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The Merciad, Sept. 25, 1981

The Merciad, Sept. 25, 1981

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The Merciad, Sept. 25, 1981
The Merciad, Sept. 25, 1981

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06/02/2011

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a
^student
publication
VOL.
54 NO. 4
MERCYHURST
COLLEGE, ERIE, PA.
Goals Of Mercyhurst
i|
Outlined In Master
Plan
The
office of President
William
P. Garvey has
>composed
amaster plan in order
to
:
moreclearly define the
goals and
am-bitions of Mercyhurst College.This plan, covering the years1981-1986, outlines objectives to
be
realized
in those
years, as wellas strategies
 for
his realization.The plan relates to all areas
of
the college, including academicdevelopments, student servicesdevelopment,-
and
the develop-
ment
ofv, the school's financialresources. As of now,
the plan
issimply aproposal;it
has
not beenapproved by the Student Senate,nor by the Board of Trustees.
This
formal
review g
processshould be completed byNovember of
this
year.
j;
Much
of the Master Plan's textdeals with enrollment manage-ment According to the proposal,the college wishes both to
in-
crease the size of its enrollment,
Graduation
RequirementReduced By 8 Credits
**
President William Garvey andDean. David Palmer rescindedan earlier decision and reduced
the graduation reouirement
from
128 credits to 120
during
the
sum-mer months.
* Jl
j£_
This reversal,
in a memo
datedAugust
18,1961,
overroa d
advoca-tions of
Qw
Senate,the StudentGovernment, and the Board ofTrustees last Spring's liberalstudies proposal, which includedthe 128 credit graduationrequirements
*^This
change
In
college policy
was
fully
within the powers
of
the
Dean David Palmer
Living Section:
Sealer and
Briggs
iSee Page
4
and to adopt
a
more
selective
ad-
missions policy based primarilyon high school performance andclass rank. Other goals in thisarea include: the development ofa special loan program forstudents, the
computerization
ofregistration
procedures
and thedevelopment of a program formarginal students.
Another
area given
much
em-
§
basis in the plan is athleticevelopment.Goals*in inter-collegiate
athletics
•,
include
the
addition of both a men's and awomen's swimming team, theconstruction of
crew tanks by
theyear
1984,
and the
hiring
of
a full-time
women's
athletic director-coach. The college also hopes toinvolve at least
50
percent of thestudent
body in some
aspect of
In-
tramural athletics.Mercyhurst also has a numberof
.construction
plans.
Some*ofthesej
are: the
development
ofhandicap access to Baldwin andOld Main, construction of aPhysical
FtftnessSi'rail
throughout campus, constructionof
a
new
PfryslcafFitriess
Cerilier,purchase of Sesler Apartments,
and the repla
cement of Baldwin's
roof.
President,
1 explained
DeanPalmer.
^The
reasons
for thischange, said Palmer, was that atmost liberal arts colleges, the
128credit
limit is considered a levelthat is appropriate. However, atMercyhurst
"There were
severalproblems with the 128 credit
re-
quirement," said the Dean. "Itwas
inancially
mpossible to goalong
with
that given the publish-ed
tuition.**]
Palmer also
.revealed
thatthere was a necessity in
making
sure
Mercyhurst's
science
pro-
gram
Is
competitive with otherarea colleges. Science studentswere always charged for the ex-tra lab
credit
they took withevery science course, he said;The Dean explained that theadministration wrestled withseveral different proposals thenreverted to the
original
creditsystem
jwhich
created the leastamount of difficulty. There is nolonger a
change
 for
he
one credit
lab,
said Palmer. The credit willappear*
onf
the
^student's
transcripts; however, if
a
studentwants it to count toward gradua-tion, he must pay for it. As aslight counterbalance,
the lab fee
was raised
 from
 $25 to
$75.
DeanPalmer added that he'd be will-ing to cooperate fully with theAcademic Policy Committee inworking
out
a new proposal.
Scholarships:
Egan Scholars
VS.
