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The Merciad, Oct. 10, 1985

The Merciad, Oct. 10, 1985

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The Merciad, Oct. 10, 1985
The Merciad, Oct. 10, 1985

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VOLUME
59,
NUMBER
5
THURSDAY, OCTOBER
10,1985
College Senate agendaawaiting full membership
By Betsy LantzThree positions
on the
standing committees
of
trie
Mercyhurst College Senate mustbe filled
by
student volunteers before
the
Senate
can
proceed with discussion
on
various submitted proposals.Five positions
for
non-senator studentswere available this
fall,
interested
volunteers were asked
to
fill
out
applications
for
review
by the
Agenda Committee.Only
two of the
five posts available
to non-
senator students
have.been
filled,
according
to
Senate President
Dr. Lew
Lutton.
"it
may be
that
the
students
are
feeling
like
there just
Is
no
point
In
this,
but if you
take
the
view
that this
is
advisory and we'resimply trying
to let
people know
how we
feel,
then that should take some
of the
frustrations away," Lutton
said.
Composed
of
faculty, administration
and
students,
the
Senate provides leadership,guidance, assistance
and
advice
to the
col-
1
Trustees.
"We
problem
is
that
if a
teacher
in the
Senatewas given
the
power
to
select studentsenators, violations could occur.
For
exam
ple,
that teacher could favor
a
particularstudent."
j *
Proposals that will
be up
before
the
Senate once
it
begins deliberation thisacademic year, according
to
Lutton, includethe possible formation
of a
Library Committee
to
establish
a
formal communicationslink between
the
library and
the
people
who
use
it.
Senate also plans
to
discuss proposals concerning fraternities, which willfirst
be
considered^
by the
Campus LifeCommittee.
J
-;
The Academic Policies Committee willaddress grading policy concerns. These willinclude
a
proposal from
^Academic Dean
David
Palmer.
concerning
the
pass-failsystem
and a
faculty member's recommendation that minus grades
be
added
to the
present grading scale.
$ 9
Last year Senate passed
a
proposalLutton
said.
"We are
simply advisory
in
nature.
'5
Proposals submitted
to the
Senate
for
discussion
are
sent
to the
standing commit
tees,
which
in
turn bring
the
issues beforethe Senate through
the
Agenda Committee.The standing committees include
the
Academic Policies Committee,
the
CampusLife Committee
and the
AdministrativePolicies
and
Operations Committee.When
the
Senate held
its
first meetingSept.
24,
only
two
student senators werepresent. Student senators
are
nominatedand elected
by the
Mercyhurst StudentGovernment."If
the
student senators continue
not to
come
or not to
notify me with legitimate
ex
cuses
for
absence," Lutton warned,
"I
willsee Dave Armstrong about
the
possibility
of
having student government rescind theirmembership
on the
Senate.
I
can't affordnot
to
have people come because we need
a
quorum when
we
vote
on the
issues
we
discuss,"
he
added.
MSG
President David Armstrong com
mented,
"If
that possibility should arise,
I
would
use all my
faculties
to
stop such
a
move, because
it is
student government'sresponsibility
to
fill those positions.
The
recomrnenaTng tTre atltllliq
and Analysis
in
Literature"
to be
added
to
the core curriculum.
The
administration
is
tentatively scheduling this course
for the
fall
of 1986,
according
to the
AcademicDean's office. This year
a
proposal willcome before
the
Senate working
out the
details associated with this course,
in
cluding
how to
exempt students who
do not
need
the
course
and
whether
it
should
be
oriented toward majors,
i.e.
technicalwriting
for
science majors.
A
proposal
con
cerning
the
condition
of
classrooms, particularly those
in
Old
Main, will likely comebefore
the
Senate, Lutton added."President Garvey charged
us at the in
itial faculty-administration meeting that thisis going
to
be a year
of
'introspection'," Lutton stated. "Consequently, there
may be a
good number
of
proposals that come beforethe Senate that haven't surfaced just yet."However, Senate cannot begin deliberation until
the
committees
are
filled.
