Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Merciad, Oct. 31, 1980

The Merciad, Oct. 31, 1980

Ratings: (0)|Views: 26 |Likes:
Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, Oct. 31, 1980
The Merciad, Oct. 31, 1980

More info:

Published by: TheMerciad on May 25, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

06/02/2011

pdf

text

original

 
Survey Shows Students
Prefer
Option E
The Merciad recently polled astratified sampling of the Mer-cyhurst student community tolearn the favorite choices of the
proposed
calendar options.
A
pro-portionate
.number
of males,females, commuters, andresidents were questioned on theissue. The student preferencereflected the faculty opinion inthat both chose E as their mostdesired option.
*Option
E,
which is most like
thepresent calendar, was preferredbecause of this similarity. This
proposal
involves three terms, afive-day week, with four coursesone term and three the otherterms. Over half of the studentspolled, 51 per cent, believe that
Ontion
E would be the most suc-cessful
choice.'^>
i *
jffi
Students do not like the idea ofhaving Wednesdays off andwould rather
keep the
three termschedule rather than the propos-ed semester options. Mary Bird,a resident student, stated, "Hav-ing Wednesday off would disruptmy week."
5 S
Other students agreed that
Op-
tion
E
is
the most
practical for
in-
ternships
and
laboratory courses,and would also allow the studentto concentrate
on
fewer classes atone time.
^ J -*3
Option D which gained an 18per cent preference proposesterms, 50 minute classes, fourcourses one term and three theother terms, and no Wednesdayclasses. A
four-day
week and 50minute classes are the most ap-pealing aspects of this optionac-cording
to
students. Resident stu-dent Mike
2Even
remarked,
''Wednesday
off would allow meto prepare for Thursday and Fri-day's classes."
?§*§2 #§g
*,-
Option B,
two
semsters, a four-day week,
60
minute classes, andfour courses
\
each semester,received 12 per cent of the stu-dent'opinion. An anonymousmale commuter stated that
tak-
ing eight classes per year rather
than the
present
10,
."would
resultin paying less money for books."fi Options
A
and
C
each receivedseven per
cent!?
of studentpreference. Option A advocatesthree terms, a
four-day
week,and 70 minute classes, while Cproposes two semesters a five-day week,
65
minute classes, andfive courses
each J
semester. Afemale commuter preferred
Op-
tion A
because she feels, "there
is
a lack of continuity when classesmeet only
onI
Tuesdays andThursdays".
j^
&J &£ 3
9
A
male
and a
female commuteragreed
on -j
Option C as theirfavorite because it is most likethat of other colleges and would,consequently, be easier to crossregister.
a
Only
five
per cent of
£
thestudents polled chose option F.
the
'..
present calendar, as
l
their
favorite. Freshmen Communica-tions major. Mary Jo Allen, com-mented that she came to Mercy-hurst "for the sole purpose of
In-
tercession." Intercession
is
eliminated in calendar Options Athrouth E.Most of the students who choseE for next year's calendar likethe present
calendar
but realizethat Intercession is really notviable. Option E would still alio
-
*'students to take ten courses andprovide the variety of a five-dayweek.
I
VOL 51
NO.
7MERCYHURST COLLEGE
I
studentpublication
OCTOBER 31.1980
Senate Supports Calendar E
MHS&
m
#
*
The College Senate unanimous-
, ly
passed calendar option E ona recommendation by theAcademic Policies Committee
and the
Student
Government air
meeting on October 28 in ZurnHall.
I * jfe
Calendar E consists of threeeleven-week terms with the stu-dent
taking
three courses in twoterms and four courses in theterm of his or her choice. The
1981-82
academic
year
under this
calendar
will begin September 8and end on May 21.
*l
One: disadvantage mentionedabout
option E
was the
two
weekChristmas break occurring afterthe first three weeks of Winterterm. This was
looked upon
morefavorably, however, than anelongated Fall term with aThanksgiving
j
break,
occurringtwo weeks before finals, or abushing back of the calendar sothat Winter term begins after
Christmas
and thus ends theacademic year
in
June.
.-•« The
<
Academic
Policies' Com-mittee
had
