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The Merciad, April 21, 1988

The Merciad, April 21, 1988

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The Merciad, April 21, 1988
The Merciad, April 21, 1988

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VOL. 61 NO. 22
MERCYHURST
COLLEGE. GLENWOODHILLS.
ERIE
APRIL
21.1988
Mercyhurst profs oppose bayfront development
By Matthew J. ClarkMerciad Editor
'\£
In the late 1970's, with the future of Erie'seconomy looking less certain than it had beenin recent memory, the Erie Port Authoritybegan searching for ways
to
revitalize thearea,
<%
f
$
\
The plan which the organizers devised,known as the Erie Bayfront Redevelopmentproject, has been met with its fair share ofcriticism. Two Mercyhurst professors, his-tory instructor Richard Kubiak
and
geologist
Dr.
David Thomas, both oppose the plan
in
its
*
'status
quo*'
form. j
^85J75
.SsS
MA*
RichardKubiak:"Thisbay is nottheprior-ess of private people,
it
b the public's re-source" i
i
The organizers felt that Erie's days as athriving water port for industry were over andthat a new approach had to be taken in orderto put Erie "back on the
map"
in the north-eastern United States. Erie still had PresqueIsle State Park; a tourist
trap.
They viewed itas the keystone
to
reviving Erie.As
a
result,the project which we nowknow as the bayfront development plan wasborn.There are many who are very excitedabout the development project, such as theport authority. But, there are many, especiallyenvironmentalists, who oppose die develop-ment for one reason or another. Many of themdon't oppose the plan entirely but would liketo see some aspects of it done differently.
*
'Mostpeople would like to see some sortof proper development," Kubiak said. "Butwhat is proper development?
|
According
to
Kubiak, the bulk
of
thedevelopment is going
to
be marina areas andliving accommodations, i.e. condos. Thereare some proposed hotel and restaurant spacesand there are also plans for
a
big historicalfacility centered around the brigship Niagara.
*
"Taken individually, none of these pro-posals seem too
bad,"
he said. "The problemis Erie hasn't planned for the developmentThereis nogood, comprehensive planforthetotal development of the bayfront"They(developmentcoordinators)j
be-
lieve they have
a
comprehensive plan, butthey don't No one really knows what thatbayfront is going to look like."Kubiak stressed that
the
reason
 for
his isbecause those who devised
the
plan were notqualified.I "Itwasdoneby planners of limited capa-bility who have absolutely no conception ofthe environmental needs
of
the area or theecosystem needs of the area," he said. "Tothem, the environment
is
there for them todevelop."
*
Kubiak feels that the developers aren'tlooking at the whole picture, and this couldcause problems."The key: flaw in this
is
the master planbecause they're only looking at this from anindividual point of view, in other words onedevelopment, thenanotherone next to
it,
thenanother.They haven t taken into considerationwhat kind of impact all of those developmentstogether will have on the environment"The best example of that is that no onehas ever considered what the carrying capac-ity of the harbor is
in
terms of the number ofboats." j
j£& 'I
|
Kubiak noted that there could be3,000new boat spaces on the bayfront"If we have that many more boats, therewill be a big problem with congestion in theboat channel,
9
*
he said.
*
'If there were a verysuddenstorm, wh ich Lake Erieis famous for,the channel would never be able to accommo-date the enormous number of boats trying tocome off the lake."It would be an unbelievable mess."Thomas noted that the boat situation canactually have a reverse effect on recreation inthe area.i"Youcan cause
a
degradation
of
therecreational segment of your population byoverpopulating withmotorcraft,which
is
what these increased number of boats couldmean/' he said.
'They arenowexperiencingthis problem in the Detroitarea.*'f Kubiak feels that
the
boat example epito-mizes theladeof planning fordieproject"The idea of development is good
:
that planning was either poorly dorplanned well enough," he said,
i
*to**b#0&&-
Dave Thomas:"The whole bayfront devel-opment idea is
wild,
nutsy planning."
