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The Merciad, Sept. 28, 1979

The Merciad, Sept. 28, 1979

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The Merciad, Sept. 28, 1979
The Merciad, Sept. 28, 1979

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MERCYHURST
/
V%
P6NNSYLVANIA
a studentpublication
VOL. 52 NO. 3MERCYHURST COLLEGE
Over 200 To Attend Dean's List Dinner
Grade Inflation:
SEPTEMBER
28,1979
Growing Problem
What grades represent.Grade Inflation vs. IntellectualDeclineAccording to a
study
of gradingpatterns done in February of1979, grades have
*
inflated atMercyhurst College during thelast decade. However, lower SATscores suggest that students'ability levels at the point of ad-mission to college have declined.These facts, compiled byThomas Billingsley, relativelycompare to those on a nationallevel. This substantiates im-plications about Mercyhurst asan education system, and theuniversal higher educationsystem in the country.
\
In terms of number grades, theoverall grade distribution ofMercyhurst students
has
risen7.25 per cent from 1972-1978. Only11 per cent maintained a 4.0average in 1972, while 18.25 percent held the same
QPA
in 1978.Also, in 1972, 5.5 per cent of thestudents made Dean's
Last
asopposed to 18.1 per cent in 1978.Contrasting those statistics isthe steady decline of the meantotal for the SAT College Boardscores from 1967-1978. The meantotal
SAT
score
in
1967
was
992.
In1972, the figure dropped to
ap-
proximately
890
and
in
1978,it fell; jeven farther to 820. Comparisonof these two separate surveys^
certainly
does not imply
anj
enrichment
tof 'student
aptitudeBut neither does it demeanstudent ambition or qualification
1
V'There
are undoubtedly manyreasons for grade inflation, mostof which are probably un-measureable and speculative.Certainly, grade
in
flation has notbeen any more dramatic atMercyhurst than at othercolleges and universities. (Astudy at Michigan State of 197colleges revealed that theaverage increase in grade pointaverages between 1960 and 1973was .404.)The Chart of MercyhurstGrades shows that the in-troduction of
passfail.and
of a
Merciad Survey Shows
Students "ThumbsDown";On Deans Proposal
Laurie
Jo
Kelyman
\,"
The Dean's proposed Shake-upis shaking up more than
^academic
programs. A recentMerciad survey, based on arandom sample of 100 students,
Tasked
the question,
"Do you
support the dean's academicprogram review?" Thecategories for response were:strong support, support, un-decided, against, and stronglyagainst.Thirty-five percent of thestudents were "Shook-Up" andagainst the dean's proposal. Mostwent as for as to say that theywould seriously consider tran-sfering from the college:, sincethey felt it would be less ac-credited.
-
Thirteen percent of the studentresponse was against theprogram review and felt that itwould not be a very good idea.Support for
the
dean's proposalwas a mere 5 per cent, whilestrong support was an evensmaller 1 per cent.The remaining forty-six polledcame in at
twenty-one
percentundecided, and twenty-fivepercent completely unaware thata such an event was being con-sidered.The majority of the studentsfelt the program would
"mess
things
up
for
many
people andpossibly cause a tuition hike.numerical grading system weretwo key elements in grade in-flation. Passfail reduced thepercentage of low grades to thetotal number of grades. Thenumerical grading systemallowed students to getquality*points for more precise grades(i.e., 3.5, 2.5,
1.5)."
Other factors which educatorshave ascribed to grade inflation
are
egalitarian pressures insociety (equal *
4
results" ratherthan equal "opportunity"),student demands for good gradesas a necessity
for
job
or graduateschool opportunities, and facultyconcern over decreasingenrollments and the weight ofstudent evaluations in tenure andpromotion decisions."It
would
seem that the time hascome for some open discussionamongst faculty about gradingpractices and standards atMercyhurst.^Only
u
facultydiscussions and agreementsclarifying standards can promotea more uniform sense of whatgrades should represent."
Merciad Interview
This photograph of Aspens, New Mexico (1958) is one of the many pictures being shown at the
Ansel
Adams display in the Erie Art Center.
Kubiak Comments
m
Status Quo
Hurst
by
Bonnie
JamesEditor's
note
f*
The ijMerctad
conducted an interview with Mr.Kubiak concerning his viewstowards
the'status
quo at thecollege. A professor in theHistory
department,
Kubiak hasbeen associated with the 'Hurstfor
18
years. During these yearshe has formed some definitiveviews.
*
•x»^w
"MR.
