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The Merciad, Oct. 12, 1979

The Merciad, Oct. 12, 1979

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Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, Oct. 12, 1979
The Merciad, Oct. 12, 1979

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A
B
fr
* %
' f <
a
jstudent|
publication
VOL.
52 NO. 5
MERCYHURST COLLEGE OCTOBER 12, 1979
Merciad Reporters Attend
Pope John Paul II Addresses lowans
Pope John Paul II spoke on thevirtues of rural living to a throngof over 500,000 last Thursday inDes Moines, Iowa.
£§j
ft
Pilgrims from at least seven
statesl
assembled at LivingHistory! Farms to hear
this
message.John Paul directed his homilyto
the,agricultural
communitysaying, "The land is God's giftentrusted to his people
Sj.
£from
the beginning it has been a means
of
sustaining life
.¥; it*#s
not
only
a gift but a responsibility aswell."
* ?3J
The Holy Father went on
to
saythat the church highly values the
Pope John Paul
II
agricultural peoples of the worldsince they are entrusted with theduty
I
to support the lives
|of
millions.
S
KJS
3
He reminded the farmingcommunity that they must neverforget their indebtedness to God,and that they should live by thevirtue of humility.
. |&
Secondly, he said that thosewho live in the heartland ofAmerica must remember "whilefarming provides money M. it ismore than profit making,
1
; it. issustenance.The Pope finally reminded hislisteners that generosity is asimportant to the ideals of far-ming as it is in all things.
;^
He called to the attention ofthose present the fact that ruralAmerica has the potential ofridding the world of famine andthe wealth of our fields should beshared by all
mankind.
J
John Paul concluded
his
homilywith a reference to Christ as theprovider of spiritual sustenancesaying, "All creation is restoredthrough Christ
Come
to Christ -He is the bread of
life.Come
toChrist
and iyou
will never behungry again."
'% V -eSS
Freshman Reps Advanced At MSG Meeting
An amendment to the MSGconstitution on freshmanrepresentation passedunanimously
at'the
October 8meeting of Mercyhurst StudentGovernment in the FacultyLounge. * fPreviously stated that fresh-
rnaji-
r**preggntgi
fives would be
elected
"3h tfie tHfrcTOVednesday
in
January'f&ie
amendment nowreads:
"Three Txeshman
represen-tatives to the Student Govern-
ment will
be elected at a
special
election held on the eighth weekof the fall term."
|
Also, it is required that"candidates shall submit a letterof intent, signed and dated, to theSecretary of the StudentGovernment no later than oneweek prior to the date of elec-tion." Action stemmed fromfreshmen expressing a desire tobecome more active and
welcome
at MSG meetings at anearlier date.Following on the agenda, the
official
decision
to
deny use of the
northeast!
slope
of Mercyhurstgrounds to the J IntramuralFootball League was an-nounced. The floor
was
then opento discussion and discentingviews were adamantly ex-pressed.
S $&
Question was raised as to whystudent government had the rightto intervene in matters which itsmembers did not directly par-
ticipated J
an.
GattL
Director of
the
Student Union, clarified Chat
student
•government
*is
anelected, representative body ofthe students, and has "everyright and responsibility" to beconcerned with* all student af-
fairs,
j
W
Sj»
Thirdly, nominations wereaccepted for students
to
serve onthe Liberal Arts Committee. Thiscommittee
fwill
serve* as thereconstructive body for the new
liberal iarts
curriculum
1
atMercyhurst. Two students,preferably
who
are
on
the Senate,will hold seats on the committee.
TheySwill
have voice,
but
novoting power.The meeting
|concluded
withJim Bplger reinstating theprocess
of*-
action toward Dr.Joseph Pizzat's proposal of ArtsEvent Funding. Each individualevent should be proposed to thegovernment separately, and itwould be decided upon,
thereof.
Financial AidExperiences Cutback
by Bonnie JamesDue to a cutback in govern-mental monetary assistance, theFinancial
Aid
Office has receiveda 20-25 per cent decrease in itsfunding for the current year.
