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The Merciad, Oct. 21, 1983

The Merciad, Oct. 21, 1983

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Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, Oct. 21, 1983
The Merciad, Oct. 21, 1983

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V
Theater Production
y
To Debut Next Weekend
L.
to R. - Bottom - Cheryl Thompson, Lynne Martin; top - Sherry Runkel and Denise Grise, from thecast of 'Celebration
9
j
Queen And King Selection ,Highlights
'83
Homecoming
By
Amy WoodworthMERCIAD
Staff ReporterAmong this fall's activities,Mercyhurst campus will behighlighted by the 4th annualHomecoming celebration on Oc-tober 29 and 30. This celebrationwill include the crowning of Mer-
w
cyhurst's
first king and queen.The weekend celebration beginson Saturday at noon with the ar-rival of Alumni and the premierepresentation; of the MercyhurstCollege film,
"That
SpecialTouch of Mercyhurst."All students and alumni are in-vited to the Student Union whereWMCY will be broadcasting livefrom 1 to 3 p.m. Starting at 2:30p.m.,
everyone
is invited to catchthe Laker basketball team in ac-tion
at
St. Marks. The dancedepartment will hold an openrehearsal for the "Fall Gala" at3:30 p.m.This year a special tailgate par-ty, initiated by the alumni office,will be held from 4 to 6:30 p.m. atZurn parking lot.* "The tailgateparty is open to all students andalumni/'' said Gary Bukowski,director of the Alumni Office.
"There
will be many successfulMercyhurst graduates present andI hope it turns out to be a nice
in
-
termingling
of students and alum-ni," Bukowski added.The tailgate party will be servedby the Hotel-Restaurant Manage-ment Department and the buffetincludes chili, hot dogs, cake andother picinic-food. Also, CoachDeMeo has been invited to speakduring
this
post-game gettogether. Tickets for
this party are
$3.50 and will be sold in theAlumni Office, the SAC Office,and will be available in the Stu-dent Union from
1-3
p.m. onSaturday, October 29.
*.
Following
the
tailgate party, theMercyhurst
Laker*footbaH"*team
will take on Duquesne Universityat 7:30 p.m. at the Erie VeteransStadium.
f,
}^
Shortly after the game ends,SAC is sponsoring a HalloweenCostume Dance. Entertainmentwill be provided
f
by the bandNIKARTA from 9:30 p.m. to2:00 a.m. All are encouraged todress
upland
take part
in{the
costume contest, said John Jones,SAC chairperson.
"AdmissionI
tothe dance is $1.00 and the pro-ceeds will be donated to the ErieChapter of the
Muscular
Dystrophy Foundation.During
v
the Halloween Dancethere will be an after glow party,for alumni, at the indoor tenniscourts,
'i *
fe Another
new
facet of
this
year'sHomecoming is the crowning of ahomecoming king
and.
queen."This idea was brought to my at-tention by senior
Carla
Ander-
son,"
Jones explained.
"The
senior students will nominate fivesenior males and
five
seniorfemales for the positions of kingand queen. From there, the topnominees will be voted on by allof the
campus
student body. Eachstudent will cast one vote for theirchoice for king and queen," said
Jones.
The King and Queen willthen be honored at the Saturdaynight football game and be two of
the judges for
the costume contestat the dance," he added.On Saturday at 11 a.m., therewill be a Homecoming mass at
Christ
the King Chapel
ia
OldMain. Following the mass therewill be a brunch available in theEgan Dining Hall.
Also,
weather permitting, therewill be an alumni
vs.
student crewrace on the Presque Isle Bay.
All
are invited to meet at the Mer-cyhurst College boathouse at 1p.m., which is located at the bot-tom of Sommerheim Drive."Even though
alumni
is notedfor last minute reservationresponse, we've already had astrong reply," Bukowski said.
"This
looks like the biggestHomecoming so far," he added.Both Bukowski
and
Jones agree
thatjpart.of
this year's foreseensuccess is the student input. "Thisis finally
going'to
be a student-oriented homecoming. We'll havea king and queen, and plenty forthe seniors to remember," Jonessaid.
