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The Merciad, Oct. 2, 1981

The Merciad, Oct. 2, 1981

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The Merciad, Oct. 2, 1981
The Merciad, Oct. 2, 1981

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ilmiad
a student publication
VOL 54
NO/4
MERCYHURST
COLLEGEj
ERIE,
PA.OCTOBER
2,1981
'Hurst
Gets*Signs;Two More
Coming
Traffic signs pointingMercyhurst- bound /peopletoward the college have beenplaced
at
four different locations.Two additional* signs will
beposted"soon
according to JohnNesbit, assistant to the presidentfor government relations.
Two
signs saving "MercyhurstCollege Exit
7
have been placedon
1-90,
both east bound and
west-
bound, said Nesbit. One sign
ap-
pears at the junction of
Old
French Road and State Streetand one sign is at East 38th andOld French Road.
|
%&*_
The two signs which have notbeen posted yet
will
be
at
the
bot-tom of the two exit
7
ramps.
*.
Nesbit stated that the processfor receiving the signs began latein February 1981. It normallytakes
18 months
for
the
process
to
be
completed^
said
Nesbit,
butthe
Mercyhurst
signs wereerected alter
only
six months dueto persistence
(
of
Nesbit and
Mercyhurstji
,.*•&•
*JtL*m
After
the application was madein February
to
the Department
of
Commerce,
theiDepartment
decided that the
signs
were
in
thebest interest of the state.
Hie
ap-plication was then forwarded toPennDOT
and-the
signs weremade in Harrisburg.
jP%
f
According to Nesbit, the costfor the signs is "still up in theair." When the application wasmade, said Nesbit,
1-90
wasundergoing construction and thesigns were purchased as part ofthe construction cost. Nesbitstated that there will probably beeither
no
cost
or a
nominal
cost
to
the college.
S?reffik
*$
iNesbit
said there are threereasons why he chose Exit 7 asthe location for the MercyhurstCollege
signs.
:
Firstt;most of.the
Mercyhurst-bound traffic travelsup
1-79.
Also,
exit? is much
moredeveloped in
the
way of
services
such as
gas?
stations, motels,stores, and restaurants. Finally.PennDOT called
for*
that roadsection to be
paved.^&
Ltiitlii
1
Nesbit
said
the idea for
tft^
1
Nesbit. "It does add an
element
of access". 1
ids-
signs
was initiated by former
MSG
president Tim
Seltzer.
^.
Academic CalendarChanged For 81-82
I .<
The
1981-82 Academic
Calendarhas been changed, according, toPresident William P. Garvey.The change will affectThanksgiving
'and
Christmasvacation
this
year.
g
Thanksgiving vacation will beshortened by four days andChristmas break
will
be
extendedby four days. The last
day-of
classes
before
Thanksgiving willbe November 24. Classes willresume
on
November
30.e
i
:
The last day of exams beforeChristmas! will be held on
RequirementsDeferred
Implementation
of
the
128-credit
graduation require-ment was
deferred,
and
not
over-rided, explained President
W.
P.Garvey.
'•:' i^
Garvey responded
to
a Merciadarticle on the Liberal Studiesgraduation requirements^ whichappeared in the September 25thissue. "We did not override theSenate' and Trustees", heexplained.
V
J&
"There
were serious
economicdifficulties Swth
the program,"said the
president,
"we thereforepostponed it until the bugs in theprogram can
be
worked out".
Garvey
also
*
noted that theAcademic Policies Committee
will work with
the
Senate and theDean on the proposal this year.December 11. Registration forwinter term is scheduled forJanuary 4. Classes will resumeon January
5Sc
Dr. Garvey explained that thechange was the result of studentrequests to institute a calendarchange.
He
noted that he expectschanges to be received with mix-ed response,
-j
kgl^ST
4*1
Dr. Garvey gave
the
assurances that changes of thissort will never again occur dur-
ing
the middle of
the
school
year.
Service
Bureaw
Dissolved
The J
Student Service Bureauhas been disbanded due to the
loss^of
t
"
Director
Jnlief
VanVolkenburg/ according
'to
E.William Kennedy, director
of
stu-dent services.
