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The Merciad, May 5, 1988

The Merciad, May 5, 1988

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The Merciad, May 5, 1988
The Merciad, May 5, 1988

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VOL.
61 NO. 24MERCYHURST COLLEGE, GLENWOOD HILLS, ERIE, PA 16546THURSDAY, MAY
5,1988
Bratton address headlines'88Commencement
By Kelley MooreMerciad staff reporterTwo hundred and
sixty-nine
students willbe awarded degrees
at
the sixtieth commence-
ment
of
Mercy
hurst College set for
May
22 inthe campus center at 2 p.m.Dr. Daniel L. Bratton, President ofChautauqua Institution will deliver
the
com-mencement
address.
J
. i
Bratton,$
?
who
has been
head;
ofChautauqua since
1984,
has 23 years ofexperience in higher education administra-tion, including ten years as the president ofKansas Wesley an College.Bratton
has
also held
administrative
postsat
the
University of Maryland, where he has
the
vice
chancellor for student affairs, and atAdelphi University,
where
he was
vice
presi-dent and
dean
of student affairs,
and dean
and
director of university admissions.He holds a doctorate in education fromTeachers College, Columbia University, an
M.A.
from Columbia, a bachelor of divinity
from
DrewUniversity,
and
an
B.A.
in historyfrom Allegheny College.
Dr.
Bratton has had several articles
pub-
lished in educational
journals,
in "Change"magazine, and in the "Presidential StudiesQuarterly."
S
In addition,
he
has written
two
books,
* ADifficult
Journey," published in
1978
and
co-
authored with
his
wife
upon
their adoption
of
two Korean-born children.
His
second book,
Students;may
consideroff-campus rent alternative
By Ann JohnsonMerciad News EditorStudents renting
Mercy
hurst-ownedapartments pay about
$
1,525
per person eachyear, a fair price, according to Director ofStudent Services William Kennedy.The
 figure
s
the price
for a full
apartment,
but it
increases
if
the
apartment
has
less
thanthe maximum number of residents. For eachof the eight months of classes, the schoolcollects around
$763 for each
MercyhurstandBriggs Avenue
apartment,
and
$1,143
foreach townhouse.
i
The price is competitive compared withGannon University apartments, which costaround
$917
per month,
and
£
Penn
State-Behrend apartments,
which ^cost
$820 permonth. Villa Maria College and EdinboroState University don't
have on-campus
apart-ments.
• Our
prices may appear high,
but
they arecomparatively reasonable," Kennedy said.
* We're
very sensitive
to the
price
of thresh-old of our
students."
The apartments, dorms, cafeteria,
book-
store and townhouses have an annual com-bined budget of
$1.6
million
or
12
percent ofthe total
budget,
according to John Maus,director of finance.According to Kennedy, money is allo-cated for maintenance as needed. "There'salways a significant gap between moneywanted and money available,'' Kennedy said.
lurst
has annual expenses like
painting and repairing apartments everysummer.
"We-
don't spare any expensethere,'
*
Kennedy said.
H
litis money comes from the
$450,000
allocated annually for contract services likegarbage removal, cafeteria services, andsummer projects,
Maus
said.
I
The budget must also improve the com-fort in
the
apartments.'Mercyhurst repaired12 bathrooms
in
south Briggs last
summer
ata cost of $100,000," Maus said.
.
Money is
thai
spent to replace about 90mattresses annually as
well
as other furniture.It costs $250
to
replace a
chair,
and $100 to$150 to
 fix
 a window, for example.
»These f repairs
are made through the$100,000 allocated for repairs, maintenanceand
equipment,
Maus said.
*
1According to
Maus,
another $230,000 isspent on utilities for housing. This doesn'tinclude Egan and McAuley, which use themeter in Old Main.
# ^
This expense
goes
up every year.
