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The Merciad, Oct. 13, 1978

The Merciad, Oct. 13, 1978

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Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, Oct. 13, 1978
The Merciad, Oct. 13, 1978

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09/18/2013

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^
VOL.
51 NO. 4.
OCTOBER
13,1978
Next Senate BusinessTo Revise 'Hurst Code
On lAff irmati
ve Action
by Sue Fuss
V$w 3
K
Following tabling action by thesenate last spring, the administrative policies committeewill begin discussion and debateearly in November on thecollege's affirmative action plan.
Tile
action plan is designed toeliminate and guard againstpossible discrimination on thebasis of race, color, creed, sex,
age,
national origin, ancestry andmarital status.
jjSBj 3gj
The
Civil Rights Act of
1964
setthe. stage
to ^
ban
^
alldiscrimination in employment,housing, recruiting and transportation. A revision in that actrequires all federal contractorsto develop an affirmative actionprogram to assure against
such
discrimination.
* sjB Zj
"It's unfinished business of the
senatef
fromlastTyear,"
said
Marilynn Jewell, assistant to thepresident and affirmative actionofficer for
Mercy
hurst.
"Our goalis
to have an affirmative actionplan by the end of this academic
year."
*£& .*. *^*";l
JT**
The original proposal writtenby Jewell and Robert Prather,vice president of development,was sent back to committee
by
the senate because it lacked
provisions
for
accessibility
by
thehandicapped,
gpt
i
93
Since then,, a committee wasformed, headed by Bob Sheeny,director of operations, to studythe campus plan and thepossibility of changes to
J
ac-
commodate the* physicallyhandicapped.
jjti £&
The
restructuring of the senatelast
spring
incorporated
the
workof the affirmative
faction
committee into the adminstrativepolicies committee. A questionstill remains as
to
whether a newaffirmative action committee
will
be formed.
?£•&
*$.
"They (administrativepolicies) may appoint a subcommittee," said Jewell, "but atpresent they are taking over theduties."
| 4;
Jewell noted
that
Mercyhurst isnot required by law to have awritten affirmative action planbut that "it's good to have it allwritten down."
>
t
"^
;gj
Federal
law
does
require that
a
grievance proceedure be set upand made available to all employees of an institution. Jewellemphasized that any person whofeels discriminated against
should j
contact her with theirgrievances.Sp;
i fS
At present the adminstrativepolicies committee, chaired by
Judy
Zewe, director of personnel,is unsure of
the
action it will
take
to revise
the
"plan
to make itacceptable
to the
college senate.
^TWvufv^Y
m<->»v.
;ff*
>§
Admissions Director Karen Schultz, in foreground of
photo
on steps of the
LRC,
gives one of the many
campustours offered at
last
Sunday's Open House.|||l «g
SK|
(photo
by
Diane
Crandall)
louse
Opens,
iGetsiMixed
Reviews
In keeping with what seems tobe an unwritten
|
tradition atMercyhurst, the weather againproved to be the limiting factor
on the
success of the Open Houselast Sunday.
*** f
B
"We were pleased
with
everything except for theweather," said Karen Schultz,director of
admissions
andcoordinator of the event. Themorning brought hail and sleetwith periodic downpours of rainin the afternoon, rThe Open House provided achance for the Erie community
and
interested
students
to
see thecampus,
Imeet
{faculty, ad-
mi nst rat
ion and students andlearn more
* about>
variousprograms,
i iJi Sn
rfrW'tAlthough the final figures wereunavailable, Schultz estimatedthat 130 prospective freshmen -high school seniors - had been oncampus as well as many otherswho were interested in adulteducation and special programs.
f*
"We're
very appreciative of allthe people in the community whohelped," said Schultz.
35
3J|
'1
Some faculty members andstudents noted a dissatisfactionwith
some :
areas of the OpenHouse program. Tours runthrough Zurn Hall often ranthrough various labs or missedthem altogether.