^ ^
II
"We
have
no
budget flexibilityto hire someone
full
time to per-
i
form the tasks
Ms*
Van Volken-burg performed on a volunteer
basis/'he
noted.
? ***
J\
m
The
service, which was fundedby the student
government,
wasstarted
two
years
ago.
A
numberof programs were organized tohelp*
in eres
ted students earn ex-tra money by operating their
own
mini businesses.
7r^
?
g*
Services provided included
bir-
thday cake delivery, a hair styl-Sister
Eymard
stands with one of her paintings on display in the Learning Resource Center for theSisters of Mercy
150
year celebration.
« u
.•»»-£•
It
k
& photo
by
Rich Forsgren
Enrollment Rises Nationally
The present enrollment offreshman at Mercyhurst is 356,which is 50 students more
than
the
freshman
class last
year.
The
|
new class includes 148 men and
208
women.
£
The
^increases
in freshmenenrollment is due to the additionof new fields of study available,according to
Mr.?
Billingsley,director of admissions.. Thesenew fields include
*
petroleumgeology, fashion merchandisingand computer science. The highlydemanding
field?
of hotelrestaurant management has alsocontributed to the increase offreshmen, he added.
23\
Athletics has also drawn morefreshmen to the campus of Mer-cyhurst College. The start of avarsity football team has had apositive
Impact
in
the increase
of
freshmen
enrollment,
Billingsleysaid.
,
"The present
 freshman
 class,"Garvey said,
"includes
some ofthe best and
brightest
studentsadmitted to the college in adecade. Enrollment is presentlyabout 10 percent higher than in1980."^
i ££
AJ
S
C^'Our^
admissions, understricter requirements, have at-tracted more young people and,even
with
a
high rate
of rejection,applications continued to be
sub-
ing salon, mending and tailoringand typing.
.
%
^Kennedy
added that somestudents are still operatingbusinesses: which originallybegan
through;the
bureau andthat
student
government
may
assume the responsibility of the
check-cashing
service.
*
%
nutted in ever large numbers."^Although there has been an in-crease
in the
number of
freshman
on campus, the total enrollmentat Mercyhurst
Collegers
re-mained stable. The enrollmenthas not
 fluctuated
 greatly withinthe last
six
years. At the present
11
me there
are^J,430
undergraduates
and 38
graduatesenrolled for the fall term.
^ 1
In 1980, 96 men enrolled asfreshmen, compared to 148 this
year.
President William P.Garvey said
Mercyhurst's
long-range goal is to have a balanced
male-female
enrollment."Another long-range goal," hesaid, "is to maintain
a,total
enrollment of 1,850 to
2,000
students
in
a mix that will includeabout 1,500 undergraduates, 200
to
300 graduate,
150 to
200
eveningand weekend students and an an-nual freshmen enrollment of 350to
450
new students."
3
Homecoming Open ToJuniors And Seniors
hi
As it looks now, only juniorsand
seniors and
alumni are
going
to
be 5 allowed
\
to attend thehomecoming dance this year.
«*»
Director
of
Alumiu\Relations
Gary Bukowski spoke Wednes-day,
September?
30,
at the Mer-cyhurst Student Governmentmeeting concerning the issue ofthe dance. His
official
position isthat he
will
take responsibility forjuniors,
seniors
and
alumni at the
dancel
If freshmen andsophomores wish to attend,
theMSG
will have to takeresponsibility.
5
The issue which
led
Bukowskito his decision were twofold.First, that drinking would be go-ing on at the dance and second,the Campus Center can only
hold
so many
peopleJ-5
*
J&
•?§
Last year
some
members of
the
administration felt manyfreshmen and
sophomores*were
out of hand due to excessivedrinking. They don't what to see
this,
happen again.
r
Bukowski expects about 300alumni to attend the
dance^This
means that if the entire campuspopulation were allowed to at-tend, the Campus Center wouldbe
overcrowded^,
*
1u
MSG had a motion on the floorto allow only juniors and seniorsto attend. The motion made by
Mike
Smith,was defeated.Missy
Hurlburt
then motionedthat MSG not take responsibilityfor for freshmen andsophomores." This motion
was
passed!,
g
&-
> jg
Another motion was made
to
allow freshmen and sophomoresto attend the dance if they
went
as a date of a
junior,*
senior oralumni. This motion was passed.
t.