However,
disregarding thecutback in funding, the collegehas committed no
less
money toits students.
w
F$
Approximately
85-90
per cent
of
the entire school enrollment whoapplied for financial aid for the1979-80 academic
$ year
didreceive it through institutional,state, or national sources. Vir-tually
no J
student
received
I
thetotal financial need expressedother
thanjby
outside
^scholar-
ships,
v
As
compared
to
previous
years,upperclassmen witnessed adecrease in money awarded tothem. Much of this was due
to
thefact that
j»more
money wasawarded to students
glast
yearthan was actually in existence.Although the difference wasabsorbed by the adjustedeligibility for state and national
Barry
Zembower"
grants, all awards were relativeto individual financial situations.Last year's financial deficit has
be6ic
redeemed; therefore,students presently receiving aidcan be sure
of*,
stable help ac-cording to their relative financialstate of affairs.*^.'
^
Barry Zembower, Director
of
Financials
Aid j>
pointed out
that
not
all,/
students who attendMercyhurst applied for aid. He
The
crowds gathered to wait for
Pope
John Paul II at Living History Farms in DesMoines, Iowa. Among
the
masses
were
four Merciad staff members.
Teaching Award Announced
In an attempt to single outtenured faculty members fortheir superior 'teaching ef-fectiveness, Mercyhurst hasestablished a Distinguishedacuity Teaching Award.
| jW*'Mercyhurst
College alwayshas emphasized the perspectivethat it is an institution whichstresses the importance of goodstated,
a
I wouldencourage the remaining 20 percent of those students that did notapply to do so."
'm
Dr.
Edward Gallagher
Operations
|
DirectorNamed a
Dr. Raymond Justice has beenappointed Director of Operationsfor the 1979-80 school year.Dr. Justice, a faculty memberof the Biology department for thepast year, was approached byMr. Kidd for the non-budgetposition at the beginning of thefall term.
$
k
$tl
Justice had been involved withcampus maintenance since earlythis summer. He and sevenstudents volunteered
to
assist thedepartment in areas rangingfrom landscaping to groundmaintenance.
J"I've;done thistsort
of thingbefore in
other*
places,"
*said
Justice. "The people here thissummer recognized what I could
do."
|
i*
|
Justice's main goal is to putdirection into the departmentthrough efficient
Imanagement^
"There hasn't been anymanagement in this departmentfor a number of years," ex-plained Justice.
"A
facility of this
size
warrants management of themaintenance department."
xTne j
new director hasestablished
%
a
number^
of ob-jectives for the department."There's going to be changes,there's
no
doubt," stated Justice.
However,
he explained that thechanges would not concern thepersonnel. Justice is aiming foran increased morale among thepeople involved in the depart-ment.
He
would like
to see
peopleheld accountable for their workas
well
as perpetual maintenanceon campus.
*g
Justice foresees no time con-flict between his position asfaculty and Director ofOperations.*<•"
# *$?&
teaching." commented EdwardGallagher, chairperson of theAward
Committee.'^SBaS-/..When
the new tenure policywas adopted by the late DeanTrimble and the tenure com-mittee, consisting
of'faculty
members
andfmembers*of*the
board of trustees, a decision wasmade to recognize
the?
out-
standing faculty. As a result ofthe new policy, any tenuredfaculty member who recievestwo consecutive positiveevaluations becomes eligible for
the'Award
which includes astipend of $1,000.00. Only
three
awards
will
be
granted
in
any one
year.?
fw •§£ f j?
Tim
Seltzer. President of the
Mercyhurst Student Govern-
ment,
appointed Alda
Walker
And
Mike^Philnps*%6
represent thestudent body on the committee.Sr. Carolyn Herrmann,
Director
of Alumni Relations, appointed
Jo
Ann DeSantis and PatrickShort to serve on the committeeas alumni members.The Committee decided toutilize the material outlined inthe Faculty Handbook as criteriafor nominating?, the tenuredfaculty.
