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The Merciad, Jan. 25, 1980

The Merciad, Jan. 25, 1980

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Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, Jan. 25, 1980
The Merciad, Jan. 25, 1980

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fTCCC
* *
a]student|
publication
VOLUME
50
NO.
13
Candidates fctftf
3
ari
4
MERCYHURST COLLEGEFRIDAY, JANUARY 25,
1980
Bins
And Miller PresentAttitudes
To
Student
IBody
Expressing their attitudes ontopics dealing
primarily
withstudent involvement in collegeaffairs, presidential applicantsDr. Gerald P. Burns and Dr.Beverly Miller
addressed!
astudent audience Friday af-ternoon in the Zurn Science
however,
are
I
"not foreverybody," he stated. Rather,he felt
that
these positions shouldgo to those J
students
whodemonstrate
I
"competency andconcern."
j 'ISg
Burns stated that he felt therole the president plays has to bea highly visible one, both in thecollege and surrounding com-munity. One area particularlymentioned was the fund raisingaspect.
^
3j|
J * £ I
In the second student addressDr. Beverly!
Miller
quickly,pointed to
the?student
as animportant source of
^ input
af-fecting college policy.
?
Millercited that in her personal ex-perience she had always madetime
c
1o
seek*
out input
Jfrom
students.
-
i
Jfl*
In the area of student gover-nance Miller felt that the collegeDr. Gerald BurnsBuilding. This marked thestudents' last opportunity
to
meetthe candidates and
*
interviewthem before the final selection by
The
Board of Trustees
on
January
29.
._
*
iTBuffisTttieU!^ear
,
"01tt
formerpresident of
Our
Lady
of the LakeUniversity
in
San Antonio, Texas,
Took
a
broad approach in definingthe roles of each component ofthe college.
I
Starting with, theBoard of Trustees and workingdown through administration,faculty and the student, he stated
(hat
the primary duty of thestudent is to study.
-*
r
Going further, Burns pointed
<>u
that he believed in studentsholding positions of governancewithin the heirarchy
of the
college. These positions,Dr. Beverly Miller
-=
had
ihejegal
responsibility ofprotecting the student from anysort of litigation for which shecould be held liable.* Shespecifically mentioned thatContinued on page
3
Service Bureau Gets Underway
The Student Service Bureau, anidea
transformed into
a reality by
two
young self-employed women,kicked off to a successful startwith a student book sale the firstweek of the term. *
*
Approximately
100
studentsparticipated in the selling
and-or
buying of used books in theStudent Union.
.
Julie Van Volkenburg and JudiRose approached the Mercy hurstStudent Government in earlyOctober in hopes of getting theneeded approval and thenecessary funds in order toimplement the program. MSGgranted the service of $750 ofwhich $500 will
be
used by and forthe students and $250 goingtowards the establishment of anoffice on campus.*;:
*-
The bureau
operates
businesses managed and staffedby students selling goods andservices
to
other students and the
Erie
community.
J&
"This service is an opportunityfor students to earn
money
andwork
in
an area of
interest,
saidVan Volkenburg.
*
"Presently
we
are appealing toMercyhurst students both on andoff campus. We
jwant
thestudents' ideas and we will helppursue
(each
possible idea
together,"'
explained VanVolkenburg.
S|^
Van
Volkenburg and
Rose
havecompiled a list of approximately20 services
«out f
of over 200possibilities. Listed servicesinclude a student check cashingservice, a mending and tailoring.service, a babysitting service
and
a
variety
of fast food services.
"We
want it understood that wehave' money available andcompletely at, student disposal.Therefore, the students need notinvest any of their own funds,"Van Volkenburg continued.Van Volkenburg stressed the
fact!?
that expertise is
\
not
necessary. The two women willwork closely with the students."We plan on being there with
t
he
si udent
every step of
the
way,and we
will
explore each facet ofthe provided service together/
1
said Van Volkenburg.
t •
A
check-cashing
service, aservice the two women havefound to be necessary throughtheir contact with students, willbe established by the
end
ofJanuary.
4
^4*
A
Van Volkenburg and Rose planon meeting with the faculty anddiscussing the Student ServiceBureau and the opportunities itlends to the students.
