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The Merciad, Feb. 18, 1982

The Merciad, Feb. 18, 1982

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The Merciad, Feb. 18, 1982
The Merciad, Feb. 18, 1982

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06/02/2011

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Merciad Responsibility Shifts To DepartmentsDisparity Found In Method Of Selection Process
As of the 1982-83 academic
school
year,
the
MERCIAD, Mer-
cyhurst's
student
newspaper,
will
become
"the responsibility of thecommunications department"and a learning tool therein, ac-cording to Dr. David Palmer,Academic Dean
of
-MercyhurstCollege.
i
f
Mr. Richard
J.
Garcia, currentdirector of the communicationsdepartment, will assume
5
the
position
of
Advisor to
the
Merciadonce it
is
housed in its newcapacity. Garcia
will
replace Mr.
Steve
Curcio,
the
present Advisorto the Merciad and
co-faculty
of
the
communications department.Garcia claimed to be unawareof the Merciad's
change
from theDepartment of Student Servicesto the Communications Depart-ment.
"To,my
knowledge no
plans
are
being made,"
he
stated.However, when speaking
to
hisnew
appointment
as advisor tothe press, Garcia likened the
MERCIAD
to
Mercyhurst's radio
station,
WMCY.
& 2?"The
radio station is a lab forthe communications depart-
ment,"'* he^stated,
"and thenewspaper is a student
paper..
Advisement
is
exactly
that,
and
Iintend to work cohesively withthe staff - not in the dictatorialsense - but I intend to be quite
active."? * * T
When asked why the switchwas made, E. William Kennedy,
director
of student services ex-plained, "It seemed
like
the
thing
to do, it seemed like a logicalplace to 'house' the Merciad. Idoubt if
only.communications
majors will work on the
paper,
but
we
would
hope
all
journalismmajors would. In previous yearsthis has not been the case, andthat's* what we'd hope toremedy."
-
}-
\
..*
Garcia concurred with Ken-
nedy's
contention that Merciadstaff positions would not berestricted to communicationsmajors'
only.
"I
don't see it as amajors only thing," he confirm-ed, "although
majors
will have acompetitive edge.
-^ v
'•".
Some
disparity of comment
has
arisen as to exactly what kind
of
"competitive edge" individualsmay possess. Although the selec-tion process for next year's Mer-ciad editor and assistant editorhas not technically begun, cer-tain steps have apparently beentaken to solidify both of thesepositions.
^
k
I
£
Three students attest to thetruth of an incident which occur-red in
Garcia's News writing
IIclass.
All
three
sources
describedan incident where Garcia begandiscussing the future of thedepartment and the MERCIADunder his direction. Sw" '
jggHe
claimed that he knew whonext year's editor would be,
and
he proceeded to write the initialsD.P. on the blackboard, in-dicating that those were the in-itials of the succeeding editor.The sources unanimously at-tributed the identity to DonnaPeterson, currently the assistanteditor of the MERCIAD. Peter-son proclaims she was notunaware of the incident."I'm very flattered that he hasso much confidence in me,"quoted Peterson when she wasasked to give her reaction to theoccurrence, "but I don't want hispersonal selection to in any wayhinder the legitimate selectionprocess. If I am chosen editor, Iwant to feel that I have justlyearned it.".
When
Garcia was questioned as
to
whether or not the incident ac-tually occurred, he stated "Idon't recall it, but it may
be
so."Peterson
admits
to
having
beenapproached by Garcia outside ofthe
classroom
1
as next year'seditor. Garcia confirms that he'has spoken with Peterson on thetopic also, except that
he
claims
he
approached her
as
next year'spotential editor.
^
1- f"We talked in generalities,"Garcia claimed, "saying if shewere editor, what
kinds
of thingswould she
like
to
do."
g&'&
rj£""I
was the one who tried togeneralize,",
quoted(
Peterson,"telling
*
him
I
:
haven't been
chosen
yet But he would say, Oh,there's no question; there's no
doubt.'*
1
Peterson also explained that
'fttft^.tfiMiv..
tfk
Campus;
Thefts
Still Unsolved
The thefts which have plagued
the
campus
within the last monthare still unsolved. No leads con-cerning the goods stolen fromvarious departments of thecol-lege have been
discovered.