RICHARD KUBIAKQ: Mr. Kubiak, you have beenquite vocal about your concernwith
\
the
decrease of qualitystudents
attending Mercyhurst
Could you explain exactly whichtraits you encompass In the term
"quality"? }
A: First of all, I'd like to clarifythat. I'm not suggesting that thestudents who are coming toMercyhurst couldn't be qualitystudents. What I'm suggesting isthe way we operate presently
doesn't
encourage that quality.What do I mean by quality? Imean that if we have a studentCORRECTION
T
In a front page story lastweek The Merciad;; inad-vertently gave an incorrect
figure for **
the
amount ofmoney spent on
Mercy
hurst'sfall advertising campaign.The correct figure is $6,000.Our reporter got it right, butthe
rewrite
man goofed. TheMerciad apologizes for theerror. "To err is human." Weemploy humans.
who
is a good solid worker
a
nd is
n
"C*-
achieveiT
then
thatfcan
indeed be quality. That doesn'tnecessarily mean that they haveto be a "B" orj"A" student. I
suppose
what I'm talking about inbasic definition
is
a seriousstudent, a student who is notgoing to come to school to wastehis or her time, but
is
really going
to
study and get the best possibleeducation.Q: Then in your opinion, doesMercyhurst nurture the desire tolearn?A: Generally speaking, no. I
think*
it is done by individualfaculty members.
*}
However, Ithink institutional policy
is
not asclear
on
this issue as it should be.A
number,
of years ago ( I'mtalking about dealing withfresh-man because those are the ones
you
have to imprint right off thebat.) we used to have a situationwhere all freshman were invitedinto the Little Theater. They hadbeen sent a book prior to comingto Mercyhurst which wasrequired for them to read. Thebook that I most frequentlyrecollect is John
Gardner's
Excellence. They were expectedto know a good deal about the
"All
right, you're atMercyhurst. .
.and
yourprimary function is tostudy/'
book and when
they
came into the
Little
Theater there was a
faculty
panel of about five people. Theywere usually members
who
caredabout students, were articulateand could get the point across.There would
-
be
a
discussionabout the main points of the bookand the floor was open toquestions and dialogue. I think
the
main message
trasmitted
there was:
Alright,
you're at
Mercyhurst...
and yourprimary function is to study. It isnot to
have
a good time; it is notto relax here
For
four years, it isprimarily to study. That does notmean that you can't have a goodtime. But by God, if you want to
be here
at Mercyhurst you realizethat we're
serious
about thisbusiness and we expect
yhu
to beserious about this business.I think what
we
need
tfi
do is getback to telling students that thisis what they ought to be doinghere. And I think the reason wegot away from it is we startedrunning into threatening times,decreasing enrollment, and itscared us off. We can't continue
//
newat-
//
I
believe that aday is dawning
Mercyhurst.
that way. You don't receiveexcellence by
pandoring'to
thecrowd and I think we are. Weought to get rid of the picnicsand the beer blasts and put thatfaculty personnel back in, orsomething of that type to tell thefreshmen that
studying-is
theirfunction here. >|Q: Then in your opinion doesMercyhurst attempt to nurture adesire to learn?
*
H
-
A: Well, I think one reason iswhat I've suggested. We'vebecome paranoid about scaringthe students away by being tootough on them.Secondly, this place is darnnear an open admissionssituation, I don't think our turn-
down
rate is really what it should
be.
What I'm talking about istaking kids
who
really don't havea super great chance of doingwell. There are always problemswith that kind of an attitude. Butthen again, if these students getinto the hands of
the
right facultymembers, the right advisors,have the right friends, if theatmosphere is conducive to studyand conducive
to
them
being goodstudents, a
\
number,
of thosestudents
come
through quite well.Therefore, I'm not as opposed tothe open admissions as
I
mayseem to be.We can
J
no longer toleratesituations where students arelaughed
at?
for
being
goodstudents.
My own
feeling
is
that
if
you're a good
student,
you caneventually be ruined by badcompanions. But if you're a badstudent, there's very
little
chanceof being influenced by a goodstudent.Q: Then are you more concernedof the atmosphere of the collegereflecting on the students ratherthan the students necessarilyreflecting on the school?A: I think that operates too.However, the place to start
Jo
correct that is by getting the nextgroup of freshmen and doingsome of the things we used to dowith freshman to give them theidea that this is a place wherethere should seriously focus onstudies. That's why the money isbeing laid out. I think there's noquestion that
we've
got to
make ituncomfortable or inappropriate
Continued
on
page
3
v
Late Bulletin
Garvey* AnnouncesCandidacy
1
Tuesday afternoon It wasreported to the THE
MERCIAD
that Dr. William P. Garvey
has
announced his candidacy for thepresidency of MercyhurstCollege. This announcementcame as a result of the urging ofcertain faculty factions ex-pressing desire for an
Internal
candidate*Garvey,
who
served under ErieCounty Executive Russell
Robison
as Director ofAdministration, was Dean ofMercyhurst College from 1970-76.Further details will be given inupcoming issues of THEMERCIAD.
