in 1968 said his motto was "never give in andnever
give
up."
President Carter gave Humphrey a lift backto D.C. on Air Force One. The President was overjoyed toget Humphrey back to work, basically because he needs
a
staunch ally and a man of
his
influence
in
the Senate. Carternamed
the
Health, Education
and
Welfare building
rin
Washington
in
Humphrey's honor.In Berkeley, California, it was reported that children exposed to heavy air pollution could
suffer
in school work andsports ability. Those who are now affected by this can lookforward to
a
higher increase of respiratory problems andlife-long higher medical costs than most adults face now.
Blood"
samples from youths
in
areas noted
for
traffic-congestion, such as
Los
Angeles and Oakland, show that
6
to
8
per cent of
the
children are carrying
high levels
of
lead and
should have
medication.'
-
New York Justice John Starkey
declared
fan "unappealable rule" stating that David R. Berkowitz, accused ofthe Son
of
Sam slayings,
is
mentally
fit to
stand trial.Berkowitz had stated earlier that
he
was "dictated
by
demons demanding
blood"
to
perform
the
murders.
73-year-old
Russell
A.
Bufalino, said
by
federal authoritiesto control organized crime in upstate New York and northeastern Pennsylvania, was sentenced to four years
in
prison along with
a
$20,000 fine. Bufalino was convictedAugust 10
of
conspiracy and extortion which involved
a
death threat
to
collect
on a
debt. Government officialspleaded
that Bufalino
be
jailed immediately. However, U.S.District Judge Morris
E.
Lasker let him remain free on
$30,000 bail pending
appeal.Would
you buy
a
used oven
from
this
man?Senate Majority Leader Robert
C.
Byrd stated that therewere "broad implications" in the South Koreans' refusal topermit officials of
the
Justice Department
to
question Tong-sun Park, central figure in the influence buying scandal.Byrd said that Seoul's refusal to fully cooperate with theinquiry into charges of South Koreans buying influence inWashington could
affect
votes in Congress on future aid tothat country.
Letters
To The
Editor
In
its
struggle
to
design
an
improved liberal studiesprogram, one of the difficulties the college faces is the so-called knowledge explosions. While
no one
can doubt that welive
in the
midst
of an
information explosion, honest,thoughtful and informed persons disagreed on whether weare witnesses
to
an explosion of knowledge.
Perhaps
the
perspective afforded
by the
passage
of
another century
or
more will
be
needed
to
resolve thisquestion. But even
if
it is merely an information explosion,this phenomenon of our age poses a problem for educationalplanners. Some have gone so far as to say that our presentexperience renders all traditional ideas on liberal educationobsolete.
'
7
I spent part of this evening thinking about this problemfrom
my
perspective,
in the
college's division
of
mathematics
and
natural sciences.
t
My thinking
was
stimulated by
my
reading of the essay
"Some
Views" thatmy colleague David Palmer wrote last summer as part ofhis
preparation
for the work of this academic year.It occurred to me that the information explosion has beennowhere greater than it has been in the natural sciences. Yetcollege and university curricula
in
the sciences manage
somehow
to
adjust—not
without difficulty,
nor
withoutserious
and
thoughtful disputation, but indeed without thenear trauma that attended the assembly
of
the college'sBlueprint III document. Successive generations of scientistsContinued next
column
manage to be trained. The development of science managestocontinue.
f-
!
The development
of'modern
sciences raises profoundphilosophical
and
cultural questions;
it
may also offerlessons
in
curriculum design. One possible lesson: the enduring value
of
thorough study
of the
enduring fundamentals and first principles. Consider
fen*
example, theexplosion
of
information relevant
to the
practice
of
medicine. But has any medical school anywhere dispensedwith the requirement
of
thorough, basic course in humananatomy?Consider, for example, the information explosion in computer
science—itself
the
detonator
of the
general
in
formation explosion. Is there anywhere a college or university program
of
study
of
computer science that dispenseswith the requirement of thorough basic course work in symbolic logic?
In
the departments
of
mathematics and thenatural sciences in great colleges and universities all overthe world there is a quite considerable degree of
agreement
on what constitutes the indispensable fundamentals of thecurriculum.