,Jan Gatti, director of the Stu-dent Union, stated that shebelieves nobody from the Mer-cyhurst community
was
involvedin'
the
v theft
of the beveragesystem
which
was
stolen
after
the
"December Belleh
Valley get-together.
•?&
"I
don't think it
was
anybody
atour campus,"- said Gatti. Gattihas established an unusual
Belle
Valley? get-together to
raisemoney
i
to^
compensate
-for
the
beverage
system that
was
stolen.'
A
slave day raffle will be
held
at Belle Valley on February 27.Students will be able to buy a 25cents chance to win a slave, for a
dayt
The
money raised
will
be put
into
the
student activity commit-tee fund because
$385
had to betaken out
to
pay for the beveragesystem.
T"
*J
J
Other,
stolen goods include atape recorder stolen from thebiology department valued at
1250
and two devices
.used
tomeasure blood pressure
which
were valued at $70
each,
accor-ding to Linda Lockner Williamsof the
biology,
department.
^Williams
reported that no leadshave been
found,
f -•
The lamps stolen from the col-lege foyer are also still missing."There
is no
news
or informationconcerning the lamps," saidPhyllis Aiello, director of
housing
and safety. *
\
jJSr.
Matthew has also reportedno leads to the break-ins of
two
cabinets outside the observatoryin
Zurn.
The padlock
3o
thecabinets
was
broken,
but nothingwas stolen, she
said.
|
./,
Cameras were
.stored
in thecabinets previous to the break-
ins,
but were moved when Sr.
Matthew.heard
of the numerousbreak-ins occurring on campus.
Fingerprints
were taken by Eriepolice out have not provided a
lead.
\l
?T
With the numerous thefts thathave occurred
on
campus,Aiellohas recommended to studentsthat
they
become more aware
of
their valuables^"Since the end of the term iscomingup
r
other students are
parasites
and will feed off thingslying around or in their lockedroom."
•Jg §f
Students who are preparing togo home for spring term and arebeing sent
money,
from
home
should
not
spread the feet
their
parents are
sending them
money,
added Aiello.
«A
i
Garcia had
mentioned
sophomore communications ma-jor,
Carla
Anderson, to her as apossibility for next year's assis-tant editor. Paraphrasing Gar-cia, Peterson
said,
"He
asked mewho
I
had
in
mind for next year'seditor. Then he told me he hadCarla Anderson in mind." WhenAnderson was asked to speak toPeterson's statement,
she
declin-
ed comment.Formally,
the
selection processis not scheduled to begin untilspring term. Legitimate pro-cedure for application for MER-CIAD editor involves submittinga letter of intent, a transcript,and three letters of recommenda-tion to the current advisor and
editor-in-chief,
Steve Curcio andRebecca Martin. Interview timeswill then be established by Ken-nedy as the Director of StudentServices.Those serving on the selectioncommittee include the presentAdvisor to the MERCIAD, the
in-
cumbent editor, the Director ofthe
communications
department,the Director of Student Services,and possibly the Dean, as he hasserved the committee in pastyears as the director of the Divi-sion of Humanities.The selection process andmembers to the selection com-mittee were defined by the Cam-pus Life Committee in 1977-1978academic school year. In pastyears, applicants have also beenrequired to
submit
samples oftheir work and to take a gram-mar test.
*$
-
'Y/SjA-/"
1
iJHerxiaftl
a
antdent
publication
a.
>*Y
VOL/5S
NO.
19MERCYHURST
FEB.18,1982
MSGt
Constitution
The entire constitution of theMercyhurst Student Governmentis being reviewed and rewritten.Under
the
leadership of the Con-
stitutional
Revision Committee,changes are being made whichwill reshape the structure of the
government.
..
-j
3|F
One of the major amendmentswhich has been proposed is thecreation of a new executiveposi-
tion,
that of Student ActivitiesCommittee Chairperson. Cur-rently, that
post
is filled by thegovernment's vice-president;however,
"because;'of
theworkload involved it was thoughtthat an
additonal
officer's posi-tion was
needed.
|
Another change being discuss-ed is the creation of a standingbudget and finance committee.This committee will oversee theuse of
government;
funds. It wasrecommended that; someunderclassmen be included so as
to
ensure
continuity.