recommended calen-dar E to the Senate after a votetaken on October
22.
It did soafter several discussions whichconsidered the fact that all for*
.
mal
responses submitted to theCommittee either endorsedcalendar E or at least the in-dividual components of calendar
fc
The Senate's recommendationwill be submitted to Dr. WilliamGarvey, President of
the
College,
who
will forward it categoricallyas a matter to the AcademicDean, Dr. David Palmer. Upon
th'e^Dean's
approval, "he^ willresubmit the recommendation tothe President
who
may either ac-cept or reject the proposal i
&
Garvey Resigns FromErie County Position
President William P. Garveyhas resigned from his position asamember*of the
Erie
CountyGeriatric Center's board oftrustees, announced County Ex-ecutive Russell Robinson lastTuesday,
j.
_• &
%
?'It
is with deep
regret
that I
ac-cept your
resignation
from theBoard of Trustees," Robinsonwrote to Garvey.
He
added that
Garvey's
tenureWas "at a time of dire need for
stability
and organization of theboard."
* "
President Garvey, who had
.been
a member of the board for
the past
two years, explained that
his
position at
the college "makes
it difficult for me to properlydischarge my duties as atrustee."
*&*
Garvey added that
the duties of
a
trustee are
"very consuming.""I find it an important
task,"
hesaid
"but I don't have the time for
it.""My job is what happenshere/' continued the! collegepresident.
"Given all the
changesthat are taking place here, myfirst duty is to the college."
Garvey's I
resignation was ef-
fective immedia t e 1
y.
In
Student Government
Egan
Hall
PresentsPetition;VisitationHours
^Reconsidered
The discussion of theredistrubution of visitation hoursand a petition presented fromEgan Hall highlighted the Oc-tober
27 •
Mercyhurst StudentGovernment meeting.
*
The meeting was conducted by
MSG vice-president Rich
Lanzilloin Seltzer's absence. Lanzillopresented a petition from EganHall which asked
for
an
all
nightdesk attendant
in
the dormitory.In the discussion that followedGeology
rep.
Christopher Meyerspointed
tut
that a key for Eganwill be made available to the all
nieht
security guard at the Mc-
Auley
desk within the next fewdays. "At least it is a temporarysolution to the problem" statedLanzillo.Lanzillo explained that
v
the
main hindrance in having an allnight attendant is monetary.
*
In other business
1
the MSGdecided to poll students as totheir
opinion on the
redistributionof visitation hours. A survey ofstudents living
in dormitories will
be taken.
"We
need
to
know what
the students
want," commentedLanzillo.
*"'
-Next, it was reported that dor-
mitory
election
will
be completednext week and anyone wishing torun for
MSG
secretary is to con-tact Michael Smith, box 514.
It
was announced that ClaudeaEnglert has submitted her letterof
intent
for the position of
MSGsecretary
11
«
**
5
~
Photos
B>
R.
Martin
(GOD)*by
Jamie Borowicz and
(LAST*FACE>
by ChristopherMcGowan
were
among
the
many works
on
display
in
the
LRC
Show.
A
Different Toon.
4
?*.
J
"?T3^
<
Homecoming
Weekend
Deemed A Success
Homecoming was-
celebrated
on campus this past weekend forthe first time
in
the history of thecollege.
* *
According to Gary Bukowski,director of alumni relations, thenumber! of alumni attendinghasn't been calculated yet. Heestimated, however, that at least200 people showed for
the
varioushomecoming activities.
**
The Weekend's success,
"definitely
exceeded
my
expecta-tions, for this year," statedBukowski. After
fa Iking jwith
several alumni during the event,Bukowski
remarked,/"Therewasn't anyone who
didn't seem tohave a good time." ^P*£-
•&
§
The only disappointing factorabout the Weekend was the cold,rainy weather.
1
according toBukowski. Next year he plans tomove the Homecoming Weekendup one month in hopes that theweather will be nicer.Bukowski stressed that theHomecoming committee wasgrateful for the foresight of SAC
and
student government.
He
con-sidered their monetary andphysical effprt to be "bone-crushing."
w$
"Without their help," com-mented the
alumni
director,"Homecoming Weekend wouldn'thave been the success
F
feel* it
was."ii /f< ^2 -wfS
Inside:
|
Campaign
'80
Survey p. 3Ghosts Stories from the Hurst p. 4-5Play Review.... p. 6Sports p. 7
 