%
''Qualities t a ken
i
under con-sideration for the nominationsinclude thorough
I
classpreparations; creative, dynamicand energetic classroompresentations;
t
the en-couragement of intelligent andindependent thought fromstudents, an extensive knowledgeof the subject matter in higherfield; and providing
?-helpful
feedback to the students about
their*
work,
j a
long with othercriteria listed in the
1979-80
Faculty Handbook.Nominations will be accepted
Irom
any faculty
member,
j
member
of the
alumni,
sophomoie.
junior
or
sewior.
Guiy
those personsalready*tenuredduring
the
1978-79 school
year areeligible for the award.
7
,
Nominations should be sub-mitted to the
Dean's5Office
noiater than October
23| 1979.
TheCommittee
hopes
to
announce theaward recipients by the end of
Fall
Term
1979,
Bond Speaks) On
Civil Rights
By Walt
GreenExpressing anger over theAllan Bakke decision and theincreasing popularity of a"Proposition113" mentality,Georgia
.
:
State Governor £
JulianBond
i
addressed a crowd
gathered
at
Strong
Vincent HighSchool Saturday night in a fundraiser for members of Erie'sOpportunities IndustrializationCenter.
*Js i *
In urging blacks to continueSen. Julian Bond
*
their struggle for civil rights,Bonds stated that the progressachieved
by
the civil rightsmovement of the
60's
has createda
"
false illusion of success" andthat consequently it has becometoo easy for blacks and otherminority groups to believe thatthe major battles have alreadybeen fought and won.
*
The fact that major battles stillremain, he said, is evidenced bythe Bakke
decision,,Proposition
13 and its offspring. Citing theBakke decision as a return to thewhite male's monopoly onqualtityeducation.Bond ex-pressed displeasure at PresidentNixon's staffing of the SupremeCourt responsible for
£the
decision, noting that Nixon'scourt marked an end
to
liberationand progress. fo
Bond
described Howard Jarvis'Proposition
13
as "social arson atthe grassroots" inspired andmade possible by a Tyranny ofthe selfish. Describing PresidentCarter's handling of domesticeconomic issues as
"
clumsy",the Georgian Senator felt thatthis was a
major*factor
in theemergence in the
.radical
taxreform movement.
£
Such movements, he noted,may be the first step towards abattle between the "haves" and"have-nots".
|
Pi
Bond, a signicant figure in the"New Politics" which emergedfrom the civil rights movementsof the^60's. was
|offered
the
jlyice
presidency during the 1968Humphrey-for-President cam-paign. However, because of hisage ( he was
28
at the time), hewas ineligible. |Bond concluded by urgingblack involvement in the politicalprocess, but conceded that at bestthe future
is
uncertain,and that itis a matter of centuries, not ofyears" before major goals areattained. But. he reminded theaudience,"
The
cost of achievingjustice| is never so high asdenying it."
 
Page
2
YHEMfcRdAD
OCTOBER
12,
1979
editorial
In Pursuit of the PopeApproximately nine Mer-cyhurst students "seized anopportunity" that the rest of thestudent body might never have achance to. They saw the Pope.Four of those students were sentunder the auspices of The
Mer-
ciad.
3^
H
As the front page indicates,these pilgrims took a somewhatunusual route by going to DesMoines, Iowa. Question of the
week
had
to be:
"
Why
didn't they
go
to Philadelphia?'. The City ofBrotherly I Love wasgeographically closer, right?Distance did not have anybearing on the newspaper's
final
decision. If convenience wouldhave been a major criteria,everyone could have viewed theHoly Father n the evening news,or they could have read about it
in
a newspaper.
•J
However, the group decided tojump in a car and drive to thesleepy little
mid
western state. Indoing this they sacrificed threedays of class and whatever otherresponsibilities awaiting theirattention at the college.Without any guarantee ofseeing the Pope, this foursometook a chance. Because they did,they gained an experience thatwill mean
more
and more
to
themas the years go by. They madethe school motto, Carpe Diem,come to life.