A
complete-ly, revised constitution
will
bepresented
to
the government at alater date.*
i
<*¥&:
MSG has also announced thatthere will be no
morelRamada
Inn
tHappy
Hours.' Because aMercyhurst student was involvedin damage to the hotel,
Ramada
officials nave
forbidden
any suchfuture events.
t
'.-
Yearbook sales have begun andpresident
Rich Lanzillo
described1982 as
attest year'J
for thatpublication. He stressed that ifenough
yearbooksfweren't
sold,the cost might force the govern-ment to abandon the project fornext
year.'This
year's theme is
«A
New
Begiiming'^i
T
Phon-A-Thon
DollarValue
.
Increase
sU
INSIDE...
Editorials p. 2Budget Cuts....p. 3Feature
P.
4News
p.^5
Classifieds p. 6Sports
.....p.
7
This year, the Phon-athon
net"
ted $16,316 and that does not in-clude $1,000 from various com-panies and organizations.
4
Mr.
GaryBukowski,director
of
alumni and giving,
said
there wasa
13.2
per cent increase in dollar
Value
over last year. g5L'
*.
He
also said a lot of alumnaeare undecided over how
much
they were going to give, so thatshould build
the
fund
up
significantly,
once
decided.
£
This Sunday night there
will
bea
party
for
the 130
volunteers
who
helped in the
phon-a-thon/
Thewinning teams will also be an-nounced at this
time.£ ™
Ron
Verrilla,
one of thevolunteers said, "It was fun talk-
ing to
students
who
once
attendedMercyhurst."
He
added,
"I foundout what professors not to takecourses
from/£-(
.
&.
Bukowski said, "The studentsdid a fantastic job and I thankeveryone
who
helped.
T
z
5
11
f
r
:
 
*.
rf>
4***^*
jEftftorial
Wholistic--*Health
*
4
.;, Program ^,
v
;.
*
**jP The recent Campus Life Com-
*
mittee discussion
Of a
proposed
.
Wholistic Health Program did not
yield
a
nV
changesor
?*
developments in 'Mercyhurst's*present health services.
j
"
«.-
Basically, a Wholistic
Health"Program**
would provide
exten-*
si
ve
health
care
and
counseling
to
R
theMercyhurst community.
£
Under
the
program,
a
physi-cian would
be on
campus fivedays
a
week for two hours daily.Presently,
Dr.
William Cohen
is
.
", at the
college
for
only
one
hour££each week.^&£
*
ws£&
i-
:
h
The
Wholistic approach wouldu also include mental health
and
B
stress counseling, birth controlBcounseling
and
dispensation,'andB^Dhvsical health/diet
and
excer-^Bcise counseling.
*
B|-
T!
^
At the February 9 Campus Life £fg Committee meeting, Director of 3Student Service,
E.
WilliamKen-JJnedy,reported that!he,Dr."JjGarvey, Dr.) Cohen,
and
Sr.T^Joseph Mary
met to
discuss iand/or plan
the
Wholistic Health!Program. Dr; Cohen stated that
I
£3 he could
not see how any
physi-
f
&i cian could Miave
the
time.
-
Si necessary
for
a
Wholistic Health
BJProgram.
I&jf
I
^ ¥gj£
The Campus Life Committee
5|
then
decided
to
retain
the
present
vsBjhealth
program and continue to
£
employ Dr. Cohen
as"*
the
one-
2
hour-per-week
physician.
I
SKJ
I
The decision to
forgo*the5»Wholistic
Health Program seems
hasty.
The
implementation
c
^
suchafprogram
is a
valuableidea.
-,
3Defined birth control, stress,andphysical,healthcounseling^are
a
necessity
for
college
-*
students. With
the
present healthclinic, these services
are
eithernil
or
non-existent*
***
-T
In addition,
a
more accessibleXVphysician should
be
available
to
thejcollege community.Thereg
are
oftenemergencies ^and
il-'
S? lnesses whichrequire
a
physi-cian's care
at
times other thanMondays from 10 to 11 a.m.
ȣ"
> Although
the
Health Center
*
nurses may be adept at nursing,
a
:.
doctor
is
a
necessary part
of
anyhealth program. Many physical
'*
^ailments cannot be solved with
a
packet
of
pills;
the
experience
-
and judgment of
a
doctor is oftenrequired.