*'
In my
20 years here, cost has never dropped,"Kennedy
said.
|
Mercy hurst also spends $60,000 annuallyfor the townhouses, which it doesn't own;
$125,000
on
salaries for the 29 maintenanceworkers; $23,000
in'real
estate taxes; and$15,250 for housekeeping supplies, Maussaid.Mercy
hurst's
price
is
high compared with
the
rent rates of
apartments
near
campus.
But
some students
may be
forced
to
live
on
cam-pus because some landlords won't rent tocollege
students.
<
Still, some students have had luck with
Erie
landlords.
The
Glenwood Manor Apart-ments on Briggs and Lewis Avenues
are
$360
to $365
per month, which includes everythingbut electricity. "I rent to very few collegestudents because I'm afraid of damages
to
therooms,"
said Rose
Day, manager of the apart-ments. "I screen them thoroughly, and Ihaven't had any problems
yet''
The Jefferson Apartments
at 280
E.
38
Stalso are available to students for $330 permonth, including heat "Students like it be-
cause it's nice
and
quiet We've had no
prob-
lem with them,'' an employee said.Some students
who
plan
to rent from
Erie
landlords
say
that conditions on campus don'tjustify the money. For them, the move offcampus holds the promise - or illusion
-
ofbetter maintenance. "I'm looking off-cam-pus for next year,'' Mercyhurst Apartmentresident Christy
Hartlage
said.
"There's toomuch aggravation on campus. Our waterheater is broken,
our,
floor is broken, andthere's too much going on all the time."
i
see'Rent,
9
P&-2
A Journey to Jurmala," is on the 1986Chautauqua institution sponsored conferencein the Soviet Union.Dr. Bratton is on the board of theJamestown, New York YMCA, Blue Shieldof Western
New
York,
Chautauqua CountyVactionland
Association,?
and theChautauqua County Committee on Tourism.He is also a member of the JamestownArea Chamber of Commerce and was
co-
Dr.
Daniel
L.
Bratton
founder of
the
Chautauqua County Forum.A schedule
of
*
events»for
the SixtiethCommencement Weekend has been an-nounced.
*
I"
I
On Saturday May 21, there will be aGraduation Awards Dinner at the QualityHotel Plaza.
A cash bar is at
6
p.m.
and dinnerwill be served at 7 p.m., followed by theawards ceremony and dancing
from
9 p.m.
tolam.
A
Baccalaureate
Mass will
be held at theChapel of Christ the King at 10
a.m.
onSunday,
May 22. A
brunch follows
the massin the
Egan Dining
Hall
for graduates, parentsand
guests.
Tickets
are available
at
the
Book-
store through May 20.Lineup for graduates starts at
onSunday at Zurn Hall in the Student Union.Commencement begins at 2 p.m., at theCampus Center.
I %
$'
Following
Commencement,
refresh-ments will be served in Garvey Park. Zurn
S
tudent Union is the alternate
site
in
the eventof rain.
Aiello
RAs
lowest
form
ofadministrative
life*
By Lillian DressierMerciad staff reporter
The
lowest form of administrative life
on
campus is the Resident Assistant, accordingto Phyllis Aiello, Mercyhurst's director ofhousing and safety.
£
I'
They
have
to enforce our
rules,
but they.don't get to make any of the
rules/*
Aiellosaid. She added
the
R.A s. are full
time
stu-dents
who
have
all
the burdens other studentshave plus the responsibility of running anapartment building or residents hall.Aiello said
juniors
and
seniors
who
wantto become an R.A. fill in an application,present three recommendations, plus theirown list of qualifications and add to it
what
they can do for
the
program.
jj
Next Aiello said
is an
interview
with
halldirectors, graduating R.A s., and Aiello. "Imust admit it's a rigorous interview, but ifthey can't stand
up
under pressure
there
is noway they will stand up to students who areobnoxious, unthinking, and just generallyosbreperous,'' she said.
\
Two requirements at the top of Aiello'slistforR.A
s.
are
the
ability to
do paper work,and using common sense in enforcing rules.
