Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Merciad, March 30, 1979

The Merciad, March 30, 1979

Ratings: (0)|Views: 17 |Likes:
Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, March 30, 1979
The Merciad, March 30, 1979

More info:

Published by: TheMerciad on May 24, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/01/2011

pdf

text

original

 
VOL 5UNO.
19MERCYHURST
COLLEGE
Muskie
,
CommencementSpeaker
Senator Edmund Muskie ofMaine, the 1968 Democratic
Party
candidate
for
:
vicepresident of the United States andpresently a member of the SenateForeign Relations Committee,
jvill
give Mercyhurst College'scommencement
speech |
onSunday, June 3.
r'
\
Muskie, now serving his fourthterm in the
Sei
ate, will con-centrate on global _in-terdependency . his com-mencement address. It was his
background!
in internationalaffairs which prompted thecollege to invite Muskie, sa.dMarilyn Jewell,' assistant to thepresident and director
oi
theInternational Studies Program.Muskie attained
{national
prominence as the running matefor the late Hubert Humphrey inthe
1968 presidential
election. The
Humphrey-Muskie
ticket lost toRepublicans Richard Nixon andSpiro
Agnew
in the closest
.rfSS
The 'Rights' of Spring - Last week, the first day of the new season lived up to its name, as thetemperature hit the 60's. These Sesler student residents took advantage of the super weather byparticipating in outdoor activities, such as lounging around outside listening to music, rapping andcelebrating with a little brew'
-
just to be sociable, you understand. It was so peaceful, youcouldn't even hear a Parade St. boulevard neighbor say anything.
Eg
I
T**.
popular votehistorv.
i
Muskieunsuccessfullycount Sin U.S.
Activity Day May 16
then ranfor his party'spresidential
nimination
in the
1972 Democratic
primaries.
i |
It was a stroke of good luck,Jewell said, that enabled theMaine senator to deliver thecommencement speech.Originally Muskie
was
Invited
tospeak during spring term as aguest of
the
International StudiesProgram. One of the dates hehappened to be free was June 3,graduation day here.
'
\
Muskie, in addition to sitting onthe
Foreign
Relations Commi'tee (considered one of the mostglamorous congressional ap-pointments), is chairman of theSenate Budget Committee. He isalso a member of the Environ-ment and Public Works Com-mittee, heading its subcommitteeon environmental pollution.
(Continued
on
page
2)
by Vicki Martinago
I
MSG is initiating ia newtradition for the
'Hurst with'its
special plans for an
"Activity
Day" to emphasize both socialand learning experiences outsidethe college classroom. The eventis planned for May 16 with araindate set for May 18.The idea
for?
a "fun day"originated in the Baldwin dormand MSG
built
on the suggestionin order
to i
provide a moralebooster for
*
the
'Hurst
com-munity.
J
"•< \
MSG
.President
Mike Hellerpresented a formal proposalconcerning the "Activity Day" toDean
Millar
and the divisionchairpersons, and it wasunanimously' accepted. Accor-ding to Heller, for the event tosucceed it needs the support ofadministration, faculty andstudents. He hopes to involve thevarious organizations within thecollege such as campus ministry,Egan scholars, PACE
