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The Merciad, Oct. 6, 1978

The Merciad, Oct. 6, 1978

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Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, Oct. 6, 1978
The Merciad, Oct. 6, 1978

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VOL.
51
NO.
3
OCTOBER
6,1978
Tentative
Agreement
Reach*;
Showing
Of SAO Movies
Editor's Note: In last
week's
issue, the Merciad ran a storywhich concerned a number ofstudents who boycotted theshowing of the
SAC
film series inthe Back Porch Cafe. A studentfrom the music department
feit
the article
did
not do justice
to the
plight of the music division.Featured below is a follow-upstory concerning the same topic.We hope we have covered allsides
equally,
for now, as it willbe in every future issue, that willbe the major objective of theMerciadby Sue FussAfter a series of meetings,memoes and debates, the StudentUnion has finally found analternative to showing movies inthe Back Porch Cafe.According to Jan Gatti, uniondirector, the Thursday eveningmovies
will
be shown
in
the LittleTheatre and the Sunday showswill be run in the Recital Hall.
A
dispute began
two
weeks agowhen students boycotted moviesshown in the Cafe. They citedpoor visability and bad ventilation as reasons for theirprotest.Because of misunderstandingsand a reported lack of communication between Gatti and
Dr.
Louis
Mennini,
director of themusic department, moviesoriginally scheduled for therecital hall were moved to theCafe.Since the Sunday movies weremoved back to the Recital Hall,attendance has improved, goingfrom two to about 40.In a memo, dated September
27,
Sr. Mary Matthew, interimdean of the college, stressed theneed for cooperation. "No areaon the campus can be consideredthe exclusive domain of anyindividual department ordivision," the memo stated, "Weshould all strive for equitable useof all Mercyhurst facilities."Bob
Lowry,
a music major,noted Mennini's concern for thestudents in his department."He (Mennini) doesn't want tosee the music department deprived of the
Recital
Hall,"Lowry said.The hall is often scheduled forother outside events such asmeetings and conferences byother college departments andoffices.Gatti forsees a few difficultiesin using the Little Theatre, buthopes
to
straighten them out withmedia services as soon aspossible.
9
Co-op
Director
Tom
ThompsonExplains
Hte'Program
To
MSG
Tom
Thompson, director ofcooperative education, addressedthe Mercyhurst StudentGovernment (MSG) meetingabout the new program initiatedthis year for job experience.Thompson pointed out to thegroup that the cooperativeeducation program is an on-the-job training class to furthuracquaint
the
student in the actualprofession behind his major."The program wasn't approved until last May," Thompson lamented, " But, over 300employers have been contactedthis summer to hire the studentsin the program."Representatives questionedThompson about the necessity ofpaying the college for the credit-hours earned in co-op when thestudent has to work for wages inthe
program
Thompson stated
that"
most
'good'
employers are
more
apt to get involved and take'a full interest in something forcollege credit."
iltek-V
*'•.
-v
?*<•»
Thompson told the representatives that because of therelative newness of the program,there is still " tremendous confusion over Co-op, and its function."Thompson encouraged anyonedesiring furthur information onthe program to contact his officeat
207
Map.
«lKr"%fe^te%*&
In other
MSG^
business,Parent's Weekend was discussedby the members. Representatives were given lists of facultyand administration personnel to
contact
concerning their attendance at the Oct. 20th event.
MSG
also decided
to
send LindaRavenstahl,
vice-president
of thestudent government, as
^Mer-
cyhurst's representative at aseminar of area colleges. TheCoalition of Independent Collegesand Institutions" (COPUS) willhold a seminar in Harrisburg toenlist
the
colleges' aid
in
lobbyingfor student related bills beforestate and federal legislatures.The cost of
the
trip
was estimatedat $110.MSG also probed the questionof a yearbook.
The
student government, alongwith Jan Gatti, student uniondirector, have taken on fullresponsibility to attempt to puttogether a staff for the collegeyearbook.Positions available includethose of editor, co-editors,photographer, copy writers, andpeople to work with layout andthe sports and senior sections ofthe publication.Aside from the positionsmentioned, a number of staffmembers will also be needed.
Although
previousqualifications and experiencewould be helpful, members ofMSG agreed that the onlyprerequisite needed was thatapplicants have "time andpatience."Applications can be picked upin the Student Union office. Thedeadline has been set for October
20.
MSG approved a $100 grant tothe
Earth-Space
Science Clubfrom their operations fund. Theclub asked the government forthe grant at the September 25meeting.E. William Kennedy, directorof student services, was unanimously elected as administrativeadvisor to MSG. elections forfaculty advisors will be held atnext week's meeting.
