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The Merciad, Nov. 14, 1986

The Merciad, Nov. 14, 1986

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Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, Nov. 14, 1986
The Merciad, Nov. 14, 1986

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VOLUME 60 NUMBER 8MERCYHURSTCOLLEGE, GLENWOOD HILLS, ERIE, PA 16546FRIDAY, NOVEMBER
14,1986
!$
.*
«
g^V^jyyi
-
At
halftime
of
the
Mercy
hurst vs. Canisius Football Game, MSG presented RobertSchrader the "Sally Schrader Award", named in honor of his late wife. (From left toright): MSG secretary Peggy Hlrsch, MSG president, Mike Kelly, Schrader, and former
MSG
president,
David
Armstrong
(*86)
former MSG
president,
grf ^g
Capital CampaignNears Fruition
by Chris KovsklThe Mercyhurst College Capital Cam-paign may benefit from the revised taxlaws. Under the new system, itemizingcharitable contributions doesn't help asmuch. "By paying more of their pledgesthis year, rather than waiting, people cansave themselves money in the
long run,"
stated Gary Bukowski, director ofdevelopment/alumni.
*
Bukowski's
department is in the pro-
cess
of sending letters to all those whohave outstanding pledges, notifying themof this change in the tax laws and its ef-fect on their contributions.
*,
Bukowski iterated the difficulties inannouncing the success of
the
campaign,due to
the
v
number* of outstandingpledges. At this point, Bukowski quotesa figure of 99.7 percent toward actualiza-tion of
the
original campaign target.The three year campaign had a goal of$4.5 million. As of this week, pledgestotal$4,485,457.Bukowski relayed con-fidence in the
"ability
of the college toraise this money soon. "I think it's safeto say we'll meet the
goal
of $4.5 millionby
the
end of this year."With this degree of success so -far,Bukowski is optimistic when respondingto the much asked question, "Will wemake $5 million?",
£
"Obviously, we want to push as hardas
we
can toward the
end
of
June
to raise$5 million. It will
be
hard, but we feel wecan do it."Bukowski credited a large amount ofthe success to the trustees, friends of thecommunity, parents, Sisters of Mercyand alumni, all of whom gave tremen-dous amounts of support.
*
The money will be used in accordancewith the guidelines set up by
President
William P. Garvey and the Board ofTrustees. Some of these uses includeestablishments of scholarships
and*,
stu-dent
loans, additional funding for
the
library, departmental equipment supply-ing and updating, computer equipment(the new system was installed last
year)
and funding for endowments.
>
The breakdown of the money incom-ing*! and its intended expenditures isunclear at present, but Bukowski wouldstate that the money coming fromparents is earmarked forthe-library,while alumni money is destined primarilyfor scholarships.
j
3"It's
been a long campaign," express-ed Bukowski, "but it shows how muchpeople like Mercyhurst."
p
4
The experience has
also
been "gratify-ing," in that this money has been raisedafter other area educational institutionshad held major fund drives.Bukowski also terms the developmentof planned giving,
where
{Mercyhurst isput in
the
donor's will, as essential inaiding the campaign to put MercyhurstCollege in a strong financial position
• vjthin
the next 10 years.
Dean
list DinierHonors Excellence
by Ann JohnsonMercyhurst's annual Dean's List Din-ner
was
held this year on Nov.
5
to honor
theS204
students whose academic skills
putSthem
on
the^listi
The dinner, spon-sored and directed by the office of
the
Dean, is conducted in order to recognizepublically those students who had ac-cumulated a 3.5
or
better
quality point
average;;(QPA)
over
the
1985-86
schoolyear,
f
Theevent*which was
held at
St*Mark's Center, began at 6:30 p.m.
with
apunch
reception^followed
at 7:00 p.m.by a dinner which was catered by
Dan
Bukowski
and other members of Mer-cyhurst's
Hotel/Restaurant
Managementprogram.- Preceding
I he dinn^r-j
K-ar-en-i
Donnelly of
Campus
Ministry offered the
invocation.
Dean Dr. David Palmer thenintroduc-ed the keynote speaker for the evening,Dr.
George
Garrelts,
professor ofreligious studies at the
Hurst. In address-ing the Dean's List scholars in atten-dance, Garrelts stressed the importanceof being a humanist, but most important-ly, being a Christian humanist. He usedthe example of Ann Frank to make hispoints. The richness of life lived accor-
Editor
Note;
*
We would like to
note
that this will bethe last
issues
of The Merciad
until
December.