3
The Student Service Bureauoffice is located in the basementof McAuley Hall. Ideally, VanVolkenburg hopes to leave theoffice hours open and to havestudents manning the office. Aphone
and
 
typewriter
will
beavailable for
student^
use.
VanVolkenburg and Rose will be on.campus during
4
the week andpossibly one night a week.Van Volkenburg concluded,"The Student Service Bureau isnot just an idea, it does work.However, we need students and
ideas
in
order
for.
it to work well."
George Kidd,
Vice-President
of Business Services, pointed out Monday that the college may have to paystudents as much as
128,000
in the near future. For more details, see storv below.
-#.
$28,000 Mistake
U.S. Department
Of
LaborCites
College
For
Filing Error
Due.Jto~an
oversight in filling
nut
the appropriate exemptionform, Mercyhurst College mayhave to pay 1977 work studystudents an amount in excess
of$28,000
it was reported Monday.In December of 1977, thecollege filed an exemption formfor
the
f
Department
of!
Labor
which would free them frompaying work
•study
studentsminimum wage.
The
Departmentof Labor notified them inFebruary of 1978 that a mistakehad been made and that theschool
would
have
to
make
up
thedifference between the minimumwage and the wage rate paid forall hours worked duringDecember, 1977
through
October, 1978^ ?
*
In a conversation with GeorgeKidd,
1
vice-president
of businessservices* The Merciad was toldThat an
estimated
400
students
were party to the error, and that
sums
ranging from $10-$250
would
be
made available
to
thesestudents.
£» Students
have been madeaware of the situation throughletters which have been sent toeach of their homes telling just
how much
money
the
school owesthem. Also in the letter was arequest that-' the students con-
sider?
not
.accepting
the moneyand instead contribute
the
moneyback into the general fund of thecollege.
4 Igl
*|
"1 hope there are somestudents
who
choose
to
return
themoney
to
the school andrecognize that if the college hadnot failed to
file
the form,
the
amount
paid would have been
the
alt i ou n I
contracted by thestudent".
' commented
Kidd.
f-T
The college, whose generalbudget draws 93 percent of itsfunds from student
tuition,-room
and hoard, has approachedCongress
and
the Secretary of
Labor
in an attempt to avert theburden of the expensive over-sigh
1
. Their response
was;the
same - Mercyhurst must pay.Kidd views the request to the
student
as one of the last alter-
natives
left
to the
administration.Realistically^though,he expects
to
recover
no
more
than
a
third
of
the
J money* from students who
stand
to gain an average of $70
each from
the college.-.
£
Kidd remarked, "We? wouldhope
t
he
students would be moreforgiving than the Department ofLabor."
1
F
W*
Students Present Presidential Petition
Expressing concern over theoutcome of the presidentialsearch
"
committee, four Mer-cyhurst students presented
I
apetition
to Tim
Seltzer, President
of ij
the
.
Mercyhurst StudentGovernment, at the January 21meeting.
^" r
SThe petition was signed by
300
students, approximately 100 ofwhich were seniors,
jj
and ad-vocates the candidacy of Dr.William P. Garvey forPresident:of the
college.:]
iThe reaction of the MSG body
was
mixed,
with some
skepticism'being expressed
j-
by presidentSeltzer. Questioned about thepetition by the Merciad, Seltzerreplied, "When you get rightdown to it a petition meansnothing. Obviously a lot of workand dedication went into it, andwe are going to try and verify itas much as
possible..It should
have been done like the Facultysurvey."
f ;| *
Asked
if
he
was impressed bythe number of students that
has
expressed concern through thepetition, Seltzer replied, "No, theonly reason I wasn't impressedwas because I| didn't
see *
thepeople." | gi.
'\
j
The
students
who
presented thepetition to Seltzer and the MSG
body
*
were:
>
Micheal Meehan,senior Geology major; ThereseTalmaned, junior Art Therapymajor; Tim Kosarsky, seniorHistory major;
and
Gene Weber,senior Art major.
o
The
sponsors of
the
petition
feltit represented a cross section ofall major
a
programs at Mer-cyhurst. Micheal
Meehan
ex-plained why he backed theinfluenced
by
this show
of studentunity," continued Meehan..Meehan feels that^
«the
signatures are valid. "They aredefinately valid. I shouldknow,Iwas one of the students thatbrought it door to door."!Gene
Weber,.another
studentwho was involved in solicitingsignatures expressed concernover Seltzer's reaction
at £
theMSG meeting. "I'd like to knowwhy a president that was elected
as a
sophomore wants
to
discountfreshman signatures."