Open House This Sunday
Mercyhurst's Annual OpenHouse will take place this Sunday, October
8,,
from
l
to 5 p.m.
A jj
tent will be set up nearGarvey Park with tablesdesignating each department ofthe college. Faculty memberswill man the booths and answer
qny '
questions prospectivestudents and their families mighthave. fefe^Ettk^Ba^SB^
B
Tours will be {conductedthroughout fr the
..afternoon.
Admission's
work-study
studentswill give most of the tours, butany students willing to volunteertheir time can also help participate. feaES*
jj
The special events
f
plannedduring Open
House r include
anopen rehearsal
by;
the dancedepartment, a music recital at 3p.m. in the Zurn Recital Hall,three one-act plays performed bythe theatre department
in
5
thestudent union and a senior artexhibition
by
John Gregory in theLearning Resource
Center.
-^$r
The various
labs
>
throughoutZurn Hall will also be open to thevisitors.
SHB??^SH5
MEwfe
§ jg£ NOTICE
S
Any student not wishing hisor her name published in thestudent directory
please'ton-
tact the Director of StudentAffairs
as
soon
as
possible.
Www a*<
Kathy
Campernolle,
left, Denise Ricci and Gene Eisert
in
rehearsal
for the play
"Mother
Courage."
s'
"Mother
Courage'
1
Now
In Rehearsal Stage
The Mercyhurst theatredepartment has startedrehearsing Bertholt Brecht's"Mother Courage", a
two-act
play which Dr. Gary Smith, thedirector, says, "Reminds me ofH"."The production is scheduled tobe shown in the Little TheatreOctober
27-29
and November 2-4.The seating has been changed tocontinental in the theatre, whichmeans there will be no center
aisle. The seats are further apart.
which provides for more room."Mother Courage" is a dramathat takes place in the 17thCentury
during
the thirty yearswar.
The
play concerns a motherand her three children, whom thewoman must support by sellinggoods to the soldiers. Heroverriding concern is to makemoney from the war; in theprocess she loses her children.The play features sevenleading roles and ten othercharacter parts. Peggy Muderyplays the title role, Denise Ricciis Kattrin, Mike Even plays acharacter named Swiss Cheese,the character Eileif is portrayedby Kevin Rozich, Tom McDer-mott plays the cook, DavidSinclair the chaplin and KathyCampernolle plays the role ofYvette.Smith provided thewith some background on
*
the
play. "The rise of Hitler forced
Bertholt
BrechTfo
flee
ffom
Ger
many. He eventually moved to
California
to write the play."Later a House Committee onUn-American Activitiesquestioned his opinions about theplay. Although no charges
were
made against him, he felt he hadto leave the U.S. to produce theplay. The first showing of"Mother
Courage"v
was inSwitzerland."
.
** J§8?
5
P
?V|
W$'%$Xx
*ss^«
Two members of the Alpha Omega Players, who performed at the"Adam and Eve Dinner Theatre/
9
^
k
>
r
__——
1
^~ X
;v *
•\";;
-
\^^i?|J*K^^-
(photo
by
Pierre Priestley)
Turnout
Low For
Dinner
Theatre!
The evening began with candlelight, tables set for two ormore, a buffet with filet
mignon,
and concluded with a theatricalperformance.
;•
The Student Activities Committee (SAC) sponsored a dinnertheatre last Saturday, September29 in the Back Porch Cafe. I
P^The
Alpha-Omega Playerspresented Mark Twain's
one-act
play,
'The
Diary of Adam and
Eve."
The cast of charactersincluded only three: Adam, Eveand the snake.
%
3 ™§s
Sister Carolyn Herrmann,director of development andAlumni
r
relations, commented,"The play was performed so wellthat I was caught up in it completely, laughing and crying withAdam and
Eve."55
$
j f 3
SAC had approximated theBack Porch
Cafe to
hold about
120
for
the
dinner theatre, but only
43
actually attended. I
W?£
j?
Jan Gatti, director of
J
thestudent
union,
stated
that*the
majority of those who attendedwere college administrators andpeople from the Erie community.She added, "The low attendancedefinitely resulted from the lackof support from students."
*
s
*-.^*-
 
*-#
-k.
PAGE
2THE MERCIAD/OCTOBER
6,1978
Save
the Praeterita
.
A healthy majority
of
last year's graduating class
couldn't
have cared less whether they had a yearbook.Of the
250
who earned degrees in 78, only
121
orderedcopies of the Praeterita. That's less than
50
per cent
of
the class. As it stands now, no copies need be ordered
by
the class of
'79
because there won't
be
a yearbook.