We
are all taking the follow-ing
weeks
off to enjoy Thanksgiving
with
our families and to write all of the termpapers and study all of the lecture noteswe have neglected over the term.
* >
Vacation starts after next
Friday's
classes. Classes
resume Dec. 1. Don't be
late!
2 *
i M M
We want to
also
clue our readers in ona major change that will be occurring inthis stalwart publication. Starting soonThe Merciad will be sporting a new
look
and delivery day. We feel the change will
please
all
of you, 'Nuff said for now.More details to follow as soon as weknow more* Have a swinging vacation, awonderful Thanksgiving
and
thank youfor your continued support.
ding to humanistic principles and
developed
by
a liberal
arts
based
educa-tion was emphasized.Following Garrelts* speech, DeanPalmer presented
the
awards to thescholars in attendance.The Dean's List dinner is a traditionbegun in the 1970s, because it was believ-ed that students who
performed
wellacademically ought to be
honored.
AsDean Palmer remarked,
"We
believedit's significant that a certain number ofstudents keep a running QPA of 3.5.We've always gone one step further thanthe Dean's List, and honored them with adinner."The 204 Dean's List students representnearly 11. of the student body. Of thea nearly three to one female ratio. This isabove the male-female percentages in theoverall enrollment, which is close to aneven split along gender lines.Graduates from the class of 1986 whoachieved a 3.5 or higher QPA returned tocampus for the dinner.Palmer acknowledged the help of Sr.
Marcia McDonald, Dan
Bukowski
andthe
Hotel/Restaurant
Department,Margie Gleason,
Leslie
Thompson
anid
Pat Weiser.
nm
Wiffl^ffie
Miiiis
ippig
SmMM
Spdttj
i
a
t
I
i
«
 
PAGE
2
Qtye ffflerci
ub
NOVEMBER
14,1986
HRM
Enjoys
Bite Of Big Apple
**x
H
%
Hot delicious pizza!Free 30 minutedelivery guaranteed!10 minute pick-upservice.
t
Custom-made with
your choice
of qualitytoppings.Only 100%
real
dairycheese.
J.
?
Fast, friendly service
for over 20 years.»
.
America's
#1
pizzadelivery company.Open for lunch
11
am
-
1am
Sun.
-
Thura
11 am
-2am Fri. & Sat.
Call us.
453-6938
442 W. 18th St.Downtown Erie
Our drivers, carry
less
than $2000.Limited delivery area.
'<•<
1986
Dommo's
p,
"*».Inc.
®
Members of
Mercyhurst's
HRM program who attended the
71st
In-ternational Hotel-Motel Restaurant Management Show.
J *!
by Amy WardBetween Sat., Nov. 1 andWed., Nov. 5, some studentsand faculty from the Hotel andRestaurant Management packedtheir bags for the
71st
Interna-tional Hotel/Motel andRestaurant Show in New YorkCity.
3
Students attending wereKathy Craven,
Mike
Defazio,Chris Johnson, Mark Medrick,Mary Perillo,
Matt
Robaszkiewicz, Babette Sharp,Amy Ward and Margaret Weir.The faculty components wereDaryl Georger, Paula Paschkeand John Wolper.Their presence marked theeighth year that
Mercyhurst
College has been represented atthis annual
event.
The HRM representatives ofMercyhurst
setup
a booth along!with other colleges and tradeschools from across the UnitedStates. Their purpose was todispense information toperspective students and in-troduce the HRM program topossible recruiters andemployers from the hospitality[industry.
j
Mercyhurst was chosen to bein the show as one of 68 educa-tional institutions selected outof 400 across the nation. Theshow is considered to be an up-to-date presentation of theequipment, ideas and oppor-tunities in the hotel andrestaurant management field.These students and faculty
"seized
the opportunity."While at the show, thestudents and faculty also roam-ed through hundreds of foodservice and equipment exhibits.Attending daily lectures andpanel discussions were also op-tional activities for theattendees.
*In
addition, the students andfaculty were very fortunate toreceive a tour of the year-oldMarriot Marquis - the largesthotel in the city. "The showheightened my awareness ofwhat's new in hotels andrestaurants," commented juniorMary Perillo.
* j
Not only did the students andfaculty broaden their knowledgeoi new services and equipmentin their industry, they alsobecame better acquainted withNew York
City,
f ?
