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The Merciad, Feb. 15, 1980

The Merciad, Feb. 15, 1980

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Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, Feb. 15, 1980
The Merciad, Feb. 15, 1980

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06/26/2012

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Merciad Interview
1
*
Q:
What b the
1 Mercy
hurstMystique?
3& sRxifc
A:
WelU've
always referred
to
itas
a
feeling of specialty
about the
college
that lit
was somethingdifferent, that it had destiny tofulfill which it could become oneof the really strong, not greatcolleges in the country and thefeeling that it was not just thesmall liberal arts college. I guessthat is where the word
specialty
comes from. Those of us thathave bought into it for a numberof
years have always
felt that thiswas
more
than another
one
of the
2,000
colleges-but not justbecause
we
were
here, because
a
number
of
us could have been atany other college. We felt therewas a feeling of a particulardestiny
to
this
institution
and
thatthere were special elements thatmade it
different.
} i
SEr
Q: Many
of
the students
were
learning
toff,
walk when youbegan your career here,
t
Whyhave*,
you I
remained
§
at
I
thecollege so long?!
jS
| 9A: For one thing the college hasprovided me with a number ofexperiences for growth.
I
was thechairman of education for fiveyears. I was director of
the
social
science division for three. I wasthe dean for six,
and
then when Icame back after a year I wasdirector of the
graduate
programfor "two. So the
\
college
hasprovided me with a wide varietyof experiences which werechallenging and creative, and I
liked
it. I
like the place. Maybe itis because of the mystique wediscussed. Also, I prefer a smallliberal arts college such as this. I
had
other
offers, but
frankly
I
feltMercyhurst had more
to
offer.
If
you want to teach, this is a goodschool to teach at. It is a prettyclimate, the students are verystimulating and it is just a goodplace to teach at.
ja& $3
Q: You had mentioned increasedfaculty morale as a major
ob-
jective.
How
do you see thishap-
pening?? ^sW
c
TCA: Well, there definitely has be-en a faculty morale problem.But, that is not because this isnot a good place to teach at. It'salways been a good place toteach at. But for
the
last two orthree years the concerns overthe governance of the collegehave pushed teaching
into
'*
thebackground.
|
That's notnecessarily the faculty's fault,nor
the t
administration, it was
something'that
happened duringthe transition of the college. Ifyou talk to faculty it is the ad-ministration's fault
and
"if youtalk to
administration
4
it's
thefaculty's fault. From my point ofview it
wast
the transitional
situation'the
{institution.* Themorale question came from thefact that
the
faculty
members
feltless and less professional collegefaculty and mOre and more like
high
school teachers. We're
not
apublish or perish college,. Ourfaculty need to be much moreinvolved
than
high school faculty,but I think that in the past fewyears the faculty got derailed on
governance?
rather thanprofessional questions,
and
didn'tlike it, and their growth wasn'twhat it should have been. So Iintend to encourage the facultyand to assist them in anyway Ican to once again becomecreatively professional. This
includes
more involvement ingrant publication and research.Q: How do you view theproposed program review?A; I have some grave concernsabout it. I think the burden ofproof for cutting programs restson the
-shoulders
of the ad-ministration and I think thatmessage has not been fullyconveyed. While I think the cutswere carried out according to amandate laid
down
by the Board
ofTrustees
to
make such
changesContinued
on
page
5
a
student
publication
VOLUME 50 NO.
15
MERCYHURST COLLEGEFEBRUARY 15,
1980
Shane ReconsidersMadeBoardProposalsTrustees
Doing an about-face in light of
the
academic upheaval
caused
by
the recent program review, Dr.Shane stated, in a memo read tothe Senate| that
the ,*
proposedprogram recommendations willnot be made to the Board ofTrustees.
4
This message, read' at the
Peteruqry
11th Senate
meeting,
^^
ed what was supposed tobe a review
cf-Fthe
Senateresolution which rejected thepresident's proposals recom-mending the dropping of geology,political science and theatre artsas major programs in
the
collegecurriculum.
n
In an interview with TheMerciad,
Dr.