Thomas also feels that proper planning
has
been lacking in
the
development project
'
'There are things being planned and builtwithout
the
application
of
impact state-ments,"
he
said. "Whateffectwill thesethings have
in
the future?""The whole bayfront development idea iswild, nutsy planning,'' be added.' 'Where are
the
tourists going to go? Presque Isle alreadyhas die population of Yellowstone National
fctfk."
f "
f
ff |
see
'Bayfront,*
Pg
3
9
Hurst to offerWriters'^Institute
ByKelleyMooreMerciad staff reporter
Pippin provides
laughs
Rich Tryzbiak, who is the leading player in the Mercyhurst College Utile Theaterproduction
of
"Pippin
".
The musical comedy will be staged Fridays and Saturdays, April22,23,29, and 30 at 8
p.m.
There will also be a matinee on
Sun.
Apr. 24 at 2:30
p.m.
Tickets are $6 for adults and $4 for senior citizens. Mercyhurst students with ID will beadmittedfree.
i
]
Mercyhurst is offering a Writer's Institutefor high school students once again thissummer.
\g
The Writer's Institute is a creative writ-ing workshop in short fiction.Students will be able
to
cultivate skills inthe reading and crafting of short stories.While attending these workshops, stu-dents will live on
the
Mercyhurst campus forthree weeks, interacting with three profes-sional writers and other students participatingin the program.
*
Dr. Kenneth
Schiff,
Assistant Professorof Creative Writing and English Literature
at
Mercyhurst,
is
the director
of
the Writer'sInstitute.Hesaidheis very enthusiastic about
the
program which hasn't been implementedthe last two summers.
f
"This
is a
good opportunity for highschool students,'' Schiff said.Tuition
for
each three-week course
is
$ 1
SO,
in which students receive three deferredcollege credits.Students live on the campus free. How-ever, there is a charge if a student chooses toeat in the cafeteria. rStudents will cover elements
of
fictionfrom the points of view of both the reader andthe writer. They will also learn about plotcharacter and many other principles of fiction.High school students
are
invited
to
applyfor
the
workshop. Students must send
a
completed application, a writing sampleandarecommendation from a teacher or guidancecounselor.For further information, please cor
Dr.
Kenneth
Schiff,
Mercyhurst College,
E.
38th St, Erie, PA 16546. Or call hii
825-0401.
!
|
For a profile on Ken
Schiff,
see page 2
MSG
election results
President* Chris MohrVice President* Beverly TuckTreasurer: Lorin BowmanSecretary: Lynn Sheffler <SACChairperson: JanetHolzhaeusser
c
tfS&x&m
.
r~>
Ikv_
 
.V
PAGE
2
The
Merciad
APR
19
O
:
Student teaching challenges education majors
By Lillian DressierMerciad staff reporter
44
Tracy Wasson, a Mercyhurst
sen
ior,
says
all juvenile delinquentsshould have to student teach be-cause sitting
on
the teacher's side of
the
desk would cure them.
*
4
It made me write a letter
to my
high school teachers apologizing
for
how I behaved there,''
she
said.Wasson, an English Educationmajor, did student teaching in thefall and winter terms of 1987.
"For
12 weeks I ate, slept anddrank lesson
plansbutloved
it,''
shesaid. Pennsylvania requires collegestudents to complete a
j
student
teachingcourseof
12or
IS weeks
in
their chosen area.
?
All though it
was
tough
getting
through this period, Wasson said
she
was'
very
satisfied''
with whatMercyhurst
had
taught her.
Mercyhurst's
student teachingprogram is run by a departmentwhose teachers are quick to
provide
help to students when needed. "Ireally enjoyed it I don't
know if
Iwould have stayed in without thedepartment's help. They pointedout things I did wrong.** said JohnMajewski, who is graduating inMay.
1
'Before fulfilling! the State'srequirements, Mercyhurst has stan-dards
that must be
met, according
to
Sister Kathleen Cribbins, directorof student teaching.
She
added thatMercyhurst's liberal studies re-quirements and educational qualifi-cations for students' particular areasmust be
met
before, they
become
certified.
"We
have almost a modelprogram as far as the state is con-cerned. We
really are in
high reputedown there,*
*
Sister Cribbins said."I went to several other col-leges, but came back here becausethey have
the
best student teachingprogram,** Keith Parry,
a?Mer-
cy
hurst sophomore
said,
f
Sister Cribbins explained thatone of the reasons Mercyhurst'sstudent teachers
are
so
successful
isthe
Practicum
Program.; Once aweek, every morning or afternoonfor 20 to 30 hours, students mustpractice
what
they have learned
in a
public school. "That's one reasonwhy our kids go into the studentteaching experience so ready tounderstand what's happening,Sister Cribbins said.