ami
theyearbook
staff.
\
The tentative afternoonschedule for the "Activity Day"includes a blue grass band, icecream social and bingo, alongwith athletic
activities
such asvolleyball, backgammon andSoftball tournaments. Plans arebeing arranged for an eveningbarbeque and an outdoorpresentation of theRocky HorrorPicture Show. The organizedactivities
will
be stretched outover the entire day beginningwith coffee and donuts in
1
themorning, numerous
afteroon
activities and concluding withseveral night events.
J
An example of a moreacademic learning experienceduring the day would involvefaculty, administration orstudent demonstrations in aspecific field
^of
interest. MSGrepresentatives will be con-tacting faculty members con-cerning possible special interestpresentations while the officerswill solicit the skill within theadministration.
\
"It's been set up for all toparticipate and to show that the'Hurst is really a personalcampus.
We
want to make this atradition at the college," Hellerstated.Posters and fliers with ad-ditional
^information
will beavailable in addition
J
to astructured program of activitiesfor the 'Hurst community in theupcoming weeks.
FRIDAY,
MARCH
30,1979
ScholarshipCompetition
Held;
j
by Sue FussOver
150
prospective freshmenand their parents were oncampus last Saturday for the firstPresidential Scholarship Com-petition Day at the
'Hurst.
A total of seven scholarshipswill be awarded based on theresults of a two hour exam ad-ministered to the students. Twoof these will be full tuitionscholarships, three will be for
$1,000
and two awarded for $500According to College PresidentDr. Marion L. Shane, all
the
scholarships
will
be
renewed
yearly depending on the studentsmaintaining academic ex-cellence.
*
Dr. John
Millar,
dean of thecollege and
vice president ofacademic services, addressedthe students and their parentsbefore the test began,
f
"Completing the
test*is
not asimportant as taking
n."
'Millar
said,
"(ioing
to college is moreimportant thangraduating/'Along with the scholarshipcompetition, many students wereauditioning for the Creative
Arts
Scholarship.
-^^
During the test, parents, andguests attended an informativeprogram with presentations by
Millar,
Admissions DirectorKaren Schultz, Dr. VivettaPetronio, director
of
the EganScholars Program, and MiriamMashank, director of develop-mental education.Also speaking to the parents
were
Director of Student ServicesE. William Kennedy, GeorgeKidd, vice president of businessservices, and Barry Zembower.the college's new financial* aiddirector.After the test was over,
studems
and their parents werefree to tour the campus and talkwith students about variousaspects of the college.
1
-
!&i
mm
m$
•>
w*««a
vv-:
s;
x-v
rssa
;••
xi
m
...:••••
m
jEV*
wCVaV
>::-a
(••>
CSS
ass
ftt'
\m-
•v
I
«••»••: i-
X-
m
••
&£*
ftl
ts/i
>
mi
oi-
mi
AV
m
m
:•-.
«j
-•
^f#
VKS
'"S
•Sv
ESft:
.*»V^*v •
i&xSSS?
:•»
38
.:•:-
'.-•>:•.•;:
:
>.
m&
V.Vl
•:®
«•
I
1
MB
BS
m
VTilV
m
**^
«
KV
3$
ssssa
.*
m
BK3
m
«•>"•:
»:^
H
Si;
:-::SS
F>S
V
S3*
«*f
Kv-
J
•5S
SSH
f>
^;%
SS:
S
•v-w
>x-:
^
5S»
,-••*«•
&
NKS
*&
m
BS
*
xSSff»
«
:
^r
6
*
1
S3S
;•;•.•.-.;-.
v*
SKS*
*ft
Ml
S=S9
X5«0
&a
.VC
<*£
VoOO
a
>&?
*
>'?
.•>
-
 