\
v"I
looked up Lady Liberty's
dress...it
was something Ialways wanted to do," Mike;
JDefazio
jokingly stated. Othersalso had cultural and shoppingpriorities such as attendingshows, trying restaurants andbreaking in Bloomingdale'scharge cards.All things considered, thosewho attended would most likelyagree that seeing the show and
pro*
Wind Ensemble Opens
New
Season
c
v
o
J
t
Vr
5
Off!
$1.00
off any
16"
pizzawith
1
or more item.One coupon per pizza.Expires':
11/30/86
'Fast, Free Deliver/*]442
W. 18
th
St.Phone:
453-6938
SEN
MN2
by Janine
Adolphson
The Mercyhurst College WindEnsemble will open the 1986-87season with a performance onNovember 20th at 8:00
pm.
Theconcert will take place in theZurn Recital Hall. IFeatured soloist will beChristina Brown. Brown is asophomore majoring in MusicEducation. She is currently stu-dying flute under LeannWistrom.
\
*"
The Wind Ensemble is underthe direction of Robert
Dolwick.
Dolwick is well knownthroughout the area as a finemusician. He plays principaltrumpet in the Erie Philhar-monic and in the Cleveland Or-chestra. As an assistant pro-fessor at the
D'Angelo
Schoolof Music, Dolwick teachestrumpet, trombone,
french Horn
and tuba. He also conducts thegrowing
ensembles
at
the
Schoolof Music. These include BrassEnsemble, Brass Choir,
Wood-
wind Ensemble and the 35member Wind Ensemble. Thecomplement of musicians isformed of music majors,students of Mercyhurst College,and some professionalmusicians.
'**
The program for Thursday'sconcert covers a wide variety
of
styles and time periods. Anil-lustration of this would be theflowing melodic First Suite in E-
Flat
by Hoist. This piece openswith a melodic line similar tothat of an early hymn tune in thelow brass. Hoist's style controlsthe rest of the three demandingmovements of this piece. In con-trast to this piece is the Latin
|
American influenced rhythm of•'Jubilee" by
Frank
Benscruito." Jubilee" is anup-tempo
^joyful
song in whichBenscruito depicts an at-mosphere of a
celebration.
The concert is free of charge.visiting the city was an
-educa-
tional extravaganza."The show was very wor-thwhile. I was more aware ofwhat was involved in the
in-
dustry
now,",
stated Perillo.The importance of meetingkindred spirits was stressed bysenior
Matt-
Robaszkiewicz.
4
'We
got to meet a lot of peoplefrom other schools and the in-dustry. We had a great time -and the show wasn't bad either.Honestly, we did learn a lot andmade a lot of contacts."Junior Babette Sharp em-phasized the equipment and in-formation aspect of the show.
"The
show was great becausewe learned a lot from the
dif-
ferent ideas and new equipment.Some of the ideas I never wouldhave thought of before the
show."
f
|
She also brought out the factthat the college's booth wassomewhat separate from theother booths. "Other than that,there were no problems."
•Hurst
Bus.
Majors
Start MBA Programs
By
Guth
The Mercyhurst BusinessAssociation has launched itselfheadlong into what promises to bea busy year. And if attendance atthe early bi-weekly meetings is anindication of the future, the MBAhas the potential to explode into amajor organization on the Mer-cyhurst Campus.The MBA roster currentlyboasts 35 members, with new, in-terested students appearing atevery meeting. This is a significant
iimprovement
over last year's 13active members, and
hopefully
all'the members will be retainedthroughout the year. The Ex-ecutive Board is encouraged bythe positive response in the firsttwo months of the 1986-87academic year, and is hopeful thatthe activities planned
foi
the yearwill draw many more students tojoin the organization.
j*
jig
The goals for the business clubthis year demonstrate both the ex-periential and social orientationsof the organization.
Involving
themselves in community and col-lege activities, and activities oi theMBA
itself,
the members benefitfrom a different approach to thebusiness world, as well as an op-portunity to socialize with| students of common interests.This year's activities are in fullswing.In October, a proposal to havea student representative attend the
B u SIriew^Departmcnt» Faculty —
meetings was accepted by thedepartment. The MBA also spon-sored a trip to the InternationalTrade Exposition in Cleveland on
JOct.
25. Despite a formidable in-itial response, relatively fewstudents have taken advantage ofcontinued on page 7
Collegiate Resume Services
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T
 
4 v
NOVEMBER
14,1986
Sttje menial!