£ i
"My
concern is whether or not
Tim
is biased," continued Weber."In other words, I wonder^ if hehasn't already made
up
his mindand that's why the petition didn'taffect him."
a ^
President Seltzer
has
however,stated
he
is
"up
in the air" as tohis choice for the next Presidentof Mercyhurst College.
^
Tim Seltzer
.
petition.
"We
felt
it
was a
chance
>to
show student support of a(candidate for president in a
.
unified way and present it to ourvote on the search committee.""I'd like to emphasise that wethink
ourf
vote in the
search.committee
should*
be
v greatly
| INSIDE -
The 'Search' Part Two
..
2Presidential Survey 3Community
Calendar..,
3
Literary Section 4Job Possibilities.,
.f .|.
5Sports
J8
M
*S?
 
Page
2
THeMfcRClADi
January
25,51980
*V\
i
%
+9
*JM
V
3
editorial
£fitil
i
The 'Search
1
Part Two
Last week The
Merciad
published the results of an in-vestigation that we had done onpresidential applicants William
C:
Cassell and William
P.
Gar-vey. Carrying this investigationon one
week
longer we will nowdisclose all the information we
have£
obtained concerning Dr.Beverly Miller
and Dr.
Gerald P.
Burns.
^J
••
S
i$&
Making a few long-distance
calls to
St.
Joseph, Minnesota andSalve
Regina
College in RhodeIsland, we talked to
two*
ad-ministrators and one facultymember, the faculty memberhailing from the
Newport, Rhode
Island
college,
p
ids"-**
In our discussion
with~:the
faculty member we discovered
a
number of
things
about
Miller.
Inher term as academic dean thisfaculty member found her to bemost dedicated to her position inthat she
spent
a
great deal of timewith faculty, both as an ad-ministrator and as an educator.Commenting that Dr. Millerhad an excellent rapport withfaculty
~the
faculty
member
stated
that
she was very dynamicand energized in area ofacademic change at the college.Discussing her impact upon theCatholicity
of
r
Salve
ReginaCollege, this person stated thatshe had not only perpetuated it,she had emphasized
it.
^
£Following this*"conversation
wethen called
Che
College of St.Benedict to discuss Miller's termas
president. This individualftad
served
under MUler-during herpresidency of
the
college.
Describing Miller as an
"ex-
tremely efficient administrator,"
tip
said,
that
before-Mtttetehad
arrived at the college,
h
theCollege of
SO
Benedict was
only
locally recognized in the state ofMinnesota. This
1
administratorclaims? that the college
now
boasts
students?from
40
statesand
17
countries,
and that thecollege is nationally
known.*.-_,:•{
'•We asked if there were
any
weaknesses or negative
aspects
to Dr.
Miller's
administration.
Hetold
.US
that perhaps the onlyglaring weakness in the makeupof Miller was her tendency to be
"officious,"or
unduly forward inoffering her services and advice.-Following up on that statementthe
-administrator
Was Quick to
~add,
however,-that
"Dr. Miller
Eran
a
iBrjQi^Rt
ship."
"»
-
f^HefeltthatDr.
Miller
would
doan
exceUerffjob
as president at
Merc^tarstT'lf
given the
fop-
port unity. £
Staying within the realm of thecollege we then talked to the anadministrator who had been astudent at the
J'College
of St.Benedict during Dr. Miller'sadministration. This person
wasted little
time in
giving
herevaluation. She stated that Dr.Miller had done an effective jobduring her administration at the
college;
This
person
felt
that oneof the most notable things thatshe
had
done during
her five-yearterm was develop the consortiumbetween the College of St.Benedict, an all-girls institution,and St. John's, an all-male
colleger
' *
\M
The administrator felt that oneof the weaknesses of Dr. Miller'sterm had been a general lack of
avaiTability-to
the student
body.