All of the motions will
be
presented to Gary Bukowski asrecommendations. The finalword will have to come fromBukowski.
I
it
[ft
3
I
i
' t
//
;
I
p
|
H
3r
ft
 
Editorial
OCTOBER
2,1981
PAGE
2
Never MixNever Worry
Homecoming. Traditional
im-
ages
of
football games,
and
bon-fires, come
to
mind.
For the
alumni, however, the very defini-tion
of
the word
is
poignant; theyare coming "home."The problem arises with the in-troduction
of a
formal dance.There
is no
definitive policy
on
the nature
of the
HomecomingDance.
In
the
past (before foot-ball), the dance was reserved
for
alumni but students were invited.Unfortunately, last year's dancebordered
on
chaos with studentsand alumni crammed together
in
the Campus Center. The solutionto that
situation^was
to
invitejuniors and senior students only.The problems
with
that solutionare many. Sophomores
and
freshmen feelmiffed;,they
pay
an activities
fee and
want
to be
included. Some upperclassmenfeel
it
should
be a
privilege
ac-
corded to seniors and juniors onlyto attend the dance.
Some
juniorsand seniors date underclassmenand naturally they would
like
to
attend
the
dance
as
a
pair.
And,
as far as alcohol is concerned, notall upperclassmen
are of
legalIf
one
examines
the
problemsclosely,
it
becomes evident thatstudent attendance
at
the
danceis
the
cause. Granted,'studentsshould
be
afforded
the
opportuni-ty
to mix
with
alumni. This
is
especially true
for the up-
perclassmen
who
have much
to
gain
in job
contact from
the in-
teraction. However,
is it
reallynecessary that
the
mixing takeHomecoming
is?
an* alumnievent
and
not an opportunity for astudent formal. Once
a
studentgraduates from
Mercyhurst
they
become -part
of the. alumni.
And
that lasts
for-fthe
rest
of
one'snatural life.
S
The rest
of
one's life
is a
longtime. Surely the students
at
Mer-cyhurst
can
accord
our
alumnithe privilege of attending
a
dance
J
ust
for
them.
It's
a
nice
way
to
lonor
those students
who
graduated from the college in
the
past.
And
since most
of
the
pre-sent students
are
future alumni,no
one
is
denied anything
in the
long run.
^E E?
l
CorrectionsForSeptember25issue
The
j
letter
|
concerningHomecoming was authored
by
Beth Anne
Dow
and
ColleenFarleyThe editorial which statedthe" Valedictorian
. and
Salutatorian receive
full
scholarships
was
misleading.Those scholarships receivefull tuition scholarship.
Sacrifices
rtost
be.
made
b^
all
/U^ncnys
<"idcr
rA^
propose)
budqd-
arfr.
IV
poor
will
opt
footer
,
-fH*.
uneducctftd,
MorsI <oill
lose
ov\
<W tte
at/Craqe.
/\meriCA*\
(Jill
fewp+KePua^ci^
crzek
gof
+Ke
UK
h<Xv*.fit*
ii
5farui'^c
t
poor,
tqhcxoM
,
fe*d^
><
Letter
IFather
jGuyWrites;-Working! In Georgia
Dear Editor:
i
§
I'd
like
to
use
theMerciad
to tell-some
of my
friends
|
at Mer-cyhurst what
I'm up to
thesedays.
I'm
in
sunny Georgia,
the
land
of
peaches, looking forwardto
a
reprieve from Erie wintersfor once.
The
chill
here
comesfrom being
in
what
is
considered
One
of
the most racist counties
in
the South.
m#
&&
^
|A
story might help
you J
tounderstand* what
I'm
doing.Yesterday,
I
met
B
Mrs. -RubyLester. Ruby
is one of the
poorblack people
of
Sumter County.Ruby took care
of a
blind hus-band for ten years before
he
died.Now
she is
raising three sonsalone on the wages she makes bybeing
a
maid
for
several richfamilies here in Americus
v
£?.