Therehas been
a lot of
response from
the
facultyand administration
forj
these unpaid,volunteer positions, Lutton commented."It's
up to the
students, first
of all
whether they want
to be
represented,
and
second whether they want
the
Senate
to be
substantive
or not," he
concluded.
A
fall
sky stretches
over
St. Mark's Seminary
At
MSG
Plans underway
for
resident
nrveys, Spring
Breakiirip
Grotto
greenery defies
Fall's paintbrush
The Resident Committee
under
MSG is
ready
to
begin distributing resident housingcondition surveys
to
every student. According
to MSG
President David Armstrong,even commuters will
get a
copy
of the
survey
in
case they lived
on
campus last
yeari f ^g & %*§»
:
S
In meetings
with
E.
William Kennedy,director
of
Student Services, Armstrong
and
Resident Committee Chairman
Don
Gibbon;were told that when
a
student
is
charged
for
a
_
repair, that
fee. is put
into
a
generaldamage
fund.
The repair will
be
made whenthe student leaves
or
when-lt
becomesnecessary
to fix.
They were also told thatfines are given
out
on
a
general assessmentbasis.
. * * £
£.
*
Armstrong and Gibbon were
also
told thatthe major repairs
are
being done first
and
that requests such as painting are being
put
on
hold.
Kennedy also told them that thereis
a
hold
up for
parts
to fix the
heating
and
electrical systems
in the
buildings.At
the MSG
meeting Armstrong pointedout that
the
room condition forms signed
by
the student and
the R.A. are the
only checkthe student
and the
administration haveregarding
the
condition
of the
housing unit.
It
was
stated that residents
of the
townhouses have
not yet
signed room
con-
dition forms because those units
are
stillwaiting repairs.- This year
for the
first time
MSG
will
be
sponsoring
a
spring break trip
to
FortLauderdale. More information will
be out
within
the
next
two
weeks,
but as it
ten
tatively
stands, there will
be two
packages
offered.
According
to
Armstrong,
who is
currently negotiating with
a
travel agency,round trip transportation with seven nightsat
a
choice
of
hotels will range between$269-309, depending
on
occupancy.
A $50
deposit
is
required before Christmas
to
estimate
how
many students
are
interested."MSG
has
never taken
on
anything like
this,"
Armstrong commented.
He is
hopingto fill
two
buses
of
Mercyhurst students.
^
The
debate between
Dr.
Douglas
Lamant
and
Desmoy Kumalo
has
been
set for
Tuesday,
Oct. 29.
They will
be
discussing
the
merits
of
economic sanctions againstSouth Africa.
h
Amy Ward
was
voted
on as a
student
representative
to the
College Senate. Ward,after voicing
a
common student complaintabout
the
cafeteria
food,
was
also
ap
pointed chairperson
of
an
ad
hoc committeeto study
the
complaints.
The
committeeplans
to
gather
the
particulars
of
a variety ofmeal plans offered
at
other colleges
and
present that information
to MSG
with
the
hope
of
presenting'an
alternative
tost
headministration.
|
Ward
and
others complained that boththe quality
of
food
and the
meal programset-up
are
poor.
It was
brought
out at the
meeting that
the
cafeteria counts
on
students missing
six or
seven
meals
a
week, especially breakfasts. Severalrepresentatives mentioned that many
col
leges have
a
"pay-as-you-go" system,whereby the student only pays
for
the meals
eaten.
g
"-
Pat
Reed announced that CampusMinistry will
be
going door-to-door collecting canned food and donations
in
responseto World Food Day. Reed also asked MSG
to
donate $200
to the
cause.
^
The donation issue
as
well
as
updatesfrom
the
Resident
and
Special ProjectsCommittee will
be on the
agenda
for
nextSunday's MSG meeting, which starts
at
7:30p.m.
In 114
Zurn.
j-J
INSIDE
Foreign
-f
Dr|
Erisrojjan -^^^^^Pf 3"Off
^W^^¥^^^^^^
Raotbal I
S^s&w
p. 8
,;• ,',/,-
 
PAGE
2THE
MERCIAD
OCTOBER
10,1985
Foreign students seize the opportunity at the! 'Hurst
By
Betty
L.
