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The Merciad, Feb. 19, 1987

The Merciad, Feb. 19, 1987

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The Merciad, Feb. 19, 1987
The Merciad, Feb. 19, 1987

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VOL. 60 NO. 14
MERCYHURST
COLLEGE, GLENWOOD HILLS, ERIE, PA 16546THURSDAY, FEBRUARY
19,
1987
\
Hurst Academic CelebrationSolicits Some Mixed Reactions
By Matthew
J.
Clark
w Mercyhurst's
first-ever Academic Celebra-tion,
hdld
last week, has been met with mixedimpressions. Faculty and administration hadgood things to say about it, while students hadvaried opinions. The student turnout
was
mix-ed as well.Some of the events were well attended, butothers received little
attention
from
the
studentbody. Faculty and administration generally felt
that
the
celebration
was a
success for
a
first-year
event.
Mercyhurst President, Dr. William P.Garvey, was
"delighted
with the
results."
"It
was
a
very
successful
two
days,"
he
continued.Garvey added that the celebration was thehighlight of
the
60th anniversary of
Mercyhurst.
"These
were
the
most
edifying
two
days
I'vespent as president," he added.Dean Dr. David Palmer, who oversaw thepreparation
of
the
celebration, commented: "Itwas marvelous. I think it went
over very
well."
"I've heard nothing but positive responses|
from
faculty and
administration,""he
added.Palmer felt that
the
celebration
was a big
sue-
cess and that
he
hopes
to
have
another
one
nextyear. He expressed that he's heard some en-couragement concerning
the
prospect of anoth-er celebration.^
"Many people have
told
me
that
we
must dothis again," he said.Garvey agreed that the celebration was suc-cessful, but wasn't as fervent as Palmer.. "It wasn't
a
raving
success,
but it
was
a
goodsuccess," he said. "Now, we're going to makeit bigger and better."
v
Garvey said that
the
celebration
proved
manythings to him.
*
It
proved
the
college community
was
readyfor
an
event like
the
celebration,"
he
said.
"Peo-ple were learning for the sake of learning," hecontinued.
"There
were no grades given,nothing
was
required.
"We
were
celebrating
the
life of the mind, and the student involvement
was a
compliment
to the
student body," Garveysaid.
£
"Those who
were
negative about student in-volvement truly underestimated the studentbody," he
added,
t
"Our worries about attendance were un-
founded,"
Palmer added. "The student par-ticipation was much better than expected andwe were
surprised
in many cases."
"
One or those surprising cases
may
have
beenthe number of students
who
attended "The Nor-mal Heart", a play about
AIDS.
%
: *?
Charles
Kolb,
Director of Prospect Researchand Grants and Chairman of
the
HammermiU
Library Committee, expressed his surprise
to-
ward the student turnout for "Heart". "Thestudents interest in The Normal Heart' wasreally surprising and I
was
rather pleased
by
it,"he said. |However, Kolb felt that the student involve-ment in
the
many other activities could havebeen better.
^
"I would have liked to have seen morestudents at some of the events," he said.Jack
Kuniczak,
Writer-in-Residence at Mer-cyhurst, called the celebration,
"A
totally newdimension to what a college offers its studentsand community."He felt that Chuck Rosenthal's presentationon "Loop's Progress" was "excellent, and themost interesting lecture I attended."
|
"It's a wonderful idea
to
have
such a thing,"
he
continued.
"It really confirms
my
high opi-nion of Mercyhurst students."Tom Dore, Asst. Director of Alumni Rela-tions said he was very pleased."I was impressed with the quality of thepresentations
and
with the turnouts for them,"he said. Dore admitted he was worried aboutattendance being poor, but was pleased to seehow many did come.
"I
expected
so
many
not to
show
up, but
when
I saw how many people actually were there, Iwas very impressed," he said.
'$
(See "CELEBRATION", page 2)
MSG And SAC Say Yes To Spri ng Formal
By Jennifer
Singer*
On Feb. 12,
at
9 p.m., there
was
*
meetingheld
to
discuss
the
Spring Formal. Concerning
the
last formal, the Hilton stated that they wereembarrassed by our behavior and that rentingrooms
was a
mistake.