Walled off by
the tformei?
president's
office,
this personstated that Dr. MUler was onlyavailable to the students
during
two hours of each week.
f.
However, when
3
asked how
Letter
* *
-a
 
Student Knocks Snackbar
Dear Editor
L
I
would like to speak out on an
Injustice
brought to us, thecommuters, by the Hotel,Restaurant 'ManagementDepartment. The taking over ofthe Union Snack Bar by theH.R.M. has brought a great in-convenience to the StudentBody.
i
I feel
deprived
of a servicefrom last year in order that theH.R.M. make a mockery out of avery important Student Service.Why should we have to sufferbecause
of
t
the UnqualifiedPersonnel, unorganized hours,and lack of food supplies?It was my belief that the UnionSnack Bar was to serve thestudents who did not eat in thecafeteria an adequate meal in
the morning
and
between classes.
It is
very
frustrating
to
ask
for an
order and only recieve the same
old
answer, "I'm sorry but wedon't have any", or if the
Snack
Bar
does"
manage to whip upsomething it hardly resembleswhat
you
ordered in the firstplace. It makes me
mad
when Ithink of all the times I want a
breakfast
early in the morningbefore class, only to findj theSnack Bar unopened.
vc£
S
M
Last year the Snack Bar was
run
a lot better then this year, so
why
should
we have
to
suffer thisyear due to the
inexperience;
lack of organization, and abilityto order enough food supplies.I hope that you will print thisletter so the students know how Iand a great many other studentsfeel about this injustice.
&3p*$
Sincerely,Lawrence Lee Johns
%
Caoado,?/
iWffaoUiethQMtfrx
"TKtrc<
*
vta'c
{****
^ rf
ffo
ur
disposal
kjhfik about Tftsrti
? £a*»o^?
Qtct&ittut
fit*ut!
Boycott??
|
DorfMtamember
5^y«j
cu/wjI 3
about
<*.
boy<dt.
jjjgjj j£ Ej Ed
student attitudes were
during
theformer president's term, thisperson said that they were verygood and that student in-volvement was
high,
£ t
£m
It was here that we closed ourinvestigation of Dr. Miller.In our search for informationconcerning Dr. Gerald Burns, wecalled Our Lady of the LakeUniversity
in San
Antonio,
Texas.While we were unable to contacta student at the time (out of
session),
we did have an op-portunity to talk with three ad-ministrators at the college. |
The
first one
was
quick
to
statethat Dr. Burns was an efficientadministrator who had done anumber of things
in
promotingthe growth of the college. Henoted the weekend college which
Burns
had
taken
an
active part indeveloping.
This ^enabled
thoseuanble to attend college full-timeobtain a degree through Saturdayand Sunday classes.In our second conversation wetalked
with
an
administrator that
had
served
in a
different capacityduring the Burns administration.
This
individual
stated-that
theformer president had beengenerally
effective?
and
had in-troduced ideas for growth that
were
new to
those
who
had
servedat the college before his arrival.
£}The
alert and dynamic ad-ministrator, this person stated,was not not always attentive,however, to the real needs of the
college.
Stating that Burns didnot,
in
their opinion, look at thesituation of the college, thisadministrator felt that he camein with a
pre-conceived
notion ofwhat he was going to do. Goingfurther
it
was stated that
this
hadan
unsettling!
influence on
faculty,
J
1*
% .
* In our third conversation, wewere told that
following
an ad-ministration in which thepresident
had
been
very laid backand relaxed,/Burns changedthings with a very creative anddynamic approach. This wasreflected, we were told, in somevery
innovative
changes such asthe college's acquisition ofuniversity status. ; i
However,
once again it wasstated that the
changes!had
asomewhat adverse effect upon anumber of
facultyfand
ad-ministrators. It may be notedthat Our Lady of the LakeUniversity
is
operated
and
ownedby the
Sisters
-c#~the-
Order*of
Divine
Providence.5Some
of
Burns'
ideas
2
were not con-sidered as consistent with the
originals philosophy
2
of thecollege.