Valedictorian/Salutatorian
ZStory page
5Editorial page 2
Loan Changes Explained;Parental Loan Begins
:
0££
*% Changes
in the
student loan program
and
the
addition of aparental loan
program have been announced by
Barry Zem-bower, the Director of Financial
Aid
at Mercyhurst College.After October
l,
1981,
students whose parents have an ad-justed gross income of $30,000 or more must complete a
"needs
test"
in order to
be considered for a loan.
< jL-i
"The needs test
is relatively
liberal," said Zembower. Headded that the
form
is approximately only
10 lines
long andwill only be "a couple of minute's
work."
f
A student's
expected
family contribution plus
any financial
aid
received
by
the student subtracted
rom
he
total collegecosts determine
the amount
of
loan
a student may borrow.The impact of the needs test will not be as significant atMercyhurst as
iUwould be*in
a public college,
stated
Zembower.
-JJP
t > *'Because
tuition is usually
less
in the
public
sector,
the
ex-pected family contribution together with other
inancial
 aidawards may equal or be close to total college costs.
Thiswould mean
the student
would not be able
to take
out
a
stu-
dent
loan,
t 1
Private schools fared well with this
type
of federal finan-cial aid cutback, said Zembower.
considering
other options
which may
have
been
chosen.
A
$25,000 needs test was
one of
the alternative
budget cut
options.!
,
A new parental loan program has recently begun, saidZembower. Parents can now borrow up to $3,000 per eachdependent child for each academic year.
-3The
parental loans were
approved under
ormer
 PresidentGarter at a 9 per cent interest rate.
If
the loan
monejbis
disbursed before
October 17 the
interest
rate will remain atsTper
cent Funds
given
after
October 1 will be at
a
14
per centinterest rate.
i^
<J*
\£&£&
Parents are given
10
years to repay the loan, said Zem-bower. Repayment
begins -60
days after the firstdisbursement.
7
\
•*£ Jf''As
opposed to
coming up with the
money
out
of the pocket,it's
a super
deal," said Zembower,.
* *
There
ha
ve been
no
federal parental
loans
in
the
past, ac-cording to the Financial Aid director. Insurance companieshave bad
loan
programs in the past but at higher interestrates.
r T J? & $5
,:
Parents'can
only borrow the difference between thestudents' other financial aid and the total college costs,stated Zembower.
^^ ££?A
typical repayment
plan for
a parent
who borrows $3,000and pays
it back over a
10-year period would
denote a mon-thly payment of $46.58.
* 4
?&m*
(PT Zembower said the
parental
loan
program
has
a significantimpact
on
college students.,
:
g \
k.
Although the financial aid changes mean much morepaperwork for the Financial Aid Office
at
Mercyhurst, saidZembower, they "will- make the
^college
much moreaffordable." i f
,
Merciad Rated "First Class
9
Mercyhurst College's studentnewspaper, the ^MERCIAD, hasachieved
a rating
of "First class"from the National^ ScholasticPress Association for the winter
and
spring
terms
of
198l7
gf'
Hie top
rating was awarded to
the
weekly
student publication
onthe basis of comparison withother newspapers from collegesacross
the
nation of similar size.The first-class rating-is an im-provement over the second-classrating the Merciad received forthe fall term of 1980. Stephen J.Curcio, the
MERCIAD's
facultyadvisor, said the first-classrating reflects the
effort
mat allstudents working on the paperput toward making the MER-CIAD
'
a
""top-notch journalstic
effort*
*
'
The newspaper
.was
judgedagainst
P
other papers in five
AtMSG
^ -j
Visitation Hours
f:-*'
a
.
*
To Be Changed
^5^?
%he
Mercyhurst StudentGovernment
discussed
how thevisitation hours in the afternoonwill be changed from
1 pm
to 12
noon
at
the ^September
22meeting. These hours willbecome effective once a memo
has been
dispersed
to
all staff
in-
volved, said Rich Lanzillo, MSGareas: coverage and content,writing and editing, opinion con-tent, design, photography,
Ait
and graphics. The rating systemNSPA/ACP uses five
classes
ofperformance. The MERCIADreceived a total of
3,365
points,with a minimum of
3,100
neededfor a
 first
 class rating.
^5§j4The
MERCIAD^ evidences anumber of
attributes which
attestto the quality of the publication"wrote NSPA/ACP* Judge BernonPeacock in the evaluation, ad-ding that
the rating
reflects "thediligence and skill of its
staff".