''For
instance noise
is a
big problem
in
warm
weather. Students leave loud playing stereos
in
their
windows and
play
frisbee
four blocksaway.It upsets the neighbors," she said.Janine Adolphson, an R.A. at Egan Hallsays you have to earn
"student's
respect,'*
and let
them know
you
have
a
"job to
do" in
order
to
discipline them. \If a student can't do
the
paper work
andget it in
on
time,
Aiello said
she can't
use
him."As you see this office looks
like
I
live
in
apaper world," she
said.
f
The R.A s. chosen from the interviewscome back in theschool begins,
Aiello
said. The
 first
 week willbe devoted to training lectures
 from
he familycrises
unit,
police
department,
fire depart-
ment,
rape crisis center,
and'Mercyhurst
administrators.
|
The second week the RA s. make sure
some
of
the
summer people
are
off campus,and
die advance
students such as the football
fi»-
^'<#?
4
wM%
.PhyllisAiello
T
team, volleyball team, soccer team,
etc.
i
to their assigned buildings. Aiello
sak
R.A s. have less than 24 hours
to
cleanbuilding. "Even! with the
house!
people helping, the R.A s. still find bananapeels in desk
drawers,
unflushed
toilets,
andwomen's panties under
beds,"
she
said/
The following week, the R.A s. begintheir regular duty
hours.
Aiello
said
they
areon call 24 hours
but
their duty
hours
are
from8 p.m. to 8 a.m. every other day includingweekends.One month
I had
to get
up
in the
middleof
the
night every
time
I
was on
duty to takecare of
drunken
students,''
Renee
Hamilton,anR.A. at Baldwin Hall said. She added,
"But
there is less partying now since the no
keg
rule."
f I
*M
Homesickness, personality clashes be-tween roommates, would-be suicides, andextreme trouble makers are
just
a few of the
t I
see
'RAs,'
pg.
2-
 
PAGE
2
The
Merciad
MAY
5,1988
MCCI
offers retraining for adult unemployed
By Matthew J. ClarkMerciad EditorIn March,
1983,
in an effort to
help
the unemployed and economi-cally disadvantaged of
the
Erie area,Mercy hurst created
die
Mercy hurstCollege Career Institute, offeringretraining to people who could ei-ther no longer
 find
 work or had
been
overcome
by
the quickly advancingtechnological age.
MCCI is
a Mercy hurst programdesigned
to
help adults
 find
 careers
via a
year of college classes.
It is
alsohelping to encourage participants toextend their education beyond
the
single year, according to LupeBillingsley, assistant director andprogram coordinator of MCCI
6 * If they get
thecertificate and go outinto the workforce andlike it, we find themcoming back for associ-ate degrees.
9
*
JMCCI
offers adult students a
one-year,
30-credit college
certifi-cate
in
such careers assales,medicaloffice, computer technology, in-ventory control technology, travel/tourism, food/hospitality, basicaccounting, business office andmunicipal police training.
"MCCI
signifies Mercyhurst'scommitment
to
the community, saidLupe Billingsley, MCCl's assistantdirector and program coordinator.
!
i*
When people come to
us,
they
always
ask 'What's the
catch'," shesaid. "After they've dealt with usfor awhile, theyknow*
we're
forreal.
[
"We have a good track record.
We
are well respected
in the
state.''
R
AS,
Jrompg.l
problems that are dealt with, ac-cording to
some
of
the
R.A's.
Tom
Shearon,
one of
the
R.A's.at McAuley Hall, said, "I think
iome
of the disruptive freshmen,
who
won'
t listen should be
expelled
from
the resident hall. It would
set
aprecedent, which would
help
in thefuture."
i i
".;
Angelo Chirillo, one of theR.A's. at Egan Hall, said, "One
of
the
main problems
are
male visitors.We need another person to help»ut.
t
Adolphson said, "It's hard todiscipline
my
peers.
You
get,
*
Why
are
you
always
hollering
at
me.
You
have it
in for
me',
that's their wholeattitude."
[
/Although
the
R.A's.
have
com-plaints, the benefits outweigh
the
complaints.