DR.
WILUAM
P. GARVEY
 
PAGE
2
THE'
MERCIADSEPTEMBER
28,1979
editorial
Last Monday
an
interestingthing happened
at the
firstmeeting
of
the
MercyhurstStudent
Government*
The natureof
the
incident wasn't what
one
might call
earth-shaking,
but it
does deserve recognition.A small number
of
peoplebegan
to ask
some Questions.One might
ask,
*
What's
so
remarkable about that?"Everybody asks questions, right?Maybe
in
some universitiesthis
is the
case,
but
generally
speaking
this
is not a
commonphenomena. Look
in the
classroom. How many times
do
people raise their hands
in the
classroom and say,
"Excuse
me,I haven't the slightest idea whatyou're doing."?The same anxiety people haveadmitting that they
I
don't,
un-
derstand professors exists
in the
JAMte>
Authority figures.
It's an in-
teresting concept considering the
social
structure in which we findourselves. They
are
literally
all
over
the
place, more than
you
could shake a
flashlight at.
A
cop,an instructor,
an
R.A.,
or
even
a
Dean.
?
I
The one thing they
all
have
in
common
is the
trust-placed
in
them
by the
people over whichthey exert their authority. They
are
directed
by
this responsibilityto
act in
such
a
manner that
the
interests of their particular groupshould
be
held
in the
highestpriority.
"
What
happenstwhenfthe best
interests of
the
group
are
blownoff
and
authority exists
for
authority itself?
In a
collegesetting, this situation shouldn'texist
at
all. However, ideals
and
the real thing
are
often
two dif-
ferent entities.
It
does seem that through timea natural antagonist
to
authorityfor authorities sake has been
the
student. Whether this
is
due
to
his-her
youth
or
environment(age
can be
state
of
mind)
is
irrelevant.
I
Here
at
Mercyhurst things
are
a little different. Over
the
pastfew years, Mercyhurst studentshave more
or
less done what
they've
been told
to do by
theirauthority figures
and
somewhatcomplacently
at
that. Perhapsthere have been
a
few pockets of
discontent-and
concern
but
theyusually have faded away from
a
lack of support
or
a'
why
should
I
care?" attitude. This type
of
mentality belongs
on the
frontporch with
Ma and Pa
Kettlerather than
in the
rooms
of
McAuley Hall,
r,
'
There
is a
major proposalbeing considered
now
that willhave sweeping effects
on
every
aspect
of
Mercyhurst.
Its
mam
target is the academic programsbeing offered by the college.
The
people
who
will
be
affected
most
is
ile
 student
body,
especially
theunderclassmen.Dr. John
Millar,
Dean
of the
college,
has
proposed,
sweepingreforms, cutbacks,
and
mergingof programs, that affect
all but
two areas
of
study offered
by
Mercyhurst. On Monday, October1 Dr.
Millar will be
present at theMercyhurst Student Governmentmeeting
to
answer any questionsfielded
by the
M.S.G.
representatives.
Here's your chance
to
kick
the
apathy label that
too
often
has
been used to describe
the
'Hurst
student body.
Find out who
your
M.S.G.
rep isand what affect the
proposal
willhave
on
your major. You mightfind that under
the
proposal, yourmajor
may
not
exist anymore.That would make
for an in-
teresting letter
home
wouldn't it?Dear
Mom
and
Dad,..
i
J,.
guess
whatl.3 j
student government. Last yearnumerous issues were
presented
to the student representatives.
It
was not until the
voting had takenplace that questions would arise,indicating that perhaps
the
repsdidn't know what they werevoting
on in the
first place.
;*
\
This year's student govern-ment might
not
realize
it, but
they took some very
|
positive
steps
in the
right direction
at
their
first;
meeting. There werecertain questions brought
up
which
one
might have consideredred herring (interpreted: smallpotatoes),
but the
message thatcame across was that this year'srepresentatives are going to lookover each issue with
a
good dealof care.
f *
One
of
these issues concernedthe granting
of the
MercyhurstCollege label
to a
biologicalhonor
.fraternity that
operates
withinj
the college
A
couple
of
people wanted
to
know what
the
purpose
of
this organizationbefore
an
okay
was
given.';The
value
of the
college seemed
to
double with that
request.
g
Another issue given seriousconsideration
was the
studentbudget
for
the year.