Peacock added
that
2
foremostamong the diligence
and
skill thestudent reporters exhibited
wereVillingness
to investigate
and
report on
f
local
issues
of,
significance
and to
offer editorial
opinion
and comment
on issues of
local concern.**
ii
A team of students will
foe
for-mulated to discuss the pros andcons of
the
ive-year
 plan
propos-ed
by
Dr. Garvey^
iThe
amount of credits neededto graduate was discussed. Anearlier decision
\
to
changegraduation requirements from120
to 128
was
changed
back
to 120
credits by the President and theDean this summer. The reason-ing behind mis sudden decisionwas
due to the new
billing systemthat
would
have to
be
proposed
if128
credits were needed- tograduate, explained StudentSenator,
Bonnie
James.
,
A
motion
was made by Mike
Smith to send
a letter
to the Dean
recommending that he agreewith
 five
 days
taken
off the begin-ning or"
iTianKSgiving
vacation
and adding four days to the begin-i
ning of Christmas vacation.
The g
motion passed
ll to
7.2*
IB .i
The SAC report was given byVice* President Mary
Baldauf.
Some of the
upcoming events willbe Mr. Arthur Schlesinger Jr.,
who
will speak on September
24,
at
8
pm in the Zurn Recital Hall.It is free to Mercyhurst Com-
munity
and $1.00 for all others.
There
will
be a
Fall
Get-TogetherS
on September
26
at Belle ValleyFire Hall, from
8 pm to
midnight. I!Admission is
$3.00 and
buses will^be provided.*In the coverage and contentsection, the MERCIAD scoredbetween very good and excellent
in
J
criteria
including scope ofsources,
i
timeliness of stories,and content.
A perfect
score wasgiven for the newspaper'sbalance of sources.Student reporting earned arating
between
very good
and
ex-
it
cellent^ for news, feature, and
^sports
stories. Highest scores
••were
earned in the opinion con-tent section, where excellentratings were, given
for
opinioncontent,editorial cartoons, andopinion feature writing. Also,editorail
iwriting
received aperfect score.
,i
\
-
»«j"Naturally
I'm proud" saidMERCIAD editor Rebecca Mar-
tin.
"The
 first
 class rating shows
that
a college newspaper canachieve distinction as a student-opera ted publication."
Letters
ToThe Editor
Page
2
f
 
1
It
\
IB
1*
Editorial
A Glaring
|jg
Disparity
There
is
glaring disparity bet-ween
the
scholarships providedfor
the
Egan Scholars programand those
for the
new
valedic-torian
and
Salutatorian program.Both programs recruitfreshmen; however, EganScholars require minimum SATscores
of
1000 while the new pro-gram requires
only
that
the
students
be
Valedictorian
or
Salutatorian
of
their high schoolclass.
:
'
SS5|The academic scholarshipsalso differ. Egan Scholars
receive
$1,000, renewable every
year
the
program's
3.0
Q.P.A.
re-quirements
are met.
Valedic-
torians
and
Salutatorians receivefull scholarships renewableevery year
the 3.5
Q.P..A.
re-quirements are met.The disparity results
in
the
comparison of SAT scores. Rightnow there are freshmen studentsreceiving full scholarships whoseSAT
^scores
were below
the
minimum requirement
for the
Egan Scholar
program. One
mustquestion the justification in this.Is
it
acceptable that
a
studentwith
low
academic,
scores
be
rewarded with
a^
full scholarshipwhile another student with
a
distinctively
higher,
score geton^
ly
$1,000.
J
:
7,>
If Mercyhurst
believes
academic prowess should
be
rewarded, then
it
must reward its
'scholars
on
a
more consistentbasis. Perhaps
the
scholarship
amounts
should
be
reversed;Egai^cholarsj|eceivin^ul^nd
Valedictorians Salutitorians get-ting the $1,000.
^"^
Another alternative would be
to
offerall freshmen scholars $1,000renewable
in
higher, amountseach year
Q.P.A.
requirementsare met*This
way
more'scholar-ships are available. And an incen-tive
to
achieve academic
ex-
cellence over this four year periodis provided.
