Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Merciad, Dec. 8, 1978

The Merciad, Dec. 8, 1978

Ratings: (0)|Views: 37|Likes:
Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, Dec. 8, 1978
The Merciad, Dec. 8, 1978

More info:

Published by: TheMerciad on May 24, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/01/2011

pdf

text

original

 
thte
VOL
51,
NO. 9, FRIDAY, DECEMBER8,;
1978
College Business MajorsInteract With Erie
AMS
%0
If Pictures Could Talk
-
What the Lakermaniacs yell most of the time can't be printed here. But here theyare^at^work getting psyched. Suffice
it to
sayfthis
is the
quietest you're
apt to
hear them.
Name!
Eleven 'Hurst Students
To
Who's
Who
Publication
!
I
I
Mercy hurst faculty membersand seniors voted eleven studentsof
the 1979
graduating
class
to the1978-79 edition of Who's WhoAmong Students in AmericanUniversities and Colleges.
jL.
I
The Who's Who
Edition»
is
pflW>H3?!en"ahrftaNy ana^ists*~the
names of students recognized asbeing among the country's mostoutstanding campusleaders.
MS
Students from Erie named tothe list were Paula Pizzat, JohnBruno, Christine Filippi andGerard NeCastro.
3 Jjjj
Other
students!from
Pennsylvania selected were JoAnnDeSantis, West Aliquippa,Michael Heller, Franklin, KevinRozich,
5
Johnstown,]! MelissaMcMurray, Brookvilie, PhyllisPieffer, Pittsburgh and DarleneWawrejko, Springcreek.
•H&iS
Barbara jHardie,
I
who
I
hailsfrom Holyoke, Massachusetts,was also named to the honorspublication.
Bo|GBraS9M|
4
The
.eleven
students! werechosen on the basis of academicexcellence, contributions toMercyhurst
College
and potentialas future
leaders
of society.
§I
Special
privileges
and
benefits
will be entitled students namedas
^members £
of the nationalprogram. Among them, alifetime use of the reference andplacement service.
•••
If
\
thestudents or prospective employers! request letters ofrecommendation the Who's Whoprogram
wiUperform the
service
free
of
charge**4MtfMMMIBh£M«*tf
""Students named will!alsoreceive
a
personalized certificateattesting
the
fact that
he or she
has been officially honored by
the
Who's Who program.^
|
SSThey will also
be
invited
to
participate
in
nationalstudentpolls"tmmluuteil penodicaiiy
on
major E issues
of the day.
Dance Marathon SlatedFor January 5 Weekend
The
Fourth IAnnual
DanceMarathon sponsored by theCouncil for Exceptional Children(CEO will take place in thestudent union the weekend ofJanuary
5,
6,
7.^JSj|'
|The 48 hour marathon willdonate
".its
proceeds to (exceptional children tin the Eriearea.
i B ^
U
Dr. John J.
Millar,
dean of
theS
college
and!
vice
president
offfi
academic services, will officiate
£
the start of the marathon. 1
kA
band, not yet announced, willpray
from
9 p.m. to
l
a.m.
Fridaynight
.^Students
and professional
y
disc jockeys are
scheduiea
to
Bwork
the remainder of the
.£weekend.
J-
82flfi'
*^6
Wt
The Mercyhurst Chapter of theAdministrative ManagementSociety (AMS) met with ErieChapter members at
a >
dinnerprogram on Tuesday, November
28.
i
5 I j
g-J
*m
The 17 members of the collegechapter elected Debi
Copper
smith, a senior business major,as president.
The
members
have
been involved
withe
AMS sinceOctober but received officialmembership
*
at
}
the dinnerprogram.
S $3t
&*t
"We're
*
finally through; the
Initial
planning stages,"
Copper
smith stated. "I can see we'll behaving worthwhile programs and
projects j
throughout the rest ofthe year
Iwhich will J
provevaluable to members and theMercyhurst community."
-
The 'Hurst Chapter hopes tobring members from the localbusiness world to the campus forseminars and lectures,
a si
Dr. Jean Lavin, associateprofessor of business, who servesas college advisor to the
'Hurst
chapter was recently named tothe AMS board
of
directors.
^^Atl ernaving
been
affllia
tedwith
AMS
for two years," Lavin
said,
"I realize that a select bodyof Mercyhurst management students would profit by
associatingwith
W
middle
jM
and uppermanagement personnel
who
haveactualized the goals of ourpresent students."
*| I
s8§|
Lavin added that, "The inner-face of these self-directed students and the
AMS
is superb. It'sa pleasure to work with bothgroups."
*
Other college chapter officersinclude Reggie O'Connor, vicepresident, Jim Tarasovitch,secretary-treasurer, Steve
Flatley,f
public relations,'MikeDucato, publicity committeechairperson and Steve|Frisina,program chairperson.Counselor Karen Jones andPersonnel Director Judy Zewewere also named as members of
the!AMS
organization at thedinner program.
jj'~
The
guest speaker
at
the dinnerprogram was Joseph>.Salvia, apartner with the accounting iirmof Root,
Spitznas
and Smiley.Salvia presented "A
New
Look atthe Federal Income TaxSystem."
- ^
1*3
Apparently members
of
theErie Chapter enjoy
4