mm
^
§55
3«&
•M
..V
H
•W:
SB
sa
VH
'
W
i«lV.
KVV
»
«c*s
%--^^J
H&
&8SH
^«
^^fe
X
NV
S*K
m
I
s*
!
#^
as
•^
V
m%
w.\
ne
e.*
i
ijM&tiT
i>W>'
kv«».
N'l
IV
f
:•><»
:
:
a
&m
iw
ss'V
%s®
We
can do anything we
want,
we're college students
-
Gary Weber,left, Pat
Silvestri
and Chuck Farina demonstrate how they celebratedthe first
day
of spring.'
ow
N
^Sfc
#^?
Sff
KMK
,
The Tyrone Family Portrait
Hie
Theatre Arts Department's production of Eugene
O'NelU's
"Long
Day's Journey Into
Night**
con-tinues this weekend with a show
tonight
and Saturday evening. Pictured is the play's cast: seated, left toright, Mary LouStockhausen,who portrays Mary Tyrone, and Betsy Henog, cast as the maidCathieen.Standing, left
to
right,
Tom McDermott, as
Edmund,
David
Sinclair,
in
the
role
of James Tyrone, Sr., andMike Lucie, cast as James Tyrone. Jr.
,* photo
by
Sandy
I la bur
a
 
PAGE
2
THE
MERCIAD
MARCH
30,1979
Maine ManNot bad Mercyhurst. Landing
Sen.
Edmund Muskie for thisyear's commencement address ispretty good fishing.Muskie was an interestingpolitical figure a while back.When he ran for president in 72in the Democratic primary,* hewas built - strictly for mediapurposes - as an
"Abe
Lincolntype." Not a sure-fire image tolive up to, as he soon found out.The senator from Maine maywell be the Charlie Brown ofpolitics. He's a likeable personwith an interesting personalitynot dynamic, mind you, butrather mildly amusing -who wasunable to win the
"big
one."He was an ideal choice for thelate Hubert Humphrey in 1968 asa running mate. The two politicalfigures complemented each otherwell in terms of their genuineliberal labels.
The
I
team lost to
the
infamous Nixon-Agnew, whorose
to
power only because of the
tragic manner
in
which
PresidentLyndon Johnson, a Democrat,handled the war in Vietnam.Unfortunately Humphrey andMuskie were of Johnson's partyand suffered politically. It's safe
to
say that they would have beenthe
"lesser
of the two evils" tohave voted into the White Houseover a decade ago.But again • nice going Mer-cyhurst. The class of
'79
gets tohear a one-time heavyweightpolitical figure who was the first
Polish-American
contender forthe presidency. He is not acharismatic speaker, but hebeats having to listen to a Boardof trustee
member-or
Lou TullioArts Need HelpJoe Pizzat would like a $10
"artistic
events"fee tacked
on
tothe bills of
'Hurst
students. Is itjustifiable? Yes, when youconsider that we have to pay $10for a sticker to park "legally" oncampus
and -
even more absurd -dish out an extra $15 for thatmiscellaneous fee. Why notanother ten spot... ?Personally I don't get intoballet and orchestras, but I knowpeople! who do. And if thoseevents elude college life, anothervoid will be created - and moretime will be left for people "withnothing to do - no place to go."When a department seeks oursupport we should respond it'snot easy to respond immediately
in
terms of dollars, but the
'Hurst
art department is worth it. Theyhave always maintained an
|Timage
of respect for the type ofentertainment they offered to notonly the college community, butto area residents as well.
At!last
week's MSG meeting aquorum wasn't reached on whataction, if any, to take on Pizzat'sproposal. He has my vote.Phasing
Out.-
Little hints tell me that it's thattime of the academic year whenseniors are. slowly, but surely,beginning to be phased out.Consider all the excitement ofcommencement, MSG an-nouncing the date for electingnext year's student governmentofficers,
and4the
Merciad sear-ching every nook and cranny fora new editor (no one has appliedyet - but we all knew that wasgoing to happen, didn't we?)Certainly the administrationdoesn't have
much
need forseniors anymore. They realize wewon't
be
back
in
September
to
getstuck with that mammothcombination fall and
intercession
tuition bill.We're
a
commodity of
the
past -like hula hoops and Koehler beer.
|;
But
we" 11 propose a toast togetting out of here come June 3.
Staff Speakout
Had I known ...If I had known about
'this
sooner, I wouldn't have come toMercyhurst right away. First Iwould have gone to a cheap statecollege and received a degree
and
then
I
would
have
come
to
theHurst.According to the AdultEducation Office, if you alreadyhave a degree, you only pay halfof the
tuition costs
at Mercyhurst.
Now
they tell
me. I
should have
gotten
a
degree
in
basketweavingfrom the State University of NewYork (where it would have costme peanuts) and then come hereto get my "real" degree. Then,instead of spending over $11thousand,
it
would have
cost me alittle over five.
And
each time thetuition went up - while those
''first-t
imers''. would be facedwith a $100 increase - I'd onlyhave to pay $50.It would have been really neat.A good part of my tuition wouldhave been covered by all theother students. It all goes into the