Too
many members of the class of 78 were apatheticand lacked insight
into
the
personal
value
the
yearbookwould give them later on in life.
To
make matters worse for those
who will
graduate next year and would like
to see
a Praeterita, the funds it
will
take to accomplishthe task have already been spent bailing out last year's
publication,
which isn't even completed yet.It would take approximately $5,000
to
produce
a
yearbook for the class
of
79. And
at
least 600 copieswould have
to be
sold to break even.
MSG
could budgetthe money for the yearbook.
A
few caring members ofMSG have already begun to brainstorm ideas to helpsave the publication.Another major obstacle comes readily to mind in thecrusade
to
save the yearbook. That's the problem of attempting
to
organize
a
staff.
Obviously there
are
capable people
at
Mercyhurst who can handle
the
workload. And the requirement for workers
who
wouldlike
to
get involved is
not
limited
to
seniors.The villain here, naturally,
is
time.
It
seems mostpeople don't have time to
do
anything around here. Butwith time and effort put forth in creating a Praeteritafor the class of 79, the
finished
product could please a
lot
of people.
g
Apathy toward the yearbook developed rapidly
in
many of the minds of those who graduated from
Mer-
~
rin
1978. Graduates
of
the*class of»*79
should
start now by generating interest in the publication of
the
yearbook.The possibility
of a
Praeterita
for
the class
of 79
looks dim at this stage.
If
something isn't done soon,the chance of the class of
1980
having a yearbook won'tappear much better.
the
merci
Editor
John BrunoNews Editor
Sue
FussFeature Editor Vicki
Martina
goSports Editors AndyFindlay,Chris TomczakContributing Writers JoAnn Alexander, Judy Anania,
Amy Chizma
dia, Kevin DowneyPhotographers Diane Crandall, Tim Hiles,Pierre PriestleyContributing Artists Jeff Paul, Suzanne Rieker,Eugene WeberGraphics and
Layout....
John Bruno, Kevin DowneyCopy Editors Mary Beth Barrett,Cathy Betcher, Carol Lukowski, Joyce SparrowFaculty Advisors ....
Andrew
Roth, William ShelleyThe
Merciad
accepts, in fact encourages, the submission of articles, letters, and stories from any andall members of the Mercyhurst College community:students, faculty, administrators, trustees, and friends of the school. However, as responsible journalists
we
must reserve the following rights:
.
L ~
-
1.
The
right
to
revise copy
into
standardEnglish;
,-'
2.
The right to revise copy into correct journalisticform;
-y i '•;•
v'..
*£•?.
.'."'*•'>"
'***
-'-^l^y.'
£
3. And, finally, the right to revise copy (but notchange meaning)
to
fill layout design.
^
~£_
^k
;'.".'^jjln addition ^Letters
to the Editor must be signed,must be factually verifiable, and must be written ingood taste. Names will be withheld upon request, butfalse names will not
be
used. «&&>£.
SSfe ;& &fe
outside line
Pope DiesPope John Paul
I,
the humble'little man' elected pontiff of theRoman Catholic Church, died lastFriday ending his
34-day
reign.The 65-year-old pope, who hada history of health problems, diedin his sleep of
a
heart attack.John Paul's reign was one ofthe shortest
in
history,
but
his
warmth
and
good humor
had
endeared
him
to millions.Edinboro ScandalEdinboro State College
has
been the victim
of
an intensiveinvestigation
by
State AuditorGeneral
Al
Benedict.The investigation was initiatedto confirm reports
of
fraud usedby some
of
the 'Boro athletes
to
lessen their tuition.and finally
jellyfish
stings forcedher out
of
the water.Taylor was
20-miles
from herAllegedly,
21
college employeeshelped nearly
120
students
to
falsify their registration formsfor
tne
cheaper Pennsylvania goal when she
quit,
resident tuition. Most
of the
students were from New Yorkand Ohio.Losses
to the
Pennsylvania
| 'ate
Education Association havebeen set at $193,000. «£MMMa»M.
No
arrests have yet been made..Swimmer Gives UpMarathon swimmer StellaTaylor
gave-up
her
attempt
to
complete a record breaking swimfrom Cuba to the Florida coast.However, Taylor did achieve
a
record
for an
endurance swim.Sharks,
a
navigational errorCancer CureTwo teams
of
Philadelphia
r
doc
tors say that they have foundevidence that cancer is caused bya virus. Scientists also claim
to
have produced
a
vaccine for thecancer viruses.The research has been done
at
the Children's Hospital
in
Philadelphia. Experts claim theexperimentation
has
surpassedany cancer studies underwaycurrently in the nation.The cure, however, does
not
apply
to
the scores of other formsof cancer viruses.