.>i<
*£
T*»
"If majors are asked tor puttogether presentations or todemonstrate their facilities,"questioned Linda Lochner,biology instructor, in a letter toSchultz, "should not all of thesedisplays be brought to the attention
of*all
of the visitors?"Of particular concern was thegeology
^department fiwhere
students
had
put together variousdisplays which were viewed byfew people. Admissions tourguides were instructed not to go
to the
upper floors of
Zurn
wherethese displays were
*
unless avisitor expressed interest.
w,-v-
Also questioned was the use ofthe Campus Center for departmental booths.
Schultz noted
thata tent
dose
to Zurn to house thetables was in the original planbutthat*
weather
had ruled outthat possibility. ;
; -
r
$
Schultz said that it
was;-notfeasibly
to have the whole operation located in Zurn because of
lack
of
hall
space
and
noted
that amajority of the faculty wanted touse the Campus Center.
^
The switch of Open House tofall term was made with hopesfor better weather and to emphasize recruiting, among jjun-decided high school up-
perclassmen £
Calendar
Talks
Again
Considered
by Kevin Downey
KS
\
The possibility of a calendarchange
I
has been
Srumored
throughout the college, since lastMarch when Dr. Jerry M.Trimble, former dean of thecollege, advocated the move.
3
Efforts
>
to
receive opinionsabout a possible change havebeen made recently as memoeshave been sent to divisionchairpersons and area directorsto gather information about apossible change;-^
%
The effort is "an informalprobe into the possibility of achange," according to Dr. DavidPalmer, associate professor ofEnglish. In an interview with theMerciad, he stressed that nodirect movement has yet been
made
to initiate a change.Palmer stated, "This is an effortto investigate the necessity, if infact there is one, of a change."Dr. John J. Millar, dean of thecollege in November, said thatthe administration, "is
not
takingthe issue (of a calendar change)
lightly
J;
We
won't just lower theboom and
say
a
change
has beenmade. It requires serious consideration."
H
!
The first mention of a change,according to Palmer, was madelast March
at« a J
meeting ofdivisional chairpersons. At themeeting, it was pointed out that
too few
classroom meetings wereheld during a trimester term.Possible solutions made by thechairpersons included a study ofa calendar change.
Tins
study iscurrently
in the
works
as Palmer
and Dr.
Joseph
Pizza
t, professorof art, are gathering input fromvarious sources and will compile(Continued on page I)
"*
Parents Weekend
Plans
Set
'£SSS«:¥a-SM gg
Left to right, Webb Durant, Parents' Association vice president,Darlene Wawrejko, chairperson of Parents' Weekend,
and
Mel Kofod,Parents'*
Association
president, check over the schedule of events forthe upcoming
three-day
affair.
*,
Plans have been finalized forthis year's Parents' Weekend,scheduled forFriday,
October
20,
through Sunday, October 22.
£?
Darlene Wawrejko, chairperson of the festivities, said,"Mel
Kofod
(Parents'Association president), and Iencourage
full
student: par**;ticipation, since we recognizethat their interest in any eventensures its
successfulness.)
We
have students from almost
every §
division contributing their effortstoward this Weekend."
\
The
weekend will officially getunderway Friday at 8:30 p.m.with an evening of musicprovided byf Jim Ritchey andBeJae Fleming
in
the
Back PorchCafe. An opportunity
to
sample avariety of teas and coffees will
,
also be offered.
Saturday's
busy schedulestarts at 8:30 a.m. with a continental breakfast
and
registration, both in the Back
Porch
Cafe.
And
at
10
a.m. guestswill have the option of
meeting
with various faculty members ortaking a tour of the campus.After lunch at noon in EganDining
Hall,;two one-act plays
will take place
in
the Recital
Hall
at; 1:80 p.m. At 2, a tennisexhibition will be held
in j
the
indoor*
courts
of the CampusCenter. Zurn Recital Hall
will
bethe scene for student dance presentations at 2:30, followed bystudent musical performances at
3.