Letter
ColumnNauseates
JStuclent I
*
Isn't Bonnie James fortunate tobe the Merciad's Feature Editor?Any other editor wouldn't haveallowed
(I
hope)
a
nauseating ar-ticle like
"On
a
Harvard
Ex-
perience" to appear
in
print?Ob-viously
Ms.
James likes
to pat
herselfonthe back and wants
the
rest
v
of *< the student* body
to do
likewise.
I,
among others,
Was
not impressed by or interested
in
learning
the
details
of
James'summer
at
Harvard. I
am
glad
it
was enjoyable
and
successful,but
the
subject is
of
limited
in-
terest.Idon't inflict stories aboutmy trip to Europe on people whohaven't asked
to
hear them.
The
editor should
at
least have
in-
sisted
on
a
rewrite before prin-
S^tingthe
article.
The
"golly
gee"
unsophisticated tone
is
beneathJames
and
is
reminiscent
of
"Tammy Goes To-College". ILg would expect better
of
someoneso profoundly influenced
by
such
'
.aprestigious educational institu-Stion.
*%
.
Nancy Pa tScanlonric Miss Scanlon
?
***5iA summer in Europe? How nice!We'd love to near about itjflr
Mt
>
1
:*£ iSheEditor
SEPTEMBER 25,1981
PAGE 2
cur
Coltyiartx.
Que
Kero 15
||§j|
£r\
fke-
-f ret ib of
-fta.
*\
1
-Uf**--
B
fa^
>s\\it\\)rtj/
/J
no
/feo.*..
Oh
Ju fke
SkaJou)
fo\ou)S.
LetterLetter
r
|
,
StuderitsWpset
-111
$
3.50 Duquesne
Game
With Homecoming Plans
W?Price
Unfair Says Student
Dear Editor:
.
*
We are writing this letter con?"cerning the Homecoming Dance.It has been brought to our atten-tion that Freshmen
and
Sophomores will not be permittedto attend the dance due
to two
factors:
f) the*legality
ofB.Y.O.B. and
underaged drinkingand 2) the behavior
of
supposedunderclassmen
at the
lastHomecoming Dance.Just because a student is
rank"
ed according
to
credits does notmean that they
are
not twenty-one or older. Every student hereshould be permitted to attend any
activity!
funded by
i
the schoolsince every student's tuition
is
accepted.*
*| ** *
-5This
decision regarding
who
will
be
permitted
to
attend
the
danced
was made
by
a
few
ad-ministrative employers. We feelthat
the
organizer
of
the danceshould look
at
their methods
of
organizing and running the
dance
last year. iMiSJ
Last year they
let
persons
in
who were
not
dressed accordingto the dress code and they permit-ted anyone
in
with alcoholwhether they were
of age or not.
If
the
behavior
of
some studentswas*so objectionable,
why
weren't they asked
to
leave?
^*
Many students who did behaverespectably
are
being punishedfor
the
actions
of the few
who
were belligerent.An event such
as
Homecomingshould
be
equally important
for
both alumni
and
students.
If
the
manpower
to set up the
CampusCenter will
be
coming mainlyfrom students
who are not
twenty-one and arenot being paidfor their efforts, it is only fan* thatthey?shouldbe<permittedtoattend.
Zfo
It
is
our understanding thatMSG
is
providing $1000.00
of
fun-ding to assist the Alumni Office inhaving this activity. It is the righttheuse
of
this money and notjusta select few.^
w
^ST"'We hope that other studentswill support our views and that
this
type of domination will not be
permitted,f^jjiv
k
99
Last week when I attended the,
Mercyhurst-Duquesne
football
gameiftVlike everyone elao^was
forced
to pay
$3.50
for
admissionto
the
game. Before
I
left
for
thegame, I was told that tickets were$2.00
at
the
gate.for-Mercyhurststudents.
If
I
were
to
purchasemy ticket here, I would nave hadto pay $4.00 ($2.00
for
the bus
and
$2.00foradmission)
I,
likea lot ofothers drove
to the
game.
|
fe?Why were students forced
to
pay $3.50
to see
a
game thatwould have cost nothing
to see
here
in
Erie?