% '
Granting that my examples deal more with training thanwith education, acknowledging that the first concern
of a
liberal arts college must be humanistic education,
I
ask:
Is
any humanistic education possible without thoroughschooling, in the liberal arts; i.e., in the
trivium
of grammar(reading), rhetoric (writing), and logic (thinking) and in thequandrivium
of
arithmetic (number), music (proportion),geometry (dimension), and astronomy (motion); i.e., in thearts whose practice develops and demonstrates the powersof the mind to apprehend, to reflect, to comprehend, and tocommunicate.Sincerely,Robert
H.
Blessing
**"
1
Assistant Professor of
Chem.
Bulletin
Board
}'
Egyptian NightAll members
of
the
Mercyhurst community, students,
staff,
administrators, faculty members, associates
and
trustees are invited to attend Egyptian Night
"77,
Thursday,November
3
at
8
p.m. in the Back Porch Cafe.Guests will have an opportunity to chat informally withthe Egyptian Seminar participants regarding their
im
pressions of life and living in Egypt. There will be
no
chargefor the evening and all are urged to make plans now to attend this gala celebration.
Political
Science
t
With continued emphasis on the trend toward relevance
in
higher education, it was announced that Mercyhurst Collegehas arranged internship opportunities
for
students
in
Washington,
D.C.
JV
According to Dr.
Erisman
of the
political
science department, internships are available during the winter term incongressional offices, executive agencies, public interestorganizations and judicial agencies.There are other areas of interest such as the environment,consumer affairs, journalism, communications,
the
arts andbusiness.The internships are being handled by Dr. Erisman andhave been developed
in
conjunction with the WashingtonCenter
for
Learning Alternatives
of
Washington, D.C,
a
non-profit educational agency which develops the individualplacements and provides internship placement, supervision,evaluation, seminars, housing and other support servicesfor students from colleges throughout the country.While on
an
internship for
a
full term, students remainenrolled at and receive academic credit from Mercyhurst,based
on
evaluations performed
by
the
WCLA staff andfaculty
in
Washington
and
\
facilitated
by
Mercyhurst'sfaculty liaison with WCLA.
"*
EducationEverything You Always Wanted To Know About StudentTeaching But Were Afraid
To Ask.
This features six studentteachers representing elementary, special, and secondaryeducation.Student teachers will reveal the true facts.
*
The meeting will
be
held October 30, 7:30 p.m.
in
thefaculty lounge. Everyone is invited.f
f
|
• TheaterAdditional auditions
for
the play, You're A Good ManCharlie Brown, will be held Friday, October
28,7
to
9 p.
m.and Saturday, October 29, 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. For further information, contact Dennis Andres, Preston
204
or
ext. 271.
YearbookThe desperate drive
to
save our yearbook
is
presentlystriving to reach its goal of
275
sales. Please see one of thefollowing people if you intend to buy a book.Denise
Arnold*
Baldwin
105
Holly Booth
< Sesler223
John Burton McAuley
224
Jim
Daley McAuley
226
Darlene Keith 734-3481Helen Kessler; McAuley suite
2
Lisa Manendo
866-5744
Katie McCaffrey
Egan
23
the
merciad
iiLiiiiiitiumHiilJ
Editor Chris Van WagenenNews Editor Gary
Wesman
Feature
Editor..
• Darlene
KeithSports Editor..
&
Terry KellyGraphics and
Layout..;...
*.
Darlene Keith, Terry
Kelly
Gary Wesman and Melissa McMurrayTypists. »>..... Jocelyn Piccuta and JoAnn AlexanderWriters and Creators: John Bruno, Vicki Martinago, BobDerda Jr., Mark Cipriani, Chris
Tomczak,
Alda
Walker,Judy Anania, Colleen Hottel,
Amy
Chizmadia,
LisaManendo,
Maryann Ferraro
and JoAnn Alexander.Photographers Sue Carlson and Randy MinkBusiness Manager ..... Darlene Keith
and
Lisa Manendo
Art
Editor
$
Patrick
DunnFaculty Consultant William
Shelley
i
*
r
i i
»
i
 
»
CXTTOBER 28.1977
THE
MERCIADPAGE
3
A Clown Named Angelee
McHugh
Says Ed.
Dances To A Silent Tune
Jobs stm
Available
Picture a typical dinner party.Casual dress, light conversation,buffet style food,
\
china andsilverware. All the
guests Lcome
in and are properly introduced
by•their
host.
u
Except one.