The
cleaning ladies foundnothing unusual and the Hilton will host a
Spring
Formal.
At the
Spring
Formal,
there
willbe a few ground rules such
as:
no rooms willbe rented, once someone leaves the ballroom,they must
leave
the
Hilton,and
no
alcohol will
be
permitted
to be
carried
into
the
dance.
Also,anyone who comes to the dance drunk will beasked to
leave.
There were approximately 600tickets sold to the Winter Formal. There willonly
be 400
tickets
sold for
the
Spring Formal.Many people at
the
meeting stated that
this
wasunfair, but Mr.E. William Kennedy, Directorof Student Services,
is
adamant
in
this
decision.Kennedy stated, "Tickets will
be
limited, ab-solutely. No tickets will be purchased at thedoor. There will only be an advanced sale."John Widecan suggested only having a DJ,thereby allowing
more dance room
and
possibly
letting more students
attend
the
dance.
Mr.
Ken-
nedy agreed
to the DJ, but
there will
still
be
only
400 tickets sold.
••- :•
Mr. Kennedy plans on being at the door anddoes not plan to be embarrassed. Drinks willbe
served.
Prices will
be
Hilton's
normal pricesand
there
will
be
punch
and
nonalcoholic drinksavailable for free.
*
The Spring Formal
is
set for May 8 at theHilton. Anyone interested in helping
to
plan forthe formal
is
asked to attend
the
weekly Thurs-day night meetings in Zurn
114
at 9 p.m..Former
KGB
Major Levchenko speaks about life in the Soviet Union at the MercyhurstAcademicCelebration*Photo: C. Kovski
"t s
'
Soviets
a
Scheming'' Says Levchenko
By Matthew
J.
Clark
-
The
new Soviet "openness" policy of Sovietleader Mikhail Gorbachev is an attempt tocreate
a
false impression "that the
U.S.S.R.
isbuilding a democratic state", according toformer
KGB
agent
and
Soviet
defector, StanislavLevchenko.
'$.
£
In his speech at Mercyhurst, Levchenko saidGorbachev's openness policy is not an attemptat influencing
international
relations, but
a
re-
sponse to
Russia's
domestic problems in
an
ef-fort to encourage the Soviet people to workharder and show more initiative.iDuring his lecture, Levchenko openlycriticized
the
Soviet
Government.
He
had work-
ed in
political
intelligence in Japan
 for
ive years
as
the
KGB's
chief of "disinformation".
He
saidhe had thought about defecting "for about 20
years"
before
he
actually did in October, 1979.
|
Levchenko cited
such
recent
events
as the re-
lease from internal exile of Soviet dissident An-drei Sakharov* and |the promise' ofmulti-candidate elections to assess Gorbachev'sactions. £
J-
f
>
ipie said had Sakharov died
in
exile
in the So-
viet city of Gorky, Gorbachev's efforts in theWest would have been dealt a severe blow. Sohe was released and allowed to speak openlywith western news media.Levchenko noted that the Soviet leadershippresently has "an interesting and calculatedscheme". "Knowing that Western countries
have
short attention spans (especially the U.S.),Gorbachev and
his
aides
 feel
hat public
interest
in
Sakharov
will fade
after
six
months
to a
year,"
Levchenko said.
-?
"The more available he is, the less sensa-tionalism there is." In addition, as the SovietUnion's most
notable
dissident,
Sakharov
is be-ing
used
as a
propaganda
tool when
he and
Gor-bachev
have agreeable positions
on
something,such
as
the Reagan administration's "StrategicDefense Initiative"
more
commonly known as"Star
Wars",
he said.
j3$
|
1
"When the symbol of Soviet dissident isagainst
SDI,
Gorbachev
can
utilize
it," he
said.
He
suggested that
the
Soviet leader's
oppositionalone would have been ignored.
Although Sakharov
is
talking
openly
with
the
western media, Levchenko said "he remainsisolated from his
own
people, who know littleabout
him and are
told that
he is an
imperialistagent working against the national interests ofthe country."Levchenko said that Gorbachev's recent an-nouncement that the people will soon be able
to
vote
for
more than
one
candidate
in
electionsthe Soviet parliament is like voting for "who
is
sexier
out
of
two
identical twin
sisters."