For
Mercyhurst'hornet gaine*-
if
M
onlypvisiUf g^pecbforsV$TjQo. ""Thismay not seem like
a
lot of moneyto some people,
but
when
you re
on your
own and
have
to buy
some of the essentials in life, it alladds
up.
Paying
a
high price
to
see an athletic event might causepeople
to
wonder whether
the
cost
is
worth
it.
3Robert J. Posega
i
THE
MERCIAD
 
Op-Ed
SEPTEMBER
25,1981PAGE
3
^Biking
Jp*%.,
MtHolland
jgSj
JJ »
By
George
GarreltsI heard that Holland was "fullof bicycles," but hearing aboutsomething and experiencing arenever the same for me. I wantedto see that "fullness" for
myself.
My
wife, Louise, and I decided tojust leap
overfall
the obstaclesand go. We dropped off ourchildren at her parents' home in
Minneapolis,?put;our
bikes onNorthwest Airlines, climbed theramp and took off
for
Gatwick,England. From Gatwick we flewimmediately to Amsterdam onBritish Caledonia, got our bikesfrom the luggage people, putthem together, changed clothesand headed out of the airport onthe bikepath (fietspad in Dutch),direction
Ley
den.
' r
Louise
and
I had done somebiking in Europe, mostly inFrance and Belgium. So we hadsome experience with airlines. Ithelps to have snap-on wheels sothat you can take the
front
wheeloff easily, turn the handle barsaround
to
fit
inside the wheel andattach them both to the bikeframe
with
tape.
We
also take offthe pedals ana I lower my
seat.
On the return flight the bikescame up on the
conveyor!
belt,thereby passing as our luggage,which is the ideal situation. Wecarried
our
clothes
in
a
back pack
which fit easily under the seat orinto an overhead
compartmentAll this plus
the guts
to
behave asif this is all normal procedure is
enough
to get
you
where
you"
are
Tjoingm"
EurbperThe
dominateimpression I brought away fromour 12 days of biking in Holland
wasfone
of being part of thetransportation
system.;
Here
in
America v
it is "catch as catch
can"*«for
the
cyclist,
but inHolland the bicyclist has beenbuilt into a system. The cyclist isnot on a completely equal levelwith the motorists but he doesfigure in the
construction
ofroads,
j
crossings, rsigns,
Jand
(believe
it
or
not)
the
stop
and
go
lights. He has a set of lights all
his/her
own.
There she is on abicycle in red, amber, and green.'Sometimes the fietspads
are
n
°t
easy to find, but
they;are
there.You have been provided for onevery street, at every intersec-tion, between every town andvillage and every other place towhich you want to go.
\
Duringthose entire
two
*weeks
I ex-perienced courtesy frommotorists and truckers in
every
city in Holland save Amsterdam.There
the*crush
of traffic andconstruction has produced moreaggressive motorist
behavior.
There are five
.kinds <of
fietspads. One
isfmade outgof
brick, and that has a tendency tobe bumpy. So do the ones madeout of
rather-,
large
v-
cementblocks.
The
asphalt
paths seem
to
be more
recent
and they aremarvelous.
They come
in
two col-
ors,
black and red and they areboth superb to encounter. Other-wise, they are the asphalt
coun-
try and
city
^roads* and
streets
which the bicyclists sometimesshare with the motorists. In thecities the paths are marked
in
the
streets
awhile
in the countrysidethere are no markings but thereare
signs
showing
(he
roads
to
bebike
lanes?
i
*
Bikelanes are sometimescrowded in the cities, before andafter working
hours.;At
all timesthey are
well
travelled and it is a
good
idea
to
keep one's eyes
peel-ed for faster bikers and mopeds.
^Through
The Looking
Glass
^
Editor's Note
:
'
,
^
This is the first of a series of reprinted
aj
Merciad articles
which'will
feature all stories with
i3
relevance to the new.
^
s
.
'^£ *
?