interactingwith the 'Hurst Chapter, as indicated by Marine
Bank
Assistant Vice President
and
Senior Personnel Officer C.
yne&.Wester-«w ^
* m
really surprised all
tl»c
amount
of
student interestVolunteer dancers
can
enterafter the marathon begins and
do
not have
to
dance
the
full
48
hours.
I
Ho we ver, they fare rex-pec ted
to
collect!
the
moneypledged
to
them. HS
I2|
Dancers expecting
to go the
distance
are
reminded
to
bringsponsor sheet, pillow, sleepingbag and Iblankets, j change
of
clothing]necessary
and
recordalbums.
SB
1
g$ 1K Members
of
the CEC executivecommittee have indicated thatthey are in need of albums for theentire {weekend. Any
*
studentwilling
to
loan
out
their albumsfor the weekend are asked
to put
their names
on the
album sleeveand bring them
to the
union
by 5
p.m. Friday, January 5.
Sgt»
%
participation in the program,** hesaid.
"In
the future,
I
hope morepeople will hear about
the
program
and
become involved."The college chapter meets oncea month |for interaction
I
withbusiness people
for
contacts
in
different job related areas.
\\%
Debbie John, left, president of the Erie Chapter of the
AMS,
presentsa pin
to
Debi Coppersmith, recently chosen
as
president
for
the Mer-cyhurst College
f
Chapterwfe
ofi*?'
the AMS.
Weref Illegal iFundsl UsedI To' Build
by Kevin Downey
2raRP2?ll
The
'Hurst
has a skeleton in itscloset
-
and
the
closet in this casehappens
to be
the Queen's Chapelin the Old Main building,
g>
Almost every freshman hasheard the tale of
g
the hauntedchapel
-
usually
on
a dark stormy
midnight.
jg¥
SlraSI
)
The tale, as told by some of the'Hurst's!
more f mystic
upper-classmen, deals with theagonizing death
a
of an earlycollege benefactor whose ghostyearns for his intended tomb butwas buried in
faraway
jEurope.Actually, the story does, havesome basis in fact, but the skeleton in the closet is not a ghost. It
is.some
allegedly illegally*ob
tained;
funds
which eventuallyfound their way to build
£
theQueen's Chapel.
*
1
\
Hardly a high school
student
has not been dismayed in his history class when informed of oneof the nation's previous "Water-gates."
Js
The Teapot Dome Scandal,involving government oil wells,in the early
1920's
was almost asinfamous as our more
I
recentWashington disgrace, but theimplications
did
not reach as highin the political structure. §
S
Two of the nuns initially involved in the building of the college had a brother in the oilbusiness. The oil baron, James
O'Neill,
a Titusville native, wasin partnership with Harry F. Sinclair, after whom the scandalwas
named.
$
&
Its
B
Sinclair had allegedly bribed acabinet member with $100,000 inorder to allow
the oil
man a cheaplease to the 'liquid gold.' Sin
clair's i
companies then reapedhuge profits from the dealing,
m
The details of
I
the schemeeventually were leaked and, thegovernment began prosecutions.O'Neill, fearing he'd
be
placed
on
the hot seat, suddenly decided toleave the States and live out of
V%.
jurisdiction in France.
|
Meanwhile, Mrs. O'Neill had
attended
a Mass service in theformer chapel (which is now the
business office)
and
was
forced tokneel on the floor in the hallbecause of the poor conditions.Her knees convinced her of theneed for a new chapel, and shethought her husband had enoughmoney which could help the effort.
IS
wBt
1
ffi*
O'Neill's two sisters-in-lawwere very pavorable to
her
suggestion and told her
f
the-donation would be very much
appreciated.
SHPl
'^s
$175,000 Donation
MBF.
§
While living
in
France, the thenfugative O'Neill sent for his twonun sisters
to
tell
them
of
his
wish
to
return to America
to
be buried.Before he died, he also told hiswife of his wish and decided togive (he college $175,000 toconstruct the present chapel.The chapel, modeled
after
animpressive English version, was
to
have
four burial vaults,
two
forthe
O'Neils
and the remainingtwo for his two sisters,
s
O'Neill never got his wish,
although
he
paid
a
tidy sum for
it.
He
died and was buried
in
Francetwo weeks after he granted thesum.
.* IE
Mrs. O'Neill gave
the
checks
tothe college for the chapel construction with the instructionsthat if she were to die in the U.S.then she and her
husband were
tooccupy the tombs, f $
I
She never got
her':request
either. She died in France andwas buried alongside herhusband. The!
other]
vaultsremained empty also as the twonuns decided to be buriedelsewhere.
^
The four chapel vaults havenever been used - and the fundsfor construction neverquestioned, even though thebribery
funds
were later tied to aholding company in which O'Neilland the infamous Sinclair werepartners.
&£.
«The noises
in the
chapel
at
night, reportedly heard
by
some,could indeed
be the
O'Neillssearching
for
their last wish
- or
the anxiety
of an
upright
in
stitution quaking
in the
Iknowledge
of its
past.
 