:
She comes in dancing to somesilent tune, shaking hands withall the strangers and giving bighugs to little folks.But nobody seems to mind,nobody is disturbed, In fact, theysmile, giggle and laugh. For sheis not an ordinary guest. She's aclown.
?
She also
happens
to be AngeleeSmith, a senior music major witha big smile and gentle voice,
f
"If there was one thing in theworld
I
always wanted to do itwas
to
be a clown," she explains,Story And
PhotosBy Sue
Fuss
"but
it always seemed sounreachable."
f
The unreachable becamereality this summer whenAngelee heard of a street churchin Philadelphia that was lookingfor clowns. Three;
times
a weekshe put on her big red nose and
multi-colored
hat and entertainedthe children of the city neighborhoods."These
kids
would come up to
me and
say, 'Are
you
a real clownor just
a
person with make-up?' "
fty,
wouldn't say anything, but
then I
started thinking,
'That
wasmy image when
I.was
little.'Clowns weren't people withmake-up.
Clowns
were real. Theywere made out of marshmallowor something. They
galways
A
i
C
L
O
w
NIN
G
Solo (Above), andWith A Friend
seemed like you could put yourhand right
through them
and theywould bounce right back." .3Angelee made her Mercyhurstdebut during this year's freshmen orientation. All through thesimulation game
"Freshmen
Year, Freshmen Year" shedanced with hurried students,passed out
M &
M's and played akazoo.
\
"It's unique to have thatsituation where you approachsomebody and they're not asshy,"she says. "They see
you
andit's like they've known youforever. I
think
there's arelationship you can have with aclown that you can't have with
anyone
else."
p
Angelee bought popcorn for thekids and led a little snake danceas part of the Campus Ministrygroup at the Fall Festival. Shehelped the Law Enforcementdepartment auction
off
cakes,
playedl
cards and danced witheverybody.
The people
smiled and laughed,some shook their heads indisbelief and others said a quiet"thank-you"
t
to their silentfriend.
>j
\
"At
first you think, 'Oh, 'causeI can't talk I can't get anythingacross.' But when
you
realizehow much you can do withoutsaying a single word, you'reamazed and you just really wantto shut up."
A
The worries and cares of everyday life go away as Angelee putson her make-up and becomessomeone else. She often feelspeople know her differently as aclown behind a
big
painted smile.And indeed she is different. Asa clown she has a magic withpeople,! a "genuine kind ofspecialness.""I don't know anything compared
to
what I want
to
know, butas soon as I did it, I felt right."After the party's overeverybody leaves a little happier
except maybe the clown."It's always so sad when youtake the make-up off", she says."You know it's over and
you'renot a
clown anymore."But the clown returns everyonce in a while to make peoplesmile, giggle, and dance.
^
"I'll
do
it as long as I can", sheshrugs. "I don't know, maybe Iam a real clown. Maybe I ammarshmallow."BRIAN J. McHUGH, pictured above, is the new chairperson of
the
education division.
| _ |
by Judy
Ana
nia
Despite a
tight
job market,education majors still should be
able to
find jobs, maintains Brian
J.
McHugh,
newly ^appointed
chairperson of thedivision.McHugh, appointed
after
Dr.
^Barbara
completed her term, now headsone of Mercyhurst'si largestdivisions. The three main fields-elementary, secondary andspecial education
currently listeducationlast JuneWeigertvironments."McHugh said 60per cent of those children are innormal classrooms, the rest inspecial ed. programs.
j&
.In addition to his duties asdivision chairperson, McHughteaches a freshman special ed.course, "The Psychology ofExceptional Children," whichwill be offered in spring term.nearly 200 majors.The numberof studentshasandtightenrolling in education
decreased,
however,McHugh attributes it to ajob market.
g
"But if the student
isi
wellprepared to
teach,!he
shouldn'thave any trouble finding a goodjob,"McHugh added.
I
McHugh, who has been thedirector of the special educationdepartment here since1972,saidthe
latest^
trend is towardpreparing
•'.
elementary teachersto deal with exceptional
children—those
with learningdisabilities who previously wererelegated to special ed.Programs.
J
'
.
McHugh emphasized the impact of the 1977 Public Law94.142, which says all exceptionalchildren
"must
be placed innormal classroom situations, inthe least restrictive en-
Back Porch
r
Cafe
presents
Bob Franke
Tuesday, Nov.
1
st
Admission
60*

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