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The Merciad, April 25, 1980

The Merciad, April 25, 1980

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Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, April 25, 1980
The Merciad, April 25, 1980

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^^
|a|student I
publication
VOL.
50 NO. 21
MERCYHURST
COLLEGEAPRIL25,1980
52%
Turnout
Seltzer I Re-ElectedIMSGi
Election!
t
Tim Seltzer, |a junior
r
com-munications major, has set aprecedent at the Hurst by beingthe first presidential candidatere-elected to the position.
KS*
of
a!handicap,"?said
Lanzillo."But not one I can't overcome."
In his
position as vice-presidentLanzillo willtake^onf newresponsibilities as chairman ofthe Student Activities Com-mittee.
Jp3 Jg mlrffi
f.
"I hope to keep the same levelof intensity I had
during}
thecampaign in my duties for next
year," he
added.SajE3SiS^
?,
2
Pres.
Tim Seltzer |Br*9
Seltzer is joined by RichLanzillo as
vice-president,
MaryGausman as treasurer, andLinda First as
secretary;
all ofwhom posted impressive {cam-paigns during the
1980-81
elec-
^^
_tions.
&
'
?*
I SSL
I*
1
*
635
-
Mar
y
Gausman
g
"I'm pleased," said
Seltzer,
b
Gausman, elected as next"We have an excellent crew years treasurer, drew the highestcoming in."
j <>?
individual vote
total
'-
of anyIn
his
cafeteria speech, Seltzer candidate. In her cafeteria
explained
t
that
a possible
re-speech
she stressed theelection was part of his campaign responsibilities and duties in-intention
m
the"79-80
,g
felections,volved in the treasurer's office,where he was
elected ••
as ja "It's important tohave*asophomore.
3J§
if
| 4
strong relationship within the
!
&
"It's different from last year,"
government,",
she stated.
W
W
said Seltzer."
"Last year
it was a In the final count Gausman
giant ^step
up.
This
year it's received
325
of
Che 501
votes castanother step forward."John Chrzanowski, one ofSeltzer's opponents in the race,said he felt Seltzer had the ex-perience and vote of confidencefrom the student body.Bob Breslin,
another?
presidential contender agreed on ithe point of experience. "I
feelf
that students
|went '
for knownquality and were afraid tovote!,for the unknown."
$ *
(j^
Seltzer stated
that»he wasW
looking forward to taking
office
W-
next year. "I can pull
everything I
together now," he said.The final vote count gaveSeltzer 224, Breslin 151, and J _Chrzanowski . 125.
'
y
Sec
.
Linda
First TFor
the
second year in a row,
aj
commuter student will accept
the
position of
MSG
secretary.
Junior
communications major
Linda
First will replace
Anita
Bonaminio in that post.During her campaign
First
suggested widening
student!
awareness of the
government
through a newsletter and the
yet
to
be
implemented radio
system.
"I think it's a necessity thatcommunication go further
than
from
secretary
to
represen-
tatives," she said.
.,
First won with 297 votes
to
Denise Ricci's 199.
|
The lowest vote count came]In the race for
vice-president,
from the office of vice-presidentfreshman Rich
Lanzillo
came out in which only
486
students
voted.!
ahead of the two other can- The new officers will assume![didates,
who
were also
freshmen, their duties on May 19 of
this
"Being a
 freshmen
s a little bit year.V. Pres. Rich Lanzillo
KENNEDY
FOR
PRESIDENT
fafcJlA
W
«-
Senator Ted Kennedy, shown here stressing a
point,
turned a sleepy Sunday into a big eventApril
20
at the Campus Center for over
3
t
000.
§
\
SjjjSE al
£" £
3& rS I
Kennedy!
Rallies
At
Thepurst,
Jabs
Carter Administration
Stressing a need for action inlight of current economic anddomestic problems, Senator TedKennedy
addressed £ over
3,000
people Sunday afternoon at the
Mercy
hurst Campus Center.
^The
rally,
which,.served
as aprelude To Tuesday's Penn-sylvania primary, proved to bemixture of criticism and humoraimed
at-issues*ranging
frominflation to the President's "rose
garden"
tactics.The Senator did not let fiveminutes pass before he tore intothe* President's strategy toremain within the confines of theWhite House. Kennedy echoedthat the presidency belongs
"to
the people of the United States."Kennedy, who captured 93 ofthe state's 185 delegates in theTuesday primary, emphasizedthe state of the economy as he
spoke
c
to
the banner-wavingthrongs. He pointed out thatbecause of 50-percent inflation,home owners were beingreplaced by "permanent ren-ters" and that
\
the
elderly's
standard of living was constantlybeing
threatened,
fa Kennedy reached out briefly tostudents during his address,citing
the
proposed financial aidcutbacks as
being
a detriment to
"one
of
the
most valuable naturalresources this country has." Inpointing this out, Kennedystressed that the governmentcould not afford to turn its backon
students.»
