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The Merciad, Jan. 16, 1981

The Merciad, Jan. 16, 1981

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The Merciad, Jan. 16, 1981
The Merciad, Jan. 16, 1981

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06/02/2011

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Student Government To
St
art
I
Newsletter
J
The
possibility
of a
MercyhurstStudent Government newsletterwas discussed at the first MSGmeeting of Winter term,
f
The representatives voted 12pro and
o
con for the motion topursue the idea of a newsletter.The newsletter would
inform
thecollege community
^01^*
"Keyissues that affect the
general
public" according to MSG vicepresident, Rich Lanzillo.
A
com-mute to begin a newsletter wasappointed. It will be chaired by
MSG Secretary
Claudia Englert.Members of
the
committee areBiology representative MariaCaruso and,
^Special
Educationrepresentative Vicki
Culmer.
j
Representatives then had adiscussion
on the effectiveness of
the government body. Lanzilloexplained that "we are trying to
isolate problems we
are having."
One
representative felt that the
government
body isn't presentedwith very few major issues.In an effort to find a solution,Lanzillo asked the represen-tatives to record what they, havedone and what they would like to
try.
H
;
ffr
In other business, a survey
commute
was appointed to get
the college
community's
opinions
on MSG, SAC- and visitationhours. The committee chairpeo-
ple
are Psychology
f
represen-tative Karen Kolpien and Socialwork^representative,AnneChisolm. Committee membersare Accounting
5
major, GihaFrisina
r
and Senator
'Michael
Smith. J
T9
It
was I
announced that theSenate approved calendar optionZ with two revisions. One wouldmake
spring
break no less thannine days. The other stipulationprevents Saturday exams forMonday,
Wednesday,f
Fridayclasses.
I J !
Jan Gatti, director of the stu-
dent union and
yearbook advisor,presented the yearbook budgetreport
to the
body.
The
budget
re-
quired a total of
$5010 to
producethe
1980-81
yearbook.
Gatti
statedthat "we will know by February
what*
we have^v
and what is
needed,"
?
i *
In conclusion, Lanzillo gave abrief summary of the
Athletic
Task Force vote on football andbasketball, stating that the TaskForce had voted in
favor
of Divi-sion III
NCAA
football.Lanzillo clarified
that a
footballteam
-will jnot
affect anyacademic or athletic budgets. Headded that
"In
theory and almostalways in practice
ft
( DivisionIII) supports
itself."
\
Lanzillo added that the taskforce also voted for the
basket-
ball team
to
stay in Division II.The representatives discussedand debated whether or not itwould be worthwhile to take astand
on
the football issue before
the task
force recommendation
is
presented to the Board of Direc-
tors on
February
5.
The
represen-tatives decided
to dicuss the
mat-ter further at the January 19thmeeting.
r&
a studentpublication
VOL 53
NO.
11
m
MERCYHURST
COLLEGE
JANUARY
16,1981
Hurst Denied Housing
Loan
For Proposed Dormitory
by Anthony MangeriThe Department of Housingand Urban
Development
recentlyrejected a building loan applica-tion from Mercyhurst College.
^According
to John
Nesbifc;assistant
tot the
president forgovernment relations, the
ap-
plication
to
H.U.D.
was
for a loanof
1.5
million dollars.*^
&&L&
The loan, which
would have
ex-tended over
period of
forty years,
was to be
applied
to the
construc-tion of a new
housing
and diningfacility. The proposed 80-bedfacility would
also
house a con-ference center for work shopsand community activities.
\
A
concept
paper,
dated July
22,
1980,
outlined reasons
for
the new
faculty.First,
-
there would bemore
on-campus
housing for theestimated
350
students
who
must
find housjng
elsewhere.The paper also stated thatthere is a need for a conferencecenter.-In the fiscal, year 1979-80an estimated $120,000 was lostdue to a lack of the proper con-ference facilities.^
•'
.
iA
dining room, which would bepan
01 me
proposed
dorm,"would
provide more practical
s
ex-perience
for|
the Hotel andRestaurant Management major.