PAGE
2
THEM6RCIAD
\
OCTOBER
31,1
c
cfc
|<D
Q
Q)
SEESEEpoo
o o o
Effective
Evaluating
Within the next week studentswill be given the opportunity toevaluate the college faculty'steaching effectiveness throughcompletion of
the
IDEA
(Instruc-tional Development and Effec-tiveness Assesment) forms. Aresponsibility comes with theseforms which should not be
taken
lightly.
gf$£ I
The IDEA form is a diagnosticsurvey, based on nationalaverages, which allows any
stu-
dent to anonymously evaluate aninstructor's teaching ability.
This
is serious business.
*> I
£
Many students don't seem torealize that in the past, facultyhave been hired and fired inresponse
tot
these evaluations.Tenure of a faculty membercould
also
be affected.
Letter
In
effect these evaluations pro-vide students with the chance tosay who their instructors will bein the future,
^v ^\
Statistical results of thesurveys are reviewed
by
instruc-tors and department heads,which further
{reinforces
thevalidity of the evaluations, j
s•\
This kind of feedback ispositive since, ideally, it benefitsthe students.
J IJ
TSFJ
j^g
Students should handle theseevaluations with some responsi-ble foresight, otherwise the forms
would
serve no purpose.
This J
is an opportunity forstudents
to
offer value input. Andthe only prerequisite is responsi-ble consideration on the part ofthe student body.
Student Calls For
Participation
InStudent Elections
To theEdditor:This is
a
special notice;Student Government electionsare being held again. OnNovember
3rd
elections
for
MSG
secretary-will
be held in ZurnLobby between
9
a.m. and
4
p.m.Also on November 6th and 7thfreshmen representativeselec-tions will also be held in Zurn
Lobby
at the same time.Anyone interested in runningfor these positions should turn aletter of intent to Michael Smith,box 514.
Letter
.
v
It's not over
yet
I We are also
looking for
people
who
would
liketo be the following majorrepresentatives: Math, Music,Sociology, Art Therapy,Chemistry,
and
Religious
Educa-tion. Anyone interested in fillingthese positions should contactMichael Smith at
box
514.Thanks for all of your help.Hope to hear
from
you soon.For the Student Government,Michael Smith 'Election Committee Chairman
Campus We
Committee
Explains
Purpose
And
Various Functions
Dear Editor:This letter is in regard to theSenate's Campus Life Commit-
tee. We
have the authority in thenon-academic area to study andrecommend policy to thestudents.
|
We study the Student Code ofRights and Responsibilities,Housing Conditions, StudentPublicatons, IntramuralAthletics, including the use offacilities (indoors and outdoors),social and cultural activities (incooperation win the MercyhurstStudent Government and Direc-
tor
of
Student
Activities.).
»«
This committee listens to allappeals made by students whendisciplinary action has beentaken,
f
J ;« "|v
TThe committee is here to workfor the students, and cannotfunction without them. If thereare any complaints, needs, ideaswhich this committee can help
you
with, please contact us.Sincerely Yours,
Damien
C.
SchmidtChairman of Campus Life
USTENTO
WMCY on 880
AM
ETJ
, ready
to
vcfe.
|
J
Letters
ToTheEditor
Tri-Beta Introduces! Itself
Dear EditorLastyear,
Mercyhurst's