"general
fund" anyway so who
cares?>
I could have received a reallycheap education.Had I known ...
Sue
Fuss
the
menci
Editor John Bruno
News
Editor
Sue
FussFeature Editor Vieki
Martinago
Sports Editor
Bob
Delia Rocca, Chris
Tomczak
Contributing
Writers Jo
Ann
Alexander, Gary 1
Wes
man.
-j
Contributing Artists ...... Jamie Borowicz, SuzanneRieker, Gene Weber
t
Photographer Sandy
haoura
Layout
and
Design John Bruno, Gary
Wesman
Faculty Consultant William Shelley
-frankly
IJ
Jofii> oofe ikmt
"M
firt
DepirtrAZrd hi
fW m
mmS
o/Ke-A
^*M
5**4
fW thej
r\tn4od
som^koki
Poem.
. .
It used to be, in days of oldProfanity was seldom told
In
presence of the younger set
-
Such innocense ne'er foul wordmet.But
now
it seems
to
be
the
caseTo spout and curse - as if inraceTo try
y
and string the longestchainOf simple words with soiledrefrain.
}
„A
child of a mere two yearsArticulates, for he has ears.Intelligence within his boundIs all it takes to repeat soundAnd understand
when
to
repeatThe tone of anger or defeat.Therefore, no special brainsrequired
>
To execrate, an accent siredThrough culture in a youngerday... J
Rhett
Butler knew the properway
\
m
To use such slang for em-phasis ;His own lexicon would sufficeFor common discourse andparole
So
few now even
know
his
role.Why then his eloquenceresound?
'•
His "damns" no longer areprofoundFor life designs facility/Even in knowledge - a pityTo have such vital arterased...Society should be disgraced.[:- Bonnie James
(Continued from
page
1)
Muskie has receivedwidespread bi-partisan supportlately as
co-sponsor
of a billwhich calls for passage of the so-called Sunset Law, which wouldcause congressional bills andprograms to lapse after a periodof years if they are shown to beineffective.
U
Graduating students will begiven seven tickets to theceremonies, which will
*
bedistributed through the bookstorewhen the students pick up theircaps and gowns.
Correspondence. ..
Support The A rts.
. .
Dear Editor:May I summarize the bases ofmy request to our StudentGovernment for artistic eventsassessment.It is my understanding that theStudent Government
is
con-sidering an increase to thestudent activity fee. If this isdone, my request for artisticevent funds
would
come from theadditional monies the StudentGovernment obtains.Briefly, the reasons for thisrequest include:
1.
The
Middle
States evaluationreport of 1975 was critical' ofMercyhurst College in the area ofour cultural climate and eventsofferings.
2.
The Division has grown anddeveloped to the point whereMercyhurst is considered "TheCollege for the Arts" in our area.We
have kthe
professional
staff,
curricula, and the physicalfacilities to make this statement.
3.
Research indicates that the
"1980's
will be the decade for theArts." For example:
.a.
The Federal Governmenthas appointed Dr. Gene Wenner
as
Arts
Education Coordinator
on
the national level. Dr. Wennerwas formerly with the Penn-sylvania State Arts Council.
b.
A recently releasedRockefeller Report entitled
"Coming
to Our Senses" hasgreat arts implications: on anational scope.c. A 1975 Harris
poll'indicated
89 per cent of the nation'spopulation felt that "the arts areimportant
to
their quality
of life."Despite this evidence many,many college students in theUnited States can get an un-dergraduate degree without evertaking an arts course or par-taking of artistic events such asseeing
a
live
ballet, hearing
a
liveorchestra, or attending a theatreperformance or attending an artexhibit, etc.Also, Carnegie CommissionReport on Higher Educationstates "A
majority
of collegestudents surveyed (100,000)expressed the opinion that theircampuses did not have sufficient
opportunities
for their creativeexpression or growth.."
j
Many scholars and leaders inthe higher education fields feelthat the small liberal artscolleges, such as Mercyhurst,can play a
significant
role ininvolving students in the artsexperience. I'd say we have anobligation to do this.There has been a great need atour college for the developmentof
a
systematic, rational and fairapproach to securing». and ap-propriating funds for the ArtsEvents here at MercyhurstCollege. There is a need for aninterested
group
of individuals togive continuity, order andorganization to what appears tohave been a haphazard approachto our cultural events and ac-tivities. . The proposal presentedto our Student Government at-tempts to do this.SincerelyJoseph Pizzat, ChairmanCreative Arts Division
S8§§§
Ssasssssss
ESSiS
PSIfi
m
MM
Kg
^SO?"
I
&&
'
I
1
IW^VV'W
W
vwws
The
only word
in
the English language that's
not
effective enough
when
it's saidspelled put.
it also has to
be
 