A new dining room would also
aidin the preparation of cafeteriameals, which currently total
1600
per
day T
*
|
|
The total facility would add an
estimate in revenue to the
school.Nesbit said that H.U.D. onlygave out 10 loans to colleges inour category
whichjwas
deter-mined by our full time studentenrollment. These loans totaled
$25 million
dollars.
He added
thatfour of the ten schools receivingloans were black and
none
of theschools were inPennsylvania.
%
\
Locked In
coal carriers, The
Presque
Isle and Lehigh at Litton
shipyard
arefrozen in by winter. Hurst students can be thankful that the gates are still open.
photo by Rick
Frosgren
College Seeks Higher
Male
Enrollment;
Dance Marathon
Slated;
Institutes New Programs And Majors
SixthConsecutive Year
This year marks the sixth an-
nual
Mercyhurst
dance
marathonbenefiting the Council of Excep-tional Children. January 17through January 19 Mercyhurststudents will be dancing
in
theStudent Union
to
raise
money
forexceptional children in the Eriearea.
*^%*|
Last year
$3,100
was collectedfrom the marathon. The goal for1981 is $3,500 stated Meg Slisz,president ofCEC.
*
£
"We're
very excited about themarathon this year," said Slisz.
"We have
a
new group
of officersand we're enthusiastic aboutmaking this the best
J
dancemarathon possible!"
J
Friday evening from 9 to 1a.m., the band
will
be "thrust".The dance
is
open to the entireMercyhurst Community. Satur-day from
9 j to 11
a.m. ChuckDaniels from WRIE will be thedisc jockey. The disc jockeys forthe rest of the marathon will befrom the campus radio station,WMCY.
£
*
Students participating
in ^
themarathon
will have breaks
everytwo hours, during which mealswill be provided. The athleticdepartment will be on call at alltimes
to,provide
first aid ifneeded.
*T
"We'need
all the help andmoral support from the student
body to help
our dancers throughthe weekend,"
Slisz
added.Any student interested in help-
ing
out with the marathon, shouldimmediatly contact Meg Slisz inSesler 314.
T
by Donna PetersonDr. WilliamGarvey,Presidentof Mercyhurst, feels that themale enrollment at the collegeshould increase.
The
main reasonfor this attitude, according toGarvey, is because "the
girls
arecomplaining". Garvey statedthat the females who enroll atMercyhurst expect a greatersocial life because this is a coedinstitution. President
Garveyrceives this
need
for a "sociallance.
"^
F*
The idea of a
possible
footballteam at Mercyhurst is an impor-tant one said Garvey, because it
would,
"help to restore abalance.'**
v
T
Garvey also commented, "Thequality is superb in our men, wejust need more." "It is hard tonave a vibrant
on-campus
sociallife when there is a dispropor-tionate ratio of male to femalestudents."Kennedy also
pointed*
to
thefact that more women are enroll-ed
in higher
education throughoutthe country than men. He seesthis as a "phenomena, not aproblem."
|
%&£
*
According to figures providedby the office of enrollment Ser-vices, the male enrollment hasdeclined since its peak in
1975.
In1969 when Mercyhurst first ac-cepted males, there were only
49
males to 640 females. The maleenrollment increased steadilybetween
1969 3
and
^1975
whenenrollment
j
statistics show 700males to 784 females. ThomasBillingsley, Director of Enroll-ment Services, attributes thishigh number of male students tothe
creation
of the
Law
Enforce-ment program.
i£Male
enrollment
has
decreasedsince
1975 and the male to
femaleratio is now 488 males to 876females.
3
J J ?
T
Billingsley feels that new pro-grams to be offered at the col-lege, such as computer scienceand petroleum geology, will im-prove the male to female ratiothroughout the 1980's.
2*,;
*,
T
INSIDE.
.. 7
Guest Editorial...
» page2
Alumni Happenings.
page
4More News
.-7
P
a
gc*>
Mercy-Ads.
.» page
6Sports...; page7
t
 
PAGE
2THE
MERGIAD
JANUARY
16,1981
1
/
'
\
s
\
1
ft
v
v
ft
On The Grid Iron ?
To
punt,
or not
to
punt? That
is
the question, and
it?
is*
ragingacross campus.
No
wonder sinceit appears the college will in-stitute a
Division
III football pro-gram in the near future.