Merciad AttendsCMAConventionWorld's Largest Student Press Meeting
PAGE
3
Four staff members
of The
Merciad
attended
the
AssociatedCollegiate: Press/College Media
Advisers national
convention
in
Washington, D.C.
i >f
It
was a
very
rewarding trip,
as
a great deal was learned about
the
business
of
editing
and
producing
a
newspaper. There were profes-sionals from around
the
countryoffering their insights into
the
world
of
professional journalism.Friday's Keynote Speaker, Judy
Woodruff,
a
Washington Cor-respondent
for
McNeil/LehrerNewsHour, offered
a
very
in-
teresting address which
got the
program underway.Although President Reagan
did
not make
his
scheduled press con-ference appearance
at the
conven-jtion because
of
a
committment
to
the Marine Corps Graduation
Ballj
at
the
White House,
the
overallquality
and
worth
of the
conven-tion
to the
college journalismstudents
in
attendance was
not
af-
fected,
for
there were many
in-
teresting, seminars offered.
"I
thought
the
seminars werethe most worthwhile aspect
of the
convention," said
Merciad
NewsEditor, Matthew
J.
Clark.
"I
definitely
got a lot out of
this
and
I'm
already looking forward
to at-
tending next year's convention
in
St. Louis,"
he
said.j These seminars
ranged
from"How
to
Conduct
an
Interview"to "Building Good Relations bet-ween Editing, Advertising,
and
Production"
to
"Photojour-
nalism and
the
CollegePublication".
^^ f
Jack Hillwig, from
the
Univer-sity
of
South Carolina, talkedabout
the
secrets
of
makingphotojournalism work with col-lege publications.
He
suggested
that those
who are
photojour-
nalists should constantly strive
to
improve themselves
and to
look
at
their work
as a
true
art
form.
V
He.
stressed creativeness
in
photographing,
as
well
as
striving
for
the
unusual shot which willmake
f
o
r
a
memorablephotograph.
All
of
these things,said Hillwig, will help
to
make
photojournalists
betterphotographers
and
will ultimately
make
the
publications
for
whichthey work significantly better.
r
:
He
added
that
the
mark
of a
good photographer
is one who is
never satisfied with
a
shot
,
alwayssearching
for
ways
to
make
a
shoteffective
by
emulating
a
particulartheme which coincides with
the
story
it
accompanies.Another subject
of
discussionwas
how to
cope with
un-
cooperative news sources. Thisseminar featured JohannaNeuman,
a
White House reporterwith
USA
Today.
She
spoke
on
what
to do in
case
of
"stonewall-ing"
by
news sources.She mentioned that most oftenit
is not the
major names
in
government that offer usable
in-
formation,
but
"little mice",
as
she referred
to
them. However,these "little mice"
are
verycareful
not to say
anything
"On.
the Record."
£ |
This leaves reporters with
a
verydifficult decision
to
make
as to
how they will
be
able
to
make thisinformation printable
by
gettingsomeone
to say it "On the
Record."
*
Neuman offered that whenshe's
in a
conference with
a
publicofficial,
she
will mention
to
thatofficial,
as
background, what
a
"little mouse"
has
said
and
then
try
to get
that official
to
confirmthe statement.
She
said that manyof
the
stories she's written havebeen made possible through this
j
technique.
*
*
-
There
was
also
a
seminar deal-ing with
the
ever-increasing pro-blem
of
Censorship
of
the
College
Pressjj Ivan
Holmes,
of the
University
of
Arkansas, alongwith
Liz
Minden,
of
CentralMissouri State University, spokeon
the
subject.
I
%
This seminar
was
based
on in-
formation gathered from
a
reportof a survey funded
by
the
GannettFoundation
of
the
campus pressand
its
problems with censorshipin
1986.
B
Q
Holmes spoke
of a
college
in
Georgia
in
which
the
editor
un-
covered
a
story
that
alcohol
was
being illegally delivered
to the
V.I.P. luxury boxes
of the
school's football stadium.
The
college's president denied that thiswas going
on, and
instead
of
say-ing that
he'd
check
up on the
situation,
he
threatened
the
editor,
not
only with
his job as
editor,
but
with
his
enrollment
\
Keynote
speaker Judy
Woodruff
status
at
the
college.The editor, being
a
very profes-sional student journalist, stakedout
the
luxury boxes
and
took pic-tures
of men
delivering alcoholicbeverages into
the
boxes. This
was
definite proof that
the
deliverieswere being made.
But
even withthis
proof, the
college presidentdenied the charges, saying that
the
deliveries were
not of
alcoholicbeverages,
but of
soft drinks.