In the
past,the approval
of the
budget
has
been
a
mere formality. Such
is
not
the
case this year.
The
repsvoted that the final voting on
the
budget be shelved
a
week so thatthey might give
it a
closer look.One professor
has
commentedthat
the
moving
force
behind anycause
is a
zealot. Those
in-
dividuals
at
last'
Monday's
meeting
just might be the drivingforce needed to improve the stat-us
quo
among
the
student bodyat
the
college. And
it all
startedwith
a
question.
' "
J
Latter To The Editor:
Dear Editor,
What
happened!
The first MSG
meeting
was
packed,
withstudents, most
of
whom werefreshmen.
I was
pleased and veryproud
of the
turnout.
I
thoughtthat this would be the year
for a
larger, more powerful student
government.«
I
might havethought too soon.
>
Monday's
MSG
meeting
was
void of all freshmen, who are thebackbone
of any
future studentgovernment. Maybe
it was the
fact that the second meeting washeld in the faculty lounge that nofreshman attended.
\
No matter what
the
reason,
I
wish you would come tell me,
or
my
fellow officers.
Our
office is inthe Student Union and our hoursare:
I
n
u
j
Monday 3-4
p.m.
Tuesday
1-3 p.m.
Thursday
1-3 p.m.
Friday
2-4
p.m.
We
are also
in
and out
of
therethroughout
the
day
and
evening.Please feel free
to
stop
in any
time.
I
urge
you to
voice youropinions, both
in
private
and at
the meetings Mondays*
at 4:00
p.m. Thank
you.
Tim
Seltzer
Lottor To Tho Studonts:
Dear Student,We welcome
all
articles
and
letters that you wish to submit
to
us.However,
we
feel that
you
deserve
to
know some
of the
rights that
we
reserve
in the
printing
of
such material.
-
1.The right to revise copy Intostandard English;
2.
The right to revise copy intocorrect journalistic form;
3.
The right to revise copy
(but
not
change
meaning)
to
fill
layout design.4.
And the
right
to
refuse
the
P
rinting of material considered to
e
In poor taste.
In
addition Letters
to the
Editor requesting
to
have namewithheld
will
not be printed alongwith those submitted under
a
false name.
S.
Sincerely,
j!
J
"
neec*
4o
tkii aga'iAI swear
Uomsi
 fa
 6°*
^ |ja5t 0o*>
ujrift.
me^>
< *~~
I p
fee
taA*~
/r
fto
Ao*"
l^QiJ
He?
fay
f?W
** **
 tf
 A
fort
M
 -.
 "De-
t>tfc-tf>
GUEST EDITORIAL
a
Look Around You
j)
by Gene Weber
After some fifty
odd
years
of
existence, Mercyhurst Collegereceived
a
vastly needed faceliftof her grounds. The mainstreamof attention focused on the areassurrounding Old Main
and
Zurn,as well
as
Tullio
Field,
GarveyPark,
and the
main gate
en-
trance. This operation
was
financed through the departmentof Operations under the directionof Mr. George Kidd.The project
was
initiated over
the
summer term and was led
by
Dr. Raymond Justice. AssistingDr. Justice were
his
colleagues;a makeshift crew
of
landscaperswhich included
( in
alphabeticalorder
) Tom
Circle,
Walt
Clark,
Jim
MacElrath
,
Bob
Stevenson,
Litter To Tho Editor:
Dear Editor,Every year
our
tuition billincludes
a
thirty-five dollarstudent activity fee. This doesn'tseem like much,
but if you
con-
sider
$35 for
every student
at
Mercyhurst,
the
total
is
quite
a
large amount. Exactly wheredoes
our
money go?
.
My key point
of
interest
is the
picnic sponsored
by the
SAC
on
September
16.Fifty-nine studentsout of an expected three hundredattended and were each charged$3.00 admission.
A
total
of $177
was
collected.
The SAC
spent
$669
on organizing this! activity,leaving them faced with
a
$492deficit. How does
our
$35 figureinto this loss?
|
Whether
the
turnout
of
thisevent
was
caused
by
poorplanning
on the
part
of
SAC
or
student apathy,
I
don't know.
I
feel that
the
SAC sponsors somevery good activities
and I
reallyenjoy attending
them.
However,
I
think they should inform
the
student body on happenings suchas this picnic,
and
inform
4
themon
the
outcome
of
these eventswhether they be' successes
or
failures. Students deserve
to
know
where their money is spent.L
ILynne
Greco
1
I
Gary Weber,
and
Gene Weber.
Many
hours
of
sweat, withsometimes inoperable equip-ment,
was J
injected into
the
surface
of the
grounds.