§
After objectively consideringthe situation,
one
may find that,
with some
stipulation, football atthe Hurst
may
not be as heart-wrenching as it seemed at first.One stipulation would be thatthe
academic *
standard remainthe same
for
football players andthe students at
§
large. Thisrestriction is incorporated in thetask
force
recommendationalready. So much for the argu-ment that football
would cause
an
influx in walking, talkingjarheads
on
campus.Another fear, that money willbe taken from other budgets, isuseless because the task forcehas stipulated that it will get itsfunding through the new
malepopulation
football should bring.I
have only
one
question at this
point.
What guarantee is therethat enough of these new males
will
actually
plav baUL ^^^
Long-range benefits from a
Letter
football program are
good.
Let'sface it, football is a great alumnidraw.
And
alumni donate
money,
sometimes
a
great
deal
of money.Also, there is the possibility ofreceiving revenue from thingslike gate receipts after the pro-gram has
oeen
firmlyestablished.The crucial stipulation for thisventure is the setting of a stan-dard of quality.
Mercy
hurst doesnot need a mediocre anything,and that includes football team.Division
in
is highly competitiveand
we
better
be
prepared.If in
facte
a
program is in-stituted, we
neea
the foresight todo it right. For example, is $40thousand enough to
outfit
a teamproperly? Or will our playersfollow that savings bondfcom-
mercial and play with paper
wad-
ded in their cleats becausenothing fits?
J
%
I,
for
one,
hope
not.
Should foot-ball be approved by the Board
of
Directors on February 5, onehopes that our community willput forth enough effort to makethe program
one
of excellence.
'?•
A Celebration For King
In honor of Martin LutherKing'sbirthday,the Minority Af-
fairs
Club would like
to
offer
thispoem in celebration.
-
Martin Luther
King
Jr.,a Black mana fighter for social justices,a leader of Black people,a preacher.
?A
man
who
had a dreamthat all men,would be treated equally.
A
man
who
spoke out against:the injustice of this country.
A
man
who
still respected
those
who
hated
him
because
of the
color of
his
skin.
A
man
who
respected all people,even those
who
harassedand threatenedhim.
!A
man
who
gave Black peoplea sense of pride and
direction
A
man
who
did
not
allow
race,
c
creed or religion prejudicehim against others.
A
man
who
believed in
^
non-violence butdied a violent death.
A
man
who
laid
down
his lifefor other
men.
\-3£
%
This man is
\
Martin Luther King Jr.and it is his dream
}
we must never forget.
A
dream that has comea
long
way and have
*
.a longer way
to go.
It
is
for
this reason that
we
should honor
him
nationally
on
January
15
-
his birth.Reginald
Herring %Br
Nerciad
a studentpublication
VOj,
53
NO,10 MERCYHURST
COLLEGE
JAN,
16,1981
Editor-in-Chief Aebecca
L. MartinNews Editor
.Miry
Collins and Donna PetersonCopy Editor
Damien
Schmidt
?
,
v
.
literary Editor
.Flo Scutefla
;v
.
Sports Editor ......Michael Fitzgerald
?^
/
'
Cartoonists
.Jamk
Borowlcz, Christopher
McGowan
Photography
Rkh
Forsgrea, Colleen Farley, Christopher Meyers,Tony
Parmdiso £ j
$
*
Sports
Andy
Fladlay, Joe
Maagnao
\
Typists
Mary
Joe ADea
v
Carta Anderson, Joan Kanaoaocky,
Jim
Kopchak,
Maree-Lynn
Ckon, Tony
Mangeri S
Business Manager
-Boh BrtsUn
Faculty Advisor
n\
State
CnrdoPublisher
.......................Brown-Thompson
Newspapers
a
Tht Merdad Wfftcoam
Letter*
to
the Editor. Policy far
letters
follow* the
aac nkttJines
as
artkte
snfcmhdow.
GaUttiat
Information
It araflaMe
la
Tie Mtfdsd
Office,
located
la the
bsstmeat
offt**oa Hag.
AB mfcw I wlsnsnea
das
by
4*0
en
Mondays.