But
in the pictures,
the
word "vodka"was clearly visible. When
he
responded
to
this,
the
presidentattempted
to
dismiss
the
incidentby
far-fetchedly
claiming
it was
merely
a
case
of
soft drinks beingdelivered
in
alcohol boxes.
^
Another incident involved
a
school
in
Illinois.
Hie
college'snewspaper editor uncovered
a
scheme
in
which
the
college'scomputer system
was
beingpirated
and
used
for
personalgains among members
ol
the
school's administration.The student, instead
of
beingpraised
for
this,
was
reprimandedby
the
administration
and the
school's newspaper was
put
undertremendous pressure. Several
of
the editor's staff members couldnot handle
the
pressure
and
left
jthe
paper. This left
the
editor
by
himself with
no
one
to
help
him in
his plight.
^
Holmes referred
to
the editor
as
"a Pulitzer prize waiting
to
hap-
pen"
but his
life tragically endedwhen
the
pressure mounted
to
such
an
extent that
he
committedsuicide.
*
Collegiate press,
in
many
in-
stitutions, cannot effectivelyreport
on the
evils
of
societybecause their very existencedepends upon
the
institutionwhich
is
doing
the
evil,
and
this
is
jthe biggest problem that
the
col-lege press
is
faced with, accordingto Holmes.Another topic
of
discussion
was
that
of
building
and
maintaininggood relations among editorial,
j
advertising,
and
productiondepartments.From
USA
Today, news copy
desk^chief
Don
Ross gave
a.
seminar
on
writing creativeheadlines
and
cutlines. Creatingheadlines
and
cutline that
are eye
catching
are the
hardest part
of
putting together
a
newspaper.Ross stressed
the
importance
of
using word play
and
humor
in
writing headlines that will makethe reader want
to
read
the
story.Paula Anderson,
a
faculty adviserfrom
the
University
of
Kentucky,felt that good relations among
the
co-workers
of a
newspaper
was
vital. According
to
Anderson,
a
paper cannot function
to its
fullest potential unless there
is
proper communication betweenall members
of a
newspaper
staff.
Some suggestions were made
as
to
how to
improve
the
morale
of
the newspaper staff
as
well
as
the
relationships between
the dif-
ferent departments
of the
paper.Anderson suggested havingweekly meetings between
all
members
of the
staff
and
discuss-1
ing ideas
for
future editions. Pco-
Journalism
convention brunch
in
Hyatt Regency
in
Washington,
D.C
pie
in
advertising may have
a
greatidea
for a
future story that wouldgo unnoticed
if it
weren't
for the j
weekly meetings.
1
Another suggestion made
by a
member
of the
student communi-
j
ty
at the
seminar
was to
have"suggestion boxes"
on
campuswhich would allow members
of
the student community
to
havesome kind
of
input
in
theirschool's newspaper.Anderson stated that even
if the
ideas
are
unusable nine
out of ten
times,
the one
time that there
is a
good idea would make
the
sugges-tion boxes
a
worthwhile effort.The press conference, featuringformer Supreme Court ChiefJustice Warren Burger, was disap-pointing, with Burger giving
a
rambling history lesson
on the
beginning
of the
free press
in the
United States.Burger could
in no way
replacethe President's presence
at the
convention,
but
because
of the
vast range
of
activities offered,the convention
was
still
a
veryworthwhile event.For
the
evening's entertain-
the banquet hall
of
the
Capitol Hill
I
ment,
the
attendees were invitedon Friday
to be
a
part
of a
livebroadcast from
the
JeffersonHotel
of
Mutual Radio's "LarryKing Show"
a
popular talk radioprogram.
Not
only was
it a
chanceto
see
live radio being done
but to
meet
and
talk with King's guests
Washington
Post politcal humorcolumnist Mark Sheilds, singerMel
Torme
and
President Reaganimpressionist James Morris.When
the
audience
was
invited
to
ask questions, Sheridan's com-ments
to the
guests were heard
on
coast-to-coast radio.
The
radioprogram followed
a
wine
and
cheese reception
for the
conven-tion members
at the
reknown
Na-
tional Press Club.
J
, Mercyhurst's communicationsdepartment
can
only benefit froman experience such
as
this,
as
many ideas
are
expressed
and
shared between
the
college jour-nalism- students
in
attendance,thus enabling publications such
as
The Merciad
to
improvethemselves through knowledgethat would otherwise
be
unavailable
to
them.College Journalists and
advisers
at
the
Hyatt-RegencyJournaJists
departing
Washington on Sunday.

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