A
" %
^
College President Dr. Marion
L.
Shane's reception will* com
mence at
4 p.m.
in
the
Weber Hall
Studio. At 5, a buffet dinner willbe served in Egan Dining Hall,followed
by
after
dinner remarks
i
by Kofed.
. Av '*
And
from
8:30 p.m. to
1
a.m. aninformal dance featuring themusical group "Casablanca" willbe held in the student union.
Refreshments
and a mixer willbe provided.
£
*1t
j
Sunday's festivities begin at 10a.m. with coffee and donutsserved
in
the
Back
Porch
Cafe. Atllsp.m., an (optional) mass inChrist
the King
Chapel, featuringspecial selections by the Mercyhurst Concert Choir will
.take
place. And, to conclude theweekend, brunch will be servedin Egan Dining Hall at noon.(Continued on page 3)
 
PAGE
2
THE
MERCIAD
OCTOBER
13,1978
*i-
rzhe
editor
*™-^^^„
am
^r
&,
^m
i tor
tno
eafxor.
zhe
e<Jditor.th^editor.the ed
dit&.tyt^ij^or
.
the ed
iditArttffieeditor.Uie
ed
japNpi
W '
wlti
*W* to
J.
tfleVjrcor.
t$e
eg
k
Jig.
*
P
*
trrc^editor.
theihe editor.ti
9 Help
Wanted
| P Jg
«-
'
gj jM
S-
The Student Activities Committee (SAC) and the
Merciad need
recruits.^
L^ll^ls
5 ^*
'M
E
SAC is
short of workers.
Only
seven
students
are
han
dling the
businessun
the seven various committees.That
involves
a lot of time and effort
on
the part of thatfew number of people.
M
*gH*.
/?$
h
^gThe extra-curricular activities
5
and
entertainmentsponsored by SAC are invaluable to the college community. Overall student participation is needed
to
helpmake the production of activities a little smoother andless hectic for those already
involved.
»ggl
can identify with the problem with which SAC is
confronted.
The Merciad
is
also
short of
staff,
i
''-
£
According
toj
Admissions,
J 47
students are
I
nowdeclared as communications majors. But I want tofocus on those in the broadcast field. A good many ofthem whom I've asked to be on the
staff
have
handed
me the lame excuse that they don't have to write forthe paper if they're going to earn a living announcing
the
news.
\
J. J|
|
8 3&g3*j[
M M
SSSg
That's a fallacy. Unless
they're
working at a localradio or t.v. station, they're not getting any practicalexperience. What they learn in the major classes hereat the
college
is
fine
for
the history and background into broadcast journalism. But working on the Merciad
would!
provide i
them with on-the-job training in reporting
the
news;
even
if it
is
in
print,
^j nr jf ; |
One
does not have to be a communications major towork on the paper. Indeed, many of the people, whosenames appear in the staff box below, are in various
other
fields
of
study.
til S I | *
!
?§K
h
if
Those of you who have the
ability,
the time and thewillingness to help report what's newsworthy here atMercy hurst should consider applying your talents.
£—.
Yearbook Update
1
\
| i |y
Thanks to the Mercyhurst Student Government(MSG) who voted unanimously to fund the moniesnecessary
to
save
the
Praeterita
for
the
class of
'79,
theuphill
battle
is
now faced
with
a
fighting
chance.Reps
I and
j
officers
heard!
pessimistic.^
argumentsagainst the attempt to produce a yearbook for nextyear's graduating class.
But,
after considerable
debate
and new ideas for
the
publication kicked around, members decided it was a worthwhile project with which tolend their full support.
iThe
date of Friday, October
20,
has been set as thedeadline for those who are considering applying for astaff position
on
the Praeterita.