»15 houRS
£
t/>
EflffllRffl&
Staff Editorial
I
ILiteraturel
Losses Lamented
The other day ProfessorRichard Kubiak offered to
"crucify
and
burn alive
in
front
of
the statue of the virgin Mary" acertain hapless student who wasnot yet known to him but whoseidentity
he
nevertheless intended
to
root
out. He
further
added
thatafter the
crucifixion
and burningthe student
would
be
kicked
out ofclass
J
and flunked (this part Ihave, no
doubt
Kubiak wasserious about)/The admittedly hvperbolic dic-tum came after
the
good pro-fessor discovered that a volumeof the Encyclopedia
Britannica
was missing from the L.R.C.Kubiak
jj
had good reason tobelieve one of nis students hadabsconded with the book.
-My
guess is
he was
probably correctsince the volume mysteriouslyreturned
to its
proper
place
in
thelibrary shortly after the conse-quences of its being taken wererealized.Having my curiousity piquedby the temporary theft, I called
Mrs.
Cooper in the L.R.C. to findout how common such occur-rences were (I don't mean
Kubiak's
irate discourse
-that
sort of thing is a common thoughwell intentioned phenomenon at-tributable to Polish genetics).What I wanted to know was howmuch stuff disappears
from
ourlibrary.
* Wf
f
?What 11
was surprised todiscover from Mrs. Cooper wasthat about nine percent of thebooks added to the library lastyear were lost. That's too muchwhen one considers the expense
of
stocking
a
library
-
it is
also
too
much when
one
considers
that (toparaphrase Mrs. Cooper) in a
small college
we
thrive
on
mutual
trust.
| |8K?
J
I
guess
one
can't
be
too quick
to
blame all lost books on
the
Mer-
cy hurst
community. After
all,
thelibrary is open to the public 80hours a week and there are out-siders using the facility. But,
Mrs.
Cooper also pointed out thesubject areas that are mostdepleted
by
theft. It
seems
to
mehighly improbable that light-
fingered high school
students aremaking
I
off with law enforce-ment, sociology and dieteticsmaterials. Those threecategories, followed closely byreligion and
ethics
are
being
mer-
cilessly
a
kidnapped
from I
theL.R.C.
|f **
If that's not
£
bad
enough,mutilated carcasses ofmagazines and journals havebeen found abandoned in theL.R.C. restrooms after havingbeen
raped
of their desired ar-ticles. We do have a copymachine in the library
-
the
dime
it costs to copy an article has tobe cheaper than the eventual in-crease
reflected
in
our tuition
fop
library up-keep. But even if itwould cost the Mercyhurst stu-dent
nothing
to
replace
lost booksand magazines in the L.R.C.,common courtesy shouldpreclude thievery and destruc-tion of materials.
JE
£...
Word
has
it that a
new
securitysystem will be installed in theL.R.C.
1>y
spring ... I think it'stoo bad
we
have to resort to
that
extra cost in order to deter thekidnappers and rapists
of the
col-lege's literature.
Flo
Scutella
C
n\or\.
I
just
goto,
report
iM
Sortie
Stud&fts
are
hbuWQ
for\
<tt
arly.
(Jell
naoefo
break
it up
<
 
JANUARY
16,1981THeWHRtelAb
PAGE
3
t
ONCE
...
by
SitMt Curc/'o
WEEK
This is the
beginning
of what Ihope to be a weekly feature onvarious topics of interest. Of in-terest to who? Well, myself forone. Hopefully,
they'll
be of in-terest to
you,
the reader, as well.I don't ask you to agree with theideas presented here, but insteadto just consider them. If some ofthe thoughts in this column help
you to^better
define your own,then they've done their job.Although it may
be old
news bythe time you read this, January15 marks the birthday of slaincivil rights leader Martin LutherKing, Jr. For a society whoclaims to
*
have made greatstrides in civil rights, there stillremains discrimination and pre-judice. I cannot help but wonderwhat motivates hatred betweendifferent groups of people, whose
only difference may be in
thecol-or of their
skin,
or
in the god
theyworship, or of the sex they hap-pen to
 be.fi
 x + i
I pose tins issue not to preach,but rather to self-analyze, for Iwould be lying if I said there was
not
any prejudice in my life. I
believe
that human nature
has
anunderside to it, one that surfacesfrom
time to
time
in
each
of
us. It
may
not*
be
entirelyposslble^to
eliminate these qualities
1
fromhuman nature, but to
atjleast
realize that each of us may havesuch feelings may be the beginn-ing of a cure. -I bring this up because of a re-cent series of news stories fromBuffalo, New York. Buffalo is acity of pride, spawned at least inpart from the success its footballteam enjoyed this past year. Butit is also a city living in tensionand fear, because of crimes ap-parently motivated by racism.Several black males have beenmurdered over the past year orso,with the apparent motive be-ing that the
vie
turns were black.These murders are as of yet
unsolved.