Hie
Merciad ap-plauds all nine "pilgrims".A Concert?
jjf|
In what may be termed as afirst, the powers, that reign have
granted
permission for the first-ever concert in the CampusCenter featuring-TheJIVatchmen,
^^ ^^
a nationally-known gospelgroup.The Merciad
idoes^hQwever,
order to
Tom
Thompson,
whoijdence
from
this
i
unidentified
convinced the administration to source with the hope of
possibly
okay such an
event.
In the recent bringing this issue to light
Society is a
mule,
not o
cor.
M
^
.pressed too hard it will kick andthrow off its rider - issawi
Letter
•»
past, no one, including the pasttwo years' student governments,have
been
able to make anyheadway in this direction. Andit's not because
they
didn't try.With sufficient funding andconstant student demand for suchan event, the students have,; notbeen able to budge the CampusCenter doors open for thesmallest of concerts. The majorreason for the student failingshas been a
lackjof
one majorelement, a tarp which
vould
cover the
floor.
%,
Where did Mr. Thompson getthe tarp? Because of an inability'to procure* one, the MSG haspondered over the idea of buying
one
financed
by
students'activity
fees.
Searching
high
and
low
for a
tarp.
Student Union Director Jan
Gatti
has never been able to findone to rent. And yet one has:suddenly appeared.
sj
Of course, no one has seen ityet However,
The
Merciad truststhat there will be one. There
is>
also hope that
the
SAC willreceive some assistance inbringing both a tarp and a con-cert to the college in the near
future.
p
«*
SSS^^Sfi!
An apology
j3 *
§
The Merciad apologizes for not
printing
one letter which was sentto the office during the weekend.Although
the
letter did deal witha pertinent issue,
its
author(s)
did
not sign their name
to
it.
jj
It should be reiterated that
the
policy
of
The Merciad
is to not
print those letters
in
which
the
name
of the
author
has
beenwithheld. This also applies
to
those letters submitted under
a
false name.
i
Ex-Student Praises 'Hurst
Open letter to the 'Hurst com-munity; -
You
know, it has been said thatyou never appreciate what youhave until it is gone,
i
Now thatMercyhurst is gone for
meijl
amvery happy that this statementdoes not apply to
me.> £j
During my association withMercyhurst.
I
found
it to be one of
the best experiences of my life.Above the din of complaints, thecriticisms^ of anything andeverything, and
the
generally
low
perception of Mercyhurst, I foundit to be outstanding in a numberof ways.
ftjf-
First, there is the faculty and
administration 0vera
11,
theteachers here are more con-cerned about how much is
being
learned than anyplace I've everseen.
S£ $Secondly,
the atmosphere is
so
friendly. People are helpful, easyto befriend, and they are always"around".
You
might
not
know(continued on page 8)
\\
1KB.
w
aatCflMewte^
&&***
A Letter To I iThe Editor
{
So
far
this
year there have beenfour printings of the The
Mer-
ciad. They haven't been badeditions except for one thing, thecolumns by Mike Philips.
\
J
In your last printing
(
he
at-tacked the intramural program,sports
£
program, and ad-ministration without many facts.
Sure -
a
kid
had knee surgery, butI didn't hear him complain aboutviolence when a participant of theMercyhurst Football
League
hadthree teeth knocked out
last
year.
Letter To Mike Philips
Dear Mr. Philips,
*
£l
am
*
writing this letter
in
response
to
your article
on the
M.F.L.
and the
resulting
injury
that took place.
I
strongly feelthat something should
be
saidabout the overall condition
of
theMercyhurst Campus, especiallyduring the winter months.The reason
you
article
"hit
home"
is
because
as a
directresult
of
the
awful
upkeep on thecampus,
I had to
under
go two
separate knee operations
and
well over
a
year
of
physical
therapy.