#j
I
THE STAFF
1
Editor John BrunoNews Editor Sue FussFeature Editor Vicki Martinago
.
Sports Editors Andy
Findlay,
Chris TomczakContributing Writers JoAnn Alexander, Judy Anania,Amy
Chizmadia,
Kevin DowneyPhotographers Diane
Crandall,
Tim Hiles,
j
|
* | ^Pierre
PriestleyContributing Artists Jeff Paul,
Suzanne
Rieker,
?
H*
Eugene WeberGraphics and
Layout....
John Bruno,
Kevin
DowneyCopy Editors Mary Beth Barrett,Cathy Betcher, Carol Lukowski, Joyce SparrowFaculty Advisors .... Andrew Roth, William Shelley
S£
7~
4 JOB **&
Go
jMty
75
C*//ef<L
#£*.£
viewpoint
7 No-Win Decision
Bob
Prat
her, Andy Roth and
Bill Shelley
are
treating with high
solemnity the ongoing effort toupgrade the communicationsdepartment.
So
might you if you
were stalking $120,000
with whichto buy a whole studioful ofelectronics.
$&jjffily^|fll
M
It is too soon, we are told, totalk of a
'make
or
break"
pointfor broadcast communications atMercyhurst. Although Roth, the
department
I chairman, andShelley, the
instructor,
treadlightly around
.the
subject,
they
do
not deny that, without its own
equipment,
the
school
might haveto at least review the possibilityof dropping
I
radio and TVbroadcasting||from
I
thecurriculum.
I S ^
If Mercyhurst does not get acommunications grant it willsoon be faced with a
no-win
decision. The department is oneof the fastest-growing here,leaping from 10 majors to itspresent 47 in four years.
E *
On the other hand, broadcastcommunications up to the nowhas been a floating crap shoot,and
options
are running
low.
Theschool has had to find sponsorswilling, for a small rental price,to submit
its
expensive equipment to inexpert handling.Predictably, the welcomes have
worn
out
quickly,
usually within
a
year.
|»
Getting its own broadcast
studio
would
give
the
departmentinstant respectability.
At
least interms of facilities. Another thing
the
gentlemen are taking veryseriously is the sort of courseswhich would be taught with thenew
equipment—and
the sort ofstudents.
gjl&
"We
are not trying
to
make on-
camera
or technical professiona
ls,"
Prather
said.
;"We
fareaiming at management personnel with a need to know thecapabilities of the broadcastingequipment.
We're'not
trainingWalter Cronkites.''
I **£ Roth
is
even more succinct. Hesaid those with visions of becoming "Danny the Deejay
types"i
or playing "Commander Codyand his
Lost,'Planet
Airmen"
*|
need not apply.
f
Judgement on the state of thedepartment's effort to build an
on-campus
studio are limited,
at
BntiTTWttfiiwiMfr'Ml
1
ConcerningOpen House. Of course italways rains or snows, but the
c61Iege~sTn!fes
up
its
Drass",
waves
its banner and smiles away.
%
But something was differentthis
^
point,' to speculation.Herewith, some of our hunches:
1.
The chances of getting afoundation grant are good.
2.
The chances of the schoolfunding the purchase, if a grantcannot be had, are bad.
pp
3.
The chances of the department ever becoming first rate,even by local standards, withoutits own equipment, are slim.
\
WBKfe m
& —GSW
Open
House
i:
3
But
probably the saddest thing
of
all
wasfthe work.lhat
sm$
peoplewere
convinced
tfie>Tiad
to put into displays and demonstrations for the event; displayshis
year.
The banners were there and demonstrations that
weren't
and so were
the-helium-filled
even seen.
4 f$T
m
balloons. Everything
was
set and.-
Something
has to be
re-thought
ready, but there were no
smiles «n
our plan for college recruiting,
and,
of all things, no people. Open
House
should show the
One
joke going
around was that college and its people, not itsthere were more Mercyhurststudents at Open House thanthere were prospective students.And everybody laughed; it wasall but true.