Biology Department started achapter of Beta Beta BetaBiological society^ Tri-Beta is anhonor and professional societyfor students majoring in biologyor who have an interest in lifescience.
*£<
Formally, the purpose of theorganization is to stimulate in-terest, scholarly attainment andinvestigation in the biologicalsciences. Further purpose of ourchapter is to be of service to thecollege and the science depart-ment, to provide a social
club
for
students interested
in
science
and
Former Merciad Editor
to provide a taste of the profes-sional scientific community.
^
During the academic
year
of1979 to 1980, Tri-Beta took a tripto Toronto's Science Center and
Metro
Zoo,
sponsored
a
variety
of
speakers,
had
a booth on
ac-
tivities day plus many
other
events.
m
A
few of
the
activities,
we
haveplanned for this school year are:to have field trips to Pittsburgh,Buffalo,
and
Cleveland; to attendundergraduate science con-ferences, such
as {the
EasternCollege Science Conference andthe Science Academic con-ference;
to hold
a
blood
pressure,
bloodftype
clinic; to help
maintenance
fix up the gardennear the library; and to sponsorparties for the sciencedepartment.Tri-Beta is a relatively neworganization here at MercyhurstCollege and many new studentsare unaware that it exists. It isnot only for biology majors butany
student
interested
in
science.The purpose of this letter is tointroduce the Mercyhurst Com-munity to Tri-Beta and
.to.
en-courage all interested students
to
attend a meeting on November 4at 8:00 p.m. in 1142. ?Lori AleandriPresident of Tri-Beta
,
M W
AlumnusRelates*ThoughtsOn National Election
'80
Dear Editor :**
The 1960 Presidential Electionquickly
draws
near
and
as it
does
some random pre-electionthought
comes
to mind.
The
first involves
our PresidentJimmy Carter. The Carter ad-ministration
has
brought
us
infla-tion, recession, unemploymentand the lessening of
U.S.
respectabroad. Perhaps his biggestweakness, however has come inthe staffing of
his
administration,
one
that
offers
little
in
the way
of
contrasting ideas and policies. *The second thought involvesthe challenger, Governor.Reagan. In the last ten years,there have been no fewer thennine documented incidents in
which
f.
he recommended U.S.military intervention abroad. Hisproposed tax cuts ignore the in-flationary precedent set by hisancestors, and his other policiesseem to reflect the* simplicityparalleled only by
his'favorite
television show, "Little
House
onthe Prairie,**
j#f-•
J
The third and final thought br-ings us to John Anderson, the in-dependent candidate.
The
Illinoiscongressman 'has made pro-posals that appear to kill
the
pro-
verbial two
birds
with one stone,i.e. the
fifty-cent/gas
tax, offset-ting the elimination of the socialsecurity
tax.
Ahead of their time,as
well
as the members of theRepublican and Democratic par-
ties.
His battle has taken himfrom compromised candidate tononentity. He perhaps
was 5
thelatest, if not equal version of
Adlai
Stevenson.Hence, the American publicwill be selecting their next presi-dent in less than a
week,
where
we
were once
confronted
with
onecompromised candidate, we nowhave three. And it appears thatthe greatest compromise is theAmerican public's standard forleadership.
'&
T
-Steve Frisina
I
\\
/
33 ttftk -IW Afte
ft(2£ra.Hi
Ov(L
0&.
\
_.
•#V
 