?By
Wydetta CarterMERCI AD
Staff
ReporterThe Mercyhurst Little Theatrewill set the stage for the produc-tion of Celebration, on October
28,
29, 30 and November 4, 5 andIt is a comedy about an ancientbattle between an old man and ayoong one, set on New Year's Eve- played out with masks and tor-
ches,
performed upon a platformand observed by Revelers whowant to see what the winter nightwill bring. This
musical-comedy
contains an entertaining musicalscore
and
unique costumes, accor-ding to Ken Morrison, a 1980graduate of Mercyhurst, anddirector of the production.
fHe
is also serving asChoreographer,Costume and
Set
Designer. Morrison's most recentproduction was serving asProduction-Directors-Choreographer for the 1982 ErieCivic Ballet presentation of TheNutcracker. He has also appearedin numerous Erie Playhouse pro-ductions, including
i
Brigadoon,West Side Story, Good News andThe King and I. Morrison hopesto portray his own uniqueness inthis production, as well as he hasin other productions.
i
Members of his productionstaff include Roberta St
ought
on,
who has been musical director forMercyhurst Theatre productions,and
Jody
Hansen, who is servingas Assistant Director.
| *Theicast
of 12 include,
prin-ciples,
David Durst,
Pam
Durst,Chris Alessi and Morten Hansen.David Durst and his wife, Pam,have appeared in many produc-tions in
the Erie
area. They will beportraying the characters of Richand Angel, respectively.Chris Alessi, a freshman atMercyhurst, will portray the roleof orphan. Alessi
has
done Oliver,The Music Man,
1
and Finian'sRainbow
in
'.
theatre in hishometown of
Beemus
Point, New
York.
^
J
{
I
|
Morten Hansen, a student atBehrend College, is playing therole of Potemkin; it is his firstperformance at Mercyhurst.Portraying the Revelers is Mer-cyhurst sophomore, Mark Yeast,appearing in his third MercyhurstTheatre production. In addition,Mark Dick and Mark Tannen-
baum
will be
.staging
for the'Hurst the
first
time as revelers.
Rickyf
Pizzi, Lynne Martin,who
<are
juniors, and SherryRunkel and
-Cheryl
Thompson,both Mercyhurst sophomores, areall making their debut in the LittleTheatre
with this
.production.The cast of. twelve actors andactresses have been rehearsingsince the latter part of
September
to present Celebration for theMercyhurst community.
;Celebration
was written
•'by
Tom Jones and Harvey Schmidt.Reservations and ticket informa-tion can be obtained by calling theLittle Theatre box
'
office at825-0255.
* *'* *i
AtMSG
Funds Approved ToFurnish Video Room
By
Jack HollandMERCIADStaff Reporter
|'
The Mercyhurst StudentGovernment met for the tenthtime this year last Monday,October 17. Dave Robinson,president of MSO, announcedthat the 1983 Food Drivegenerated over
1500
pounds ofdonated food. Also, interviewsfor
^appointments
to theJudicial Board were conductedat Monday's meeting.
The
can-didates (for these positions in-cluded Sister Lisa Mary, RayFlint, and Jim Sniffer. Afourth candidate was MikeDiaco as an alternate, but wasnot in attendance at themeeting. All three candidatespresent at the meeting were ap-proved by MSO, with Diaco'sappointment to be consideredat a later date.
i
The budget report for themonth of
.September
wasdiscussed with Office Expensesand
SAC
taking
up
the majori-ty of the spending. The OfficeExpenses totalled $395.92 forthe month, $150.00 of whichwill be recovered because itwas an emergency loan. SACspent $2,456.65, with over halfof it paying for the services ofSeymour' Hersch, a speakersponsored by
MSC.
Bids were received for therecreation center as compiledby Pat Songer. The items in-clude things needed for out-door activities such as threeFamily Dome Tents, two2-person tents and two Grum-man 17' canoes.Lastly, a motion was passedto allot $1,196 for the fur-nishing of the new video roomlocated in the basement ofZurn Hall. MSG in coopera-tion with SAC, renovated thespace to make a room open tostudents for studying andtelevision ^viewing. The
Hems
being purchased to furnish theroom include a sofa, a loveseat, two large bean bags, andfour smaller bean bags. Someother materials expected to bepurchased are lighting fixturesand wall posters. MarjorieMcDermott, Director of theStudent Union, was the personresponsible for pricing the fur-niture necessary to completelyassemble the video room.