Shane
stated that hefelt it
would
be
in the
best interestof the institution if responsibilityfor the reallocation of collegeresources was placed in thehands of the
president-elect,
Dr
v
William P.* Garvey.Dr. Shane pointed out that Dr.Garvey concurred with him inthis matter, referring to a recentmeeting held with the
president-
elect. Garvey was not available
Eqan Scholar Program
>
for comment.The decision not to make therecommendations culminates aneventful two week period inwhich faculty and student bodiestook steps to delay and deter themaking of the program recom-mendations to the board. One
Dr.
Marian Shanestudent
group initiated a petitionwhich threatened the loss of jstudents if the recommendationswere
approved
by the board.Faculty, acting through thecollege Senate, attempted todelay the presentation date untilthey had an opportunity to react
to
it. Receiving
a
two-week graceperiod from the board, meetingswere neid and the resolutionrejecting
Che
cutting of the afore-mentioned programs was drawn.The resolution, however, hasbecome useless in
light-of
themoot topic.
£
Shane emphasized that thedecision not to propose was not acompromise. He feels that suchchanges need to be made in thecurrent curriculum which offersover
30
majors, claiming that thecollege does not have a sufficientecomomic base to effectivelysupport all of them.
k
He stated, however, that suchchanges could be handled by theincoming president
who
would bebetter prepared to face theconsequences of self inplementedchange.
Hurst Profs ShedInternational ConflictRoots
|
j;
by Walt Green
Proffering the point of viewthat
perhaps}
the
United -
Statesmay be taking the wrong courseof action in its internationalcrises in Iran and Afghanistan,four Mercyhurst professorsdiscussed
the
American plight asthe
r
Egan Scholars presented,"America and Iran: Roots of theConflict" Monday night in thefaculty lounge.The panel, comprised of Dr.David Bethune and Dr. MichaelErisman
.'from
the PoliticalScience department, Dr. GeorgeGarrelts from the Theologydepartment, and Dr. MichaelMcQuillen, chairman of theSocial Sciences division
and-a
member of the History depart-ment, addressed the crowd of 60on topics ranging from Sovietimplications to theologicalmisconceptions of Islam.Opening the discussion withremarks concerning the effectthe crises have had on PresidentCarter's domestic policy, Dr.Bethune stated that
the
Presidentlas "overreacted," especially tothe situation in Afghanistan.Noting that George Kennan,long-time analyst of Soviet af-fairs,has described the Russianinvasion of Afghanistan as adefensive reaction to an unstableborder situation, Bethune
f felt
that it was difficult to
justify
the
hard line
the President has takenthus far."Carter* has responded tooquickly to the Russian invasion,"Bethune stated,"and the reactionon the homefront seem to in-dicate that the American peoplehave yet to fully learn the lessonof Vietnam.
>
/Bethune criticized Carter forretreating into the White House
and
avoiding
debate when
debateis essential
not
only
for achievinga
sensible $ policy
I
toward theSoviets, but also to help gain anunderstanding of the roots of theconflict, with Iran. Withoutdebate, Bethune felt that the"fallacy and criminality" ofAmerican foreign policy in Irancould never be corrected.Bethune concluded
his
remarks
•>y
stating that the President'sactions thus far have been in-fluenced by the "bellicosity" ofnational security advisorZbigniew Brzezinski.
**
Focusing on the Russianreaction to the Iranian crisis, Dr.
McQuillen
stated that contrary to
popular
opinion, the leadership inthe Kremlin and Politburo are"deeply disturbed" by
the
turn
of
events In Irang
McQuillen further held that theSoviets were much happier withthe position of Iran under theShah. Although he has been astrong ally of the west, the Shahnever permitted Americanmilitary bases in Iran, and hisstrong leadership maintainedstability along the Soviet'ssouthern border on Iran.
4
\p
:
"The
Soviets were caught bysurprise'in Iran," McQuillenContinued on page 5"Spring's Around TheCorner"
MS6 Economizes On
Acts:
Martin's
SettiSettimi's
Out
During the February 11meeting of student governmentthe MSG voted to brinecomedian-juggler MichaelMarlin to the college for one dayof scheduled performances.The
student
represetativesarrived at this decision followinga week of
consideration
of aproposal presented by
SAC
at theFebruary
4
meeting. The originalproposal included two days ofperformances by Marlin and
mime
Tim
Settimi.