I **!! ^ll
buildings.
Fancy
signs, impressive view books and heliumballoons all add to the festivity,
but
in
the end,
only the programsand the people will sell Mer-
If
you worked a booth
in
the cyhurst to students and to the
Campus?
Center, most of your community.
3*
4!
?%j
time was devoted to draggingpeople over to your table andLet's hope that we get morethan
130
freshmen next
year.
AndSue Fusstalking to them. If
you
worked
in ^
let's hope that Open House didn'ta
lab
and brought your books, you scare those who attended away,got four hours worth of studyingdone.-jefej
U
$ irt>
t*
i
I S3 3
f
.
**!
|End
of the World Postponed
Surprise.
/B& RS
We're still alive.
^g
The hottest
\
topic of conversation, by far, on campus this
week
was
speculation
on
whethertiie World would come to an endthis Friday the
13th.
Perhaps thissays
something* uncomplimentary-about
"our
collective powers of reason.If you haven't heard by now,
which
we
doubt,
the
latest
end-of-
the-world
rumor began with thedeath of Pope John Paul
I.
Aninterpretation of a line from theBook of Revelation suggests thatthe countdown to apocalypse hasbegun, because the late Pope'scasket
occupies
the last availablespot in the Vatican burial tombs.
This
LIS
nonsense. We knowbecause
our
editor
tells
us so.
Wepass the following
-.
bit of information along in the interest of
an
informed citizenry:
The
end
of
the world
will
really
take
place in
1999.
)
Why?
Because the
"
16thCentury French philosopher-metaphysician, Nostradamus,said so.
*|* 1?
So,
relax.Gary Wesman
 
OCTOBER
13,1978
THE
MERCIAN
College [Shopping
For
Radio {Equipment
Sometime
next':
week the
I
chase in the college budget.college will apply
to
one or moreeducation foundations for
$120,000
to buy enough electronicgear to outfit a "modest yetfunctional" campus radio stationand color television studio.Chances are good the equipment will be installed and readyfor use by next fall term 1979,college officials said."I have every confidence theschool is committed to
this,"
saidAndrew Roth, chairman of thecommunication arts department."If it can't be done it will bebecause
the
money
is
not there tobe found."
i-
Mercyhurst is first looking forthe money from public and
private
foundations; applicationswill be
 filed
 with perhaps two orthree of them next week, according to Vice President ofDevelopment Bob Prather.If a foundation gift cannot beobtained the
college will apply
fora federal grant, Prather said. Asa last resort school officials will
try?to
make room for the pur-
Calendar
•'";
(Continued from page
1),.-.',
the information for a presentation in November. >The reasons cited in favor of achange include the possibility ofdecreased attrition,
insufficiency
of classrooms and fewer costs foradministration.
Inter
session andproblems connected with it couldalso possibly be alleviated, according to
Millar.
M I
"Attrition could
hypothetically
be cut,"
Palmef
said, "becausethere would
only
be two
start-upsand endings in any year withsemesters. Costs could also becut with the decreased work withthree registrations."
*
'1
••Millar
stated
that,
"There
are"
two basic problems
\
with thepresent calendar as it nowstands.
The
first
is
the problem
of
intercession
and
the
second
is
theshort spring term,
gg 3
\
"The
main question
is
what arethe outcomes of the learning
process as
it
now
stands?
Can you
do what you were supposed tohave learned
from
class? If
not,
a
change
has to be
made. If
so,
thenwe can leave things alone." ra
I
Parents|||
p§p
(Continued from
page
I)
jS
"We
recognize
the
necessity
(of
having on-campus radio and TVfacilities) if we are to have aneffective communicationsdepartment," Prather said.If the money is
found,
Mercyhurst will then post bids for asupplier. A shopping list ofmaterials was provided lastspring by Warren Radio Co. of
Erie.