Themost important action Gorbachev could take,he said, is to amend
the
penal code to removea section which permits the arrest of anyonefound possessing written or taped material thatcriticizes the Soviet state.
«Ms§
Side
Pg
Ki
A|bum
Review.
priffr
 
PAGE
2
3be fHerriafc
THURSDAY,FEBRUARY
19,1987
Fr. Tracy Calls For Religious Acceptance
/
The
60th Anniversary AcademicCelebration kicked off with adiscussion on one of the most con-troversial subjects in our society:Religion. Lecturer
Fr.
David Tracy,a Theologian from Bridgeport,Conn.,
spoke
of
"The
Challenge
of
Religious Pluralism" and what itmeans to society in how we viewother religions. Pluralism means: astate of society in which membersof diverse ethnic, racial, religious,or social groups continue to par-ticipate in and develop their tradi-tional culture within a common
civilization.
f
In
a
speech
that rambled
at
times,Tracy said
he
thinks mystery is im-portant to religion and is, perhaps
more*important
than logic. In
Musical Chairs OutLazer
lag
In MSG
By Margaret
Coffey
The fourth MSG meeting of theyear
was
opened
by
MSG
President
Mike
Kelly.
The January
budget
was
approved
and
Tresurer
Barb Sayers
announced that
we
lost
$1288.56
on
the Winter Formal. This is goodcompared
to
other
formals and
theytook in more than expected. Theproposal to accept HSMA (HotelSales and Marketing Association)
was
approved.
Vice
President John
Widecan
announced that on Satur-
day
of Activities
Weekend there will
be a Lazer Tag competition from6:30
p.m.—9:00
p.m. From .1:00
p.m.—4:00
p.m.
on Saturday
there
will be Team Olympics. Sixteen
If
you are searching for fulfillment,we invite you
to
join
us.
We
are theColumban Fathers, Catholic mis-sionary priests, serving the poorand the little ones in twelve
Third
World countries.To learn more about the reward-ing work we do, and your possible
role
in it, please write to: FatherMichael Harrison, ColumbanFathers, Box fll25,
Edgemont,
PA 19028. Naturally, there's noobligation.
r
NAMEADDRESS
CITY
STATE
ZIP
SCHOOL/COLLEGE
AGE
teams will
compete.
The
teams
willconsist of three females and threemales.
*
The
newfcalendar
was also
discussed.pMercyhurst
PresidentDr. William P. Garvey has asked
MSG to
take
a
position on the newcalendar. A vote was taken and 11favored the semester system while12 favored the current trimestersystem and nobody
voted ;,-for
thethree eleven week terms.The
muscial
chairs project willprobably be cancelled until nextyear. There is not enough time toplan it for this year. "5
The
votes
 for
 a
mascot
are
still
be-
ing tabulated but the MercyhurstLaker
is,
in the lead so far. AdmiralHurst is in second followed by theLaker Wave. One representativesuggested
we
change the nicknameof the
school.
Chuck
Fleet presented
the
idea of
having a
Men's
Volleyball
team.
Itwas approved as a club team with
the
possibility of becoming
a
varsi-ty team next
year.
The club is ask-
ing
for
$500
from
MSG's club
fund.MSG hasn't decided whether theyare going to give them the moneyyet. The issue will be discussedlater. The season would start afterSpring Break
with Elaine
Ruggieroas the teams advisor and ChuckFleet as the coach.regards
to
the
many myths
surroun-
ding
religion
today,
he
stressed
that
it
"should
not
be
taken
literally,
butshould be taken seriously.The University of Chicago pro-fessor suggested
that
Theology canalso be pluralistic and can workwith
science.L
He offered that the ultimatereligious or limit question, the"radical contingency found in thegreat religions", deliberately asksthe ultimate meaning of reality.Tracy said he disagrees with thebelief
that
all religions worship thesame supreme being. "There's noway that all religions can possiblybe worshiping the same God," hesaid.Despite his feelings toward the
"all
religions worship the sameGod" concept, Tracy'added, "Bud-
dhists have
a
great
deal
to
teach Jews
and Christians about
1 i
fe,
love andother aspects of
reality."