New
growth developed with each newtask.
Dirty
hands, washed
a
thousand times,
had
planted
the
seeds, moved
the
shovels,
and
pushed
the
mowers.Layers
of
decaying leaves,deposited throughout
the
i
pastyears, were raked from beneaththe rows of hedges.
So
it
followedthat some
of
the wrinkles
on the
face
of
time
faded from
the
school.
"
Jungles
of
weeds wereuprooted
and the
lawns
replenished.
The
diminishinggraying
hairs
of the
scalp soonregained their fullness
and
shimmering color. With eachprogression
a
sense
of
youthfulcharacter had replaced
a
feelingof antiquity
.[Yet
the^ surface
of
the grounds
had
only beenslightly touched.
What
will become
of
our
lady,
if
now
the
r
first phase
of
.
her
operation
is
determined suc-cessful? Subsequent
to the an-
swer I anticipated,
phase
two hasbeen implemented and work shallcontinue through
the
upcomingyear.Dr. Justice will still head
the
pursuit
in
bringing some life,some dignity
to
these grounds.His original colleagues,
now
more experienced
are no
longerthe makeshift crew
t
they oncewere. New blood will take placeof
the
others
who
have
not
remained. The: newly
im-
plemented phase is
now
in effect.
So'continues
the
revitalization,an endeavor with many morechanges
to
undergo.
When
shall itend?
Well,..hopefully
never,
or
else
all
that
is
done
has
been
in
vain.i J
I
M,
.-H
I
OFFTHEWALL
By the time the readership hashad a chance
to
scan the pulp ourpresident and the First Lady willhave completed two non-politicaltrips, that of
the
latter being
right
here
in
Erie. One question,
how
can
a
visit
by the
"wife
of a
prominent-
the
most prominent-politician
in the
country
be
considered non-political?
I
1
-
The
answer,
to this
is
simple-she says
it
isn't.
There's
a dif-
ference,
you
know, between
the
riding
of a
riverboat down
the
Mississippi, waving
to the
masses and
going to
Erie,
wa
vingto the masses while receiving
an
award. Talking
to a
politicalexpert,
The
Merciad
found
out
that
the
difference
is in (the
method
of
waving.There
are two
basic forms
of
political waving.
The
first
in-
volves
a
teacher-may-I-use-the-
hall-pass
raising
of the arm
coupled with
a DC-10
landingmovement back
and
forth.
The
second form, which
is
non-
political, invloves
a
short, quickelevation
of
the arm, followed bya motion similar
to
that
of
messing
a
tall
person's
hair.
We
believe that the First Ladywill employ
the
latter.
F*
•HHVi'
The
Merciad
$tgff
^"^^^^I^^IZZIZ^—
*SJL
 
SEPTEMBER
28,1979
ComprehensiveCalendar
9
September
27 -
ThursdayAnsel Adams Photography Display
-
Erie
Art
CenterFarmer's
Market-Downtown Mall
-
Homegrown
produce
&
handmade crafts
am
.""?
J?
,m
-"
M
1
*
Center Student Dra wine
Exhibit
-
GECAC
Lobb5 p.m.
*
Apres
Diner -
Erie:
What's
Beyond
the
Gates?
-
Faculty
Dining Room7:30 p.m.
-
Blue Oyster Cult - Erie CountyFieldhouse8:30 p.m.
-
Erie Philharmonic Orchestrawith pianists
Misha
&
Cipa
Dichter
-
Erie
Civic
CenterSeptember
28
FridayAnsel
Adams
Photography Display (Cont'd.)
Nutrition
Display
-
Millcreek Mall
9
a
m.-5
p.m.
-
MLK
Center Student
DrawingExhibit (Cont'd.)
4:30
p.m.-
Mass
-CM
6
p.m.
-
Folk
Group Workshop •
CM9p.m.- Disco
&
Rock
Masonic Temple
(7th
&
Peach)
9-lep.m,|«
WQLN Fall
JJazz
Festival-8345
PeachSeptember
29-Saturday
Ansel
Adams
Photography Display (Cont'd.)Nutrition Display
(Cont'd.)
.f
Noon-6
p.m.
-
IntercoUege Picnic
&
Mass
-
Presque
Isle.
Cabin
3
-
8 p.m.
-
U.S. Marine Band
-
Harborcreek'High
School - $4 in advance, m5 at thedoor
r.
9:30 p.m.-Midnight
-
Disco Party
-
WQLN
8345
PeachSeptember
30
-
Sunday I ,
Ansel
Adams
Photography Display (Cont'd.)
7-10
a.m.