The
projectedprice for both performers wasaproximately $2,300.
«
{
tInfluenced by
high
cost
and
thefamiliarity of Settimi
on
campus,the government decided to spon-
sor
Mike Marlin.In other action, reprimandswere the order of the day as theofficers confronted the represen-tatives
with what they
felt was anapparent lack of involvement inevents affecting
the
college com-munity.
{!
Jg
Vice-president JoAnn Alexan-der criticized the representativesfor not taking an active part inthe preparation of Activity Day.Alexander pointed out that at thelast Activity Day meeting onlyfour of the nine people attendingwere representatives.
;*"
Disputing the claims that it is"too early" to begin active plan-ning ofthe*event, Alexanderstated, "We want to get thingsstarted
now."
*
&£#&
The next Activity Day meeting
will be
held February
24 at
7:00
in
the student union, I'd
appreciatesome
input,"
added
Alexander.^ •"Activity Davis
just
one part,"continued MSG president TimSeltzer.
^'Another
problem is theprogram review." Seltzer wasrefering to the poor represen-tative attendance at a student
senate
meeting scheduled for thediscussion of program review."You've got to realize," ad-monished Seltzer," we've got a
job to
do
here."
k %*&
<
Newly appointed Historyrepresentative
Tim
Kosarsky ex-pressed disappointment towardswhat he percieved as an absenceof representation
i
among therepresentatives.
Y
He
also felt
the
representativeswere remiss in failing to solicithis opinions concerning his thententative position as a MSGrepresentative. "For me it un-derscored the seriousness of theposition," stated
Kosarsky.
£
In . other
i
business, SACpresident Jim DiSanti presenteda proposal of a Spring Weekendthat would take place in con-
duction with
the
Spring
Formal.DiSanti cited the possiblity ofContinued on page
5
1 INSIDE
Editorials
\
2Popcorn
V
Profundities 3Seltzer Interview ... .
|3
The
80/s 2
4
Financial
Aid &4
Comm. Calendar 6Sports
X*S
t8
 
PAGE
2THE MERCIADFEBRUARY 15, 1980
----'-
Change Is
In
The Air
For
those
of
us
that are comingback to Mercyhurst next fall,there may be a surprise waitingfor
us tin
the registrar's officewhen we decide to sign up forclasses.
"&;
For one, if one is not careful,she-he might find themselves atthe college a week before theyare due. While Mercyhurst hasalways been a late starter as faras
classes
\
are
concerned, nostudent has ever
had to wait
untilSeptember 22. At least not yet.Another factor that may not bethat detectable is that studentswill be registering for
12
Credits.Many students might retort,"What's so unusual about
that?
By taking four classes in the fallI can work during intersession."The third factor may relievestudents of that option. This mayhave been the last year that in-tersession existed.
Next
week thedean is presenting a proposal to
do
away with intersession and
in
its place institute a 12-week termt hat would let out the same
time
as intersession does now forChristmas vacation.
M
Students would take fourclasses during the extended
fall
term. Four classes. Is anyonesatisfied with the amount of time(10 weeks) that'we, presently
have
to take a course in? Ifstudents presently
are
hurting for
time
do they think that two moreweeks would facilitate threeclasses effectively, let alonefour?*
i&dfcjt
Maybe they would, maybe theywouldn't. The variable in thiscase is the student. An importantvariable mind
you.Jl
Jg|
How is this
going
to affect
thosestudents that rely on intersessionas a means for earning moneyduring the holiday season?Where a student would normallybe going to one class five days a
week!
she-he
might find them-selves
studying
for four finals ata time when holiday
money;'is
ripe for the students' picking.With four finals, or even three,
there
may
not
be time for holidayjobs.| I
t
What about athletics? Will thefall sports be able to begin theirseasons as early as they
do
now?With cross country
and .soccer
both beginning their seasons inearly-middle fall, will such achange
>be
a benefit or a
detriment?