£
%
He
indicated
that,
although there
are
differences
in
the
many
religionswhich society follows today, we
should make
an
attempt
to
interpret
and
understand
as
many
of
the
great
classic religions as we can.Although
he has, in
the
past,
beenthreatened with being ostracizedfrom the Vatican for his radicalstance on
artificial
birth control,abortion, pre-marital sex, mastur-bation, homosexuality, dirvorce andeuthanasia, his discussion did notdeal with these subjects.
Tracy
closed by reiterating thatChristians
should
try
to
learn
aboutand understand other religions."(Christians) cannot master
even
the language of our own tradition.
To
even
do
that,
we must
learn fromthe other traditions," he said."There must be new forms ofChristianity
in
other
cultures
if there
is to be
global
Christianity"
he
said.
Kolb Explores
Celebration
(Continued from page 1)Palmer promised that, if there isa celebration next
year,
"we'll
do
alittle better planning so that eventswon't conflict with one another.""We had some complaints frompeople
who
had
to
choose betweentwo or three very good events," hesaid. "Next
year,
we
will
take stepsso that that won't happen."Garvey expressed
his
delight withMercy hurst's
students."The students are better than
Erie's
By Kelly Moore
'
'Prehistory
9
Dr. Charles Kolb contributed to
Mercy
 hurst's 60th
anniversary
celebration
with
his
lecture
on
"Ex-ploring the Erie Region Prehistoryto ca. 1800 A.D."
:
£Anthropologist
Kolb
of theDevelopment Office here at Mer-cyhurst, discussed the earliesthuman occupation and showedmaps, artifacts, and other visuals.The lecture focussed on the
Tribal
Cultures and Early European ex-ploration of the
region.
From 500
B.C.
to
1658 A.D.
theevolution of village life occurred.The influence of British and theFrench is the major point of Euro-pean contact with the evolution oflife.From 1600 to 1700 A.D. theBritish
and the
French were
the on-
ly native groups
in
Erie
and the
sur-
rounding areas.
Kolb also
focused
on
the Indians'reaction in Fort Duquesne, the furtrade,
and
various disease
problems.Kolb displayed approximately 15maps to give specific detail to
his
subjects. He also lectured on thepermanent settlement of Erie, whichoccurred in
1795.
Kolb
emphasized
the
importance of
European contact
and that this contact has put theUnited States where it is today.
-
many people think they are, and Ithink the students are better thanthey think they are," he said."I think they are much more in-tellectually alive than
many
peoplethought theywere."Garvey added.Garvey put the reason for
the
celebration into
perspectivcf1
"We
exist
not
just to give kids ajob and credibility, but to educatethem, and that was the whole ideabehind the academic celebration."
he
said.
Ww
m*~
The Merciad
Asks:
What Did You Think OfThe Academic
Celebration?
m m
Mark
Burrelli,
Criminal Justice"It
was
great.
We
got
two
days
off.I don't think the students really got
into
it,"
J
i 1
PHONE
Greg Latimer, Criminal Justice"I think it
was
nice
to
celebrate the
birthday
of
the
school
but
they could
have picked better subjects andmore interesting items of study. Imean, who cares about frogs and
toads?"
Michael Burke, Mu-sic/Psychology"I thought the Academic Celebra-tion was good.
There
were a fewwell presented lectures and ac-
tivities that
I enjoyed, especially
the
jazz
concert."
*
Sheila
\
Ragus, InteriorDesign/HRM
\
"My
avorite
 event
was
the
jazz
con-
cert,too,;It
was
the
best thing
I went
to and I enjoyed
k
thoroughly."
 
Xtf
XI \L
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY
19,
1987
i
utile
MtttXah
PAGE
3
Importanfj
Story NotCovered
Dear Editor,
^^
On Jan. 31,1987,
an
event
occured
that
I
feel shouldn't
have
been miss-ed. At the Senior Dinner Dance,Mary Beth Joseph, a Senior SocialWork major,
was
presented with theSister
Carolyn
Herrmann ServiceAward. During this time wheneveryone is proclaiming their right"not to be active", Mary Beth hasexemplified how amazingly muchone can do for their college and thesurrounding
community.?Yes,
Ibelieve many of your articles
are
in-formative, but I
thinkjhat this
storyranks above any article in the lastedition.