 
Firomthe *Editors
Desk
Take It To
TheJudicial Board •
Mercyhurst
Student
Government has taken a step forward tofinally initiate the Justice Proposal and
Judicial-Board
afternearly one and a half years of deliberation at meetings.The purpose of the Judicial Board
is,'
to see that the publish-ed policies of the college are administered so that justice
is
donewithout the rights of the student being impaired or unjustpenalties being levied.** V
V
The board is a good committee that will solely be able to con-centrate its efforts in the area of student justice. Hopefully,these decisions will be made with constant fairness and objectivi-ty, as it is a sensitive area.
*
The board has been divided into two separate bodies: a three-member Preliminary Board and a ,Main ; Board of sevenmembers. The Preliminary Board consists of
one
facultymember and two students; the Main Board consists of two facul-ty members and five students. A freshman representative posi-tion is still open as well
as
a floating faculty member position, tobe considered at a later date.The board people were selected on a basis of their abilities and
strengg\s ^p>\jcVj^\j^y
©addition, these members have hadprior experience
wrfti
boards of this nature. After careful evalua-tion and interviews, the
corrimittee
was chosen with that criteriahaving foremost importance/*After a freshman representative and an alternate member forthe board have been ratified by MSG, the Judicial Board will befully organized. Next on the agenda,
will
be for the
board
tocreate specific guidelines and policies.
"The
institution oftthe Judicial
Board
is an important step indeveloping a
postf^
studentattitude
at Mercyhurst.
-/' j 4 5
For the first time in the history of Mercyhurst College, thecreation of such a proposal by
junipc
Bryan Doherty one and ahalf years ago,
has.*ef^iffefe3ent %V
student justice^-
-
.
*
The Judicial Proposal and Board has come a long way sinceits initial inception. The greatly discussed proposal has a lot ofpotential and is needed at the college. Through objective study,the
Judicial
Board bodies will be able to review appeals, allow-ing students freedom to express their side of minor and majorinfractions.So remember, to coin a popular television phrase, "if youhave a grievance,
don't
take the law into your ownhands . . . take it
to
the Judicial Board."
Work Study PositionAvailable
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The MerciadOffice.
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ThelMerciad
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its readers.
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-
Letter
Student
Cites
Mercy Walkway Danger
Dear Editor,In
reaching
St. Mark's Center,the Mercy Walkway is {bothfrightening and hazardous. Beingalone on the walkway at night, aperson is just inviting danger. Forexample, there are no safe sur-roundings such
as
buildings or thescenery of people. This lack ofprotection produces a feeling ofisolation and insecurity. The com-
bination
of these elementsultimately creates a pulsating anx-iety for those who are travelingthe walkway.Another beastly characteristicof the
'Mercy Walkway
is the ex-posure to inclement weather. Liv-ing in this geographical location,the
variety
of
elements
to contendwith ranges from light drizzles to
I
hail
and
snowstorms.
The
thoughtof
plodding
up a slippery hill withno handrails for support during a
storm
of any kind
is
dreadful. Forinstance, just last Thursday
r
several students had a night music
class up at the
center.
The
weatherconditions"' were awful.Thunderstorms provided' afrightening mixture of
wind'and
rain. Therefore after the tenminute walk up the
hill
to reachclass, the students faced the pro-
spect
of
sitting in
class for over anft hour with wet slacks. (I wonder if
k
anyone caught a cold?) The general
reaction
concerningthe walk to St. Mark's Center wassummed up by a student at the, student union, "1 avoid going upthere as much as possible."However, there are manystudents who have no choice inthe matter because of classes andactivities that require theirpresence. Their comments dealtwith ideas and solutions alongwith the problems involved.A Hotel-Restaurant Manage-ment student stated, "It's a painright now, let alone what it will belike in the winter. It'll be toughgoing up, especially on the steeppart with ice on it. They,
should
have handrails."^A freshman girl attending theMercyhurst Student Government(MSG) meeting at the
4
centerrevealed her feelings, "It's scaryat night. I made my roommatewalk up here with me.""It's a hassle. I wish I had mycar," one tennis enthusiast said."I'd use the courts up there a lotmore if
they
had a bus shuttle orsomething."
i
These solutions mentioned bythe students
should
be
§
takenseriously. Another reliablepossibilitiy for protection is toemploy a security patrol for thewalkway; after all, St. Mark'sCenter is now a part of the Mer-cyhurst campus.