Lanti
*
"If only the Americanstudents would realize what awealth of first hand information about other cultures andcountries we have here, and ifonly they would use It..."Sister Elisabeth, director ofCampus Ministry and foreign
students
advisor/
is of coursereferring to the foreign
students
who are presently attending Mercyhurst College,This year 24 foreignstudents
v
representing 13countries are enrolled at thecollege. There are
11
Canadianstudents, two from Ireland,and one student each from thecountries of Denmark, Egypt,
England,
Jamaica, Mexico,Nigeria, Pakistan, SouthAfrica, Spain, Sweden, andZimbabwe.What is
it
that brings a
col-j
lege student thousands ofmiles from home to attendMercyhurst College In Erie,Pennsylvania,
U.S.A.?
P Many of
the students arerecruited by the college'ssports programs, particularlycrew and tennis. PhilNykyforuk, a senior history
WW
w
major from Canada, admits,"Honestly,
it
If weren't for thetennis team,
I
would neverhave come to school in the
U.S.
* *
"College is unbelievably ex-!pensive here," he continued."I could complete a four-year'degree at a Canadian university for about 3,500 Americandollars."
\ m
ftrvjThe same is true of Sweden,according to freshman math
major
and tennis recruitMichael
Jonsson.
"Our universities are free," he
said.
"Allyou have to pay is a $50
stu
dent government fee."
$.'
Other students like DianneFranklin from South Africa,particularly wanted to study instudents are HRM majors.Students from Ireland are attracted to the college throughthe recently instituted John F.Kennedy Scholarship programfor Irish students.
*tf
* Mercy hurst's
Foreign Students - standing,
l-r:
Khalid Massoud(Egypt), John McKenna (Canada),
Jim Whitley
(Canada),
Mikael
Jonsson (Sweden).
Ravi Brewer
(Canada).
Humay
un Ahmed Sheikh(Pakistan), Sr. Elisabeth (advisor), Juan Blazquez (Spain). Couch, l-r:Chris Marshall (Canada), Fiona McGettigan (Ireland), Dianne Franklin(South Africa), Margot Miles (Zimbabwe), Patty Marshall (Canada),Chris Spencer (England) and front center Segun Balogun (Nigeria).
[the United States just to seethe country. Mercyhurst's firstforeign graduate student,Dianne is working for herMaster's in criminal justiceadministration."I am really here to
see
Bruce Springsteen," she quip
ped.
A national champion inwhite-water kayaking, Diannewas also drawn to
Mercyhurst
by the crew team.
*
b*
"The students who do notcome because of the athleticscome here because they haveheard Mercyhurst is a goodcollege," Sr. Elisabeth com
mented.
Many
are drawn bythe reputation of the hotelrestaurant management pro
gram.
Eight of the 24 foreign
5
Of course, every individualhas his or her own reasons forbeing here. Freshmen dancemajor Margot Miles came fromZimbabwe hoping to arrive at adecision as to her futurecareer. "I had lost a lot of interest in my dancing and so
I
am here asking myself 'Do
I
really want to dance?'," she
said.
Wm8mSG0fiNHRHER m
As Sr. Elisabeth explained,there is a lot of red tape involved for these students oncethey decide to come into theU.S. The government requiresthem to carry a foreign student
I.D.
with them at ail times.They are not eligible for financial aid or work study. If theywish to work off-campus, theymust apply for permissionfrom the government, which
is
only granted to them for co-opexperiences.
f
r As foreign student advisor,it is Sr. Elisabeth's job to takecare of all the students' legalpaperwork. The entire CampusMinistry staff works to helpthe foreign students with anyproblems they encounter."I am still missing one of mybags that the airport lost,"Dianne
said.
She thinks someone may have stolen itwhile she was occupied at im
migration.