The TV
equipment
\
listed includes one portable and twostudio color cameras, a videotape
'.recorder
and
editor,.
aspecial effects generator andmixer;, color and black-and-whitemonitors and
a.video
editingcassette recorder, plus accompanying hardware and astudio lighting system.The audio gear will do doubleduty for radio and television andincludes a mixer,
two
turntables,two cartridge machines,
microphones
and a
monitor, all
of
broadcast quality.The school's effort to buy itsown equipment represents inseveral ways
.
a crossroadsmoment for the departmentThe communicationscurriculum originally was builtaround the cable television industry and most of its present
47
majors are interested in
broadcast,
rather than print,media.'
.
<\
\
*g
Even
so,
electronic
Journalism
has been the orphan child of thedepartment for the past fiveacademic years.
" ."
<
***
In May, 1975, the Erie public!broadcasting system,
WQLN-FMdropped
its sponsorship of theMercyhurst radio station. Sincethen all lab classes have beenheld off campus, by turns atcommercial stations, theMillcreek Middle School andprivately-owned studios, butnever
the
same place two years
V
m
a row
*
. Scripps Foundations. He said itThis week Prather said
the j
will
be
several months before thechances
for
getting a grant were school's request is accepted or"pretty strong;" partly, he
and!
turned down.Roth agreed, because the schoolhas "made
do"
in the past and isnot starting a new program.
jL
"The program has a trackrecord and we
did it
responsibly,the bard way," Roth
said.
"This
is not some bonzo outfit trying toget a hold of somebody's loosecash."
^Prather
said toe college will
apply
to two
or three foundationsfrom a list of
10
that specialize in
communications grants, including the du
Pont.
Ford and
Kubiak Lands
Temporary
(Post
by Barbara CyterskiRichard J. Xubiak is heading
the
office of
Adult
Education hereuntil a permanent replacementfor
Kathy
Skerlong,
who
resigned
last
summer, arrives.Kubiak, Mercyhurst professorof
history
and the man whorecently resigned as ErieCounty's director of administration before he officiallybegan his duties, started
the
temporary position in AdultEducation on October 9. Dr.Gerald Dweller will take over
f
u-
lltime
on October
23.
V L
Kubiak said he will spend hisbrief period on the job studyingthe present state of the AdultEducation program. He said hewill interview college faculty on"how they view this departmentand what they feel
is-viable
forthe adult learner."
A
,
"I will gather facts on the typeof courses that could be made
avnilobUiw
ideas
on
^greater
flexibility in scheduling
ana the
feelings of the Erie communityon adult educational needs," he
added. fflBfff^'WMJBH
M
fillBE
Kubiak
also
indicated he would
also like
class scheduling to havegreater range.
He
will
look at theidea of
addingfto
the presentevening and weekend hoursclasses which meet
one
full
day aweek for five weeks.
? |
|
§3
"In the adult community, home
and
work demands must be metfirst," he explained.
yjCoursesmust
J range from enabling amother to gain insight on child
« ..
... .
J
i.
•.
raising to helping a person gain
%
Parent's
Weekend
has.been
an background toward a careerannual event at
the college
for
change-and
in hours accessible
over ten
years,
but this
year
to
me average
adu
i
t
marks the first time
the
students"I feel he has expertise instructuring an adult educationprogram and under properdirection, this department couldforesee an enrollment of evengreater numbers than those ofpresent regular student figures."Kubiak said
*
he
will
beon the Mercyhurst community.He replaces Sr. Mary AliceSchultz, who was hired by thecollege in September as actingAdult
Education
coordinator,
but resigned the position lastweek. ,
" ^ ^
?•
schools and special programs atChicago Urbana Skills Institute,City Colleges of Chicago,
K
A
graduate of
the
University
of
Illinois, he got his doctorate inAfro and Brazilian Literature.'