The
house she has been rentinghas finally been condemned
by
the city
as
uninhabitable
and
Ruby and her sons were about tobe without a home.»SThatmuch
of the
story
is not
uncommon. There
are
hundredsof thousands
of
stories .likeRuby's. But' this
one has a
dramatic turning point becauseGod intervened through somepeople
who are
willing
to
helpHim.This morning, Millard Puller,the founder
of
Habitat
for
Humanity
(the
group
I'm
work-ing
with)
and Waul-Dlvolunteer
builder from
New
Hampshire who
is
here with
his
wile and three girls and who
is
giving
his
service
to
Habitat,studied
a lot
site for, building
a
new home which Ruby will
be
a ble to buy because it will be soldto her without interest or an im-possibledownpayment.I hopetobe able to help build that home.That is > what Habitat
is all
about
-
Christians
who
contributemoney
to be
used
as
capital
so
that volunteers
can
build
or
repair houses which can
be
soldto thepoorat a cost that they canafford (mostly the.cost
of the
material) and that money is usedfor another house. That's whatMillard .Fuller calls
the
economics of Jesus.Since Habitat began
its
work,(it's about
to
celebrate its
5th
An-niversary),
it
has' been
in-
strumental in providing over 100houses for poor people
in
the U.S.
f i ®lre fflerriao
a student publication
VOL. 54 NO.
4 MERCYHURST COLLEGE OCTOBER
2,1981
^Editor-in-Chief
Jtebecca
L
Martin
Assistant To The Editor..
Donna
/.
Peterson
Feature-Editor
Bonnie James
Sports Editor
Jack
BOUT
Photography
RichFongren
Circulation
Manager......
.Carta Gasparello
Typists...
JtobPosega, ElaineCoyte, CarynKUnvex
Proofreaders
Jean Harris, Mary Cay Marchione
Cartoonists
Jamie Borowicz, Chris McGowan
j
General Staff
May
Jo
Allen,
Fran Moavero, Chris Dorado,Brent Scarpo, JohnBroderick, Maree-Lynn
Ckon,
Therm Sanders, Greg Yoko, SteveSeymour, Margaret Deitrich, Real People, JimKupchuk
'-
Faculty
Consultant
Steve Oath.
8
Published by..
J3rown-Thompson Newspapers
THE MERCIAD
with
25
under, construction' orrepair,
and in
Africa, wherewhole villages
are
rebuilt,
180
units have been finished with
71
under construction.Since
I
arrived
I
have beenworking most
of
the
time
in
the
office using
the
evenings spong-ing dinners
and
painting
a
roomin the house I live in. As soon
as
I
finish this letter, I've been invitedto
go
down
the
street
to see
whathelp
I
can give
to
repairing an oldhouse there.
. _
work with
is
prayerful and dedicated and I amenjoying working with them.I
do.miss
all
of
you, especiallythe gang around the
coffee
pot
in
the Campus Ministry
and
wish
you
were
all here.
We
can alwaysuse good volunteers^:
-
I would
be
remiss
if I
didn'tmake
a
pitch before
I
close this
letters
Habitat
is
always
in
needof money,
to
expand
its
work.
If
you occasionally have
a
feelingGhat you; have
-"too
much
n
Habitat would
be
willing
to
helpyou share
it
with God's poor.Sincerely,
I
£*v
FT.
Guy A. Patrick
P.S.
%
The address
for
Habitat
is
419
West Church Street
f
Americus, Georgia 31709
Letter
Council ForExceptional
Child
en
The council
for
exceptionalchildren (C.E.C.)
is a
very activeorganization
on
campus. C.E.C.is open
to all
special educationmajors
andc
minors,
j
Honorarymembership
is
also open
to
anyone interested
in
joining
the
club.