"My
winter boots,life jacket and teddy bear arein that bag," she added -essentials for
a
water-sport enthusiast who will be tacklingher first winter in Erie.Upon their arrival in the U.S.,most foreign students mustadapt to an entirely new
culture
and lifestyle.Everything from clothing sizesto dating customs are usuallydifferent. When a student'snative country is much
dif
ferent from the U.S., he or shewill suffer culture shock.Margot was shocked by thecasual classroom atmosphere."I went to a very strict, formalschool at home. You wouldnever see a student with hisfeet up and a Pepsi in his handduring class.
<
"The food is entirely
dif
ferent here also," she
continued.
"And at home we haveservants.
I
do not know how toiron clothes or even how tocook. I'm learning how to live,not how to study," shecommented. iOther cultural differencesare less troublesome. "Athome we call traffic lights'robots'," Dianne
said.
"Andmy roommates thought it wasfunny when
I
said the phonewas 'engaged'. It was 'busy'."Dianne is in the process ofpurchasing a used car. Ofcourse, she will have tobecome accustomed to driving on the opposite side of the
road,
but at least gasoline isnot eight American dollars pergallon as it is in South Africa.Loneliness can be another| problem for those foreignstudents who are unable toreturn home and must remainon campus over college vaca
tions.
"Many of our foreignstudents have no contact address in the United States,"explained Sr. Elisabeth. "Itwould be really wonderful ifthe American students wouldinvite the foreign students togo home with them overholidays."The foreign student profitsby that, " she continued, "butthe host student and his or herfamily also profits by havinganother culture in their home."In the end, it seems that theadvantages of studying
in
aforeign country outweigh theproblems. "Even if
I
choose togo home in December,
I
know
I
will have gained maturity andindependence," said ahomesick Margot. *"I am grateful for what
I
amlearning and
I'm
happy
I
tookthe opportunity to come here,"she concluded.And that from a student whodid not even know that Mercyhurst's motto is "CarpeDiem - Seize the Opportunity".
3700 Pine
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OCTOBER
10,1985
THE
MERCIADPAGE
3
College Freshmen
often
experience loneliness
A student's high schoolgraduation is often followedby their enrollment in college.Young adults tend to havehigh expectations at this pointin their lives. Although theyhave high expectations
many
college freshmen often experience loneliness.
Robertj
Pagni, director ofFreshmen Studies, says thereare no real signs of loneliness.Often students cannot
pin
point particular reasons whythey don't like school; theyjust do not
feel
right. They maysimply decide that they don't
like
being at school and wantto go back home.Surveys done by researchers at the University ofNebraska-Lincoln have indicated much of theloneliness experienced by
col
lege freshmen stems fromstudents being "uprootedfrom their family supportsystems and life-long friends."Students who fit into atypical loneliness pattern arethose who have much moretime on their hands than theydid in high school. They havegotten into the habit of goingto classes then going back totheir room and studying. Afterstudying they find nothing leftto fill the gap.
^hQLiar^
tr^problern of
f r e
s
h
m
e h
I
o n e
I
 
n
e s s
Ts
serious, there are some simplesolutions. Any students whoexperience loneliness shouldtry and get Involved in campusactivities such
*
as SAC andstudent government. Thestudents don't necessarilyhave to become actively involved but should just go tomeetings to meet and talk withothers.
J -| |
Studies done by Pagni andthe Office of FreshmenStudies have shown thatstudents who live more than150 miles from the campus are
more-apt
to transfer to
col
leges closer to home.Since Mercyhurst is
con
sidered a "suitcase" college
many
freshmen ease theirloneliness by going home onweekends. Although this mayalleviate temporary lonelinessIt also tends to Isolatestudents further, since manyactivities take place over theweekend.
This
is one reasonwhy parents at freshmenoreientation are encouragedto have students stay on campus for the first few weekendsof
school.j&
l^sfe
Even though
many
freshmen experienceloneliness, it is important tokeep in
mind
that others arelonely as
well.
Unfortunately,transfer students do not attend orientations, which provide excellent opportunities tomeet people.
?