^
iH& \^i
^
f
College students keep longhours, arduous schedules,
and
rarely take good physical careofthemselves. TheWholisticHealthProgram should
be
reconsideredto ensure that students
are
menjrtally and physically
fit.
If cost
is a
factor
in
adopting
.
the Wholistic Program,
it
can be
easily eliminated. Many collegesand universities charge healthcare fees which
are
included
in.
tuition.
A
typical
fee
of .$25
per
year would
see
that
a
doctorcould
be on
campus five days
a
week and that the additional ser-vices could be provided. ».'The Wholistic Health Program"is a good one and should be put
UK*
to action.
A
quality health pro-4gram can hardly be ignored.
FEBRUARY
18,1982PAGE
2
Editorial
Student Press: Image
OriActual?
a
gFreedoml.of the CPress «isguaranteed under
the
first am-mendment
of
the
constitution.
It
is this same freedom which gives
power
to
the people in soaely ^lodeny individuals this right leavesthem defenseless
to
the arbitrarywhims
of
societal authority.Campus newspapers
are
no ex-ception.
To
place
the
MERCIADunder the auspices of any depart-ment violates this freedom. Oncethe student press
is
associatedwith
a
department,
the
free flowof ideas from
the
community
is
hindered
by the
image
of
specialization. Whether
~
or
not
this specialization is actual is a
moot
point,,
it
people
perceive theimage to be
so,
then
It
is,^*'
Further, a direct relationshipbetween the
newspaper *
and adepartment creates an in-cestuous breeding of
talent,'
abili-
ty
and competency. Thus,
Stagnation.
f
1|
X
Beyond impotence is thedanger that one
voice
or
view willcompel all others and thereforethe flux of opinion is lost. Whenthis is lost, the ethical ideal of a
free
cajnpus
press is irreparably
besmirched^
^ ^
It takes the fresh flowotldeas,questioning minds, and an
open
student press free
;from the
stigma of departmental authorityto maintain the power the firstamendment gives the people.These are thoughts the Mer-cyhurst community - andespecially the student body
r*
should seriously consider. Is animagistically
<free
press worthsacrificing to departmental re-quirements? And should aresponsible
servicexthe
studentbody provides to the college
be
demoted
to
a mere learntag^fool?"Or shall the MERCIAD continueto exist in the spirit of the firstamendment
-
as a
free
press ?
\
If the latter is the choice of the
'
students
to
whom
this
newspaperbelongs, now is the time to makeyour voices heard.^-:vfe,,
Letter
Federal Aid Cut-Backs
Discussed
Students; Urged
Tdl
Take Action
SubmissionsDue By NnWednesdays
To
the
Mercy
hurst Community:As we experience day to daylife at Mercyhurst, we have a
tendency
to
become
engrossed inimmediate problems and con-cerns
-around
us. Today'smidterm or finding a date to theformal takes on tremendous im-portance, leaving little desire toconcern ourselves withdevelopments outside thecampus.
£&r«In
the past there has beennothing so pressing
to
force ustobecome involved m
off-campus
governmental policies.
:
The
ad-
ministration
in
Washington haschanged this situation? TheReagan administration
has
pro-
posed cute
in
higher educationthai will
be
nothing less thandevastating
if
passed by
*
the
Congress.Kit
is the
responsibility
of all
who view higher education
as a
nationalpriorityto join
in
activeopposition
to
these cuts.
For
those" receiving governmentalfinancial aid, the responsibility
is
that much greater since
it
is theywho would suffer
the
greatest
loss.
*
g£It
is
impossible
to
completelyexplain the impact
of
the propos-ed budget cuts
in
this letter,
but
the following summary should in-dicate their significance.
The
Reagan administration's propos-ed reduction
for
fiscal year
83
would remove
the
eligibility
of
over one million students
for
Pell.Grants,
and
limit eligibility
to
those with family incomes below
$14,000.