»»
4 4444444
I like
it,
they make you workand
there
is
a lotof
practicum expe-
rience which
is
good.' * In elemen-tary teaching, Mercyhurst has an-other
Pre-In
tern Program calledPipping'* by the students. "Stu-dents
go out and work as
a teacher* saide three mornings a week," Dr.Barbara Weigert, director of ele-mentary education said. It is asophisticated program** becausestudents are gradually main-streamed into teaching a wholeclass, Weigert
said.
1Dr. Barbara Weigert kept up todate on what we were doing. Hercomments were excellent Theybrought out my better qualities,"Sylvia McKce, a former student,said.
i
I
The Practicum Program doesn'tgive students a lot of opportunity todevelop
and
evaluate
their student-teacherrelationship.
"It'slikeaone
shot deal", said Sister PatriciaWhalen, Coordinator
off
the Pre-teaching Internship Program.In the Preteaching Internshipstudents go three consecutive daysso that they get a stronger feel of
what
the
classroom
is
like
and
whatthe art of
teaching
involves.*'During this program studentsmust keep a journal of their dailyexperiences
and
their reflections onthe art of teaching.
'.'On
Fridaymornings we have a seminar toprocess the experiences of he week,and the students submit
j
theirweekly journals,** Sister Whalensaid.
"I will
comment
in the
journalif
I feelit is
appropriate.'*^ . L.
^^Ttes^cfc^^whqWejgmvolved
in
1
secondary
|
student teaching,grades seven through twelve, mustmeet
two
separate student teachingrequirements, according to EdwardGallagher, director of secondaryeducation. Gallagher said studentsare assigned to a junior
high
formiddle school! and then a highschool with him as their primarysupervisor.
>
"The cooperative
features
i
ofthe secondary education depart-ment were very helpful. Mr. Gal-lagher was very helpful,** saidJackie Mauriello,
who
became
cer-tified in 1987.
£
m
p
:
If students miss classes morethan once,
the
"Chicken* SoupMan,** as the students have nick-named Gallagher, checks to see ifthey need help. "This gives them
be
yours as an
Air
s not easy, but theare great. You'll haveForce advantagesdays of vacationeach year
and
commedical
care—and
much're a college graduatewill
be,
AIM HIGH
|
Force recruiter forabout
Officer
Tra
and pilot trainingGreg
Agen
-
633
- 7094
Colle
the the message that they have re-sponsibilities to
meet,**
Gallaghersaid.The biggest problem with theStudent Teaching Program is thecalendar system, according to SisterCribbins.
"We
had
no
input
for
the
change in
the
calendar- they didn'task
us,**
she said.Sister Cribbins added that stu-dents must have everything donebefore they do student teaching.are full-time students plus studentteaching, and; that is hard. Plus,many of our students have to dosome part-time work
to
meet finan-cial obligations,* * Sister Cribbinssaid. I
"When
you'restudent!teach-ing, the last
thing
you
want
to worryabout
is
taking
test,
when
you
haveto be making tests,'* Wasson said.
4
* It's not a good
calendar for theeducation department because our
Mercyhurst
student teacher Tracy Wasson with some
of her
students
at
Union City Middle School
They can't
come back
to take major students teach until the Christmasrequirements.'
*
In reality our kids break. Therefore, they have
to
takeevening courses. Splitting
up a
term
at
Christmas
doesn't seem
to
fit thelifestyles of students,'* SisterWhalen
said,
t
.
)
'sSister
Cribbins said that in thelast couple of years many adultstudents are coming back for certi-fication. Of 46 fall students ap-proximate! y five
percentwere
olderadults. The older adults may have
gone
through
college
from a liberalarts standpoint and now find theyare interested
in
teaching,** she said.
4
'The
calendar
was
purehell.""It was really tough, it was achallenge to get everything done.Some of the students had to take
courses
in
the evening,*' Majewskisaid. I
"The
demands placed on thestudent teachers were very great
trying to be a full-time teachertoward
the
end of their program as
well
as being a student on campus,''Gallagher
said.