H
§ C.E.C. works with exceptionalchildren
and
adults
of
the
Eriearea
in
non-academic
settings.The organization
is
known
in the
Erie community through its workwith special Olympics,
and
socials and picnics.The first event
on the
club'scalendar
is a
fall social
for the
trainable mentally retardedchildren
of the
Erie
and
Millcreek schools. The social
is
a
dance for the children. The social
Letter
HarvardExperienceSupported
Isn't Brent Scarpo fortunate
to
be writing
for
the
Merciad Staff?So what, even
if I
was not on the
staff
I
would still
be
submittingthis letter
in
response
to
MissScanlon's letter.First
of all, I
among others,was impressed
and
interested
in
learning
the
details
of
James'summer
at
Harvard. I
am
glad
it
was enjoyable and
successful
andthe
subject
was
of
great interesttome.
_
Whether
it is
to just visit or at-tend classes,
I
have alwaysdreamed
of
going
to
HarvardUniversity.
H
have done someresearch on
the
school
but
I havenever gotten
a
true
picture
of
what
the
school.?
is
like. MissJames' article painted some
of
that picture
for
me.
§
The article she wrote aided
me
in visualizing
the
atmosphere
of
the school
I
have dreamed
of
at-
tending one day.
g^SSF j§jB
Whether it was Tammy, Sue,
or
Bonnie,
it
made
no
matter,
I
en-
joyed
the
article immensely.Also,
I
have never been
to
Europe(another dream
of
mine).
I,
likethe editor, would
be
most
in-
terested
in
hearing about
it.
Brent Scarpo
£
Letter
11
Harvard*Again
Dear Editor:
*
I
am
writing
in
response
to a
letter which appeared
in the
September 25th issue
of
the Mer-ciad
in
which a student expressedher dismay regarding the column"On a Harvard Experience."Having known the author
of
this column, Bonnie James,
for
three years through studentgovernment
and
various otherCollege committees,
I can
positively
say
that
she was not
j
"pattingherself on the back and'wanting
the
rest
of the
studentbody
to
do likewise."
I
took thiscolumn for what
I
believe
it
wasg intended
- the
author taking
the
& time to share her perceptions andrealizations
of
life
at an
educa-tional institution other than Mer-cyhurst College.The article was extremely well-written and insightful, not
of
the"golly gee unsophisticated tone"Nancy PatScanlon alludes
to.
The accountwas
1
warm
and
friendly, reminiscent
of a
letterone would receive from
a
closefriend,
and I
looked forward
to
reading the next column.I thoroughly enjoyed both col-umns-and
I
thank Bonnie
for
sharing her thoughts with the Col-lege community.Sincerely, P*Jo Ann Alexanderis scheduled for Sunday, October
4. It
will be held in the back porchcafe, beginning at 7:30 p.m.If you are interested m joiningC.E.C.,
the
fall social
is a
goodway to see the club in action.For more information contactRenee Domowiczj C.E.C.President.
*
S3
1
 
4
I
Op-Ed
7
4
OCTOBER
2,1981
PAGE
3
Holland Biking
The Dutchhouse-Museum
£'
by George
Garrelts
t-y
Over the
years,
in the matter of
museums, I
nave
come to think"small is beautiful." I like thehouse museum especially, placeslike the home of Joseph Smithnear Palmyra, New York, or thehome of the Oneida Communityin
Oneida,j New ?
York,
or thesmall
\
museums of Brugges,Belgium,
flike
the Hotel Dieuwhere the
Mem
ling
reliquary
ofSt. Dorothea is housed. That is asmall medieval hospital that hasbeen converted
into
a museum.Then there is the site of
Thoreau's
hut next to Waldoen
Pond,)
or Abraham Lincoln'sHouse in Salem,
II.