One of
mydreamswhen
I have been on the intramural entering college wag to
playxjj
lntramurals
are coordinated
for
the enjoyment of the students. Wedo
our
best
in
obtaining fieldprivileges
and
good equipmentfor use.
Admittedly,
sometimes
it's
not up to par, but what do youwant
-
Three Rivers Stadium?
Or
perhaps
a
Superdome?I hope now Mr. Philips and theMSG are satisfied that the MFLhas been cancelled! Maybe
you
would like us to cancel volleyball,basketball and
Softball
as
well
as
well."
/^g I 'kSj s
As for where your tuitionmoney goes, you don't buy anybaseballs or bats. Baseballs arebought with money
earned'that's
right, earned - by the baseballteam.
£ \
c
$1
also feel that MSG
and ad-
ministration should not have anysay
in
intramurals.
I
don't,
seethem helping make schedules,
find
referees,
or
putting
up
with(continued on page 8)
he
DasKetbai
team and that
dream was quickly shattered thevery first term
I
was here.
A
My knee
has
never been
the
same
and the constant pain
and
swelling is something
I
will haveto live with. This
injury
has
caused stress
within
my
family
over'the
years
and
constantworry among family memberswhenever
JI
participate
in any
kind
of
sports activities.
I
firmlybelieve that
the
whole campussituation should
be
reviewedalong with
the
procedures usedduring the \\ inter by an unbiasedparty
with,
the
resulting
con-
JUSIOHJ-
-
being
•published..^
Dai lene Kosthauser
Reverberations - By Philips
find
ihtngQog<yt<Jpcmifetnblza'vJ
iJif^Qflfc
fleams
for
/ttf/cyi"
T/n
3
*
»
Freihpiiijv-ffcdfr/ps
v-
Simple solutions to simpleproblems. Sounds
nice
doesn't it?But unfortunately, here at the
•'Hurst
things don't always workthat way. Problem; Mer-
cy hurst's f Intra
mural Footballplayers are playing on an area
that
is a natural drainage surfaceand somewhat resembles theprofile of the
Loch-ness
Monster.Even the people who play on thefield will not deny that it is by nomeans a field meant for athleticcompetition and it is unsafe. But,Intramural Football players,especially MercyhurstIntramural football players, arenever the most rational of people.
Having
played with the
"StonedRangers
(Freshman year), the"Rolling Thunder Revue"(Sophomore year), and "JointEffort" for the past two years, Ican attest
to
that fact without toomuch hesitation. The gameprovides a competitive outlet forthe young men who compete(besides being a hell of a lot offun) and they would just as soonplay
on
the dark side of the moonas Tullio Field.
4g|
d
c
P*
1
But there comes
a
time whensomething has to be done
for
thesafety of those competing with orwithout their consent.The situation
is all so
simple
and*
will
now be
explained
in
terms
that
;
the average eight-year
old
will understand.
One
field is
a
bad field. Another fieldis
a
:
good
field. Good fields
are
meant to be played on. Bad fieldsare
not
meant
to be
played
on.
When the good field was made,
it
was
made
so everybody could use
if.
Mommies
and
Daddies
and
little soccer players
and
littlebaseball players
and
even littleintramural football players coulduse
it.
Isn't that nice?
End of
fairy tale.
i-
f
^Nobody,not even the M.S.G.executive officer seems to un-derstand this concept. When
Tullio
Field was built (during theterm of Dr. W. P. Garvey asDean) it was designated an AllSports Field and everybody got to
,
use it. Since actions speak louder
1
1nan
worcfe, this
could'mean
thatthe only administrator who
has
held office since the school went
co-ed(1970)
that really cared
for
the welfare of
assorted knees andankles
.was
Dr. Garvey,
But
thatis irrelevant to the issue involvedhere.
\
On Monday, October 1, the
.MercyhurstStudent
Governmentrecognized
the
problem andrequested that the games berescheduled to where they hadbeen played prior to the 78-79school year
(Tullio
Field)...