. 5
J]
Wasson said
one
of
the
hardestthings for her
to
overcome
was
theminimal age
difference
between thestudents and her at East HighSchool. "Sometimes there's lessthan three years difference. Youhave to rememberyou^
have
theknowledge. Your attitude is whatmakes it," she said.
Schiff
likes teaching lifestyle
Ken
Schiff
By Michelle Bush
I
Merciad staff reporter" Passing
Go
" means
more
thancollecting $200 to Dr. Kenneth
Schiff,
a new English professor at
Mercyhurst.
His novel. Passing
Go, won
theLibrary
Journal's
title for
*
best first
novel
of the year'' in
1972
and wasnominated for the National Book
AWard
in 1973.Schiff
has
been teaching for 10years and has a
background!
inEnglish literature
and
creative
writ-ing. He
earnest©
Mercyhurst inSeptember 1987 for two reasons.First, he says he
gets
to teach crea-tive writing.
^^^ have
always been interestedin writing. I never wanted to doanything
else,*'
he adds.
Second,
he
can work
on
a sum-mer writers' program. "The Sum-mer Writers' Institute is a special
interest of
mine," Schiff
says.
As
itsdirector, he explained that
the
pro-gram, starting; this summer, ismostly
for
high school students. But
he
added that it's open
to any
Mer-cyhurst students who want to par-ticipate. The program is designed to
<«
cultivate a student's proficiency inwriting short fiction and is like thecurrent writing fiction class."I like the lifestyle of being ateacher," says
Schiff,
45,
whoearned
his
Ph.D.
at
the University
of
Denver in
1987.
"Teaching is aprofession which should allow meenough time to do my
own!writ-
ing,'
he
adds.
He
also said
he
likesdealing with
ideas
and is especiallyhaving
a good
time teaching Ameri-can literature this term. "I like
the
life of the mind and being aroundyoung people. I forget temporarilythat I'm not," he said.
Schiff,
who taught English at
Anselm
College and New Hamp-
shire
College,
both
located
in
Man-chester,
N.H.-
has
Mother:
interestsbesides
writing
and teaching. He
goes to the YMC
A every morning at6:30 am.'
'I
jog or play racquet-ball," he
says.
"I try to do some-thing every day.*' He plays thebanjo. IPassing
Go
took Schiff about ayear to write. He said the bookfeatures a young adult
in
a sanitar-ium and is about, "the sanity ofinsanity." The young man in thebook
is
based on
his
brother.
"Mybrother had some hardtimes,
and
itis about
that,**
Schiff said.
The
book
has
a quote from oneof
Bob
Dylan's songs, "You Ain'tGoin' Nowhere," which shows
how he
views
the
protagonist in thebook "It's the notion that you ain't
goin
no where. Doesn't
that
say
it?"
he says.Schiff recalls the day his bookwas published. "It felt great," he
says.
He was at
a birthday party with
16
friends on a farm in Maine. Hereceived a phone call from NewYork announcing
that his
book
had
been published.
The
person on the
phone
in New
YOrk could hear
the
cheering on the other end
 from
hebirthday party.
I Afterward
I wentfora
walk
and
smoked acigar," said
Schiff.
1 M
I
$
The reviews came soon after."They were positive reviews, so Iwas real pleased,'
*
he
says.
He gotan offer for a movie option and agood review from the
New York
Times
among
others.
[ $
Schiff
has
a single explanationfor why a writer writes. "It's whatI do best And I feel compelled towrite" he said. "It feels good tohave written, which isn't the samething as saying it's fun to write."Schiff said many people writetoday. "It
is
just about impossible toget
I
something
published,
unless
you
go
through
an
agent,'
*
he
adds,
and
even
then
he
says
the
prospects
were
very slim.Schiff
gave some
advice
to
po-tential! writers: "Write. Sit downand
i
write." He said writing is amatter of discipline.
A
person whowants
to be
a writer should write forseveral hours everyday,
and keep
atit, according to
Schiff.
Schiff is working on anotherbook, but like many writers hewouldn't divulge any informationon a work in progress.