Joe
Fessler,
one
of the R.A's. at
Briggs
Apartments, said he became
an
R.A.because
he "got$700off
ofmy $1300'*^ for his apartment
•'After
awhile
I
realized the benefitsI was getting, such as sharpeningmy listening skills and
the*good
feeling I get from helping otherswork out their problems.''Adolphson
said,
"It
looks
great
i<wi
a resume because it
shows.we
According to Billingsley,MCCI students are just like regularstudents
on
campus, sharing manyof the
same
courses and instructors.
* No
one really
knows
who theMCCI students are," she said."They're not high breds. Theyintermingle with regular classes.We go through the faculty to findfaculty."
|* MCCl's
one
year
programrecognizes that a four-year degreedoesn't always appeal to adultsbecause of personal and financiallimitations.Mercy hurst College.Many MCCI students return to
Mercy
hurst to further their educa-tion after
the*institute's
one yearprogram
is
over.
6 6
MCCI signifiesMercyhurst's commit-ment to the comm-unity.
9 9
444 4
More students would like
to
t
try something
for a
year, Billingsleyexplained.
I
*
Presently
there are
200students enrolled, a total that hasdoubled
from
three years ago."
The
students must
take 15
cred-its of core classes for each major,
wh ich is
in tended to
provide
a broad
base
of skills and knowledge
in
suchareas as composition, reading,computers,
life
and
career planningand business math.Most enroll in the secretarialscience. They are required
to do
aninternship
of
200
hours worth
threecredits. This gives them hands-onexperience.
|
Can
they
take
a course
in
lieu
of
the internship?Only if they've demonstratedthat they've had a lot of experienceprior," Billingsley said. "Perhapssomeone who was out-teched, andcomes to us to be
retrained."
Frank Corapi,
the MCCI
admis-sions placement coordinator saidthat 85-100 percent of the MCCIgraduates
are;
placed. Their jobsincluded work as computer opera-
tors,
bookkeepers and secretaries,restaurant and hotel personnel,travel and airline ticket agents, sale-speople, and inventory expediters.Local employers who have hiredMCCI
.graduates
include SaintVincent Hospital,
City
of Erie, FirstNational Bank, Lord Corp.
^and
44
'If
they get the certificate and
go into
the
workforce
and like
it, we
find
them coming
back
for associatedegrees," Billingsley said.
**
"The need for the
Mercy
hurstCollege Career Institute's financialaid meeting in March is a strongindication
that more MCCI
studentsare staying
on
to further their educa-tion at
Mercy
hurst,"
Billingsleysaid. "Many high school studentsare now enrolling in the MCCIprogram
as an
alternative to
two
orfour years of college. They try it
for
one year to see if
they
like it"Thirty year-old Rita Mangini, aresident of
Erie
and single parent ofa 14-year-old
son, is
an MCCI stu-dent Enrolled in her third semesterin the
business-office
curriculum, amajor which also includes an on-the-job internship, Mangini attendsthree classes this semester. She is
also
an
intern Mondays and Fridaysat the Veteran's AdministrationHospital as an executive assistantsecretary.
She-got
the internshipthrough a referral
fromKJ.Sd
Rep.
Tom Ridge's office.
"Thereis
a likelihood I
will
behired
here
full time after
my
intern-ship,"Mangini
said.
"My
tr
at
Mercy hurst
helped
me
to
improve
my skills and become more confi-dent'
She
adds that
she
regrets nottaking shorthand, which she saysshould be required.
;
; «
Rent alternatives,
from
pg. 1
discipline
and
responsilIt
also showswith DeoDle.
I
Another
Mercy
hurst Apartmentresident said the condition of theapartments on campus convincedher
to
move.'
* We
can
get
an apart-ment for half the price without thenoise and in better shape,*' the resi-dent
said.
*.