PAGE
2
Hie
merciad DECEMBER
8,1978
k
The Selling of
Christinas
1978 ^ '*•
It's beginning to look a lot like Christmas, everystation
you
watch. And it
is
frustrating.
£;
Charlie Brown, the hapless "Peanuts" comic stripcharacter
was'right
on target years ago when hebrought to the
public's
attention that the true meaningof Christmas has been lost, thanks primarily to thecommercialized wizardry of Madison Avenue.The Christmas holidays supply advertisers with theperfect
gimmic
to sell everything imaginable. And ofcourse every product makes
"a
great gift."
Commercials insult the
public's
intelligence all yearround. Before, long before, and during the Christmasseason they, well, hypnotize us to go out and spendmoney on gifts many a time recipients are disappointed with because they either expected something
more
or something
not
as expensive.The advertiser's near-brainwashing techniques can
make
many of us feel guilty if
we
don't make someone
ha
ppy by spending money
on
them.Whatever happened to 'Peace on Earth and Good
Will
Towards Men (andWomen)'
indeed!
Even Santa
Claus
has been reduced to many a company's pusher of toys. It seems nothing in the advertising world
is
sacred about Christmas.In fact, there used to be a billboard throughout theErie area a few years back which serves as an exam-
B
e
of how the meaning of Christmas has been
lost,
avbe some of you remember.The billboard sign depicted a pleasant looking painting of a home decorated in an attractive snow scene.Camouflaged in the painting were the words
"Christ
Lives."
Below the painting, in clear view and in largerlettering
was "Meadow
Brook Dairv."
^
ftp
.
It's great that
we
live in a country that celebrates thetradition of Christmas. But it's too bad we live in acountry that has made a tradition out of commercializing Christmas.
8888
8
88888888888
the
merci
Editor John BrunoNews Editor
Sue
FussFeature Editor
Vicki
MartinagoSports Editors Andy Findlay, Chris TomczakContributing Writers JoAnn Alexander, Judy Anania,
Bob
Delia Rocca, Kevin DowneyContributing Artists Jamie Borowicz,Suzanne Rieker, Eugene WeberPhotographers
Diane
CrandaU, Tim
Hiles
Graphics and
Layout....
John Bruno, Kevin DowneyCopy Editors .... Mary Beth Barrett, Cathy Betcher,Joyce SparrowFaculty Advisors
Andy
Roth, William ShelleyThe Merciad accepts, in fact encourages, the
sub-,
mission of articles, letters, and stories from any andall members of the Mercyhurst College community:students, faculty, administrators, trustees, and friends of the school. However, as responsible journalistswe must reserve the following rights:
1.
The
right
to
revise
copy into
standard English;
2.
The right to revise copy into correct journalisticform;
3.
And, finally, the right to revise copy (but notchange meaning)
to
fill layout design.In addition. Letters to the Editor must be signed,must be factually verifiable, and must be written ingood taste. Names will be withheld upon request, butfalse names will not be used.
0#^r»1
fromthe
£»£»£»
I
t
«
'
#
*
t
I
 