 
ff
1
I 11
OCTOBER
6.1978
THE
MERCIAD
PAGE
3
Fall Fashion ForecastFull
And
Tailored Look
by
G
retch en Narcisi and VickiMartin
a
goFall provides a new beginning,with different challenges andperspectives for the collegestudent. Summer jobs, humidweather,
t-shirts
and shorts areput in the past, while classes,"co-ops,"
levi's
and sweatersonce again reign on the collegecampus. But this fall, fashionsextend beyond the
levi
with theintroduction of the oversizedshirt,
peg
pants, dohlman sleeveddresses and the suit with thelayered look.The newest look for fall thisyear is the peg pants and bigshirt. The pants are tightly fittedto the leg and tapered close to theLeft to right, Lyn Molinaro, Susan
Wengert
and
Laurie Mahnken(photo
by
Diane Cranda U)
iichael
Lewis
SINGERHMIST
BLUES-JAZZ
ROCK a BOLL
4
GREAT
TIMES'
BACK PORCH CAFE
Performances at 9 p.m.Admission
50
c
Doors Open At 8:30 p.m.
1
ankle. The material for thesepants range from solid cottons,wools, to leather. The shirts areloose fitting, long and pulled in atthe waist with a rope belt. Cottonwith banded collar, guaze, andsilk are the main fabrics shownfor the oversized shirt.
I
The total look demands a
careful
selection of
shoe
and boot.The "mule" shoe, a thin highheeled slip-on, is shown with thepeg pant look along with the allnew ankle boot.With the introduction ofdesigner jeans such as, CalvinKlein, Gloria Vanderbuilt, and
Vidal
Sasoon, the denim peg pantis considered a style in
itself.
Topped off with a blouson blousedenim is appropriate for casualand dress occasions.The "neat", tucked in look isgone, and the loose fit dominatesstyle for this fall.Dresses are back this fall withthe flowing look of the dohlmansleeve and soft prints to match."Femenine" is the look and thesedresses add that certain look allwomen desire. The high, thinheeled, open shoe adds a "touchof class" to this feminine dresslook.Designers have created a newdimension to fashion with theintroduction of the
"slit."
Skirts,shirts and dresses are all caughtup in this look. The "slit" in
dresses
range from knee to mid-calf in order to promote analluring, but yet innocent look.The oversized look is alsoapparent in dresses for fall. Thebanded collar shirt dress with tiebelt one of the favorites.The layered look of the suitcoordinates well with the fallweather here at school. Thepants, vest and Jacket are eachtailored and fitted.
Wools
thatvary
from
plaids to
twed,
cour-doury and seudes head the list
for
suit fabrics. The blazer and vest
coordinates
are ideal for mix andmatching with shirts, skirts,
and
slacks. The classic suit isdefinitely a fashion winner thisyear.These latest fashions are seenat the
'Hurst,
intermingled withthe jean and levi "prep look".The photos on this page showstudents modeling the variousfall fashion designs.
Nw
Harolyn Gaudette
Gaudette New Dance Instructor
by
Judy Anania
Ballet, jazz and basic dance areonly three of many differentdance styles in which HarolynGaudette, the new dance instructor at the
'Hurst,
has participated.She has been involved in dancefor 12 years and has taught for
eight years. Prior to
Mercy
hurst,
she taught dance at the University of California, the Universityof Wisconsin, St. Tyeresa Collegein Minnesota and NorthernIllinois University."I like teaching at Mercyhurstbecause, so far, it has been a niceexperience," she said. "Thestudents are really good. Even Ididn't start dancing until I wastwenty."Besides ballet, jazz and basicdance, Harolyn will also instructdance history and compositionhere at the college.She mentioned
that
in the pastten years she has studied variousforms of ethnic dance. Her firstexperience was in East India.Her interests eventually expanded to Spanish and Hawaiianstyles."It was mentally challenging
because you had to think and
learn how to use space," she saidof ethnic dance. "I found themore you know about dance themore you learn about
yourself."
Harolyn is a native of Boston,Massachusetts, but has livedmost of her life in California. Shereceived her B.A. and M.F.A. indance at
the
University ofCalifornia.In November, Harolyn willchoreograph two ballet and onejazz numbers in a danceproduction here at the college.
•y
MM
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