-
Sunrise Classics ChampagneBreakfast
-
WQLN 8345
Peach
11
a.m.
-Mass-Chapel
1-7
p.m.
-
Bluegrass Festival
-
WQLN
1 p.m. - Pershing Rifles Trick Drill TeamsExhibition
-
Gannon College Audi
-
FREE2 p.m.
McDowell Annual H.S. MarchingBand Competition
-
Erie Stadium3 p.m,.
-
Tambous Percussion-Flute Duo
-
ZRH7
p.m.
-
"Jaws"
-
ZRH
7:30
p.m. CEC
Meeting
>
9:30p.m.
-
"Jaws"-ZRH j>October i
-
Monday
6:45
a.m.
- Mass - Chapel9
a.m.-5
p.m.
• MLK
Center Student Drawing
I
Exhibit (Cont'd.)
K
>
r
4:30
p.m.-Mass-CM
5:15 p.m. CM Dinner Meeting
-
Faculty!,' Dining RoomOctober
2
TuesdayFarmer's Market
-
Downtown
Mall
6:45 a.m.-Mass-Chapel
•,9
a.m.-5
p.m. - MLK
Center Student Drawing
Exhibit (Cont'd.)October
3
Wednesday
6:45a.m.-Mass-Chapel
i
9
a.m.-5
p.m.
• MLK
Center Student DrawingExhibit (Cont'd.
>
10
a.m. - Coffee Hour -
CM
- Andy Rothwillgive
a
book review
on
"EnergyFutures"
4:30p.m
-Mass-CM
f
8 p.m.
-
Egan Scholars Meeting
-
FacultyLounge
>.
\
j&
9:30 p.m.
-
Ecumenical Prayer Service
&Rap -
CM
-
Rev.
Sanford
&
Fr.October
4
-
ThursdayFarmer's
Market
-
Downtown Mall
6:45a.m.-Mass-Chapel
i
,
9
a.
m.-5 p.m.
- MLK
Center Student
DrawingExhibit (Cont'd.)
'
;
3U
a.m. - Jessica Savitch - Warner Theater
-
$4
9:30
p.m.-
Mass
-CDL
October 5
FridayBaseball
vs.
Fredonia
-
Away
6:45a.m.-Mass-Chapel
9
a.m.-5
p.m.
-
MLK
Center Student
DrawingExhibit (Cont'd.)4:30p.m.
-Mass
-CM
6:15pm.-
Folk Group Practice
-
CM
8 p.m.
-
Erie Travel Club
-
program
of
Yugoslavia
&
Vienna
-
Knox Hall. Chur-
ch
of
the
Covenant
-
FREE
;
8-12 p.m.
Octoberfest
Polish Falcons
(19th
&
Ash) Busses leave Baldwin at 7:30,8.
Iv
8:30 p.m.
># i§
1
October
6
-
Sa
turday
J.
Soccer
vs.
Grove City
-
Home7 p.m.
-
Mass
-
Faculty Lounge
8 p.m.
-
Prague Orchestra
-
Erie Civic Center
October
7 -
Sunday
Baseball
vs.
Canisius
Home
"Great American Cities"
-
Erie
Art
Center
II
a.m.-Mass-Chapel
'
7 p.m. -
"Cassandra Crossing"
-
ZRH
9:30
p.m.
- "Cassandra Crossing"
-
ZRH
PLAN AHEADBus trip to see "Coppelia"
-
with the Pit-tsburgh Ballet, Sat.. Nov. 3 call EmilyOsiecki for
reservations
(899-9140)
Theater Trip to see Richard Kiley
in "Man of
La Mancha" Oct. 14 in Pittsburgh -
bus?
leaves from Liberty Plaza Marine Bank
| Drive-In
10a.m.
-call 864-1105 for
info
Beer Causes Cancer?
I The Associated Press recentlyreported that according
to a
study conducted
by
the Food andDrug Administration, 28 brandsof
Seer
contain microscopictraces
of
nitrosamines,
the
chemical known to cause cancerin animals.
1
Thirty brands
of
beer weretested, 17 domestic and 11 im-ported, by the FDA.
Of
thosebeers tested, only
two,
Coors andGuiness Stout, were found to befree of the
cancer-causing
agent.Traces of nitrosamines ranging
up
to seven parts
per
billion
werefound in the other 28 beers.Wayne Pines, spokesman forthe FDA, said the governmentdoes
not
know what dangernitrosamines pose at these lowlevels." We
don't think
that there
is
any reason for people
to
change
their
beer-consuming
habits.'