4
This article, which appeared in part in the September 12,
&
1975,
issue
of
The
Merciad,
College
an
interesting perspec-
^
tive to recently released
^* *
/H~
:
w^
| "Master Plan" Blueprint III: Hurst in 1980
j^§
Jg|
A
group
of eight persons
-
representing
the
students, facul-ty, administration, and trustees of the
College
- has
embark-ed on the project of designing the Mercyhurst of the 1980's.The group known as the Blueprint
III
Task Force wasorganized in May of this year at the behest of Dr. MarionShane, President of the College.&S*1 *The task force takes its name and heritage, from theBlueprint I and Blueprint II planning projects of the late
1960's
and early 1970's.
According
to Dr. William Garvey,Vice President of Academic Affairs and Chairman of theTask Force, it was the first
two
Blueprints that transformedthe Mercyhurst of
1965
into the very different
Mercyhurst'of
1975.
[
] : jg
When asked what
the
purpose of Blueprint
III
would
be,
Dr.Garvey stated: "I still believe that the statement
'the
needfor change is the only thing that doesn't change' is anoperative statement at Mercyhurst .
? .It's
absolutelynecessary for
the
college
to
continuously consider
significant
changes if it is to continue to meet the challenges to itssurvival.
M
i J
"
v
?
-.".
)
It
was
at the organizational meeting
in May
that PresidentShane spoke to the task force on their goals and presented
them with
the
guidelines
to be
incorporated into any plans forthe Mercyhurst of the future. Those goals were:1) an optimum enrollment for Mercyhurst of 1500 FTE(Full Time Equivalency) Students.
S
1" 8
2)
A
continuing movement and commitment
to
interinstitu-tional cooperation through the Erie Consortium of Collegesand Regionalization.
+-£
*oL
I 3) Preservation of the Christian heritage of the College.
£*4)
Development of programs which would relate
to the
liv-ing and career needs of students and society in general, in-cluding consideration of
the
market appeal of new programs.5) Development of Mercyhurst's
role in
the Continuum andits commitment to
life-long
learning.
fifcgSiri
~i
i
One
of the important duties for the Task Force will be toformulate a
purpose
and a set of goals for Mercyhurst as a
col legeTDfT Shane
stated:
*'Before
BfuepHnTi.
the purposeand goals of Mercyhurst were quite- clear.
Since
Blueprint I,the changes
have come
so
rapidly and the
college
now has so
many different things going that it is time to sit down andcreate a
new
sense of identity, direction and purpose. I con-sider this one of the main duties of the Blueprint III TaskForce."
I i
With the start of the academic year, the members of theTask Force
will
be
meeting
weekly,
according
to Dr.
Garvey.
Harvard:A Living Art
-i'< ***
Editor's Note: This is the secondof
a
two-part series
in
which Bon-nie James, Feature Editor ofTHE MERCIAD concludes herexperienceat Harvard. Here, shediscusses atmosphere anduniversity facil- ities as
i
theyrelate
to
her personal revelationsabout the oldest educational in-stitution in America.
•J
Harvard houses more than justrare people; the university andits vicinity comprises a physicallegend
which;landmarks
historical events, famous poetsand breathtaking New Englandscenery. I
i *
1
The
Charles
River dons
all
the.grandeur and majesty befitting
of
its
name? Christened
after
King v
Charles
i
I,.
this natural
sovereign^
is crowned by the
Longfouow
bridge in downtownCambridge. It is no wonder thatwith all the bridges crossing theCharles,
New
England
poets
suchas Robert
Lowell
and Hart Cranebecame inspired
by
their concept
of I
connecting one place toanother, one
culture
to another,one life to another.
The
preservation of
T.S.
Eliot's•Time Past" within "TimePre-sent?' is manifested in"Grendels", a restaurant erectedback
in
Harvard's turbulent '60's.It is a beautiful Bostonian
man-
sion transformed into a periodpiece. Classical music floatsthrough the upstairs dining hallwere
shishkebob
and pate'embellish the
menu,
whiledownstairs
pipecRh "Jazz
muslc~'compliments the bacon-burger-
and-cherry-coke
crowd. I was
told
that Grendels is the last ofthe remaining "hang-outs" oncepeopled with hippies, yippies andflower children
during
Harvard'sradical era.
jun.