5
I
*
We
were told that Burns was astrong advocate of student in-volvement in the governance ofthe college, employing studentrepresentation on the Board of
Trustees.
His involvement of thestudent body went into the arenaof admissions where he en-
couraged students
to
be "market-oriented" bringing new moneyinto the college. 'Describing Burns as a strongadministrator
who
was willing tolake risks,
this?
administratorfound that he
moved
too quicklywhich irritated a number offaculty at the
college.
>
*
K
This concludes our search.We feel that the views ex-pressed
have been
very
open,
andwe thank those individuals whoassisted us in our search. Theidentities of our sources willremain unknown as was agreed
to
before they
consented
to
speakjo us.
} I
It?
should be emphasized thatthese views have pot beensolicited to lessen nor improve
the chances
of
/anyone
being
named
to
#
the
office^
of the
presidency*W6 do TMJfSee' !f"Ss
our responsibility to endorse a
candidate!
our responsibility hasbeen to present the backgroundsof each candidate as viewed byrandom sources.
Outlook
'80
- Jimmy Carter
After four years of on-the-jobtraining, Jimmy Carter has
acquired some
savvy of
the
gameof politics as it is played on theinside,
and he
is
using every
bit
of
it in his bid for
re-nomination
by(he Democratic party.Carter, who contended that anoutsider was needed in the WhiteHouse in 76, is acting like acareer insider in '80. He is notadverse to granting favors to
friends,
punishing enemies, oractively courting those strad-dling the fence. It remains to beseen if Carter has learned thetricks of the trade
In
time
to
helphim survive the challenges he is
facing.
i j ^
The challenges are on several
fronts.
Obviously, Teddy Ken-
nedy
and
Jerry
Brown are
forces
to
be
reckoned
with,
although
the
polls show Kennedy slipping
Badly, and
Brown
choosing
*to
withdraw
from
the
Iowa precinctcaucuses for lack of support.Still,
there-
is considerable un-
certainty
as
to how
strong Carteris
outside
his native
south,
and itis up to Carter to eliminate thecompetition, as neither
Kennedy
nor Brown can be counted on tobow out gracefully.
M
Aside
from J
his fellow can-
didates,
Carter
'is
campaigningon a record that is less than
illustrious.
His mismanagementof the dual problems of inflationand unemployment has not en-
REVERBERATIONS e
y
n*.
(by Mike PhilipsAt the M.S.G. meeting lastMonday (1-21-80), somethinghappened that should raise a feweyebrows and shake up the"apathetic" label so easilyslapped on
'Hurst
students:
FourMercyhurst students presented apetition to
»
M.S.G. and
its
President that, by the time you
read
this,
will
have
300
signatures
on
it 2 I
.
%J
The last time student supportlike that surfaced
was 1970,
whenthe leadership of the students
mobilized
j*
them to play
a
im-
portant |role in changing thecurriculum of the college. Thatpetition had
500
signatures on it.That was power.
t
The petition just recentlycirculated expressed
strong
advocacy of the
candidacy
of Dr.William P. Garvey as the nextPresident of Mercyhurst College.I wonder if anyone realizes thepower those 300 signatures
represent;, 1
X
%
fWJV».
Lets say half of the studentswho took
the
time and caredenough to attach their signaturesto the petition decided to take awalk if their statement isignored. By "Take A Walk", Imean split, exit, boogie, LEAVE.
g-That
would?mean
that Mer-cyhurst College, a school thatsuffered one of the worst budjetdeficets in its history duringfiscal
78-79,
a school that runs on85 student tuition,} would beforced to operate missing 150students
tuition.?A
Even though I
j
failed mathinsights,
I can
still preform basicmultiplication. Lets see now,
ISOx
| $3,000.00 (tuition) equals$450,000.00 (WOW!).* And thatonly represents half of thestudents who signed the petition.Take
away
those kind of bucksfrom
the
operating
budjet
and
thesign on the
front
gates will
read:
GANNON
f
BRANCH CAMPUS.Think about that* one for awhile.
%
deared him to the generalpopulace, and George
Meany,
thelate president of the
AFL-CIO
was a staunch critic of Carter.Yet Carter is still claiming to bethe man for the people, pointingout his victories over Congress in
the last four years.