Ijfeel this
way withoutregards to the other stories butbecause this event was the
Merciad
acknowledgement of
a,
student giv-ing unselfishly to her college andcommunity. Mary Beth has "seized
the
opportunity"
to
serve and I hopeyou will "seize the opportunity" toinclude
an
article or possibly
a
per-sonality profile on her
in
the future.Thank you.Respectfully,Peggy Hirsch, SeniorEditor's Reply: You're right. Itwas an important story that wemissed. There will be a story onMiss Joseph in next week's issue.
We too
feel
she really deserved thehonor. Thank you for calling thiserror to our
attention.
Student Tells OfMissed! Opportunities
Dear Editor,For weeks students heard aboutMercyhurst's 60th Convocationplanned for Feb. 10 and
11.
It wassupposed to be a time to celebrateour college's success in the worldsof academics,
fine
arts, sports, andother aspects in which
we've
excell-ed. I personally was looking
for-
ward to a chance to expand myknowledge of all subject
areas
by
at-tending the lectures, discussions,films, etc., that would be offeredduring the Convocation. Others, Isoon found out, were looking
for-
ward to a few days, or even a week
off
of school.
I
There were so many educationaland entertaining programs open toall Mercyhurst students last week,that I find it hard
to
believe that onecouldn't find something that in-terested them. And yet, many pro-grams were poorly attended, evenby their own majors. I found thatwithin my own major (one of amediocre size), only myself
and an-
other faithful major
made
it to mostof our major's events. Why? I ask-ed myself this question as thecelebration drew to a close,
and
came up with this answer: thestudents weren't really interested inbeing educationally stimulated.We're college students! Shouldn'twe want to learn? And, what's bet-ter
is
that
we
didn't
even have
to pay
$546 to watch, listen, discuss, andeven yell a bit with distinguishedcollege officials. It
was a
terrific op-portunity
to.
learn
about"
what's go-ing on in the world today and howit
affects u
s.
We
even got
to
feel onthe level with
some
of
our
professorswho
were
seated in the same lecture
halls
that
we
were.
So
where
was
3
A
of Mercyhurst's population? Homeor at the library. My sympathies to
those
at
the library
who
really
need-ed the time to catch up on all thehomework
they've
been putting off,and my condolences to those whoneeded to go home to mommy, but
my
kudos
gof
to those who took
the
challenge and ventured out intothe educationally elite of
Mercy-
hurst College. Although the fecul-ty and administrators probably thinkthat our student population
was
lacking during the Convocation(which it
was),
rest assured
there arestill a few of us faithful pupils whowant to and will take the chance tolearn.
j
Sorry everyone else missed itbecause there was
a|wealth
of
knowledge to
be gained
over the past
few days. I'm just
glad that
I
was one
of the few to Carpe Diem!Loretta A. Layer
Media Missed Point
Of
Dwyer's Suicide
Dear Editor,I am writing in response to theeditorial published in
"The
Mer-ciad" on February
5,1987.
This ar-ticle dealt with the press responseto the suicide of
R.
Budd Dwyer. Iagree with Brian Sheridan thatDwyer's
suicide
was a news event,as such things are classified. Dwyer
was a
public official who elected tokill himself in public office.I differ,
however,^
in my opinionas to whether the press actuallyserved any useful function in theway they covered the story. WasDwyer's decision intended
to
makesmall children aware of the realityof death? Dwyer claimed
he was
in-nocent. The point he was trying
to
make was that he was an innocentpawn in a political web. In his"rambling" (as the press called it)statement,
he
made
it
quite
clear thathe believed he was set up.Most people I
have
spoken to areastonished when I suggest Dwyermay have been innocent. They ask
why
he killed himself if that
was
thecase. These people all are unawareof the realities of politics. The feetis that Dwyer was politically ruin-ed,
even'if
found innocent. Inreports after his
death,
Dwyer
wasdescribed
as a
very
dedicated public
servant..'Not
only was all he hadworked for destroyed, but all hebelieved in, too. For Dwyer, therewas no tomorrow.Do not mistake
me.