You can often lose that concen-tration
when you
are
biking along
canals which are
full
of in-teresting things to see like
wind-
mills, boats, of all shapes andsizes, almost infinite
numbers
ofducks, fisherfolk, and wind-surfers, or people just sitting in
the
sun. The
farms are
also worth
scrutiny. They
are'"handsome,
groomed, giving more of an ur-ban than rural impression,
plot*
ted and pieced
by*
their ownsimilar canals, gracedsometimes with precision that-
ching
on the roofs,
dark-
brownsheep, countless cows. Along allthese lanes
from city
to
city
thereis a stream of varied bikers in
good
weather, families of four orfive.expert riders going swiftly,older men and women people ofall ages, sizes using
bikesffor
recreation or
transforation.
Our routine developed so thatwe found ourselves in museumsand important areas of the city
we
were visiting
in
the mornings,on the road in the afternoons andearly
evening,
in our
hotel
by 6:30or 7, dining leisurely at a placethat looked
good
to us
in the laterevening. Sometimes we took in a
movie
or a concert; otherwise
we
are reading and getting ready fortomorrow
or
'1
having a lateespresso at a sidewalk cafe. Oc-casionally, as at the Hague westopped for a swim in the NorthSea or visited with a Dutch fami-ly with whom we were ac-
quainted.
Travel
in
town could
be
demanding and
even frustrating
until you found out more aboutContinued
on page
7
i*.l
; . , ,
O,
$ftO
MISTER
Home
of
Fresh BakedFreshly Made
Delivery System WithCombined Order At:
•'*.1f
III
PleaseminutesI prior
to
deliveryShowiMercyhurst
FRESH
BAKED
PIIXA^
[FiMHUAKNOAMS
Cr*/H>se From
Save
33rd
Pine
DILICtOUSHOACIIS
iWS.
459-4104
Harvard Square is slightlyreminiscent of that time, but it isprobably more reflective of thegreat emphasis on the arts inBoston. Musicians
carrying
anything from a horn to a harpmay be found on street corners,in
mint
of banks, and in subwaystations. Mimes', comedians, anddancers also filter through theSquare, opening their souls topublic criticism with an
empty
tin cup that they
hope
will
be
till-,ed with coins.
s Ja
Harvard Yard
looks
directly atthe Square as it sits on the otherside of
Massachusetts
Avenue.As the original Harvard College,which was built in the 1600's, theYard is entirely encompassedwith wrought-iron gates and pad-ded with cobblestone walkways.The classrooms of literature arenamed after classics such as
Ralph
Waldo Emerson.
%
Thescience building is a replica of thePolaroid Land Camera, fundedand named after Mr. Land, whodeveloped the Polaroid. Everyacademic discipline has its owngreat history to boast."These
fields
of study salute those peoplefamous
in
their past
by
collectingtheir ^originally
publishedmanuscripts and/or
tapes
of theirlectures
elsewhere^
In fact, thetracts of one living monumentare still fresh on Harvard'sgrounds:
I've
heard B.F; Skinner
drops
by occasionally for lunch.ultimately, tins is the pictureHarvard has Impacted on my
"Sour**!!*"-
is
*liire-*a^poem-,
aesthetically structured with aunique style that alludes to the
historyv
and people
-of
ourAmerican heritage. Its tone isreverent and its theme
is
to reachfor the highest ideal in life evenamong
the
highest idealists.
I
feelvery
much
about my experiencethis summer as Robert Frost felt
When Ihe ;wr
ote
WTte"^Grft
Outright":
'U %
S o
me thing
w
elw ere
withholding made us weakUntil we found out that it wasourselves
;
£*<
"*jt s
We
were withholding from ourland of living, |
**
v.
And forthwith found salvationin surrender,
s
7?
P
Such
1
;
as
>we
were we gaveourselves outright
>'
**
(The deed of gift was manydeeds of war)
?§
To
ihe land vaguely
realizing
westward, 25?"
j
But still unstoried, ^artless,
unenhanced,
t*
Such as she was, such as shewould become.*
&3T
THEMERCIAD
ATTENTIONFRESHMEN
The StudentGovernment is
nowf
acceptingletters of intent
for|
FreshmanRepresentatives.Letters shouldbe dropped
offiat
the
I
Government
Office 209
Main

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