JT
I
«F$t^
Of course, the black communi-ty in Buffalo is justifably alarm-ed at what can only be perceivedas a threat one's own existence.Just talk to any male studenthere at Mercyhurst
who
happensto be black and from the Buffaloarea. This appears to be a crimenot only by the white communityagainst the black, but rather one
by
a sick individual against
black
individuals.
. i '*SiL
However, the issue becomes
much more
complex because of
a
planned demonstration by agroup whose
actions
are raciallymotivated. I Representatives ofthe Ku
Klux Klan
have announc-ed that they will demonstrate inBuffalo on Martin Luther King'sbirthday, in an
effort
to bring at-tention to their racist point ofview. Again, as you read this,that planned demonstration may
have
already taken place,
so
as
of
press time the result of such ac-tion is not known. However,members of Buffalo's black com-munity have said they plan acounterdemonstration. Such ac-tions in a community alreadytorn apart by fear and tensioncan be
comparedho
throwinggasoline on a fire. Only moreharm can come from suchactions.
'SBEJBO^^r |fl
Martin Luther King's birthdayis celebrated as a holiday in 11states, including Pennsylvania'sneighbors, New York and Ohio,and I would suggest that it iscelebrated
as
a holiday
to
remindus of the goal of equality for allmankind.
J^SE^ST
I write this because I cannotunderstand what
motivates
peo-ple to assemble in such an at-mosphere. One student recentlypointed
out to me
that
he
feels the
Ku Klux
Klan themselves are notto be feared, but rather the fearthey may generate
is
what shouldbe considered a threat. I canagree with that, but it is not thefear that lynches, nor the fearthat discriminates and murders.This issue leaves me frustrated,because it is a helpless feeling tosit back and not be able to doanything about, the oppressionthat
goes
on.
The only
thing I feelI can do is continue with my pre-sent course - realize my owntendencies and limitations, andguard against being swept up in
any actions
brought about
by fear
ornate.*
« * & ««w
Faculty Focus Features Igor Stalsky
By Chris SettlemireAs you
walk
into his office yousee pictures of theatrical topicsand
he is on the phone
speaking
of
rehearsals, there
is
only one per-son we can be referring to andthat is Igor Stalsky.Mr. Stalsky came to Mer-cyhurst
College in the
fall of 1964,and he has done a lot for the col-lege and the theatre department.He hat seen the theatrical pro-gram at Mercyhurst from allangles, the classroom
-
and thestage.
v
"I
really
enjoy
feedback andimprovement,
he
commented ashe leaned back in his chair usinghands signals, as if directing aproduction.
"The
literature class
is
less fulfilling to me than thespeech class
because
just like inproduction of plays you can seethe* change of people's ac-complishments and receive
feedback."
"" •
Mr. Stalsky commented on theelimination of theater
as a
major,
"It
was a major for about
ten
years when I got here. By lastsummer I found out that onlyabout three people had becomesuccessful in the area of theater,
Christie
Warnick for example.
>'
"So due to
the
high competition
level in the line of
work
I thought
it
better to drop it to a minor. Ithought the
false
advertising tostudents that
we
could
give
thema job after college, even onBroadway was just too much to
offer
the Kids.
r
,,,'
:
"Now
with it as a minor I feelthat it makes the students a bet-ter person because of thenumerous facets that it entails,i.e., shops, acting, speech, text,etc. Plus it makes it sheer fun in-
(
%
Igor Stalsky
photo
by
Rick
Forsgnn
&
Stead
of a
worry*"
w >
Mr. Stalsky has done much forthe college as well as the theaterdepartment
He has gone
out intothe local community and broughtin outside agencies to perform,included
the
Erie Playhouse, andprofessional actors who perform
For
a minor
fee
compared to thatof a regular theater production."I would also like to bring inclowns, puppets, and even MSGmusicals because Erie did ahangup job with the summerclassics and without theater as amajor it leaves me other time to
do more things like
that,"
he
add-ed
enthusiasticallv.