What are the advantages ofeliminating intersession? What
a ret
the benefits? These
«arequestions
each of us is going tohave
J to
answer for ourselvesbecause there may not be anymajority response. This is a timewhen students
must
voice theiropinions.The college student is not atennis, ball to be served andvolleyed.
In
this case
intersession
may have played a role in astudent's coming to MercyhurstIf
this
is the case, student input isimportant. And it always
^has
beenv*
JL
Hfrt
*V#
Vet Questions
Weissman'si
Ideals
To the Editor;Being a veteran of the armedforces,
I
felt compelled to givemy opinion on Beatrice A.Weiss
man's
letter to the editor.Although
I
am far from being aCarter supporter, I stronglyagree
with
some of his proposals.In 1973when,Mr. Carter waspromising reduced militaryspending, detente was the
order
of
the
day.
The "big
bear" was alltoo eager to talk of the SALTTREATY, grain deals, ourtechnology and dissidentpolicies. They even went so faras to host the Olympics of 1980.
"What
kind of Russia was this?"we asked ourselves, as
all ft
hehand shaking and cheek kissingtook place. Well, most of
I
theworld welcomed this softening ofthe usually hard line Soviets.But, poor world, duped again bythe glimmer of a peaceful co-existence of the super powers.Another country, defenseless in
nature as
past countries, grippedby and loss of FREEDOM!History through the ages willagree that nothing more than astrong military defense will in-sure freedom for all peoples agedor young, rich or poor. Ask thepeople in Poland, Afghanistan orCzechoslovakia.
\
9
People say they are scared andworried because revival of the
draft
is
the
first step toward war.They should be scared more for
loss
of freedom. Ask the
people of
Russia what a peaceful protest
is f
and I think they would be"afraid" to answer that.Because of freedom, won byour ancestors, we feel no fear ofreprisal
\
of
i
what we may say
because
we are free to say as wefeel.
|§
f h
*War is
definitely
not the
answer
but p
neither is lying idly bywaiting for talks to happen. Onecannot reason withunreasonables. I think after 95days of dealing
with
maniacs will
prove that at
the right time, forceor military presence may be theonly solution.
§
I am scared and worried, too,Ms.Weissman, but because
I
fearsomeday my children may losewhat we both cherish so deeply,FREEDOM. I respect youropinion and I hope you respectmine.
'•
That's what makes us a soliddiversity of free peoples. I guessI'll have to admit to being ahawk, and hope I'll be entitled tostay that way until IJohn M. Chrzanowski
Student Offers
An
Art
Experience
Dear Editor,
$
Even though I'm studying ArtEducation here at Mercyhurst,my interest lies far beyond justteaching. Hopefully, my futuregoal is to become a free-lanceartist. I would like to trace thehistoric culture of
\
BlackAmericans and do some writingand paintings on the subject forpermanent display.
I
don't like torefer to myself as a
?"black"
artist. I am a "people" artist. Itis also my
ambition |
to depict(through art) the American lifestyle from the radical sixties ondown through the years.One of my favorite artists wasNorman Rockwell. It may seemunfair Ho other more
famousartists for me to say that Rock-well attempted
*
to express hislove for the simple life inAmerica by painting andillustrating
people
caught up inplain! everyday situations. Herealized, like
myself,
that mostevents we take for granted arelater thought of as the happiesttimes in our lives.
I
I have an art show
coming
upFebruary 24 to March 8 in theL.R.C. on campus. Not only artwork will be on display but a lotabout who I am. There will bemusic and dance performed by
our own
dance department. Also,there will be poetry that waswritten by me
and
finally the art
.work
itself.
?This
will includerecent drawings and paintings.
I'm'really
looking forward tosharing this Sunday afternoonreception with as many people asI can.
*
Art is a part of my philosophyof life. It adds to the excitementof discovering where you belongand trying to get there. For thisreason, most people are excitedby things that don't excite me atall. I'm different. Sometimes it'sgood to be different because youfind yourself going in the oppositedirection of everybody else. Youdon't have to worry aboutcompetition and the constantstrain of trying to keep up or getahead of the person in front of
you.
i
4
£ u
Tim Ward
Outlook
'80
- Ted Kennedy
1
fi
H
*
JlJW I
'.M«"-VM»"M.M,M^^.,!