Among*
these "victories"Carter counts the Panama Canaltreaty, his energy package, thedevelopment of the Departmentof Education, and hospital cost
containment.
He may have
gotten these bills through, but inmost cases that is the only senseto which the term "victory" isappropriate. The canal
treaty
was
passed
by
a hairbreadth, andsupport from the electorate forthe treaty
was^split
50-50. His
energy
package was so watered
down
1
as to be almost
unrecognizable,
and neither theDepartment of Education norhospital cost containment can foecited as burning issues in theeyes of the electorate. Thus
itappears
that
it?
will be difficultfor Carter to campaign on themerits *of his domesticachievements.
>y.'
v
-^
Fortunately, however, Cartercan point to his role in obtainingthe Egyptian-Israeli accords.although. Israel's occasionalbelligerence still leaves Carteropen
to
criticism. His handling ofthe Russians in Afghanistan andhis cool handling of the Iraniancrisis have caused people
to
rally
around him, and carter is wellaware of this| Opponents have
accused
Carter of "wearing aflag on
the;
campaign trail";these charges Carter has notpublicly responded to. In fact, itoften has not been necessary forCarter to respond; often thesecritics are viewed as being
un-
patriotic and petty in a time of
crisis.
If he continues to play his
I
.
- ; Continued
on
page 3
 
January 25,
1980
Survey Shows
M^^^B^S™^^ffi^g||B
1
Students Support Garvey
ft
Indicating
a
strong interna 1 preference,
a
majority of
'HUT-
yst students stated that Dr. William Garvey was their choice Bfor
the
college presidency
in a
random poll
of
100 students
^
conducted by The Merciad.Garvey's closest competition, however, was the combined
5|
total
of
students who didn't know who the candidates were
^
and those students who were unsure
of
their vote. Garveyreceived
a
31
per
cent show
of
student support which was
3
followed closely with 30 per cent
of
students who were unin-
£
formed and indecisive.
ijf*
*
With 21 per cent of the student vote, Dr. Beverly Miller was Ithe next contender. Eighty-three per cent of Dr. Miller's sup-
port came from the female students in on campus.
fl
The remaining 20
per
cent
of
students divided their vote
1
between Dr. William Cassell and Dr. Gerald Burns, who gar-nered13 per cent and 7 percent respectively.
W*t
The poll was conducted after all four candidates had been Binterviewed on campus. However,
as
might
be
indicated
by
Ithe 30
per
cent
of
students unaware and unsure
of the
can-
.
didates, the majority may still be silent.
\
"S
THE
MERGIADPage
3
«lf
he Inquiring Reporter Asks:
| ^S^fe^^^^^S
m
W^&
"What should we look for in bur new president
»^**^
Anita Bonaminiol.
..
Someonewho has experience
in
educationand public affairs. This personshould have strong interpersonalskills.
&•&%& <£
i
;---«S
X
:
:"*
Diane Dippold
... An
honest,sincere person that
has
leader-ship qualities and initiative to getthings done. -si
Wolves
On Campus?!
To whom
did a
little
pig
say,"Not
by the
hair
on my
chinnychin chin?"
Why the Big, Bad
W«»|f
of
course,
and
Mercyhurststudents will
be
presented withthe unique opportunity
of
lear-ning more about this interesting
animal.
'
'*%
J *g
«*;
Nancy Snyder,* an expert
on
wolves and their behavior, will bea guest lecturer in Andy Martin'sWildlife Management course."If there
is
anyone interestedin sitting
in on the
lecture, theyare more than welcome," saidGame Protector Martin>I don'tanticipate
any
problems.""Hopefully
Mrs.
Snyder willhave
a
wolf with
her," he
con-tinued.
"It
depends .von
the
temperament
of the
animal
at
the time."
*
f
The lecture
t
is
scheduled forJanuary 29 in 114 Zurn Hall at
6:00
p.fti.
SSfeaL*
Community I
Calendar
January 25
-
Friday
'%
7:30 p.m.
-
Bayfront Orchestra Free Performance.
St.
Patrick'sChurch. 130East 10th St. «#•<**•-* o 4
•*.-''.