MARCH
30,1979THE MERCIAD
Wa
nt*To
Be
A
n
MSG
Off
i
cer?Deadline
April
12
For
The filing deadline for can-didates running for one of fourofficer
positions
on next year'sMercy hurst Student Govern-
ments
Thursday, April 12.Letters of candidacy must beturned in to current MSGSecretary Darlene
Wawrejko
by4 p.m.
it
 hat
day.The campus
election fof
the1979-80 student government of-ficers will be held Wednesday,April 25.Campaigning regulations willbe posted on the door of the
MSG
Student Union
off ce'for all
in-terested candidates.A brief job description of thefour offices follows:The President,
who
presides atall
1
meetings
of
the StudentGovernment, also sits on theBoard of Trustees as a member
ng
Half
Price Tuition
According to Dr. GeraldDreller, director of adulteducation, tuition at Mercyhurstfor anyone who has alreadyearned a degree is half price.Persons who have alreadyearned a college degree can goback to school at the
*
Hurst andstudy for
a
second degree
-
a newcareer or just for general in-terest, at half price. Interestedpeople need only supply
a
copy oftheir degree or transcript whenregistering.The tuition savings applies toall credit courses offered J days,evenings and weekends.
'Hurst
Art Instructors Dan Burke, foreground left, Joseph Pizzatand Ernest Mauthe judge entries for the fifth Annual
Art
ScholarshipCompetition.
Art Scholarships Awarded
The Mercyhurst Art
Depart-
ment awarded a
$500
scholarshipto Teri Dewey - making her thewinner of
the*Fifth
Annual ArtScholarship
Competition
Teri isfrom Northeast and
attends
Northeast High School.Mary Suehr, from Clinton, Pa.,received the second award of a$300 scholarship. She attends
Burgettstown,
Jr.-Sr. HighSchool. The third award of a
$200
scholarship went to, JohnGehringer,
aCathedralPrep
HighSchool student. IHonorable mention recognitionwent to-Jane Fuhrmann, a St.Benedict Academy
student,who
placed first?. Second place waswon by Wayne Estes, a Water-ford resident who attends Ft.LeBoeuf
High
School.
Villa Mariastudent Nancy Mazzeo waschosen third.Last year's winner of the ArtScholarship Competition was
'Hurst
student
Jamie
Borowicz,
amember of the Laker basketballteam and
cartoonist
for theMerciad*of the student body.The Vice
President,
whopresides
at
meetings in the ab-sence of the president, generallyassists the president withexecutive duties and also servesas a liaison officer to the StudentActivities Committee.The treasurer oversees ex-penditures of student govern-ment funds, keeps financialstatements and the MSG check-book. He is also responsible forpreparing all budget reports.
The
secretary
keeps
a
record
of
all meetings and MSGproceedings, sends notices of
meetings
and keeps all otherstudent government records.
Ask UncleMacho
Dear Uncle Macho:Why is it the jocks get all thewomen at this college? My dadtold me when he went to college
t
he
jocks got some of
the
women,
but
l here were plenty
left over
for
intellects like me. What hap-pened? Have times changed thatmuch? Boy! Jocks tick me off!
- Frustrated Scholar
Dear Frustrated:Unfortunately, for you, thethrill of victory has replaced theagony of trying to make thedean's list But don't be sodiscouraged - I'm sure you canstill find a woman
here
-
why notoffer to type her term paper orsomething.
'You'll
never knowwhat will happen after that...Finally, don't be
so-negative
about jocks - after alt they keepus in
a we
u
with
their feets (andhands) of daring on the courtsand on the .fields. Always,remember - if you can't be an
athlete,*at
least be an athleticsupporter.
["
Have a problem? Who cares?We do. Write Uncle Macho, careof the Merciad.
Inquiring Reporter asks.
:•
v?
•_%
EhiW
*&
.v>
$?*:
Has The
'Hurst
jf
:&SSSS3SSK8
n
•"
.-KM
*S&33
W
k •
*
mm
PAGE
3
Trends
in
enrollment figures inhigher education
-
directly tied topopulation statistics - indicate apeak in undergraduateenrollment in 1982 and declinethereafter.