*|| |
In addition, about
1.3*
millionawards wduld be eliminated fromSEOG, SSIG, CWS, and NDSL. Indollar terms, about half of the aidpresently available
to
needystudents
at
the
poverty level
(in
reduced amounts)
is cut
virtual-ly J eliminating assistance,
for
most students with family in-comes
in the
$14
thousand
-
$25
thousand range,
x
7
-
Despite
the
potential .damageof
the
aforementioned cute
and
President Reagan's seeming
in-
vincibility on legislative matters,panic
is not the
next step. Thereis growing oppositon
in
the
Con-gress
to
the
administration's
at-
tack
on
education
and
withenough
of
a
push
by all
concern-
THE MERCIAD
ed, aid reductions can bedefeated. This is where ourresponsibility begins.
j|
There are a number of optionsavailable
to
students, faculty, ad-
ministration,*,
and' parents.Writing your congressmen is oneof your best options. Sample let-ters, tips, and
t
addresses
are
available
in
the
student govern-ment officej
It is
also importantto
\
encourage your parents J towrite their congressmen. In mostcases they
are tax
payers, homeowners,
and
have
a
much betterreputation
for
voting
at
electiontime than students do.
-
JsThe student government will becoordinating an on-campus effortthatwillinclude:
a
formal letterwriting campaign
, and a
massmailing
to
parents
to
enlist theirsupport.
In
additon
to
this inter-nal push, we will also work to per-suade other colleges
in
this sec-tion
of
the
state
to
develp
an ef-
fort
of
their own.(fl
If
you are interested in workingwith
the
M.S.G., please stop
by
the office
or
talk
to a
represen-tative
or
officer. £
Rich Lanzillo, &
*
Student GovernmentPresidents #-
Letter
Shakers Thanked
Dear Editor;&The entire admissions staff
at
Mercyhurst. would like
to
takethis opportunity
to
thank
the
Laker Shakers
for
their tremen-dous support during
the
recentbasketball contest against Gan-non University^Their constant cheering
and
great half ime'show made
the
contest
as
enjoyable
as it
was
high spirited. Thank you, ladies,you made our day!
;
On behalf
of the
MercyhurstAdmissions Office, -£&SteveFrisina
.
v
 
%-©>
FEBRUARY
18,1982PAGE
3
College Reps UnveilNew
College
Budget
WASHINGTON D.C, (CPS) - Inwhat
one of
them' termed
a
"historic" gathering, represen-tatives
of the
largest and mostimportant college groups
in the
land last week
met to
previewwith alarm
-
and to politically
ap-
prise - President Ronald Reaganand the 1983 education budget hewants Congress to pass.Representatives
of
stateschool, private universities, com-munity
and
junior colleges,students;and faculty membersbitterly predicted that
as
manyas
two
million college students-will
be
hurt
by the
cuts.Thousands
of
them
may be
drivenfrom campus altogether.
;
"Deep cuts have already beenmade
in
appropriations
for
stu-dent financial aid," summarizedEd Hanley, lobbyist for the U.S.Student Association;(USSA)."Further cuts are going to keepthousands of students from retur-ning
to
college this fall,
and
others will never
get to
attendcollege at all."!!?
W,
W
The spokespeople, solemnlyfacing an audience
of
reportersand association staffers
in a
House committee hearing room,said
the
Reagan educationbudget would effect
all
federalstudent aid programs: 1?*?'S^
f
PELL GRANTS *_£
|
According
to
numbers leakedto the press, the administrationwants Congress to cut funding forPell Grants by 40 percent. Onlystudents from families earningle grants, comparexnoTunui oi$27,000 this year. The maximumgrant, moreover, would be $1400,down from $1670 this year.SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCA-TIONAL OPPORTUNITYGRANTS
*
j£L £
,
/
SEOGs, which currently servesome 615,000 college students,would be eliminated.
:
NATIONAL DIRECTfSTU-DENT LOANS
'
J*
Under theyNDSL program,created during
the
Eisenhoweradministration, 250,000 studentsnow get low cost loans to pay forschool.
The
administration willask Congress
to
end
all
fundingforNDSLs.