The Massachusetts Senator leftno stones unturned as he com-mented on the absence of localpoliticians, Mayor Louis Tullio,who
_
spent the afternoonpreparing
for
the arrival of VicePresident Walter Mondale.Chiding Tullio for catering tothe
;
current administration forfederal grants, Kennedy said"Had the mayor been here today,I would have explained to himhow the system works. Themayor tells me what the
city
needs, and I deliver a speechabout it. The President readsabout it in the newspaper andgives the mayor what it is Italked about."
\ *
The'oil
industry also foundFreshman Mike
Fitzgerald
shows a
pro-Kennedy
slant duringthe Sunday raOy. On the basis of crowd response, Fitzgerald wasnot a minority backer.
^F*v
INSIDE
Editorial,
.f^
..
X
Pg. 2Mind Readings Pg. 4Mercy-Ads Pg. 4Boycott Staged
g*...
Pg.
6Sports Pg. 7
itself the target of a barrage asKennedy
mentioned*
that MobilOil had just acquired the Mon-tgomery
Wards
department storechain. "I wonder how much oilthey are going to find drilling inthe aisles of Montgomery
Wards^he
remarked.
*
The rally proved to be a three-ring circus for
Mercy
hurst as thetelevision networks made theirpresence known
on
campus. NBCfilmed the event for a Tuesdaybroadcast on the Today show.
However,JCBS one-upped
their
competitor!
with a personalitythat almost proved to
be
as muchof a draw as Kennedy.
3
Walter Cronkite, the retiringanchorman on the CBS EveningNews, made an appearance atthe campus center that split theaudience's attention. The crowdswarmed around the -veterannewscaster to shake hands andget his autograph.
Amidst
;
the
excitement,
chants of "Walter forPresident" could be heard:Cronkite smiled
throughout^the
accolades/ |
*\
§
However, in the end the centerring belonged
to
* the 117-year
Senator as the highly-partisancrowd cheered his everystatement. Referring to the factthat Carter supporters had beeninvited
10
the rally, Kennedy said"We invited them to the rallybecause they don't have one
to goto!"
Rebecca
L.
MartinNamed
New
Editor
?
Rebecca MartinCurrent Merciad AssistantEditor Rebecca L. Martin has
been
chosen to serve as Editor-in-Chief for the 198041 academicyear. The selection of Martincomes as a result of a processthat began in early
February.
Martin, a sophomore Englishmajor, was one of three can-didates vying for the position, aposition that carries a
full
tuitionstipend. Among the other ap-plicants
for
v
the
position wereKevin Downey and
t
ColleenHottel.
TS
| As assistant editor Martin wasresponsible for coverage of allMercyhurst Student Governmentmeetings this year, as well asmuch of
the
feature coverage andphysical design of the paper.In her new position Martin willspend a great deal of timegathering new staff for the
20ming
academic year. With thenewspaper losing only one of its
Staff
members this year, Martinfeels
thai
she will be able to
"etain
much of the current
staff.
In her interview with theselection committee, Martinpresented proposals which shefelt would increase both contentand circulation of the newspaperfor
"the
coming
year.
Amongthose ideas were a subscriptionservice for alumni-ae, trusteesand parents of current students, aliterary supplement and a rideboard that would be provided tothe student body.
^ >
Martin played a key role in the
implementation
of "Mercy-Ads",a service similar to personal adsin weekly newspapers.She succeeds Steve
Frisina,
a
senior;
business administrationmajor, who is currently seekinga position in print media.Frisina said of Martin, "Shestands out simply because of thefact that she has had intensiveinvolvement in all areas of theMerciad." He added "Thecommittee was fortunate to havethree good candidates to choosefrom. Now she has the respon-sibility."Martin will officially take overthe office on May 9. Her firstissue will come out on the 16th.