I do not con-done suicide. However,
I do
believe
it
takes
a
certain amount of courageto do what Dwyer did. He couldhave committed suicide in theprivacy of his own home. He didnot. And, this is the point. Dwyer
was
trying to make a statement. Hewas crying out for a review of asystem that can
find
an innocentman guilty, and destroy him at the
same
time. It
was
this point that thepress failed to emphasize.No one has subsequently ques-tioned the system. There has beenno national clamoring for a reviewof the legal process that triedDwyer. How many people actuallyread
his
statement? How many peo-ple saw the article tucked
inside
theErie Sunday Times which allegedthat the judge,
jury,
and prosecutors
were
all
conservative?
Are
only
peo-ple who are involved in law awareof
how
detrimental
this can be to acase? How many people are awarethat the prosecutor in this case hadbeen employed by two people who
were also
allegedly connected
to
thebribery? How many know thatDwyer's co-defendent received oneyear? One
year!
What happened to
the
55?
• J f2
The fact remains. Public attention
-
Student Government PresidentClarifies His Position
Dear
Editor,!
At times during recent weeks Ihave viewed the comments whichmy article
"MSG
President
is a
Lit-tle Disappointed" has producedwith some mixed emotions. Attimes, I
have
been annoyed as
is
thenatural reaction of someone who isbeing criticized but that criticismcomes with the territory; in effect Iam fair game. At other times myoriginal emotion of frustrationreturns. Perhaps
possibl/'through
lack of
eloquence
on my part, I didnot express my point of view verywell, however, if you read the arti-cle again it should come through.' Are you correct, Mr. Editor,
when
you say that people have theright not to attend? Of course, you
are.
I do not think that this was thepoint of
my
article however. I wasattempting to point out that MSG,in
my
opinion,
is not being utilizedto its fullest
extent.
The service be-ing provided to you, the students,could in fact be giving you more.The point of this whole debate,therefore, is not to have you rally-
ing
around
the
cause
by
attending allthese "wonderful activities whichwe provide." The point is, that bytelling us what is wrong we couldhopefully attempt to give you morefor your money. Why does it mat-ter that you give us suggestions? Inthe
long-run,
»it
doesn't. You stillgraduate and get a job withoutMSG.
However,
as
MSG
is
here
andthe ability to provide services
to
theMercyhurst Community, it shouldbe utilized to its fullest
potential.
Because
we cannot think
up
servicesto suit
everyone,
it
is
often useful tohear other ideas. I resent
the
accusa-
tion that you would
be
doing our jobfor
us.
Any organization that youwould be doing our job for
usMny
organization, yes, even The Mer-ciad
can
always
turn useful criticisminto something positive.
MSG is
notmy
organizationy
it is yours! In
ef-
fect you
help
yourselves through abetter
MSG.
I am surprised that
the
Editor did not pick up on this. Yes,our posters need improvement. Bypointing out these things we will
hopefully)never
spell anything in-correctly again. What a
beautiful
example of how criticism works. Iwelcome
your^comments,
Mr.Editor. I find it
a
pity,
however, thatwe are using the amount of energybeing negative as we would beingpositive. Maybe if we were beingpositive, we could both (MSG andThe Merciad) grow togetherbecause I find it hard to believe thatno room to grow positively exists.Yours
Sincerely,
^
Mike Kelly
:
was diverted from the real issue.Perhaps the
^possibility
of amanipulated trial was not news-worthy enough? Perhaps the pressare aware of the
public's
"starry-eyed" vision of the judiciary? Whocreated this illusion in the firstplace? Legal
officerslare
onlyhuman.
t
sr-
Instead
the
picture of a
man
aboutto blow his head off was more
sen-
sational. I believe that in the storyof R. Budd Dwyer, the press hasmissed the issue
completely.,R.
Budd
Dwyer,
it seems, died
in
vain.Yours sincerely,Dianne Franklin
Letters to the Edi-tor
must
be
signed
but
the name can bewithheld upon re-quest. No
unsigned
letters will be pub-lished.
Letters
are dueby
Friday
by 2 p.m.
to
The Merciad
office,located in the base-ment
I
of BaldwinHall, Room
81
or
P.O.
Box 129.A phone numbershould be includedfor verification but itwill not
bepublishedi
We reserve the rightto
editf
letters.

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