"We figure we'll save about$400 per month," her roommateadded. "The money
we
spend heredoes give
us fthe
convenience ofliving on campus, but now that weall have
cars,
that doesn't matter."
|
According to the residents, re-pairs take too long. "Some guysthat lived in this apartment in
1985
came one Sunday to see their oldroom. When they sat in the chairwe've been trying to get fixed all
year,
they told
us
about
the
night
in
1985
when
they broke
it,"
the
resi-dent said.But that didn't surprise them.
"Our
faucets have been dripping
since
October, and
we
have
to
keepour heat up because both doors toour building have been broken formonths," the resident said.But according to MaintenanceDirector Harold George, his depart-
ment does all
it
can.*'We
get
about100 complaints
every
week,
and we
try
to catch
up
on major problems bythe weekend,'' George said.Many repairs
llike
washers,dryers and windows have to becontracted out "As soon as some-one calls us, we call the vendor,"George said.Maintenance has added ex-penses because things don't last aslong as they should on a collegecampus. "We always buy goodgrade materials, but
we
often have
to
replace
things that should last
10
years,
like
the
carpet
in
McAuley,''George
said.
I
"We often
get
abusive
studentson
the
phones. People get impatient,and sometimes they're justified. Itry to see it doesn't happen toooften.
\''
"We've got quite a few build-ings, and we keep growing everyyear. Maintenance is expensive."retrained.
Bules
said
the
MCCI program
is
"great" "I went to Edinboro forawhile
and
I'm
glad I got
the oppor-tunity to go to Mercyhurst It's abetter quality school."Bules said she
likes
the standardof grading and feels that the profes-sors are qualified. "The programhas a higher standard of require-ments,' she said.Since enrolling in MCCI, Buleshas landed a job as agency directorfor John Robert Powers modelingagency in Erie. Bules said she gotthe job as "the result of what I'dlearned in my courses" at MCCI.
Pat
Brocius, a single parent
and
a former
MCCI
student,
is
enrolled
in
her unior year at Mercyhurst and
is
working on
an
associate degree inhotel restaurant
and
I
institutionalmanagement A resident of Girard,Pa., she is the former executive di-rector of the West County Divisionof
the
Red Cross,
f
k
'
When
the Red Cross mergedwith the Erie Chapter, I wanted tochange and do something else,"Brocius says. "I believe all of
my
classes here at Mercyhurst areworthwhile. To the other studentshere at Mercyhurst I recommendmaking
a
plan before scheduling
all
your classes.
'She
says that job-placementservices at Mercyhurst show that
"they
want you to be successful."She worked as a cook at the Mer-cyhurst Laker Inn's kitchen in
an
MCCI food hospitality
*'learn
and
tO improve my
skillsapplication" situation,
and
she says
she hopes to do that in the future.Linda Bules learned about
dent.'
MCCI through GECAC. "It's notvery well advertised," she said.
.%
"Most people don't know about
it"
f 1 J
Despite the apparent lack ofadvertisement, the number of stu-dents taking advantage of
the
pro-gram has increased steadily.Bules said she came to MCCIbecause it offered a
course
she
wasinterested
in.
She
was
also making a
change
in
careers and needed
to
be
6 6
Myti
Mercyhurstand become more
confi
v
Bules
said she got the ob
on herown,
however, and not through theMCCI placement office. Accordingto Bules, she basically was told tohunt down an internship on herown, which she did.
see
'MCCV
Pg.
9
English
pepartmefitformsforeign language program
A new department
has jj
been
formedfat
Mercyhurst called theDepartment of Foreign Languagesand Literatures.
>
\
fFormerly included in the De-partment of English and ModernLanguages, the
new ^unitjwill bemade
up of Dr. Marilynn
Jewell
inGerman, Barbara Moskwa in
Pol-j
ish, and a new faculty member inSpanish who will be chosen fromamong the applicants for the posi-tion.
Dr.
Vivetta Petronio
will teachFrench
and Italian and
also serve
as
chairperson.