_. •/i .<
'j*
His
post-doctoral
work was doneDweller
formerfer
was the
I at Illinois
in
adult
and continuingavailable
to
Dreller
as an
advisor*
associate
2
director of evening education.Good Times - TMR students and 'Hurst chaperones applaud the
ljttle
girl, pictured near far right, for
placing
first
in the
da nee contest held
at
the
CEC
sponsored
affair.
KS'
.f?
TMR Kids Boogie, In Union
have helped supervise its planning and j preparation. Theevent's entertainment
is
intendedfor parents of all Mercyhurststudents,
m
j)£ £
jj
/Students whose
parental
areunable to attend the event arewelcome
to
any of the festivities,including the dance, at the priceof $2.50 per person."I don't believe in retreadingold ideas, so all of this fact-gathering
will
be
given
to
Drelleras background information,"Kubiak
said.**
~ jS jS
About his successor, Kubiaksaid, "(Dreller) comes
to us
fromthe University of Illinois and hasmanaged an
S,
adult
education
program on a campus of 15,000.
&£$&&&
The Council for ExceptionalChildren (CEC) sponsored aback-to-school
J
dance
3
fortrainablementally
}
retarded(TMR)
junior,
and senior highschool students Friday, October6, in the Back Porch Cafe.A parent-teacher conferencewas held in conjunction with thedance.
| 3«The
teenagers took part inseveral dance contests, including
the
hoakey-pokey, twist
and
discocompetitions.
Ssi
Colleen Walsh, treasurer of
CEC,
said, "It was great havingthe dance
in
the (Student) Union,
because
it
gave
'Hurst students achance to
see
what we are doingwith and for the kids." V
B
Of the many record requests,Walsh said,
the
favorite
was
"Gr
ease."
| I
"One student was so excitedthat
he
brought
his own
records,"added Education InstructorDiana Bohl.
>Bohl
headed
the
parent-teacher
conference, a panel discussionwhich brought together about 30parents of TMR students. Shewas pleased with the attendance,saying, "Usually
when
you inviteparents,
you
don't get
too
many."But this year it seemed thatmany
| pa
rents and students
returned
because of the success
^Friday
Night Fever was the tone set by the TMR students at the
j
°*
last
year's dance and con-Back
Porch Cafe
last week.
Ifr5
!
ference.
*
"There were a lot of familiar
faces,
which
is
a
good
sign," Bohlsaid.
|
\%
The format of the conferencewas a discussion during whichparents questioned members ofthe panel. Topics includedplacement of children in schools,special
*
education teacherevaluations, training of
Mer
cyhurst special ed. majors, andmainstreaming.
i
"With mainstreaming, thestudents have the same facilitiesand teaching
options
as the other
kids,"
Bohl explained.
£j j
This practice is being used inclasses such as art and physicaleducation.
'>
After the conference theparents joned their children inthe Back Porch Cafe for the finalhour of the dance. I
Caribbean
Adventure
Many interesting travel courses are being offered during In-tersession
78. One
that has attracted a great deal of student interest is Caribbean Adventure, a study-tour of the
U.S.
VirginIslands. The course will include a study of the biological,geological
and
ecological aspects
of
the
environment
of the
coralreef tropical islands.
Astrophotography
of the Southern Skies
will also
be
included.
?
Headquarters for
18
days will
be
Maho
Bay,
a camp located
in
the Virgin Islands National Park on
St.
John,
U.S.
virgin
Islan
ds.
The resort is a community of
tent-cottages
located on theshore above the pristine beach and blue-green water of theCaribbean.The cost of the Intersession is
$460
plus
food.
Definite
reservations
for
the
flight must
be
made by October
25.
Reservation
forms
and further
information
can be obtained
 from
 Sister
Mary Matthew Dean's
Office
David Thomas ..205ZurnLyn
Fleming
106Zurn
DM4I1IM
for
RMicvaHoin
-
October
23,1978
>*-
I

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