They are im-pressive places, speaking elo-
quently
by
way
of
their
simplicityand their silence, of howgreatness comes out of austerity,simplicity, and adversity whenthey are wedded with wisdom -and the thirst for truth. EzraPound reminds us of how thatworks when he says that"emerald hath no Memling withusura;'' commercialism andgreed will never give us colorssuch as Memling could make, fWhile we were biking inHolland this summer we sawmany museums, large
and
small,but the most memorable of themwere the small ones, the house-type museums. There were ex-ceptions of course. Seeing Rem-brandt's, famous Night Watch in
*
ne
buge
k
Rijksmuseum
inAmsterdam is
breath
taking. See-the
Mauritshuis
in Rotterdam isimpressive. Seeing a museumfull of the work of Van Gogh inAmsterdam is also impressive,unforgettable. It is also very in-teresting to see the exhibits con-cerning the life of the
artists and
to learn more about their familylife,
their religious
life, and theirmarital
and
social life.fc But- the; small,
house-type
museums remain my favoriteand I am always happy to en-counter them wherever I am.While we were biking in Rotter-dam, searching for
the
departure
Through
The Looking
Glass
"1 ;
Residents of New DormEnjoy
Lnxurious Living
Editor's note This week's article shows students how living condi-tions in the dormotories is subject to change. Without notice.Reprinted from the October 9, 1954 issue of the MERCIAD.Residents of New Dorm Enjoy Luxurious Living.
A dream came true on
Sat.,
Sept
26,
/ that
was
moving
day for
some
40
senior resident students into the new McAuley Residence Hall.The gallant Knights from Gannon began the moving caravan byhelping to arrange the large pieces of furniture. Following closebehind came the girls, ladden with luggage - realizing at last whyfathers complain over
the amount
of baggage
their daughters bring
tocollege, f.
j ~
:
; ;•; \>r
^tw*,
j$
Reactions of
Hurst
girls
to
their ultra-modern "home"
ranged
fromsighs of wonder to shouts of
pure
delight as they viewed the sunnypastel walls,
 tiled
loors,
 and blond
furnishings.
They were even
moreoverwhelmed by such features as sound-proof walls, electric wasteand dust chutes,
hair-spray
sinks,
and huge kidney-shaped
bath tubs.For the first time in Mercyhurst history the girls were concernedabout having too much storage space.
The step-stool
was kept in de-
mand
as the "shorties" tried
to
reach the
top
clipboards.McAuley's
new
residents
used
ingenuity
in
decorating
the
numerousshelves in
their
rooms. "Animals
on
Parade" was the theme selectedby Connie Revelas and Sheila Quinn. Sissy Natile advanced hershelves with Delta Sig souvenirs while Sue Hall's decor consists ofmementos of Jersey Shore., .
v
y
Hurst-ites relax in the comfortable lounges which are located onevery floor. Though such necessities as water and electricity werepartially lacking,
no
complaints were heard
-
everyone's greatest ex-pectations seemed to have been fulfilled."
Feature
Column
Editor's
NoteIndicative Of An Era
place of the Pilgrims
in
1620, wecame across a small
house-type
pewter museum, just one block
from
the.
departure
point -forwhich we were searching. In thepewter museum they
describedm
detail
how this
material, mademostly of
tin
came
to
be the poorman's silver. Men were workingwith
pewter
there, making cupsthey sold to tourists.Down
the
street was anothersuch museum which showed howthe various crafts and commer-cial enterprises of Dutch life inearly
t
Rotterdam
developed,paint-making, leather working,windmills
and
their various grin-ding. activities, fire-fighting,weaving, etc. Just beyond thatRijksmuseum
e(
people'smuseum)
thetplaque
has beenplaced which marks the depar-ture of the Speedwell in 1620 forEngland. That
\
ship , took Fthe
Pilgrims to
England
where theyboarded the Mayflower
and
sail-
ed for
Plymouth.
Jfafc 4 9
In Leyden we found a house
museum which
featured
the work
of a famous Dutch master JohnOf Leyden. The main hall there
J
showed his famous Last Judg-ment to advantage.
As you
facedit the Center Panel showed thesheep separated by a triumphantJesus from the goats.
On
the leftthe blessed were being separatedfrom the damned and led into aparadisal condition. On the righta fiery
mouth was
sucking
into
itstorments the handsome buttormented group of the damned.One
had
to admire the painter'seconomy, since he painted Peterand Paul on the back of his hugetryptch.