4
The Department has been
cre-ated with the purpose of giving
languages
a chance
to
assume theirrightful place in the Mercyhurst ofthe
90's,"
Vivetta Petronio, Eng-lish Department Director said. "It
will
be working toward a strength-ening of the present minor program,development of offerings in addi-tional languages, and eventual
de-
velopment of a major." .The department will serve stu-dents in several ways. First, it willcontinue
to
offer the
Basic
I, II
and
III
courses
in
French, German, Ital-
ian,
Polish,and
Spi
y
Basic
I
courses
are
intended torstudents
who
have never
previously
studied the language or for students
with
an extremely poor preparation.Basic II and III courses, however,are for those students with a goodpreparation. These courses fulfillthe requirement in the Contempo-rary World Core.
s
Second, the Department
*
willcontinue to offer Diction I and II(English, French, German and Ital-ian) for Voice Majors, courses re-quired by the Music School.Third, courses will be offeredfor students wishing to minor inFrench, Spanish or German.
The
department will also offer coursesdesigned to help students pass thedepartment's proficiency test Stu-dents who pass the test, will have theachievement noted on their tran-scripts.
I"
I
Fourth, the department will of-fer courses in" two areas of theContemporary World Core: WorldCultures and World Literatures.
<\
These courses will be given
in
English and will feature the culturesand literatures of France, Italy,Middle-European countries ^(in-cluding Germany, Austria, etc.),Poland and Spain.
j
|Students
who
have taken
one of
the languages currently offered atMercyhurst might consider fulfill^
ing two
of their core requirements inthe area of
the
language they stud-ied.
I
They-could
take an advancedlanguage course (Basic
II,
III
or anyof the Minor
courses)
to
satisfy theHuman Studies
requirement,
andthen take a culture or literature
course
(in
English)
in
the area
of thelanguage they know to satisfy theContemporary World
requirement
;
These are the plans of the de-partment "They point to new di-rections in language-learning andensure that Foreign Languages
and
Cultures will contribute to qualityeducation at
Mercyhurst,"
Petronio
said,
J
1
t
9 §
 
MAY
5,1988
The
Merciad
PAGE
3
- •
4
Intramural program needs
revamping
f At
Wit
End
By Steve RushA supervised program of competitive
intramurals
is available throughout the school year for
both men and
women. Softball, volleyball,
and
tennis are among the
offerings.''
\ I
These
wards
appear
on page 10
of
the Mercyhurst Collegecatalog and
are probably
read
by about 90 percentof
the
incoming
freshmen
here
at Mercyhurst Boy,
are they in
for a surprise!I think
that
it's
about
time that someone looks at this program
and
makes some
changes.
How
hard can
itpossibly
be to
construct
a worthwhile program?
3As in most situations
her© at
Mercyhurst,
administrators
use the
•'lack
of student interest" argument toexplain
how
unsuccessful certain endeavors and programs have
become. I hope
that the same rationale is
not
being used hew How can you possibly interest someone in a prop^m
that
is futUe
and worthless rom he start?
You must
give someone something to believe in before
he/she
can become a believer! Why
should intramuralteams organize and be there when
the
organizers and orchestrators
of
the program are lax
in
their efforts andobligations
to such a
program?
4 4
supervised program... is availalperson, don
t you think? And
remember,
the
question
as
to
the
competence
of
such
supervision
probably needsto be
raised.
Enough
said,
f I
In
the
past year, this college has lost
three
head coaches and a Sports Information director. When these
vacancies
opened,
everyone was quick to
 find
 competent coaches to
 fill
hese
positions/
Why
can't
somethingsuch as this
happen with
the intramurals?
If
die responsibilities
of
such a program are too much
for
a presentcoach to
handle,
then let'sgive those responsibilities to
someoneelse.
If you give
someone a worthwhile programin which
to
participate,
he/she will
participate.
%.
I don't
think that
I'm
alone on this
viewpoint I
think that I
speak for
many people on this
campus.
One
of
two things
must
be changed -
either
the program
or the catalog.
Who will decide? IName withheld by
request
i
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SAC NEWS -
Anyone interested in joiningideas
would like considered are askedcontact JanetHolzhaeusser in
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