«<j*#9.«;
.<*?***>
WWWmlJWWW^MMWWl'
1
by Dr. Barry Grossman (Editor'sNote: This
is the
ourth
n a
seriesof columns dealing with thisyear's presidential hopefuls,
g
They
are
calling it the "Politicsof Nostalgia" or
"Camelot
Revisited," and columnistGeorge
Will went
so far as
to
saythat it reminded him of the 1948Democratic platform.Choose whatever comparisonyou like, it appears that EdwardM. Kennedy's run for the White
House is
being widely interpretedas a campaign with much hind-sight but
very
little vision.Strange that the only certified"liberal" in the
1980
sweepstakesis being accused of advocatingarchaic governing principles.But to most astute students ofthe presidency, the Kennedycampaign is the culmination ofan evolution and selectivebreeding that hatched the NewDeal, the New Frontier, and theGreat Society. Teddy is perhapsthe last of a political specieswhose family tree is traced to1932 and that patriarch of "BigBrother" government, Franklin
D.
Roosevelt.
4
<
The old Rooseveltian coalitionof labor, intellectuals, blacks,eastern Europeans,, the Irish,poor people, Jews, urbanities,etc.is the fabric
from
}
whichTeddy hopes to weave an Elect-oral College diploma. The bigquestion is whether that coalitionhas any viability left.As
we
embark
into
the 80's, thedelineation between ''liberal"and "conservative" is growingincreasingly obscure. Forexample, how does one classifyJerry Brown? Certainly he andKennedy seem to march to adifferent drum. If by liberal onemeans a person wedded togovernment playing the role ofthe great equalizer
and
funding amyriad of social-welfareprograms, then Kennedy wouldseem to fit the bill.
i
But does Brown then representa new strain of liberalismcharacterized
by
the Proposition-13 mentality
and
%
is shouting"Let's get
the
government off
ourbacks!"?|If
that's^the case,Teddy may be finding himself asthe ghost ofyesteryear];ratherthan the prophet of tomorrow,which is a role entirely alien tothe family legacy.The idealism of Jack and thepassion of Bobby coalesced toform an image of bright-eyed,visionary young Turks as thevanguards of America's future.The torch was suppose
to
pass tothe sole survivor who wouldultimately fulfill the dreamswhich his slain brothers weredenied delivering.Ted Kennedy, haunted by thespectre of an alcoholic spouseand that infamous bridge inMartha's Vineyard, is finding therites of passage much rockierthan was anticipated. A majorproblem has been the absence ofa Nixon-type villain which madehis brothers' "we vs. they" ap-proach so effective.
j
In the 60's
it J
was easy toseparate the guys in the whitehats from the guys in the blackhats. Not so anymore. As satiristTom Wolf recently commented,
''How
do you attack a guy whoruns around wearing picnicclothes and grinning?"
"
Jimmy Carter may be inept,but he is not
hateful.
Although hedoes not inspire, he also does notalienate.
So
the rapid-fire,caustic, high-sounding rhetoric
of
the Camelot years is beingdeflected by an incumbentpresident who (although nobodyis rallying
to
ibis defense)
ap-
pears to have few Americansanxious to preside over hisdemise. 2In fact, most, if not all, of the
hatred
embodied
in the
Americanelectorate is being lavishly spenton our "friend" in Iran. AndTeddy's attempt to redirect thatanimosity to the Shah, Carter,the oil companies, or any otheravailable "enemy" has thus farproven futile.
£
Kennedy is now off
Ulting
withwindmills in
New I
England. Itappears that his campaign could
only be
salvaged, at
this
point, byfactors beyond his
control;
e.g.injury to the hostages, economicdisaster, severe
loss
of face
in
thecurrent
Cold War
showdown, etc.That makes campaigning
dif-
ficult.
^ , 2
These
are times when
trumped-up nationalism pays dividends towhomever the incumbent maybe. Thus, a flag-waving,Ayatollah-hating,
Commie-bait-
ing public is not the rightchemistry for a
Kennedy-style
Sen.