*
r
Nijmegen, Holland,!
and
Ox-ford, England, featured small'town' museums which showedContinued
on
page 6
iummmiiiiimmuu
The history of the "Editor'snote" is an illustrious one,
to
saythe least, but it is far tooneglected as an indication of theend
of
an era.The Editor's note is the only
tool
such a person owns toredeem
him/herself
from
a
nastyletter to the editor. Sometimesthe letters deal
with personal
opi-nions on matters of controversy,and sometimes they question theeditor's ethics and profes-sionalism in the
manner in
whicha topic was handled. But at anyrate, the "Note" is the onlyweapon- the editor is given.Therefore it packs all the gutsand fire its bearer has to offer.Such a defense is flavored onlyby
the
owner's personality, quickwit, eloquence and mood swing.In 1976 when Carol Quartuccianwas editor of the MERCIAD, thenote had the tone of straight-forward clarification of point,with a personal "zinger" in thelast line aimed at the inflictor ofcriticism.As an example from the Quar-
tuccian
era,
four students wrote a
letter to the editor complainingthat
'Hurst
events were not
f
wblicized
in advance, but mere-y
foil owed-up
in a report. Theauthors suggested using pressreleases from other colleges,making phone calls, and referr-ing to the Erie Times as sourcesfor updating the calendar.^ The
editor'8
note was thus:.
«WYour
request is unfair.First,we do print the events that will
haDDen
on campus.
i
When
THE
^^^B
^^F^^^&^L^
K
^0"
^rf
^
S ^B
^k^
^H4
KfI^S^^^^k^^^bJ
release
from other colleges which
are interesting to our students,
they are
printed. Secondly, we donot have a phone; our budgetdoes not permit one. Finally,since the Sunday Erie Times isonly* 40 cents, purchase
tone
yourself!"
*
S
1
if
The Brunonian era, slotted in1979, seems to be plagued by aneditor's bandwagon. John Bruno,MERCIAD editor, was infamousfor never-, having enoughreporters to staff
bis
paper, andtherefore lacked
material
toprint. Consequently, THE MER-
niiiiiiiHiiiiiimiiiimimiiuuimuu
CIAD
became
a
four-page editionrather than the traditional eightpages
that
immediately preceded
and
followed the Brunonian era.One student' who apparently
had the urge
of
late to
relish
THE
MERCIAD with' his opinionsbegan by saying,
\- -' *j
"Although
I don't want to
makea habit of writing letters to theeditor,
I/once
again feelobligated
Vt.
"
k
After
answering the
crux
of thestudent's concern, Bruno endedhis
note
with, "Finally, don't
feel
guilty about writing letters wealways need to fill space."The Frisinian era, 1979-1980,has been interpreted by this col
umnist
as
Sone
of reversepsychology. After a thoroughsearch through THE MER-.
CIAD'S
morgue, I found not oneprinting of an Editor's Note.
Ap-
parently Mr. Frisina felt his toolwas more powerful when it wasnot in use; he said more bystating nothing.Presently, the Martinian age isat hand. Rebecca Martin, two-year editor of
the
MERCIAD, hasbrought the paper full-circle inthis historical chronolgy. AS inthe Quartuccian vera,
Martin's
tone is professional and matter-of-fact.She,does, however,change
the
personal attack of thelast line to a profound, universaltruth. (The intrigue of
this
techni-
que
is that
one is
never quite surewhether he/she has been zinged
or
not.
)^
j^
,- » i
As exemplified in a letter last
chastized*. THE
MERCIAD for endorsing can-didates in the
MSG
election cam-paign, Martin replied:"There is nothing ethically
wrong about a
newspaper endors-ing candidates for governmentpositions. Editorial comments, aswell as letters to the editor, ex-press a view
1
that people can
either
accept
or
reject. Editorials
do
not cast votes people
do«f'
*
So does the craft of the use ofthe tool,
be
it one or many,distinguish the
power
of the onein charge.
We
are told this is thedecade of distinction.
'Nuff
said.
ittiiiiimni
MIIIIIUL
38th And Pine
Catch The
"Merciless Hour
after the game
99
Oldies But Goodies
)
Featuring J. J. Kelly
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THE MERCIAD

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