*
u
T^
"I have
one big
thing in
the works
right now, out remember thatthis is just in the proposal stageright now. I would like to makedinner-theater a major."We have the facilities, in factI'd
say we
probably have
the
bestfacilities in the area and the onlyreal cost to the school would be
to hire one more
faculty member.
"Erie
used
to
have one
dinner-.
theater group and local peoplejust loved it, so I
don't-see
whyMercyhurst couldn't be
successful.
1
"We have the best
group of kidssince I've been here and that'ssixteen years.
The-kids
v
have
great enthusiasm and they ac-cept my crazy ideas and even
come up with some
of their own."There was really only
two
pro-
blems
Mr.
Stalsky could point outwith college's theatrical depart-ment. "One of course is alwaysbudget and right now I'm work-ing
on a
way
to use
a new systemin order to get the departmentmore money."And the second one is boys,there is simply not enough boysand never have
been.
15
"Right now I'm having pro-blems casting for
Guys
and
Dous
because I have sixteen maleparts and only fifteen males atauditions."
^L
*
£±
When
asked
how he
anticipatedGnys and Dolls to turn out he satstraight and a grin appeared onhis face, "Great! The leads aresensational, they look good,sound good, and are acted out
Synapse ]
I
Scorchers
Brown
Welcome
back!
After a long rest your brains should find thisweek's head hurter an easy challenge.
*
Jonessays,"Smith will
now
tell a lie."
&
•Smith says, "Brown
will now
tell a lie."
m
Brownsays, "Jones and Smith are lying."
I
Who's lying and who's telling the truth??? Incidently, if you
took
Logic,
you
can
do this
problem very
quickly using
symboliclogic!!
t -tig ; spP
These
months
mean
snow,
andsnow means cold and cold canmean frostbite if the properpreventative measures aren'ttaken.
WXMm
-"
;
*H|
dfiji
The opposite} of sunburn,frostbite results
from a
chilling
ofthe skin until
the surface
and
sub-cutaneous of the skin becomefrozen. Since cold anesthetizesthe
skin,
victims often have noidea they are being frostbitten.ft Prevention is the easiest
treat-ment.
.. wool clothing providesthe best protection
against*;
the
cold
but
be
sure it is
not too
con-stricting. Be sure mittens don'tbecome soggy, because frostbiteoccurs most often in moist
cold.
.FiT"
despifeyour
efforts,frostbite does occur it is easilyrecognizable* You'll notice aslight swelling of the affectedarea, which will first turn dullgray or white and possibly darkred. As the skin rewarms, itbecomes increasingly painful.However, mild cases usuallyrecover quite well.
«
Remember:..
rubbing andmassaging the skin will onlydamage underlying tissues, aswill rubbing
it
in
snow.
In order
torewarm
the skin safely, stay in acool room and apply cool-to-lukewarm moist
packs
to the frozenarea. Gently massage the skinaround the affected
area,
jAfter a while, you can give the
a
victim
*hot
J
drinks,,
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which-
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1
Student Service Bureau
Winter TermMonday, Wednesday, Friday
11:00-3:00
Tuesday, Thursday10:00
-
11:00
3:00
-
4:00
". Check cashingMonday, Wednesday, Friday
12:00 •
3:00
LIBRARY
HOURS
WINTERpERM4981
MONDA
Y-
THURSDA
Y
^9:00
turn.
- Midnight]
FRIDAY
f
9:00
a.m.
•4:30
p.m.
I
SATURDAY^
10:00 a.m. • 4:30 p.m.
SUNDAY I
2:00
p.m.
• Midnight
good.. Everyone seems to havethat
'ham It
up'attitude and thatis exactly what we're looking forsince it is a ham it up show."The musical
director
SteveKayner can
make
anyone singand the students are reallyenthusiastic.^
}
*
.
"I'm excited about it" con-cludes
Stalsky.
And with so much
enthusiasm, Hurst students arebound to get caught up in it.

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