I
V
 
PAGE
2
TH& MERCIAD
APRIL
25Jl
980
Came
lot? Afraid Not
For one afternoon MercyhurstCollege was a political
mecca
asSenator Ted Kennedy addressedover
3,000
people Sunday at theCampus Center. With theAcademy High School bandplaying "Oh Danny Boy",numerous banners filling the air,and Walter
Cronkite
observing it
all,
the stage was set for somelively political theatrics. And ithappened.Kennedy, showing no signs ofthe oratory difficulties thatearlier plagued his campaign,gave the people what they camefor. Delivering humorous barbsand sharp criticisms
\
at "theCarter administration,! theMassachusetts Senator showed acomplete
mastery?of
the toolsnecessary to discredit anotherpolitician.
?
\
Kennedy made a completesweep of the issues facing thecountry and used them as abludgeon against Carter,
who one
of
the
Senator's supporters calledthe "best Republican thecountry had
since
HerbertHoover." Of course, there wasalso fa "rose agarden" spicethrown in
to
excite the taste budsof the audience.*
i|3y£_
W
When it came down to alter-natives to current national woes,however,
the
Kennedy recipe wasnot substantive in the least. TheSenator appears determined todraw the President out of theWhite House to debate the issues.This, and not inflation, seems tobe the chief issue in the Kennedycamp. People know
mat
inflationis high and that things are notgetting better.If one listens to George Bush,Jimmy Carter, John Anderson,or even Ronald Reagan,
he
or she
will
be
told the same thing.
1980
isnot a year when issues are
dif-
ficult to find and used to gain
political leverage. However,
rather than making alternativesto problems the chief issue in this
years
campaign, Kennedy isbent on pursuing and attackingthe Carter administration.
M
The Sunday address was butanother example
J
of
^
thisphenomenon. Until the Senator
begins
to display some of thevision his brothers possessed, hewill
contiuerto
exist in
theii
shadows.
:'•
Staff Editorial
A Presidential Exam
**
ijk.
After witnessing procedures inthis year's student governmentelections, a number ofsuggestions for future campaignscome to mind.Why
not
implement* an
<
ob-jective exam to test presidentialcandidates on their knowledge ofcollege administrators, policies,and regulations? These can-didates are, afterall, potentialstudent leaders.This exam is not really a newidea. There are some universitieswhich already incorporate thistactic in
student
\
governmentelections.If the 'Hurst were to give such atest and post the results beforepolls opened, the student bodywould be better informed of apresidential candidate's workingKnowledge of the college.
$*
In the end this could
onlybenefit all parties involved.Students would be makingresponsible choices based on acandidate's viable awareness ofthe college hierarchy.Candidates themselves wouldbenefit by attempting to ensuretheir understanding of the manyfacets of the college before beingelected. This could possiblysilence the cries of "transitionperiod."
%
S^,
Overall, the exam pointstoward an informative andknowledgeable campaign, basedon college
1
awareness, for allconcerned.Another idea is the eliminationof cafeteria speeches in favor of adebate between candidates.
'p.-
Let's face it, the cafeteria isnot a realistic setting forspeeches. People are tired,hungry and ill-disposed topolitical jargon.
*8
As
far
as candidates areconcerned, one can be relativelysure of a maddening frustrationthey experience when people getup and walk around during their
speech
Not to mention peoplewho ignore them.On the other hand, a debate,sponsored by MSG, would drawonly interested students. It wouldalso afford candidates the op-portunity
to discuss
campaignissues.
£
And hungry students coulddevote their full attention tomashed potatoes in peace. Not abad deal.
<
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MSSM8GURO ELfCTCiOTX O 0BKKBUS SOUROFUeiOL •ODttRs
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CM)
Jo^el temed
Letter
Student
Cites
Kennedy For No Alternatives
Dear Editor:Did you see it? A 15-20 carcaravan pulling up in front of the
Campus
Center! I sure did, and Ialso heard Senator Kennedyspeak in front of a capacity crowdat the Mercyhurst CampusCenter Sunday afternoon.I'm one of the many studentsthat saw Mr. Kennedy that dayand please let me say that I havenever heard so much
bull
packedinto a
twenty«minute
speechbefore. Sure, he told us the things
thai
are wrong with the economy,foreign policy, trade, etc. We alsoheard him refer to the president,not just once, but many times onhow he is incapable of being anykind of leader. He also pointedout all the
things'that
thepresident has done wrong sincehe has been in the White House.But you know what? He never,ever, told us how he wouldcorrect the wrongdoings or howhe would fix the economy. And
right?now
that's
the thing
theAmerican [people
jtfare
mostconcerned with.
jg
On Sunday when I walked intothe Campus Center I must admit,I walked in with a chip on myshoulder. But when I sat down I
decided to listen with unbiased
ears. I really felt I did this.Honest. But when I left Kennedyhad only confirmed my initialsuspicions of himself and hisparty. He is all to willing to givethe people what they want. Andhe will always say what thepeople want to here, not exactly avery honest way of business, heshould talk about the things heplans to do rather than elaborateon the things that are wrong.We can all make, promises, butwhen it comes to running forpresident
it
seems that promises
are
just words
K.