owt M
?? wsa&
ffiHBHHHHHHHHHHJJJIfHI
«*«S#:*M
SK?
RSfcJfl
V
Faculty Focus
'Jjjffl
featuring |
Dr.
Nye
Applebauxn
by
Tom
Kowalki
i$&f &
This fall marked the return ofDr. Mika
Nye-Applebaum
to theMercyhurst College faculty afteran eight year absence.Dr. Applebaum, who teachesMedieval and Renaissance WorldLiterature and
jj
two
^Writing
classes, is one of the most in-teresting faculty members in theEnglish Department. She wasborn in Athens, Greece. In 1955she came to the United States ona scholarship
to
the University
of
Montana. Upon graduation, shetaught high school English for
two
years before returning to theUniversity of Montana to workfor her Masters in French.In 1968, Dr. Nye was hired bythe! Mercyhurst English Dept.She taught until 1972 and thenenrolled at Suny at Buffalo towork for her Doctorate inEnglish. During this time, shealso added the name Applebaumto herown.!
f 58While
here, Dr. Nye
was
amongthe people who formed the Mer-cyhurst Style Sheet. fEven though it's been almostten years since she last taughthere,Dr. Applebaum states thatshe has seen no dramaticchanges.
"However,!!/she
said
£'now*
tqe
school is more deter-mined to maintain a high level
of
education."
* *
Even if
the school
wasn't deter-mined to maintain a high level
of
education, Dr. Applebaum main-tains that she certainly
is-jgti&iftj;
^"Dr^HSarvey,"sher
conPmented ' "is I
dedicated to theschool and is anxious to developthe Humanities and offer a goodoverall education for alldisciplines."
i gl
Dr.
Nye-Applebaum
added thatprospects
fori
Mercyhurstgraduation I are more positivethan ever.
? .?
At the beginning of the year,Dr. Applebaum was hired as apart-tune teacher, however, shehas since been hired as a full-Nye Applebaumtime member of the Englishdepartment. She also holdsclasses at GannonUniversity.
C
The next time
you
walk by aclass room, and
hear
a womenwith a Greek accent
saying'Tm
with ya," You'll know that it'sDr. Nye Applebaum doing her
thing.
g$
HSHRSS
"BaM
mind readings
The Egan Scholars recently in-itiated a monthly limerick con-test with a designated topic. Oc-tober's topic was appropriately,"Halloween." The
top
three win-ners this month, as judged by
Jamie'tYule
and Dr.
Detmar
Straub, are
Amy
Rowand,
WalterR. Green, and
Bambi
Illig.Each winner was awarded $5.00.LIMERICK
NUMBER 1
People cringe from the vampire
in
fright,
Jg£:
Especially on Halloween NightBut, what they don't know,Which is quite apropos,Is his
bark:
is much worse thanhis bite.
}'4
by Amy
Rowland 'LIMERICK NUMBER
2
There was an old spiritin Baldwin,
e
»
Who needed some things
fori
her cauldron.
?
To the Director's dismay!She cooked an R.A.Then she and her cauldronleft Baldwin.
* £
by Walter
R.
GreenLIMERICK
NUMBER 3A
skelton once in Khartoum JAsked a spirit
up
to his room;
."L
They spent the hole nightIn the eeriest fightAs to which
should
be frightenedby whom.
5'
* *by Bambi
Illig
Visit
the
Mercyhurst College
WRITING
CENTER
At its new location in McAuley
Hall^Lower
LevelServices provided include: tutoring in mechanicaland rhetorical skills, assistance in
writing?
resumes,themes, and research papers,
and
help in preparingfor essay tests and graduate record examinations.Call Writing Center Director, Betty Gartnerat
864-0681
ext.
344 or stop in
at
McAuleyHall, Lower Level to make an appointment.
THEMERCIADPAGE
3Campaign
'80
1
ill
In
Survey
Bpftf!'-'
Wifc
i^SHHR
M
Students React To
|
Presidential Elections
2
What effect do you feel Ander-son's candidacy has had on the
1980
presidential race?
A
randomsurvey of
19 people
from the Mer-cyhurst Community found
47
per
centl
believe Anderson's can-didacy is taking away supportfrom the other candidates.
H
Father Guy Patrick believes,
"the
Reagan camp is hopeful forthe {independent to draw votesfrom Carter and possibly allowReagan into the office.""He has kept Carter andReagan on their toes," com-mented freshmen education ma-jor Sharon Johnson. She addedthat this was because they don'twant to lose votes to Anderson, 5
B
Sixteen percent felt that Ander-son's candidacy destroyed thetwo major political parties.
8H
Anderson's candidacy,
^"has
taken the Democratic andRepublican
partiesland
destroyed their
importance
andchanged the whole Democraticprocess," {remarked CarlMorgan, a| junior businessmanagement
major.I
•;'
-gftaiBgf
Marce Lynn Cicon, asophomore history major, stated
that
Anderson's "candidacy hashad a major impact on currenthistory because a lot of attentionis being focused on him.
S ;if
3 "This seems to be a currentpolitical phenomenon," she add-ed, "considering America'stendencyjto focus on thesometimes stifling two-partysystem."
§| 9 S
Six percent of those surveyedfelt that Anderson's candidacy iscausing confusion among voters.Beth iHaughey, freshmaneducation major, commented,"Anderson's candidacy has caus-ed confusion between the can-didates. Whatever qualities theother candidates