1
On the
local
front,
the
news
wasreceived rather calmly. Whenasked how
he
felt about
the
potential danger,
'Hurst
seniorMike Philips responded with the
';
opening of a
cola
Michelob.'
*****
THE
MERCIAD
PAGE
3
Saw The Light"
Bear-Bedfellow BurnsFriends Mourn Loss
Bruce Miller delivers
a
moving eulogy
to
friends
of
the nowdeceased Theodore Ernest
Bear*
I
by Mary CollinsTheodore Earnest Bear, age
17,
was found dead September 18 inroom
209
McAuley Hall.According
to
authorities, cause
of
death was excessive exposure
to
heat.
i
The fatality was the first of itsnature,
according *
to PhyllisAiello, director of housing at thecollege. It also marked the firstnon-human on-campus death ofthe new academic year.
||
According to the main witness,David Snyder, smoke
was
detected
on the
second floor of the
co-ed
dorm early that evening.
"At
first
I
.thought
some
guy
burned
his-
peanut butter
andjelly
sandwich;
but
when
I
walked
out
in the hall and noticedall the smoke,
I
knew
it
wasn't
caused by
a
peanut butter andjelly sandwich// commented
Snyder.
*
I iJjL
1
Leaving his studying, Snyderproceeded to room
209
to find outthe cause of the smoke. When noone responded to his knocks, heentered the room only to find the17-year old victim aflame.
By
that time|two. other residentsarrived.
!
They rushed Ted, as he wasknown by* his
friends,?
to
the
shower to save him, but to noavail. Ted was pronounced deadof
third
degree
burns
caused
by
a
60 watt light bulb.
\
\
'\
A memorial mass was held inthe second floor lounge
on
McAuley j
Hall on^ Wednesday,September
19. A
special messagefrom President Carter was readalong with
a
eulogy by FatherBruce Miller, who
hails
from theAshtabula diocese.,
"
Poor Ted was so innocent, hewas just sitting on the light andhe got
fried,
expressed JohnBroderick,
a
friendl
of the latebear.Ted is survived by his father,Randy Patterson, who receivedhim on his first "birthday. Com-menting on his loss, Pattersonwas heard
to
say,
" I
guesseveryone gets burned once in
a
while."
I
I
H I
Area Colleges Tow The Line
Tuition Guidelines
Set
Washington, D.C. (CPS)— Eversince
Jimmy
Carter announcedhis voluntary wage-priceguidelines last fall,
and
universities have been lobbyingfor special treatment. Highereducation lobbies argued thatthey should not be treated as for-profit institutions, and that theyshould
be
allowed
to
raise studentcosts more than the seven
per
cent the guidelines allowed.The argument suffered
a
setback when, just before LaborDay,the Council on Wage andPrice Stability cited BostonUniversity
for
probable. non-compliance with the guidelines.Though a final decision has notyet been made,
BU
could
iose
some
$50
million
in
federal grantsand contracts this year.The Boston case is the Coun-cil's first response
to
last spring'sround of protests over
spiralling
tuition costs,
to
numerous studentcomplaints
to
the Council, andthe many requests
for
"clarification" of the guidelinesfrom colleges and universities.In fact
many
schools wouldappear
to
have violated
the
guidelines.
A
report from
the
College Board estimated that
a
student going
\
to
a
four-year
private college will pay
10.6
percent more than last year. Public
four-year
schools' cost are up anaverage 8.5 per
cent.
"
Things are' even worse
for
students who commute
to
andfrom classes. The same reportshows that total costs for those
who
commute
to
two-year privatecolleges
are
up 14.7 per cent.Commuters' costs
at
two-yearpublic colleges are up 10.1 percent this year.In the Erie area, most of thearea colleges are staying withinthe guidelines
set by the
President Mercyhurst shows
a
6.25
per cent increase in costs forthe
1979-80
academic year. Otherarea colleges show the followingcost increases:
Hehrend,
6.6
per
cent,; Villa Maria, seven
per
cent,
and Gannon,
7.3
per cent.-these are approximate figures.
t
Though
the
wage-priceguidelines- are voluntary,
the
Carter administration
has
pledged
to
withhold federalcontracts worth more than
five
million dollars fromorganizations that violate
the
guidelines^
M
1 i
t
1
MAHIPOSA
A
COLUMN
BY
REBECCA L.MASTIN
An Anecdote
L
Some time ago, our local PBSstation aired
an
informationalprogram on venereal disease. Apanel
of
doctors answered anyquestions phoned
in
landperiodically the number to callflashed across the bottom of thetelevision screen.My family, with the exceptionof
my
little
sister
Joan, was tunedin
and
watching. Halfwaythrough
the
program, Joanskipped into the room, She spentseveral minutes observing
the
doctors answering
the
phone, and
the
next
time
the
number flashed
on,
she eagerly ran to the phoneand began to dial.My mother was mortified; hecouldn't imagine Joan having
a
question that she, as
a
mother,
couldn't
fanswer.My father,stunned, quickly grabbed
the
phone and asked her what shethought she was doing.Joan stood
her
ground,declaring that
she was
"calling into win some."
w
Monta
Go climb a glacier! The slogan of Glacier National Park was acommon one in my ears this summer. It captures some of thesense
of
excitement and adventure
I
felt living among themagnificent Rocky Mountains.