I don't want tomake this sound like I'm makinga punch for Carter
butJiey.
weknow that he's doing the best job
p05sible7f"He
<
"'
,
has'*made
somemistakes, but let me tell you, ifKennedy gets into office thiscountry will really be in trouble.John Broderick
r &
Post-Primary
Ponderings
With a furious push to remainwithin the race, Senator Kennedyproved many of
the
expertswrong as he claimed a narrow
victory
in Tuesday's Penn-sylvania primary. Riding on thewings of a strong showing in the
city
§
of
Philadelphia, theMassachusetts Democratovercame the pro-Carter at-titudes dominant in the westernpart of the state.
%
By achieving a virtual standoff(Kennedy 93 delegates, Carter
92),
Kennedy preserved a smallspark of
his
candidacy.
The
sameexperts that projected a Kennedydefeat are now saying that theSenator stands half a chance inthe
£
other industrial-stateprimaries. While this may pullKennedy back into the race, itmay also create another pullundesirable to Democrats as awhole.
J*-
8
With a newly rekindled two-horse race there may be somestrains| developing in 'theDemocratic party. And justpicture what happens when twoof three possible candidatesnegate one another. We areusually left with the third can-didate.In this case the third candidateis Ronald Reagan. The formerDeath Valley Days
jjstar
hasdistinguished himself
as the
arch-conservative
in this year'spresidential race, makingpolitical statements that the U.S.should get tough with Iranians,Soviets, and any stray
1950's
Communist
^sympathizers
currently in the motion pictureindustry.
*5
His chief political claims
£
tofame have come as the formerCalifornia governor who left
Jerry
Brown a $500 millionsurplus. Now he wants to be
president.
For
all
Democrats
who
are
doubled-over
with laughterover Reagan's oratory
bumblings
and ethnic jokes, take anotherlook. The
man
j
just passed upCarter in preliminary polls andsurveys. And his. support is
By Pablo Pursburg
building.What this leads to is the factthat the Kennedy-Carter con-frontation may be opening the
door
for a 69-year-oldRepublican who is not all thatadverse to war. The opinionhere is that this does-her-or-doesn't-he sexagenarian is not agood alternative to Kennedy orCarter. However, with growingdissatisfaction with the
President's
performance, aswell as the Democratic
tug-of-
war, Reagan's
^
chances arebeing needlessly improved.
Walter, How About Vice Pres?
 
APRIL 25, 1980THE MERCIAD
PAGE
3
Statistics Show
Enrollment Drop ExpectedIn
Private
Colleges
The National Center
>for
Education Statistics,
in its
annualsurvey,is predicting that collegeenrollment will
hit an
all-timehigh
in
1981 before falling
to
levels that could
pit
$
four-yearprivate colleges against two-yearcommunity colleges
in a
battlefor older,
part-time
students.
£
The
NCES
expects
11.69
millioncollege students to enroll in
1981,
a record number.
By 1988,
however,
it
sees enrollmentshrinking to 11.048 million.It projects that small privatecolleges will lose
the
greatestpercentage
of
students. Privateschool enrollment should fall
to
2.294 million in 1988, down from2.49 million projected
for
1981,and 2.748 this year.Total enrollment
at
Mercy-hurst
for
the
,1979-80
year
was
1450 students.
It
may
be
notedthat
as of
Spring Term
the
fulltime enrollment
was 916
students.
91
Admissions stated that theyexpected enrollment for
1980-81
tocontinue
at
the same
1450—give
or take
25
students,
i
NCES
analysts predict that theprivate four-year schools willhave to attract more older, part-time students to
compensate
fortheir losses.Ed. Note: President-elect
Dr.
Garvey
acknowledged this factwhile still
an
applicant
for the
position
of
President
of the
College.Two-year community colleges,though, have been
the
mostsuccessful recruiting older, part-time students. One reason,
ac-
cording
to the
study called"Projection
of
EducationStatistics
to
1988-89,"
is
thatcommunity colleges are usuallyin urban areas convenient
to
commuter
students.Older, part-time studentscurrently account for 40 percentof the nation's
two-year
collegeenrollments. The NCES expectstwo-year college enrollment
to
decline "only slightly" over thenext
e|ght
years preciselybecause
of the
communitycolleges' attraction
r
to
part-
timers.
i&£$
If
private
four-year
collegescan't compete
effectively & with
two-year schools
for the
older,part-time students,
iNCES
warned that "many of them couldface closure."