don't!
have,Anderson does."Mary BethTomich,asophomore business administra-tion major, voiced the opinionwhich;. ten percent of thosesurveyed hold, John Anderson'scandidacy has had
no
affect. :
*
The
remaining
six percenthave no idea what effect Ander-son's candidacy has had on the
1980
presidential
race.
5*3
TBS
Survey
Asks
Will
Abortion Issue Affect Vote?
In a recent survey, represen-tative of the number of
males
andfemales on Mercyhurst Campus57 per cent
saidf
abortion in-fluences their choice in the elec-tion and
77
per cent of those peo-ple were male,
who
were againstabortion. <*
?
The question: "How stronglydo your feelings about
abortion
persuade your choice for thepresidency?" elicited 23responses, 17 of
|
which
Swere
female and six were male.
£
The representative selectionmodeled the ration of the maleand female population
at^jMer-
cyhurst.
Oftne 13 people who said
Films
For
Discussion £
y
Also responding were facultymembers. "They persuade mevery little," commented a maleprofessor.
"l|
think there aremany other issues to base a deci-sion on the presidency."
f*
B
It is interesting to note thatsome of the
*
replies opposingabortion
I
came f rom ^
specialeducation or elementary educa-tion majors, or those
who
plan towork with children.;;Students in a journalism classconducted
the pose
exclusively onthe campus. With the 1980Presidential election a weekaway, interests on controversialissues
seem
to be heightened.that abortion will influence theirvote, one is not voting. However,seven
of
,
the 10 who werenot influenced are voting.
?
For those who opposed abor-tion, some replies* revealedstrong emotional undertones:
-M
"It
(abortion)
has
influenced
me greatly. I am totally againstabortion. Therefore, I would votefor
Reagan."
?
replied
a femalestudent.
-I 1 *Depicting
another point ofview, one female said, It wouldmake a difference. It would givean
iinsight •ion
-&is^decision.especially on other iss
women."
S£$!B
L"'3L
Psychology To Host King of Hearts
King of Hearts is about WorldWar I. It is set in a small town inFrance that has been deserted byAllied troops and
not
yet reachedby an advancing German army.It is, however, a comedy, and apleasant one made with con-siderable
c
art.
It has achievedcult-film status in a number ofuniversity towns, perhapsbecause of
the *\ne
acting-and thelast fewseen.
\ «
£|
When the French town
In
thefilm
is
evaculated,
the
gateway
of
the asylum for the insane, thealiens, is unlocked, and the in-mates move out into the town,now on their own, and freely actout their fantasies.
One
thinks heis a prince of the church,
another
a!great
diplomat, another ageneral, and several old peoplethink they are small children. Alldress and act accordingly, andthey cooperate in one another's
delusions in such
a way as
to
pro-duce a bizarre communal lifethat is nonetheless
always
happyand harmless. Toward the end, aplatoon of Allied soldiers returnsto the town just as an advanceplatoon of Germans arrives. Thetwo forces meet in
i the
g
town
square, dutifully
line up in
oppos-ed ranks, raise rifles on com-
mand,*
and shoot one another
dead—without?
remainder. Theinsane observe all this withamazement; as the film closes,they trail back to the asylum.When all are inside, a handsnakes out between the bars andlocks the gate-against the world.
{King
of Hearts is a conceit, afantasy, which will appeal par-ticularly to those who
are
fascinated
-with
the works ofThomas Szasz and Ronald Laing.Szasz argues that the notion ofmental illness is a myth and thatinstitutional
psychiatry
bears acloset functional resemblance tothe medieval Inquisition; Laingsuggests that the inner ex-perience of schizophrenia is akind of personal code that maydisclose truths that are generallyhidden from the rest of us. Suchsuggestions are likely
to find
cor-roboration in the film. In any
Getting Married?
The First Wedding Service
4625 Homeland
Blvd
InvitationsNapkinsMatches
By Appointment Only
Linda First
866-1018
event,
J King
of Hearts is not atreatise, but a gentle and movingfilm bound to raise* questionsregarding the nature of sanityand madness.
-|
This film for discussion willtake place
on
November
5
at
8;00
in 206
Main.
W
Dance DirectorTo SpeakOn Campus
"
Mr. Lawrence Jones, directorof the
Dance
Theatre of Erie, willbe on campus October
31.
g
Jones
will
be available for aquestion and answer period con-cerning his Intersession course,Dance Technique andProduction.
)T I
|
p
The course will develop in twostages. It begins with balletclasses at the college and isfollowed by work with the DanceTheatre's production ofKinderconcert.
v
J*3
Kinderconcert will premier onDecember
21
1
at
J
he WarnerTheatre downtown,
*
\
Jones
will
also teach afreshmen ballet class from
10
to
11:20
in the Weber Hall Studio. I
Happy BirthdayValerie!
WeLove!You

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->