EdwardKennedy
shootout. Teddy's only hope is to
wait for Carter to
fall, unassisted,because to try to knock him offhis horse now, in the face of all ofAmerica's ."enemies," is
not
onlypolitically suicidal but is viewedby some as even traitorous..Edward Kennedy appears
to
bethe only prominent politicianconcerned about the poor, thepowerless and the downtrodden.But his
committment
to these
people has been
obliterated
by
hispersonal liabilities and theworld's exigencies,
j
this is allvery painful for those of us whohad dreams of the 60's ... thedreams of three assassinatedleaders. jBut Teddy faces an Americauninterested| in dreams; anAmerica full of hatred. Perhaps
this
is
the
greatest tragedy of the1980 campaign,
j
rifrra~»rn?«A..............,,,
>
k
.... cm
,,»#»»•»• i»»»,•.
msr!
^vTf.M*'
i«
.:
*
4
 
iUfifc
FEBRUARY15,1980
ITHE
MERCIAD
*?
*6*A^
RAGE
3
Seltzer ClearsThelAir
by Laurie Jo
Kelyma<
nndRebeccaL.Martin
f
In an interview with TheMerciad, MSG
president £
TimSelzter attempted to clarify whathe felt were misunderstandingsarising from an article in theJan.
11,
1980 issue.- Seltzer feltthe article, which concerned thestudent petition for the candidacyof William
P.JGarvey,
did notaccurately convey his message.
jr'I
can't blame the paper
in
anyway/' said Seltzer. "It's just theway it came across."
"It
didn't bother
me as
much asit bothered other people," he
continued.•
That's
why
I'm doingthis (the Interview), I've beentold by other people that I shouldcorrect the wrong that's been
done." j
J
Seltzer, who quoted as sayingthe
Garvey
petition
"means
nothing," believed his quotes"weren't finished."
£
"I commended the people whodid
it,"(the
petition)
he
explained"I know a lot of the signatures
were
very valid and they
had
a lotof force behind them."
However,
Seltzer stated furtherthat there were discrepanciesregarding some of the names onthe petition, which he felt neededclarification,
j
r^
"All I got was a petition withnames on it," said Seltzer. "Whydidn't the names come to me? Iam
a
realperson,I'm
not
a blotchof ink on a piece of paper."He pointed out that only a fewof the people who signed thepetition showed at any of thestudent meetings scheduled forthe specific purpose of studentinput.
33S?^F *P
Continuing, Seltzer stated thatstudents could have reached himpersonally if they were unable toattend the meetings,
j
"I wasavailable," he said. "I
was
tryingto make myself very available."Responding
j
to an editorial(entitled
A
Secret Society? in theJanuary
11,1980 tissue
of TheMerciad, Seltzer attempted
-,to
justify the secretive nature of thepresidential search.
:. •&§?
"Right now I guess I'mdefending the presidential searchcommittee
as a
whole,
but
mainlyfrom the students perspective.>^ He explained that many of thecandidates requested j con-fidentiality
so as
not
to
jeopardizetheir currentfpositions. "Theydidn't
{tell
their present em-ployers that they were seekinganother job."
iS*
"I'm sure people can un-derstand that," continuedSeltzer. "If I was working in a
place
and
looking
for a
better
job,
I wouldn't want to jeopordize thejob I have
now,
If I haven't leastgot a good shot at the other one.That should be understandable."Seltzer also felt that any in-dependent questioning] of thecandidate's campuses couldhave closed doors for the searchcommittee, hindering Ithecommittee's investigation."Since we were the ones thatknew the candidates best andinterviewed them all the waythrough, the responsibility wasleft on our shoulders," he stated."That goes along with the thetoken representation it said The
Merciad,
Jan.
^
11,
1960 betweenfaculty and students."Seltzer stongly denied the idea
REVERBERATIONS
By
Philips
. . And when the
smoke
cleared, there stood Gallagherand the Senate.*^*
lf^
The
preceding might
serve
as a
fitting
conclusion to the past twoweeks. The
chain
r
of eventstriggered by the president'sproposed program reviewprovided an interesting sideshowto what is supposed to be a"higher" education.