It
was
a
powerful
experiencewhich I will long remember.
' *
I went to Glacier National Park with
a
program called
"A
Christian Ministry in the National Parks." As a result, I helpedout with interdenominational services and an activity time forchildren.
I
also worked forty hours
in
a
gift
shop.
g
.
My days off were spent hiking, for Glacier is definitely
the
hiker's delight with over
1000
miles of trails. I
would
like
to
inviteany nature lovers to share my slides with me on Thursday, Oc-tober fourth at
8
p.m. in the Campus Ministry
(212
Main).If anyone
is
interested in learning more about the ChristianMinistry in the National Parks program,
I
will stay after theslide presentation to
answer*any
questions.
I
hope to
see
4
you
there!
*
Ellen Soisson
4
* *
~—_j^_
j_***^*t*jj-^_
_L^_!_J
i->
...
bjLJJa,
Kubiak...
Ill
Continued
from
Page
1
for students to be detrimental to
other students
who
wish
to
study.We've: got
to
give them
the
message
that they
can't continiuelike this.
<
*
Q:
Let's
get
back
to the
upgrading
of
the students andperhaps the individual quality of
why the
college
has
decended. Do
you
think that
students' neglect toevaluate themselves has createda neglect to evaluate themselveshas created a neglect to evaluatetheir
environment?
A: Yes. What I see as one of theoverwhelming things
...-
is thatthe student's self image,
the
image that the kid comes to uswith is so dismally low that theydon't believe they can achieve.
I
ran into one student*
this
mor-ning .... who was the completereverse of that. The kid has all
kinds
of
confidence,
and
I
loved
to
hear what he had to
say
becausehe is so damned
different
thanmost of
the
kids
I
spend time with
talking to in my office. They areusually frightened
.:..
whateverhappened to them
at
homes
orhigh school has really managedto take that out of them. That'sone of the major problems thatwe face. That's wny to a great
INTER-COLLEGE
RETREAT
|
FATHER-DAUGHTER WEEKEND
The seventeenth annualFather-Daughter Weekend will beheld on April 26 and 27, 1980.Please reserve these dates
on
your colendarVo^
*
«A-*-1_JL_#_«••>
«*«•
FQRWME
"iTTA
CMCUZM)
extent the interpersonal skillsdevelopment
is
worthwhile.
I
think there is a tendency here bysome quarters to overblow that.However,
I
believe we need
to
give our students here morechances
 to
 succeed. Just in verysmall ways. /For
'
instance,
in
class room
discussions
to
developtheir communicative skills, youlet
the kid
talk
so
that he realizeshe's got to ask those questionsthat he thinks are
dumb
and
he'sgoing to realize that about one-half dozen others have the samedumb question, so ... it's reallya crucial issue that everyoneought to be
discussing
1
And
onceyou start getting students likethat to develop successes undertheir belt they build up someconfidence that they came' toMercyhurst with. We don't have
programs
to do
that
as
effectivelyas we could: but they're on the
way.Q:
In
what direction
do
youthink the college is heading?A:
I
believe that a new day
is
dawning
at
Mercyhurst.
The
problems that
we are
facingcurrently, we are not going to befacing eight months from now.
I
think
we
need some
ad-
ministrative priorities.
I
think
we
need a flat refrain of the faculty
from
some of
the
idiosies they
are
required to do.Something
we
didn't discuss atall that needs to be discussed isfaculty moral at this place, andhow destructive students can be
to
faculty doing
a
good
job by
notresponding, or putting out someenergy for the faculty. That's anissue
that ought to
be
discussed in
the
blasted Merciad, too. How inthe hell
do
you keep facultyhappy at a place where students
don't
care? We've /got betterfaculty than this place deserves.But I think that the moral of thefaculty can be ruined; it alreadyhas been in
many
quarters. Andwe can pick
it
back
up by thestudents viewing themselvesprimarily as
studiers
and lear-ners and
cooperators
of the
faculty rather than seeing thefaculty
as
the enemy encroaching
4m
their booze time.
«W

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