A
copywas sept to Dean
Millar's office
and the Athletic Department. OnTuesday, Wednesday, . and
Thursday of A last
week, in-tramural games were played onthe unsafe field in direct con-tradiction
to
the
M.S.G.
proposal.Finally,a copy was sent to thepresident's office in hope of someaction;. Action was taken, thegames were suspended,
J.not
moved to Tullio Field..
,i-.
The games could have beenmoved
to
Tullio. The soccer teamwas off the field by 3:00 Saturdayafternoon| Four games could
have
been played before the sunset. All day Sunday there was no
one;
on the
*
field. How manygames could have been playedthen?
Z *
The way things look now,
play
will be resumed this week. Backon the
N.E.
slope of Mercyhurstgrounds,"
*^
£
I suppose it was silly to thinkthat a unanimous proposalpassed by the StudentGovern-ment would be taken seriously bythe Athletic
Department.
Silly to think that the wishes ofthe student representation ofevery department at the
'Hurst
would be respected.
?Silly
to
hope that an intramuralsport would be allowed to play onthe only field at the college thatcan be legitimately called
an
athletic field.
Silly
to
think that an expressionof concern
and'a
use of the ..proper channels could right anobvious wrong.
S^
-Nice lesson in
life
for un-dergrads,' isn't it?
«^r
f
'
K*
 
OCTOBER 12, 1979
THE
MERCIAD
Page 3
I
Traveling
Through Mid-America
by
Mary
Beth BarrettRarely do I act on an impulse,but when Steve Frisina visitedmy Advertising class and offeredany interested female an all-expense paid trip to Des Moines,Iowa to see the Pope, I couldn'tresist.
* & £;
It was
Tuesday
at 5:00 when I
was
confronted with this
once
in alifetime opportunity; Stevewanted my decision by 5:30. Iossed the whole idea back andforth in my head until finally I
concluded
that seeing not only thePope but also parts of Ohio,Indiana, Illinois, and Iowa was achance not to be overlooked. Me
—a big city girl who is
bored withErie more often than not wasready to
{venture
westwardthrough the
flat lands
of mid-
America,
i
*JP^
I ran
back
to the dorm, let myroommate know where I'd be forthe next four days, packed mybags and headed over to theMerciad office. The officialfarewell committee consisting ofSteve and a few of the staffmembers met with me and theother adventure-seeking in-dividuals to provide us with roadmaps,cameras, film, a taperecorder, and inspiring words.Waiting
outside the
office was thered two-door Dodge Swingerwhich was to eventually get us toour Des Moines
destinations
The four of us hopped in theSwinger and were soon on theroad feeling excited yet a littleapprehensive at the same time.We had a long 14 hour road trip
lying
ahead of us and
no
real ideaof why we were doing what we'were doing. Impulse. .
\
We
traveled along Interstate
80
for hours upon
hours $
stoppingoccasionally to splurge on a cupof caffeine - our main means ofstaying alert.
1-80,
a joyride in
itself,
was comparable to anamusement park ride; we pickedup the ticket and trekked downthe road, lured to stop at serviceareas to refuel our Swinger and
£r
our own depleted fuel systems.
nwAfter
sattefyingtawmeeds,
we*were back for
more fun on
80.Thelong dark hours of the nightstretched
into
the break of
day.
Itwas at dawn that I awoke to find
two
of
my cohorts
standing
on
thehood of the car, capturing whatthey considered the classic farmon the hillside scene with theirMinoltas. I immediately came tothe realization that these girlswere crazier than I.
:»
I suppose it was lack of sleepthat
was
propelling them to act insuch a - bizaare manner.However, we were managing toget closer to our ultimate goal -Des Moines, Iowa.
'*~x.
Radio provided us with thePope's visit updates and needed
information,
we arrived in Iowa
10:00
Wednesday morning only tolearn that all
roads into the
city
of
Des Moines were closed and thatother means
:
would manifestthemselves
I
to the 500,000 ex-pected visitors.