-
DECEMBER
8,1978
THE
MERCIAD
PAGES
^C
W$^&%&8M&'
Dowdell's First Teaching
Job
As
'Hurst
Faculty Member
Cftdpl
Job
Pleases McMurray
According to MelissaMcMurray, a senior com-munications major,"Cooperative education providesexcellent learning opportunitiesfor the Mercyhurst
student."
She is currently working atWLKK Radio in Erie as trafficmanager, a co-op related job."I was lucky to get the job,"she explained. "I heard about iton a Friday and started work onMonday."
| p
tSg z
She further stated that not allco-op related jobs can be obtained
so
easily. "Tom Thompson(Mercyhurst Co-op Ed Director)is doing all he can to find co-opjobs for all who are looking for
them."
ft
.
2# I
$ McMurray's
job involvesscheduling commercial spots andprograms for the radio station."It's more complicated than itsounds," she assured. "I have tobe aware of the nature of eachadvertiser and try to schedulethem accordingly."
%%
The job, according
\o
WLKKSales Manager HarryKingdom,is
"a
good place to find out aboutradio and a good start in the
field."
f | J
%
Kingdom, who is McMurray's
co-op
supervisor, added that"students
should!
be moreanxious to accept
co-op
positionsbecause they provide invaluableexperience for the student andgive a big plus when applying fora job elsewhere."
#
ft
|
McMurray indicated that shefound her employers flexible toher schedule. She works about
25
hours a week and still has time totake classes at the
'Hurst.
%
"I'm really glad I was able toparticipate in the co-op program.It's given me a great experience
in
a field I had never previouslyconsidered," said McMurray, aformer Merciad editor.
S Eg
Presently she is in the processof completing the six credit co-op
job.
She has
been
offered
a£fulltime
positon
with
the radio
station
after graduation.by Judy AnaniaTen years working towards hereducation has made possibleMary Ann Dowdell's firstteaching experience. She isdirector of the
food
servicemanagement and nutritioneducation department at the
•Hurst.
\ i
£
A native of Elyria, Ohio, mostof her eight family members arespread
out
from Southern
Florida
to the West Coast. |
p.
"I'm looking forward to seeingmy parents over the Christmasholidays," she said. "I haven'tseen them for two years and Ican't wait to tell them about myfirst teaching experience."
She
received an undergraduatedegree in dietetics from KentState University and continued
her}
education at Ohio StateUniversity where she obtained agraduate degree. 1.She was a registered dieticianat two hospitals in Cleveland forthree years. The basic trainingshe experienced there includedpurchasing food, planning menusand supervising kitchen personnel.This past fall term, Dowdell
taught
a basic food course. She is
currently
teaching
the
world foodproblem course.
IB^tPB?
"The basic food course consisted of a small and friendlygroup, and the students workedreal well with one another. Ireally enjoyed teaching | theclass," she said. MsEE!
$Bm
tersession course is generating alot of interest and enthusiasmconcerning the world hungerproblem.
.gS
I
Dowdell is also advising sixteen
students!majoring .in
thehuman ecology and foods andnutrition departments.
*&**&»&«&»*•*
She does, however , find timefor outdoor activities. During the «*'summer months she spends her
*
spare time water-skiing, boating,
.^
fishing and swimming.
"This.winter
I would like to
snow ski
and I'm planning
to
fekegfta cross country course to learn
w.
something different," she
said/
%
Mary
Ann DowdellShe indicated that the
in-,4
z
***
Inq&i rj&gjtepp
rter Asks.
**
tfuU'VAU^
»AX*kAXA
C^*ViV
VSW_«K>*
lu
Hb\
VAV6
^
9SG
:
<>:*S
EVt
E&
K"v
WOT-
1
SSKwt
**v
mMBmm
m
IV
•«;<
^W
mmmMm
mm
V*"."
.
-
•S
BP^i8S93&
*
ffig
&S&9
H5?i
^
5&
-;*:
«$
r
«
§ Sue Shugart-Jeffreys,
,'Senior1
"I want a dog. A little cockerspaniel. Also, a Merry Christ
mas.
Tyrone I
Moore, (Director ofCounseling Services
'•
*1E3
§
"A
^wonderful
Christmaspresent would be a healthy baby.Personally, I'm hoping
for*
aboy."
M IggM
J
W&
?;««w^w^!
unii
^i&wSg
>s£-a
MS
W^«W>»»RS^
Cindy
I Prlestap,
ffl
Co-opSecretary
to«»
^SHS
"I'm looking forward
to
a weekoff quiet rest and
a 5
lot of nicepresents."
SS^S!
8R?
I
B
Larry Gronostaj. Senior"Ski equipment with a femaleski partner and a 4.0 in HumanSexuality. And I hope for a lot ofChristmas spirit."
BSHI
OxiVJ
,o:i"-"
hVv
IVVJAQJ
mm
^W»
I
?Fr.
John
ISwartz,
*
TheologyInstructor
j 5 ^?
"All I want for Christmas is akind word. Just for someone tosay, 'I think you're important inmy life.
m
Cathy Flanagan, Freshman
8§
"I want lots and lots of snowand a man to keep me warm."
*
S
MikeMarklewicz,Senior
nI
"I'd like $5,000 to pay off mycollege loans." r
'*
W
1 Sandy Goring, Freshman
I-A
Christmas vacation withcollege credit."
g *$£
»»»^
BCr«
^^*4*4*4*4*4*4***4*4***4*4*4*4***4*4***4***4
,f
*
,f
4***4*4*4*4*4*4***4*4*4*4*4**'*

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->