BHF
The agency's projections
for
four-year public colleges
and
universities were less drastic.
It
expects |
total public
college
enrollment to fall to
8.754
millionin 1988 after
a
1981 peak
of
9.2million. Public colleges' largerbase should allow
the
biggerschools
to
survive
the coming
eraof limits.
$
\
Most experts expect collegeenrollments will decline becauseof
the
dwindling number
of
current
school
-age ^children.Other
studies
predict enrollmentswill start
to
grow again
in the
1990's, when the children of post-World War
II
baby boom reachcollege age.
Millar,
Prdther
AnnounceResignations For July!
Two future administrativevacancies were announced thisweek as Dr. John
Millar,
dean ofthe college,
and
Bob Prather,vice president
of
development,announced their resignations,effective in July.
Millar,
who
will be finishing his
/
Robert Prathersecond year at
Mercyhurst,
toldthe Merciad that the big factor inhis decision to leave was the factthat he did not see the college'sfuture direction correspondingwith
his
own.
He
stated that whilepersonalities played
no
role
in
hisdecision,
the
fact
that'he
was
uncomfortable
in his
currentposition did.
Millar
was active incollege affairs this year withproposals to change the divisionstructure of
the
college, carry outa program review, and change
jthe
3-1-3-3
calendar
to a
4-3-3isystem. While none
of
the threeproposals received the approvalof the college community,
Millar
did not cite these as reasons forhis departure.
§
1
He
does
not
have any {im-mediate plans for the future.Prather,
who has
beenassociated with the college
for
the past seven years,
will
be
leaving Mercyhurst
to
assumeduties
as
vice president
of
development
and
facultymember
at
Olivet College
in
Olivet, Michigan.Prather expects to receive hisdoctorate I
in
higher educationfrom Columbia UniversityTeachers College this June.
He
has his
M.A.
from that institutionand
a
B.S.J,
from Ohio Univer-sity. He will assume his duties atOlivet College on July 1
of
thisyear.Dr. John
Millar
•>
*v
Ayotollcyou
D.
J. JOHN
ft
VV
I
plays dances, weddings
and
private parties.You will call
him at
454-1287
or
write
Box
918.
Hmmm IJRocka
and
Roll,
Funk, Disco,
Oldies. .
I
1
K
\
I
Admissions Counselor
Co
J
Attention to Any Student who will bea Junior or Senior in September!!
The Mercyhurst! College Admissions office
is
seeking
two
students interested
in
doing
a
Co-op experience
as
Admissions
Counselors.^Students
from any
jmajor
or
minor program
are
welcome
to
apply.
Familiarityl
with
the
Pittsburgh and/orPhiladelphia areas is desirable but not mandatory.
f
This Co-op
is
worth nine
(9)
credits which twill
be
grantedthrough the business department. The length
of
the position willbe 17 weeks, beginning on Monday, August 4, 1980 and endingon Friday, November 28, 1980. The salary for the
17
week periodis
$2,500
plus expenses and mileage.
Students must hove theirown cor.
A description
of the
responsibilities
and
duties
of an
Ad-
missions Counselor
can be
obtained
in the
Admissions Officewhich is located on the first floor of Old Main.Anyone who
is
interested
in
applying
for
the positions, shouldforward a resume and three (3) letters
of
recommendation to KarenE.Benzol,Director
of
Admissions. Application deadline
is|April
28,
1980.'
This Sunday, April 27, three senior art majors Jeanne Mates,Kelly Conaway, and Jeanne Fox will present
"Nature's
Call
9
' anart exhibition
of
their works. The show will include Pottery,Jewelry, Drawings and Paintings and
Fibers/Fabrics
pieces. Theopening reception
is
3-5
p.m.
in
the
LRC Gallery.
All are
welcome.
I £
>p*lng (fotmai
"&un&/ilne.
talnbowb
and
d*eam&"
hmldattaLabow gatd*n&
I
9pm
-
Jam
\
dickmtt -SIO
ht 50-S8
(ft*u
9,
7980
J
.
I
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$4>$3>
DEADLINE
For
1980-81
BasicGrant Applications
> <
Contact FinancialAid
Office
for additionalinformation
(
x
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

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