With this in
mind,we decided the best thing to dowas rent a room and sleep away
the
day, for
we
would
be up
againat an ungodly hour to completethe last leg of our race to seePope John Paul!Before-
we
settled into ourroomVwe feasted on a steak and
\
egg breakfast in the hotel's
^
restaurant. We slept until lateafternoon; this truck driver lifewas not for me. I wondered if I'd
t
Marybeth
Barrett, Carol Lukawski, RebeccaL.Mar-tin and
Flo Scutella
are pictured here in the Merciadoffice before beginning their journey to Des Moines,Iowa.
ever be the same after sleepingduring the days and drivingthrough the nights. Before long
it
was time for
our
last supper.Again we treated ourselves to agourmet meal; little did we knowthat our next meal would be 24hours away and a sack lunchselling for $1.50. Feeling ratherstuffed and quite exhausted, weunanimously concluded that itwas time to catch some moreshut-eye.
|
r
Awakened by the hotel deskworker at 1:00 a.m., we slowlydragged ourselves out of bed andinto our home away from home -the
now
infamous
Swinger.
At l
inthe; morning, however, it ap-
peared
more demonic than home-like.
|£JThe
excitement among the fourof us mounted for it became
obvious
that
we
were really going
to
see the Pope. Our mission nowwas to get to a shuttle bus whichwaited on the outskirts of DesMoines. This was to carry us to
Urbandale's
Living
|
History
Farm. Arriving at the pick-uppoint of Adventureland, an ironicmeeting place for those who had
hopes
of
seeing
the Pope, we wereforced to recognize the apparentcommercial aspect of ourpilgrimage. However, this wasnot to destroy our feelings of
anticipation.;..
*It was now five a.m. andthrongs of people were pouringinto the shuttle
bus
area.
We
werenot to worry, however, becausewe were number two in line. Thegates
opened:
and the mass of
blanket-donning
people surgedthrough the fence, seekingshelter and warmth. It was afrigid 35 degrees. The busesdeparted on schedule every 15minutes. Bus Number
One
pulledout at 5:30 and we were aboard.We arrived at the LivingHistory Farm at 6:00: the Popewould not arrive until 3:00 thatafternoon. Before gettingsituated,
we
had a half-mile walkahead of us. Thousands walked
down the
dirt
road.
This proved to
be
an experience in
itself.
I felt asthough I was journeying throughthe Holy Land in search of aChrist who
-would fill
me withwords of- encouragement andinspiration.
|
The wait seemed unending; itwas a very long nine hours. But agenuine closeness developedamong
the
thousands whomarched to this hillside. Thebitter cold and the smell of freshcoffee enveloped the crowd.Those who came well-preparedwillingly shared blankets,sleeping bags, coffee and food forthought.
We
were strangers frommany faraway places joined bythe deep-rooted desire
to
see andhear the Pope.
\
§* SIH
This visit by John Paul was tobe the only one of its kind. Therewould be no motorcade, no visit
to,any
cathedral and no VIPsection for the Pope
\
in
Iowa.Instead. John Paul was met by150 elderly and handicappedpeople at the airport, visited asmall-town church and said Mass
to a
crowd of
504,000
gathered
in
apasture. This small Iowa townoffere the gift of simplicity to thePope and his followers.
* j
The ugly, cold morning grew tobe a beautiful, warm afternoon.Ther was still a chill in the air,but it was soothed by the thoughtthat the Pope would soon be
there.
;jj*:&g»»j*_
It was 3:00 when
we*learned
that he had landed in Des Moinesand was on his way to the farm.Soon after, the Pope's helicopterwas sighted which
brought
I
thecrowd to its feet and arms wavedwildly. Binoculars were passedfrom one hand to "another;everyone
'wanted
tot catch aglimpse of this long-awaitedman.
jUii
The helicopter stirred the airand created a wild rush of windaround the altar. It slowlydescended, its door opened andminutes later the Pope steppedout and onto the
grassy
land.