 
APRIL 21,1988
The Merciad
PAGE3
Student addresses parking issues
DearMr.Oaik,
jI am acommuter student at Mercy hurst College
and
I d ike to
address
a
few problems
with thepresentparkins
arrangements.
i
First,
unless you have an
8:15
a.m. class, don't expect
to
find a parking place on campus.Second,
the
construction that is
going
on
is
a
big
hasde. I
realize
during construction there are
going to bea few
inconveniences.
What I cannot understand is putting dirt in.ar>arldng lot and maldng it look like
a
miniature
mountain.
M
The parking
was
congested before
they
decided
to
fill parking lot number seven (located off Briggs Ave.]with the
fill
dirt taken from the addition being put on to Zurn.
2*
I heard that prior
to the
start of the construction, President Garvey said there would
be no
inconveniences
Well I
am sorry
to
say there
are
many
inconveniences
to those of
us who
com mute. If Dr.
Garvey
 finds
 no problerr
with parking it's understandable, he
has
a reserved parking space on campus.I think it is time to remove
some
of that lovely
grass and
replace it with asphalt for more parking
on
campusSincerely,Daniel
J.
Church
M
Bayfront development
People are saying this is goingto be the salvation
of'the
city,**Kubiak
added.
"I don't think that'strue.
They're
talking about bringingpeople off Interstate
90
into
the
city.
 4
The
ury is still
out on that
andI'd be very surprised if they hadenough of
the
kinds of things thatwould enable them to pull peopleoff the Interstate. I
think that's
apipedream."
i
Kubiak noted
that
in February, ascience advisory board consistingof 20 scientists, who have seendevelopments all across the basin,looked at the bayfront develop-ment
£
y
,
I i'
They
were appalled
at the
lackof planning/' he said.
They also
showed concern over
the
condition of
the
water.
* We have fish
with tumors," hesaid. "Eleven percent of bullheadcatfish have tumors. That percent-age is
much
too high to be a naturaloccurrence.
q
According to Kubiak, bullheads
are
a very good indicator species asto
the
health of the
 fish
 population."They are telling us that
there's
something wrong in that harbor,"he said.He feels that Erie should bedesignated
asian
area of concernalong
the
Great Lakes. It would be
the
43rd such designation,
t
"It
is the
first step to getting thewater cleaned up down there,'' he
said.
| -
Kubiak doesn't like
the
fact thatbecause of some of these projects,the public
will
no longer have freeaccess to many areas along thebayfront
i
I
. "This bay is not the prioress
of
private people, it is the public'sresource,'' he
said.'
The
public hasto have open and
 free
 access."I'm not opposed to develop-ing the area, I'm opposed to wallingthe
citizens offJwhat
happens if
some
kids want
to
go
 fishing?
 Sud-denly they won't be able to fishwhere they
were
once allowed
to.*'
If bill number
1685 J
passes,Kubiak feels it
will
set a dangerousprecedent because it will say, inessence, that there is nothing toprevent people
 from
 buying
a pieceof any
state
park.
4 4
There's simply
not
enough population
to support
many
of theprojects which the de-
velopers have
planned.
That's why somepeople are
talking
about the possibility ofputting in
casino-style
gambling.
5 9
4«T.>
According to Kubiak, there iscurrently a bill out, in which thedevelopers are requesting to pur-chase some dock tips. They alreadyacquired most of the dock, but the
tips
fall beyond aline drawn in
1843
which prohibits
4
development
be-
yond that point
Kubiakf
feels that too manypeople looked at non-Great Lakesdevelopment when they made thedecision
to develop
here.
He
addedthat they didn't take into account a
lotof
the
weather
problems synony-mous with the Great Lakes.
'
'The development needs to bescaledback,"
hesaid.
"It'sgoingtocome down to an economic deci-sion. The climate here prevents
a
lotof development possibilities.I
,*
"You have to be careful whatyou're developing.''Another problem, as Kubiaksees it, is the lack of people in this
area to keep
a project
like
this afloat"There's simply not enoughpopulation to support many of theprojects
which
the developers haveplanned," he said. "That's whysome people are talking about
die
possibility of
putting
in
casino-style
gambling."If you do that you've justcreated a situation for even
greater
corruption. I believe you will seecasino gambling eventually, andthat's a bad move."Regarding studies to determineif the
areas
for the project
are
safe tobuild on, Kubiak
said there
weren'tenough.
|
He said there were not enoughcore borings done at the variousproposed
development
sights to seeif there were any contaminants ortoxic materials of any kind.
jfrompg.l
According to Kubiak,
over a
S.S
mile area, there were 28 core bor-ings conducted,
most
of
which were
not properly
tested.