J*
COLLEGE WORK-STUDYPROGRAM 1
*
*
The Reagan budget calls for
a
27 percent funding
cut for
thisprogram, under which
±
thefederal government helps col-leges pay students working theirway through school. Observersestimate some 250,000 studentswill lose their jobs as
a
result ofthe cut. JpfvS* «tSTATE STUDENT INCENT-IVE
jg
Wzzpt
The SSIG fund matches grantsmade
to
students
by
the states.The administration wants to endthe program entirely, which thisyear serves 300,000 students. "'
7
-v
GUARANTEED
ISTUDENT
LOANS
M
S I
\
|
- *
About 3.5 million students tookout GSLs this year, but the ad-ministration wants
to cut
drastically the number
of
students eligible for them in thefuture;- Reagan proposes
(to
eliminate
all
graduate and pro-fessional school students fromthe program, double
the
loanorigination
fee to
10 percent j ofthe loan value, make borrowerspay market interest rates
(up
from
the
current nine percent)starting twoyearsafter leavingschool,'?and limit!GSLs
to
students with "unmet needs."ButDr.Edward Fox of the Stu-dent Loan Marketingi Associa-tion, which helps, arrange GSLsamong banks around the country,says those changes might effec-tively mean the end
of
the GSLprogram
*
&•gAnfc Change in
the
(GSIAmcrecn Df^amoun^f^xpensivepaperwork
 for
he banks (whoac-tually make
the
loans)," saysFox,who*was
not at the
Washington press conference"Banks could certainlybedropp-ing out in the future."
j|
That's just one consequence oftheouts
if
Congress approvesthem, according to the press con-ference participants. ?More than 300,000 independentcollege students would probablybe forced out
of
school, predictsJohn Phillips
of the
NationalAssociation
of
Independent Col-leges and Universities.?
<j£
Assuming only
half.,
of thosewho drop out
of
independent col-leges
go on to
public colleges,Phillips estimated "states would
tod!
ffc
al*oit
brtlarw^ tfnf
if Da^e ?
S\r
X75 #»Hioh
Doha iXkfccorJ
Oe/iCi/*.
/
."r
H
{/•
have
to
increase their subsidiesby more than $500 million."Allan Ostar
of the
AmericanAssociation of State colleges andUniversities then pointed out thatmany states
\
themselves
±
havebeen badly hurt by the recession,and were unable to make up thedifferenceanocanonsto^ineir puDiic col-leges haven't increased as fast asinflation.
$
£
*
|£j £jStill others worried about
the
ability
of
the 839,000 public col-lege students who now get aid toholdon.i
V i
Wife£ A Southern Illinois Universitysurvey found that 61 per cent ofits students doubt they'll be ableto continue«in school full timenext fall when the first round ofReagan education
|
cuts takeseffect.Those worries
are
echoedaround the country:*
%
' *
,igDr. William Pickens ?of
the
California Post-SecondaryEducation Commission fretsabout-a "step-ladder effect"
in
which private college, students
'or
Gi/yv\fe(iA
iftttt
u li\co*fe}n/\t
&&,
FA
'r
'/
/
,
will have to transfer to public col-leges, where they will displacethe poorest students on the publiccampuses. Those students,
in
turn, would be bumped down theladder
to
two-year institutions.The
 
less-well-endowed studentsin community colleges will then
fa
.displaced, hefears.e Higher Education commis-sion similarly worries about
a
"displacement"
of the
students"on down theline" of institutions."The question is what happens tothe student attheend oftheline."Ort estimates some 50,000Washington students would be af-fected
by the aid cut. and
speculatesthat"maybe
20 per
cent
of
the
7
aided population"would have to drop out.Asked
if
the state's public col-lege system could continue
to
function under; those cir-cumstances, Ort paused and said,"I don't see how/'Utah Education official \Dr.Steve Bennion" speculates
-
asmany
as
"5000
to
7000 studentsmay nave justthe doorsclosed on
5s*fr
f 9
T
sSS.
them." in that state
if
Congressapproves the cuts.Cautioning
he
didn't want
to
sound alarmist Bennion explain-ed that
"a lot
would depend
on
which campuses lost that manystudents.'
If the
University
;
ofUtah
or
Utah State lost them.:they could probably absorb
the
Tne^niailerscnoclslme^weDerState pr Southern Utah lost them,
~
then-we possibly might have
to
think about closing
a
campus.""It's kind of bleak," adds AmyHarshman
of the
TennesseeHigher Education Commission."A relatively high proportion" ofpublic college students,
in the
state
are
"first generation col-!>tlege students. These are the kidswho, faced with
an
increasedfinancial burden, are most likelyto give up and go find a job."InKansas,
W
the
independentcolleges
are
very fearful,"M-reports Dr. John J. Conard of theState Board
of
Regents. "I don'tsee much hope. There just aren'tany other sources (of aid money)to turn
to."
f^t*£
* *
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