'* $
££g
Many people were given achance to shine. In the samelight, many people were given thechance to bury their headsdeeper in the sand. The activistscame out of the closet and thepeople who fear action andchange threw their heels downand
did
their best
mule
imitation.An interesting question toaddress all this is, "Where wasthe student body during thefireworks?" The answer un-fortunately
is,
"nowhere." Someattempts were made to organize,but they were either criticized as"blind action"
or-
met with ayawn.The funny thing about thecriticism
was
that it came from a
group
of people called (for lack
of
better terms) handsitters.Handsitters are those whowatch and might occasionallywrite a letter to The Merciadexpressing their handsittingview. Of course, after they:,
get
through writing, their handsrevert
to
permanent positions onthe underside of their buttocks.You
-should
know that
'The
Merciad had a chance
to
get
into the thick of the programreview controversy. A Merciadstaff member, who had been
effectively
stonewalled by both
the J
president and the
dean
concerning the proposedprogram cuts, wanted to print aspecial sheet informing itheMercyhurst community of thepresident's intention to bypassthe Senate and go directly to theBoard of Trustees with theprogram cuts.The idea was enthusiasticallyreceived at a student meeting,but it
was
met with an editoriallysmug adjustment of eyeglassesfollowed by an upstaging "no."The
* Merciad's
chance tobecome a real "studentpublication" went out the win-dow. The paper will undoubtedlycontinue to wallow
inj
fen-cesitting.
j.
£
Don't blame the students for
being
"nowhere " for
the
past
two
weeks. With handsitters voicingopinions, leadership thatquestions valid expression ofstudent concern, and a studenteditor that fears anything but adreadfully bland celebration ofthe status quo, how can they beanything else?of token representation. "In noway
*was
there
j
any j tokenrepresentation.'^J,
'
S
"To be perfectly honest," hecontinued,
"I'd:
say that studentsand faculty had the biggest voiceon that committee, the loudestvoice for sure."
$g
ISeltzer,
when
asked
how he
feltabout The Merciad, commentedthat the coverage
I
of MSGmeetings had been sparse,
jj:
m
J*
"It used
to be on
page
one,
nowit's on page three," he com-mented. "We're getting pushedback."
M*.
"I
think
MSG has one
of the toppriorities, it should be on page
one,"
he added.
L
Seltzer feels the reporting of
the
student government meetingsis sparse. It doesn't go into thedetails that it should." '3
|
We've had a little problembetween
MSG
and
The
Merciad:*,continued
Seltzer,
^Either
it's alack
of.
communications
or alack of respect, I don't know for
sure."
*5
Seltzer, stating that a numberof people in the MSG had beencomplaining about the meetingcoverage
through-out*the
year,added that
>
he hoped to beworking closer with The Merciadin the future."I'd like to
have
MSG and TheMerciad, since their both the
major;
main studentorganizations on campus,working more closely together;instead of the seeming fight it'sbeen."He
explained J
further thatdifferent
.»people
("My room-mates in particular") hadremarked that it appeared
to be
astruggle for power between MSGand The Merciad.
| [SPf
"I'm
not
struggling for power,"commented Seltzer. "I've stillgot another year
here."
"If
it*,
seems like there's astruggle for power," he con-cluded, "that's a mistake."
m
Black HistoryMonth HereAt The
'Hurst
Mercyhurst College, viaMinorities On The Move, beganthe celebration of Black HistoryMonthon*February 9. Thecelebration, which will highlightnotable achievements by theblack people, will continuethrough the 29th of February.Programs
daring
the monthinclude panel discussions withwell-known black officials fromthe political and
educational
areas.
In addition to this, MinoritiesOn The Move will sponsor agospel hour featuring the ShienkBaptist
.Youth
Choir and theInter-denominational Choir ofErie
on
February
24
at 3:30 p.m.These events will take place at
901
East 5th Street in Erie.Planning
is
also
underway for
a
talent show by the organization.Minorities On The Move hope toexpress their understandings ofblack history through art, music,poetry, and drama.The Mercyhurst community isinvited to attend the eventsscheduled.