So if you find you are lonelytalk to someone. TheFreshmen Studies Office andCampus Ministry are alwaysthere to lend an ear.
' *?
5,000
new
books
ordered
for
Hammermill Library
By Jennifer LairdSince last spring, some
5,000
books have been orderedfor twenty majors on theshelves of Mercyhurst
Col
lege's Hammermill Library asa result of the on-going CapitalCampaign, according to JoanCooper, library director."At this rate the librarycould acquire 10,000 volumesby the end of the first year ofthe^program***-
©©oper—saicfo
The purchasing of thesebooks is part of a three yearprogram to improve the qualityof the library.In addition to the books,three new microfilm readersare due in the next few weeks.The
fund
drive money,however, has not been allottedfor library materials such asperiodicals because they
In-
volve continuing
expenditures.
*5
The goal set for the libraryfund was $700,000, 80 percentof which has already beenpledged.
%
:
.
.
'/_
J
Cooper indicated that thefaculty has been quite helpfulin suggesting new titles forthe library.
The
new volumes[cover subjects such as sportsftiedTCin e",
aTt Ml
story;
"lite
rarycriticism, chemistry, biologyand hotel
restaurant
management.Space for the new bookshas not been a problem,Cooper
said.
The library nowhouses 105,000 volumes buthas the capacity to accomodate 130.000, she added.
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^^M*am*wm%<*
Dr.
H
Michael
Erisman
will be teaching
in
< Trinidad
during hissabbatical.
=.,*»
Dr. Erismanbook
recently'published
Over the summer,
Dr£,H.
Michael Erisman, professor
of
political-' science, * had- hisbook,; Cuba's InternationalRelations: The Anatomy of aNationalistic Foreign Policy,published by Westview Press.This book deals mainly withCuban foreign policy.Two
other
books authoredby Erisman have -also beenpublished: Colossus Challeng
ed:
The Struggle for CaribbeanInfluence (Westview Press,
-1982)
and The CaribbeanChallenge: U.S. Policy in aVolatile Region (WestviewPress, 1983).
I
Erisman has also written 15articles, the
majority
dealingwith Cuba and its struggle forThird World
Leadership."His
articles also deal
with
suchtopics as the social origins ofrevolutionary elites of LatinAmerica, trends in Cuban internationalism, and culturaldependancy and tourism inthe West Indies, amongothers,
i
Appearinglin
suchmagazines as CaribbeanReview and Latin America inBooks are many book reviewsby Erisman.
M
From early Decemberthrough July, Erisman
^will
travel to Trinidad through thegovernment exchange program known as the
Fulbright
plan.
According toErisman,The Fulbright plan has variousprograms, two of which arethe young teachers program,for those teachers that are juststarting
^their
career (usually
r
-------------
I
I
II
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I.
3728PineiAve.
This coupon entitles
you
to
2
mixeddrinks for
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price of
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1
4
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'i
*
one to five years), and thegraduate program for teachersthat have taught for more thanfive years.
?^P
While on the exchange, hewill be associated with the Institute for International Relations which is a branch of theUniversity of West Indies. Thisuniversity trains people toassume academic service andtrains diplomats. The University of West Indies is a regionaluniversity that is housed inEnglish speaking Caribbeancountries, such as Trinidadand Barbados/
^
Erisman, while at the Institute for International Relations,
will
be teaching alongwith possibly collaborating ona book with the director of theinstitute.
;
-
p*
At the annual convention ofthe Caribbean StudiesAssociation, which is to be
held,
this year, in Caracas,Venezuela In the spring of
1986,
Dr. Erisman will presenta paper on Cuban foreign relations with respect to ThirdWorld Countries/
jAlso.i
a United Nationsrepresentative from *Cuba,contacted Erisman abouttraveling to Cuba to presentlectures.
This
idea
Is
still
In
the making but if Erismantravels to Cuba, he will probably leave
for *
Cuba fromTrinidad. The reason behindthis
Is
that it
Is
much easier totravel to Cuba from Trinidadthan it is from the United
States.
H |
T
I i
1
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