^
A 1978 AKPA study projectedthat the number of both un-dergraduate and graduate ac-counting degrees would increaseat a higher rate than generalenrollments through 1982 andwould continue to show a steadygrowth trend at least through1990 (the end point of the study.)What that means
to
institutionssuch as Mercyhurst is a readymarket of individuals seeking aquality program to fulfill the
educational
requirements of
their
career objectives.At Mercyhurst,
over
\
the lastthree years accounting majorshave grown 300 per cent on thestrength of what is happening inthe classroom and the placementopportunities. Seniors have beenhired by large public accountingfirms, government agencies andmore.With
Co-Op
Education,students
in
the program have thechance
to
get
an
insider's
view of
the job
market and to have theirprofessional skills before that
senior year
marathon,
to
obtain
a
placement.The
}<
'Hurst
accountingdepartment currently has ninestudents working in the
Co-Op
program. The glamour positionbelongs to Donna Zaffina, who isan internal auditor traveling allover the United States for Zurns.Jim Tarasovitchand*Pete
 serve;, as auditors for
Apple
tree, Kern and
Apple
tree.Rosanne Smykowski is com-pleting a study of
quality
controlin public accounting in con-junct
ion
with her audit respon-sibilities at Root, Spitznas &Smiley. Brad Richter is involvedin a major computer conversionat Erie Insurance Exchange.Dick Molder and Beth
Beai
have direct client responsibilities
offi?
frlv-
.vx.
«H
«R
mm
••WP
w
.'•>.
*m
in their position as tax returnpreparers for Benificial Finance.Bob Tobin is a "utility" ac-countant for Jerry Sandelstein,where he prepares financialstatements and tax returns fromraw data which he feeds into acomputer system. And CarolynPhillips has been given the op-portunity to gain an overview ofpublic accounting at Salvia,Kramer
&
Schaffner.According to Susan Longo,director of the
'Hurst
accountingprogram, the students are doingexceptionally well. "The resultsof my visits with the employersshow that all
"the
students arebeing treated as professionalswith responsibilities similar tothose of permanent, full-timeemployees," she said."Mercyhurst is making a realimpact out there in the jobmarket thanks
to the
enthusiasticparticipation of the co-opstudents," Longo added. "I'mimpressed to see how fast theprogram has gotten off theground. Employers are nowcalling us and that only meansmore opportunities for ourstudents; opportunities thatextend all over the State in allsorts of industries and with thefederal government. And we aregoing to see exciting things back
here on-campus
as
these
studentsreturn and bring their ex-periences into the classroom."Susan Longo
Ml
VW
W
-^m*
*>
- *-
KB
ViV
%•>:
ft&^
Lived
«
Your
mm
m
s
JKs?
Kv
--..-.-.-!
I
IP!!!
hL.»* i
j
Mil #
?
«=
&g*
Vft
fc»
Expectations?
J canine Baas • Sophomore
"Yes -
academically, I like It. Idon't have much time for
a
sociallife so it doesn't matter in that
area,"Bfl
1
I
Mark Gaydosh - Freshman"Compared to the othercolleges I went to, it does. I likethe
small
classes."
Lori
Jo
Kelyman
- Freshman
"No.
I thought the social lifewould be
di
fferent."
fl
H
<•:&
:
=3
38
.v«fi
I
aa
jttMvtOC
W*
-v.
«
pi
ra
AVV
sss
w
^!
SSN
»v
^
1
^
&*&&£&
*>;•
s&
v^*
JEW/*
LOK
.«a?
mmwr
RfR
WW
Ly
nette Mason • Sophomore
•It
hasn't because there are somany
cUques
and the
people
don't relate to each other.beenteve Joyce - Senior"I'll say yes - it hasgreat four years. I'm sorrypassed so quickly."
g |_Ijohn
Burton - Junior
"Yes.
I didn't think that theTheatre Department was thatgood at first
-
but I learned
a
lotbv working over there."Chris
Filippi
• Senior"Academically no - but itmade up for in other areas."
Welton RIU -
Junior
"In
some ways it has. Theprograms have been good,
but
I'm
not
happy with
campus life."

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->