West of ParadeStreet he suggested boring every300 feet East of Parade Streetevery 100 feet
j*
' 'We need to
core
bore
at
every
sight" he
said,
M
a
good
idea
to clean
up
anddevelop,
but die
development needsto be
more
public-oriented."
"Speaking as a native, this is afilthy environment" Thomas of-fered.
"It
wouldn't
attract
anybody.If you want to make somethingreally ugly, you overdevelop.""Right now, Erierotten mess. Clean
r
___. ^
hell. We need a firm, sensitiveleader to tackle these problems.Pittsburgh
once had
a mayor, DavidLawrence,
who
did tackle the envi-ronmental questions
and
he cleanedPittsburgh up.""One thing is for certain,"Kubiak
added,''
today we should begetting rid of the pollution that'salready there
 from
 sewage."
" In
the shortterm,
development
will mean economic gain to some-body," Thomas said. "In the longterm, it
will
probably
mean an
eco-
nomic loss to the
community."
4 4
It was done by
plan-
ners
who have absolutely noconception of the environ-mental needs of the area.
J
9
As for the condominiums thathave
been
built at
the
mouth of thepeninsula, Kubiak noted that sincePresque Isle
has an
annual numberof tourists comparable to Yellow-stone National Park,
the
traffic isvery heavy and people who live inthose condos
will have trouble
get-
ting
out *
'.
"The weather is very harshdown there
in
winter," he added.
44
There should have been asection of
land
near the
cliff
side setaside for a park," Thomas said,noting that there's a
steep
cliff justsouth of
the
condominiums.
'
'The reason for
this is
becausein the long run, with a four-lanehighway with condos on the
cliff-
side, it's not going to be a pleasant
place
to live,'
*
he
said.'
The
condoswill depreciate."
At
Wit
9
End
BySteve Rush
Bull
n
Thomas feels that the develop-ers are "missing the boat" withrecreational development He feelsthe emphasis should
be
on develop-ing for the technological industry.We have an ideal chance toattract technological industry," hesaid. "We shouldn't stress recrea-tion. Building
and'developing
for
the
technologies should
be
stressed- for
die
year2,000.
4
m
They believe theyhave a comprehensive
plan,
but they
don't.
Nobody
* I
really knows what thatbayfront is going to look
like.
9 5
'
'This
can only be done by anexcellent higher education system."A good public school educa-tion system. I'm not interested inprivate schools, they're the ruina-tion of
the
publics.
'
'Clean, paved streets and clean,well-kept business areas and qualitylaw enforcement
jWe
also need
solid,
intelligent leadership."Thomas presented what hetermed as a "master plan" for theErie community."Environment should be toppriority," he said. "I'm
no*
justtalking pollution, a good environ-ment starts in the home."From your back yard, thestreet in front of you,
all
disposalfacilities, municipal business andindustrialareas,andinally, schoolsand recreational facilities;Thomas feds that if
those
con-cerned about environmental issues
want o have a
real impact
they
have
to red)
ink their strategies.
!
}
/
"Environmentalists are fight-ing
die
wrong people," Thomassaid. "If you want public access,you don't go to the developer, yougo
to the
federal government
"The
Erie county government
gave all
of ts access land away, andinstead of having nice parks, nowthey've got run-down dumps," hecontinued. "If you're an environ-mentalist go after the state andcounty and get those damned parksback. |
sj!
*
I"
It's
a governmental thing," hecontinued.'
Those
who are goingafter
die developers
are missing themark by light years."
It.
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a
meaningful, exciting summer
oppor-
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Catskiil
Mountains, Rock
Hill,
New York and
work
in a residential camp
for
persons
with developmental disabilities,Positions are available for Counselors, ProgramSpecialists, Nurses, and Cabin Leaders. Seasondates: May
3lst-August
13th. Salary, room and
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Call
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Equal Opportunity Employer M/F

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