January 26
-
Saturday7:30 p.m. - The Single Set
at
Nunzi's, 1523 Bast 38th St. Dancing
to
follow at Cesare Battisti Club. For reservation call 833-5780.
7:00
p.m.
-
Mass in Campus Ministry Office.8:00 p.m. - Basketball game. Mercyhurst vs. Waynesburg
in
Cam-pus Center£F*£ >11:00 p.m.
-
McDowell ClassPlay. "You Can't Take
It
With You."McDowell Intermediate Little Theater. Tickets available
at the
door.
-^
»
^
J a nuary 27
-
Sunday |T11 a.m. - Mass in the Chapel.7 and
9
p.m.
-
Movie, "That's Entertainment". Zurn Recital Hall.
$.50
at door, $.25 in advance.Ja nuary28
Monday
8 p.m. - Basketball. Mercyhurst vs. Edinboro at the Campus Cen-ter.
^ ^ J
:
; }
\
January 29 •
Tuesdav2:30 - Coffee Hour at Campus Ministry Office. David Blanchfieldspeaks "Moral Theology: Vatican II."
4:30p.m.-Mass
in
the Campus Ministry
Office.
8 p.m.
-
Prayer meeting. Campus Ministry Office.
8 p.m.-10p.m.
-
Dr. Wilson Bryan Key will speak on"SubliminalSeduction". Zurn Recital Hall. Admission free
to
'Hurst students.$.50 to other students and $1.00 for adults.10-12 p.m. - Michael Lewis. Back Porch Cafe. Admission
$.50£
January 30
-
Wednesday4:30 p.m.
-
Mass Campus Ministry Office.9 p.m. -11 p.m. - Michael Lewis. Back Porch Cafe. Admission $.50.January 31
-
Thursdav
m
4:30 p.m.- Mass in Campus Ministry Office. $8 p.m.
-
Basketball game. Mercyhurst vs. Gannon
at
the Erie Coun-ty Fieldhouse.Februa ry 1 - Friday
*
6:30 p.m.
-
Folk Group Practice. Campus Ministry Office.8 p.m.
-
Adult Singles Association. The Unitarian Society. 7180 NewPerry Highway. For more information call 456-1435.
W.B.
Key ToLecture AtThe Hurst
How do
advertisers manipulatethe consumer's senses? Whattechniques are
<fem
ployed toarouse
the
sexuality ofprospective consumers?These questions will be dealtwith on Tuesday, January 29, asSAC presents an
evening with
Wilson Bryan "Key, a lecturingauthority on subliminalseduction in advertising.
C
Key has authored two books onthe subject,
" Mediaj
Sex-ploitation and " SubliminalSeduction.
"^The
latter isfrequenty 'used in businesscourses here on campus.
'
r
\
Key's lecture will be held at8:00 p.m. in
Zurn
Recital Hall.Admission will be free to Mer-cyhurst students with iden-tification. All other students
will
be
charged $.50 and Adults $1.00.
Outlook ,;
m
Cont. from page 2
cards right, the;Russians
and
Iranians
may be the
best
\
thingthat could possibly happen
to
Jimmy Carter.
Yet his
foreignaffairs record has i also beenmarred
by
bitter debate over theSalt
II
treaty
and
critics
are
quick
to
point
out
Carter'snaivete towards
the
Russianswhile fighting vigorously
for
Salt
II.
v
By
no
stretch
of
fineimagination
can
Carter's can-didacy
be
labeled impressive.But then, Carter's opponents
are
exhibiting less than stellar can-didacies themselves.
If
Carterdoes
win the nod, it may
welldue more
to his
opponents'liabilities than his own assets.
F-
»
J
CIVILIAN CABINETThe first all-civilian cabinetsince
the 1967
military coupwas installed
in
Greece
on
Oct.8,1973. » '4 lftW£
~:\
.17.
P
:w*
\
\
*>»
DebbieChilcott
... A
strongleader with
*
understanding
of
students and their needs.
^:
KathvLowrv
.
. v Ditto.
'
-..
t&WT
^H.
"Snake"
Raillv ^
.