.The
Mercy Walkway is a con-cern of which the entire studentbody should
be
aware.
Will it
takean injury to a student on the icysidewalk or maybe an attack toone of our female students beforesome concrete action is taken?The solutions are simple if theywould just be put into practice.Thank you,Cathy Nelson
THE
MERCIAD
 
Mercyhurst Football: Four Years Later
By Dr.
Barry
G.
Grossman
J
It is time to put things back inperspective. Four
years
ago, whenthe suggestion of
installing
a foot-ball program was made, many ofour reactions ran the gamut fromskepticism to outrage. Horror
stories were paraded
from
one end
of campus to the
other Jit
was asif a cursed plague was about todescend
upon
our
tranquil, civiliz-
ed,
little campus. The harranguesranged from predictions that 300
lb.
quasi-homicidal, Neanderthalswould be raping and pillaging inGarvey Park, to the fears that theCollege's largesse would bediverted from microscopes, Ap-ples and film series, to seven-mansleds, artificial turf and fur linedjock straps. Like most venturesinto that all-mysterious world of"change," the advent of Lakerfootball has failed to produce anyof
the
dire
atrocities
that
so
many,myself
**
included, were certainwould be visited upon us. Insteadof Gunga-Din, we've
been
blessedwith the likes of fullback JeffJones, now
a
Rhodes Scholar can-didate. Contrary to expectation,the Jim
Sturm
s and Bobby Nieshave turned out to be muchblighter than the rocks they arestudying in geology.Today
even
the
most
outspokencynics among us are cautiouslywhispering that the football pro-gram has supplied far moredividends than debits. So whathappened? Why is it time for areassessment? .Let's focus on the Frostburggame of October 1, when our 3-0Lakers opened their homeschedulewith'a "humiliating"10-7 loss. Mercyhurst coaches andplayers alike were showered by acrescendo of boos, the likes ofwhich are common today in NFLamphitheaters where a hystericalpsycho-sexual mania is displayedon most Sunday afternoons. Thepostmortem that is performedweekly in the faculty dining roomon Mondays took the tone of- avigilante Kangaroo court. Thecoach
was.under
indictment. Notfor losing, mind you, (which isbad enough), but for committingthat greatest of all modernAmerican sins -/'the team wasboring." There were, no "trickplays" (as if trickery could evercompensate for inferior talent); orthe passing game "stinks"(translated as meaning we don'thave 6'4", 210 lb. quarterbacksthrowing
50
yard
bombs to world-class sprinters); or the coachescalled the"wrong"plays (i.e., thearm chair critics who spend two
hours
a week
watching
football onTV would certainly select betterplays than the eight professionalcoaches who are spending 60hours per week breaking downfilms, working with the players,scouting the opponents, etc.).
The "Op-Ed" page
is
designedto be a catch-all for any opinioncontent that did
not
make
the
editorial
page.
It can
also
be
the page representing
a
varietyof viewpoints other than thoseof the newspaper's editors
and
staff.
What has brought us to thebrink of this insanity? It is not asyndrome peculiar to MercyhurstCollege. Rather it is akin to theneo-religious, self-indulgent^ cultthat is sweeping the Americansports scene. From pee-wee foot-ball to the Super Bowl, "fans"have become so absorbed withwinning that all
^
the other at-tributes of healthy athletic com-petition are being shuffled aside.What's wrong
with
a
football pro-gram that stresses character,ethics and discipline on the sameplane with winning? It's been saidover and over on this campus that
"The
bottom line
is
[winning."That's the same credo thatcharacterized AmericanDr. Barry G. Grossmanin the age of the robber barons("the bottom line is profit").