Send food
and
medicine
tohungry
and
sick
CAMBODIANREFUGEES
*
THROUGH'
/lintl
FUND
FOR
l/ilflJj
CAMBODIANS
' Kaufmann's
5th Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA
15219
AEA
*
-
Lambda
Epsilon
Delta is planning for the
candlelight initiation
ceremony which willtake place this Sunday, February 17,
1980
at 3:00 p.m. in the Back Porch (Cafe. AllElementary Education Majors are
invited.:Ifyou J
are interested in being initiated pleasecontact
AnnejpelMedico
868-0004, beforeFriday evening.
Popcorri
cptbfuqdities
by Cyclops
By
Cyclops *
Occasionally, one sees a movieso good that
all
by itself
its
can-cels out all the other hours onehas sat alone in the dark waitingfor something to happen. Such amovie is Kramer
vs.
Kramer theDustin Hoffman-Meryl Streepvehicle
currently
screening at the
Millcreek Mall
Cinema.
JJKramer
vs.
Kramer
is a post-feminist film about a male'sdiscovery of those things in thislife that truly
count.
In short, TedKramer is a George Up-and-coming advertising executivewho has managed to totallyignore his wife and son to thepoint where the wife feels thatshe must flee to
preserve ?
hersanity and Ted must ask his son
what
grade he is
in—Ted
havingforgotten.*At the wife's departure,
[
one
braces oneself for the anticipatedfeminist,polemic; however, themovie takes another turn andinstead
follows«^the
gradualdevelopment of
a 1
truly lovingrelationship between father andson, For
Ted
Kramer
is
not someunfeeling cad, but rather a manwho had only temporarilymisplaced his sense of priorities.
When
confronted
by
the choice
of
giving up his son or raising himhimself he naturally chooses thelatter.It is the development of thisfather-son relationship which isthe movie's chief delight, andbasic to this delight is the
brilliance j
of Dustin Hoffman'sfinely nuanced performance asthe harried and sensitive father.In fact, acting of a finely tunedsophistication is at the heart ofKramer
vs.
Kramer's excellence.Hoffman as the father MerylStreep as the mother, JaneAlexander as a solicitous neigh-bor and Justin Henry as the son
are
all a
revelation; even HowardDuff as an all too realisticallyaccurate reptilian lawyer issuperb.
'
If the film has a flaw, it is itsambiguous, if
not
overtly fantasyinspired,
ending
-an
ending whichmust rattle the teeth of bothfeminists and male
;
partisans
a like
and brings nothing to mindso much as any of many "StellaDallas
1
' style weepers of the late30s
and-earlv
40s when
Bette
Davis and Barbara Stanwyck'shearts were, it seems, forever
being
broken. (I would
like
to
tell
you how it ends, but if have
not
yet
seen
it,
I don't want
to
depriveyou of a good cry).
All
in
all,
Kramer vs Kramer isworth the price
of
admission,
andiff
 you catch it at a bargainmatinee, well, then, it's priceless.Unfortunately, the samecannot be said for AmericanGigolo, the Paul Schrader film
starring
Richard Gere andLauren Hutton about theemotional poverty of a BeverlyHills male prostitute who earnshis keep offering lonely, old
women services Welcome Wagon
left
out.^
The film begins on two tracks,both of* which apparently lednowhere, for about
two-thirds
of
the way
through
Schrader
takes
a
third spur into a sado-
masochistic-murder-myst
er
y-
frame-up
subplot not much moreinteresting than your gardenvariety
"Barnaby
Jones"episode.If the film has a strength, it isthe performance of Richard Gereas Julian Kay, the maleprostitute! Gere is sublime atportraying emotional vacuitycompounded
Jby
an arrogantly
aloof
smuggery, all
wrapped
upin the comforting quilt of asurpassing vanity. Gere is on theverge of becoming a great actor,and off of his performances inDays of Heaven ,Yanks, and
now
American
Gigolo
he hasn't muchfurther to go before he joinsHoffman, Nicholson, and Voightin the forefront of American filmactors. To check out thishypothesis, pay especial! at-Continued on page
4
MERCIAD
is now accepting
)
applications for theposition of
EDITOR
For the
1980-81SchoollYear
Apply by March 7 to
either:
"f
William Shelley 222 PrestonSteve
Frisina
Merciad Office

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