.d
Someonewho'll get things done and whowill
be
a servant
to
the students.Dr.Plain-
leader!
t-
An
ACAlftMM
Photos by Steve FrisinaAt MSG Meeting
Presidential Candidates Discussed
The January
27
meeting
of the
McTcvhurst Student Governmentbegan with
the
governmentpassing
the
November
and
December budgets.
A
lengthydiscussion
on the
fourpresidential candidates followed.The November budget totaled$3,937.97. while December tallied$5,421 HI- Both budgets passedwith a unanimous vote.Next, there was
a
considerabledebate between
the
represen-tatives concerning
the
fourpresidential candidates.Amongthose
who
expressed
Attitudes
cont. from page 1
students
and
faculty should
not
he permitted
to
serve
as
grouprepresentatives
to the
Board
of
Trustees.Carrying £ over
the
idea
of
protecting individuals from legalliability. Miller felt that
the
administration should have
the
right of censorship over school-funded publications such
as the
newspaper. Stating thattheadministration would
be
heldliable
for any
liabelous materialor articles printed, such
a
rightwould
be
necessary.When asked about
her
academic policies, Miller statedthat
she
could exist very com-fortably with
any
direction that(he college would take
as it was
passed down
by the
Board
of
Trustees.
She did
feel, however,that it
I
was important that'sheplay
a
vital role
in
com-municating
the
desires
of
students, faculty
and
^ad-ministrators
to the
board.With
the
presentations
now
completed,
the
PresidentialSearch Committee will now meetto finalize their decision
as to the
new president
of
the? college.Their recommendations will
be
given
to the
Board
of
Trusteeswho will make the final choice onJanuary 29.
t
*ftfcc*2
v
.-..« <•opinions. Dr. William Garvey andl)i Beverly Miller appeared
to
be
the
student favorites
for the
position.
History
representative Tim
K««sarsky
presented a student
petition
in favor of Garvey to the
government
towards the end ofthe discussion. The petition had
'MM)
names on it, which roughly
I
represents 25% of the studentbody.
'
-
./'
Following this action, the co-el
<iirpersons
of the Activity DayCommittee,
Jo Ann
Alexanderand John Chrzanowski, an-nounced the committee's first
open
meeting. The meeting,which
will
establish ground rules,will be held January 24 at 7:30p.n
.
in the Student Union. Themeeting is open to
the
Mer-
evl'urst
community.Next on the agenda wasTreasurer Jim . Bolger'spresentation of the quarterly
budget.
"This
is just to show how
we
stand." he
explained.;
In new business, the formation
f two clubs was announced.
Itehemi
Martin explained the
creation
of Peopleglow-,
a
campussociety interested in community
sci
vice
projects:
3
We'd like to establish our-
selvcs.as
an individual entity oncampus," added Martin. fc&
a
fcj&As
their ^
first project,
I Voplenlow
is planning a variety
slew at the
Veterans Hospital on
•February
16.
Any member of theMercyhurst community wishingto be involved is asked to leave amessage in Box
45
of the campus
n
ailroom..
.,*
....
.;„^
&
In
. conclusion,* John
(I'ry/.anowski ..informed
the
government
of a Racket ball club
recently
formed on campus.
Interested
students should
|contact
the Campus
Center.
^
STAFF-BOXEditor-in-Chief .. Steve FrisinaAssistant
Editor.7-..
fX
..*
*.'..
.
Rebecca L. MartinLiterary Editor.
.^,.
J
_
^^L
.^.
^^.J^^-.
Bonnie
Jame
-
*— -•
i*
*• *
f*
»
Sports Editors.
.......
Russ Wilheim, Tony ArcabascioBusiness Manager >...: ,V.
:
. John ChryzanowskiTypists
j..
Carla Gasperella. Shannon FeenyPhotos
'.
Tony MangeriStaff Mary Collins, Michael Phillips, Mary Manross.
J.
Linda First, Walt Green, MaryJTBeth Barrett,
and
Barb Burbules.
^
«Cartoonists
,';*...........
Jainie Borowicz and Chris McGowanFaculty Advisor *..»,*d
-...
j ^William Shelley
MERCY-ADS NEW RATES
$.25 for up to
10
wordsan additional $.25 after
10
words
Box 918
r
Mailroom
.£
Preston

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