When
winning (or profit) becomesthe sole virtue, the pressure uponthe participants (players, coaches,administrators, etc.) tomanipulate the system becomesoverwhelming. Normally ethicalpeople resort to cheating, lyingand worse. The very horrors thatthe
anti-football
people were pro-mising four years ago may yetevolve if
the
increased
carping and
sniping
at the
coaches and playersdoesn't abate.Shamefully, the
effects
of suchbehavior have already begun tomanifest themselves. The coachesare loathe to visit the faculty din-ing room at lunch for fear of be-ing constantly cross-examined,then drawn and quartered. Moreregrettably, many of the coaches'wives are absenting themselves atthe games, or sitting away fromthe "fans" in order to be in-sulated from
the
torrents
of verbalabuse being heaped upon theirhusbands. Football was supposedto
draw
us
closer together,
but
it'sbeginning to drive wedges bet-ween
us..
*
Comments like "Coachesdeserve to be booed when theirteam doesn't perform" bogglesthe mind when put into the con-text of
a
Division
III football pro-gram at a small, religious liberal
arts
college of
1,400
students. Ourfans aren't paying
SI5.00
a ticketto sit in judgement of paid per-formers. All of our players areparticipating in football as an
extra-curricular
activity. They'renot paid;
they're
not even on ascholarship.
Would we
boo
a
poor
performance
by
the
drama
depart-ment in the Little Theatre; orwould we hiss at a
sub-par
musicrecital in Zurn? Do we gather onMondays and* suggest that IgorStalsky or Joe Chiarelli should befired because, their amateurcharges
r
.
were "not entertainingenough"?
<
All of
this
is not to suggest that
our
coaches
and
players should beabove criticism. The point here isthat we merely place things backin perspective. Our worst fears offour years ago have nevermaterialized. The swarms of sub-cretinous jocks just have not ap-peared. That's not by accident.Anybody who has become ac-quainted with Tony DeMeo, FredConger and Ken Brasington (andother assistants), is
aware
that ourfootball program is in the handsof
class
people. (This
recalls
an
in-
cident last year when some of theassistant coaches, yours truly in-cluded, were pressing' TonyDeMeo to bring a
51st
playeralong for a road game. We sug-gested that we camouflage him asa manager, because we had somedepth problems at the kickingposition. The rules, however, only
permit
traveling squads of 50players. Most of us were* arguingthat we'd never be caught. CoachDeMeo, however,
quickly rejected
the idea with a staunch "No!".When we pushed for an explana-tion, he
f
simply responded,"Because it's against the rules."Enough
said!)
Let's all stop and take stock.Football
at
Mercyhurst
has
been
atremendous success. It has in-creased the low male enrollment
at the
college; it has produced un-told amounts of publicity in areasthat have never heard of Mer-cyhurst College; it has brought toour classrooms some of the most
dedicated
and conscientious
pie
in our student* body; and
above
all, it
has
given
us a
rallyingpoint on Saturday afternoonswhere students,
staff,
parents andalumni can gather and more fullyenjoy collegiate life. If you
add
upall these dividends, the footballprogram is still a plus, even if theteam
goes
0 and 9. When you puta
winning team
(as
ours
is),
on
topof this, it is merely the cream onthe pudding.
\
It is time for all of us to helpput an end to this cancerous at-titude that is afflicting much ofAmerican spirit. Never againshould we tolerate such idioticslogans like "winning isn'teverything .. .
.it's
the onlything!" Let's not succumb to theReagan
esq
ue harpings of "goodversus evil." Our football op-ponents aren't our enemies. Weare not waging crusades ofrighteousness and truth. Theresults
on
Saturday
afternoons arenot
a
litmus
test
as
to the
worth
ofour college or its students.Undefeated seasons at
NotreDame
or Penn State, or wherever,
have
not
produced
one
more
poet,physicist, or accountant fromthose institutions.
Yes, it is
time
to
put
things back
in perspective.
* t
THE
MERCIAD
•:-:•
RepresentativePositions For:
3FreshmenBiology MajorDance MajorDietetics Major
A
*J
r.to
21B3Y
!
with
?iti
yi&nimihiH.
s*IT u^isd
•l'£alflM>II*-•
dD'
*
b/TL
*>
*•
4
* I
v
4
InteriorDesign
Major\
Nursing MajorReligious Studies MajorSecretarial Management MajorSociology Major %
Please submit letters of
in-tent
to
the MSG
office -
2nd
floor,
Old
Main, by Monday,October
p.m.1983
4:00
uHelp
Student
GovernmentWork
For;
You!

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