Mass began promptly and a hush
fell
upon the people which wasnot to be broken until after theaddress to rural America. Heads
bowed,
the crowd listened in-tently to the Pope's words ofwisdom. Mass ended as suddenlyas it had begun. The nine hourwait on the grassy knoll and thetwo day journey to Iowa wasover.
£
I
The only
thing awaiting us nowwas the long ride back to the
'Hurst{-The
Pope had come andgone and thousands had done thesame. It
will
most likely
be a
verylong time before that same op-portunity to see and hear themoral leader of the
work&will
present
itself.
But if and when it
does,-1
will do it all over again.
MAHLP0SA
ACOLUMN BV
REBECCA
L.MAHTIN
Commercialism is the holyword of America's free en-terprise system. Anybody canattempt to sell anything toanybody, and many of the any do.A striking example of this isseen in the Pope's U.S. visit Inevery city he toured, the mer-chandise mongers followed himfaithfully.
J"
In Philadelphia they featured
T-shirts
emblazoned with, "Ipeeped at the Pope in
Philly."
Claiming to have "peeped"(peeped?! Hi. I'm Tom. I
peep.)
at so astute a personage as thePope seems a tad sacrilegious.In Des Moines, the papalpeddlers mixed among the piouspilgrims (oh I do lovealliteration) making tremendouscapital gains.
A
man I purchaseda
T-shirt
from wailed miserably,"I have to sell these. I'm notmaking
any
money." T-shirts,buttons and banners abounded.Everything for everyone in-terested in a possible secondgeneration relic, fI am not passing judgement onthis popish commercialism. Icould not, since I posess nopersonal protection from thepapal propaganda. I must con-fess, I sat on a cornfield in Iowastuffing handfuls of sillysouveniers such as pope dirt,pope grass (wow man), popepebbles, and pope corn (yes, Ikept kernels of corn, in a brownpaper bag. ft
|
Think of it. Commonplacethings from nature, blessed by aman representing the greatestunknown mystery of humankind.
Now,
I am
not insensible
to
glory.Even if I'd wanted to resist thoseabominable advertisers, Icouldn't have,
j
However, that I fell prey doesnot make me unnecessarily
uneasy,
after all, I live in adecadent era of
t
good oldAmerican ingenuity.
s
DISTINGUISHED
FACULTY AWARD
The following tenured faculty may be nominated for theaward:Daniel BurkeWilliam GarveyFrank
Hagan
Edward Higgins
Robert
Hoff «£Marily
nn Jewell
Richard
KubiakPeter
LibraSr. Mary MatthewErnest MautheP.
Barry McAndrewBrian McHugh
Michael McQuillen
Louis
Mennini
David
PalmerVivetta PetronioJoseph Pizzat
Oonald Platte
IgorStalsky
tt£ra*^
Detrhar
StraW*
-
*^
Robert Sturm
David
Thomas
Barbara
Weigert
Sr.
Patricia Whalen
Judith
WieczorekJamie YuleAll nominations should be submitted in writing to theDean's Office no later than October 23,1979. Your letters ofnomination should clearly indicate the reasons
why > our
Can-
dida
te should be recognized as a superior teacher, using
the
criteria listed
in the 1979-80
Faculty Handbook. .If there are
any J
further questions, contact EdwardGallagher
in Old
Main.
"
i
Carol
Lukawski,Rebecca
L.Martin, and Marybeth Barrett amidst the crowdawaiting the
pops
in Pes
;Motoes,][oyya.
1
Pi0?ir^^
Fl0
Scutella.
|fc j>-ftf^i|l
*Htf
420 W. 8th St
455-0511
Female Help
Wonted
at
Times
Square
jjjj
Millcreek Malt
Mon.-Fri.
12-3 and
Sat,
^
$2.90 hr.
plus J
weekly
bonus
for appointmentCall Gita before
6:00
at 866-6106
LiX
i'Ji
'•?'*
'-.Wl*
4 \
T
*
%
t i

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