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The Merciad, March 30, 1989

The Merciad, March 30, 1989

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The Merciad, March 30, 1989
The Merciad, March 30, 1989

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VOL. 62 NO. 20 MERCYHURST
COLLEGE.
GLENWOOD
HILLS, ERIE, PA 16546THURSDAY, MARCH
30,1989
GannonVilla mergeraffects
the
i
Hurst
By
Michelle
BushMerciad staff
editor
The merger
of
Gannon University andVilla Maria College could
I affect
several
Mercyhurst
programs, including nursing,dietetics and possibly education, according toDirector of Admissions Andy Roth."In terms
of
numbers,*' Roth said,
"the
largest possible negative impact may
be
education.
9
' An average of 20 Gannon stu-dents per term attended Mercyhurst in the1988and
1989
academic year,
and
an averageof six students attended
per term
from Villa.
I
Mercyhurst President Dr.
William
P. Gar-vey also expects
the
merger
to
affectMercyhurst's education department
*He
saidfewer Gannon students will come
to
Mer-cyhurst for education classes.
'Mercyhurst]
Education Chairperson
Brian
McHugh met with Dr. Robot Wehrerfrom Gannon's education department Sun-day and discussed the integration. Gannondoesn't offer elementary education, and its
students can take
it
at
Mercyhurst, accordingto McHugh. Since Villa
does have
an elemen-tary education* course, however, Gannonstudents can attend Villa.
"We
are
the
only
one with
special educa^tion,"McHugh added,
so
students fromGannon will still come here for that
Al-
though Gannon students now have theirchoice of colleges,
McHugh
said, the numberof its students at Mercyhurst won't signifi-cantly drop unless the nature of Gannon's andMercyhurst's agreements change in the fu-ture.
",|pOn
Jan.
16 Gannon and Villa
announced
that
they will integrate with Gannon effectiveJuly
1,1989.
The announcement was madeby Bishop Michael
J.
Murphy, chairman ofthe Gannon
board
of trustees; Gannon Presi-
iMiit^imtmr
DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONSANDY ROTH?
•H:I
dent
Dr.
M.
Daniel
Henry;
Villa
Maria Presi-dent Sister
Leonie
Shanley; and
William
Hill,chairman of the Villa
board
of trustees,
v
"The integration will be good for bothschools,"
Gannon's
president
told the
Gan-non Knight, the college's student newspa-per. He added
that Gannon
will gain stronghealth science, education,
and adult
learningprograms from Villa.When the
Sisters
of St
Joseph
originallymade
the
proposal
for the
merger, Mer-cyhurst also
was
considered
in a plan
for thethree schools to integrate, Garvey said.
TheSisters of Mercy
didn't
want to
mergewith Gannon University and Villa MariaCollege
when
one joint governing
board
wasproposed for
the three
colleges, according toGarvey.'
'Mercyhurst
was doing
so well
they
saw no need to
merge with Gannon,'' Garveysaid.
i
The Sisters wanted to remain
independent
of Gannon,
Garvey
added. "Mercyhurst has
no interest in
giving
up its
identity
in
a largerly,"
he
explained. After consulting withthe Sisters, the board
of
trustees formallydecided not
to
merge.
|
Although Mercyhurst didn't merge with
the other two
colleges,
its programs still may
see some changes.
' 'It
will reopen some ofour existing
arrangements with
Villa
as
far asnursing,'' Garvey said.
Mercyhurst
students
enrolled in the
nurs-ing program primarily take their courses atMercyhurst the
 first
wo years, according toAssistant
-Professor
of
Biology
DianeDudzinski. They do take a foundations ofnursing course at Villa during their sopho-more year Dudzinski said.
jg
In their junior and
senior
years, however,almost
all
their clinical work
is at
Villa.Dudzinski| said that probably wouldn'tchange because
Mercyhurst students do
wellon the current program. "Mercyhurst stu-
dents
have
always done very well on
the stateboards," she said.The admissions policy
for
Mercyhurstnurses may change according to Dudzinskibecause all three schools want to adopt thesamepolicy. "We
will all be under the samecriteria
for admissions,'' she said.Gannon will
see the
biggest
change in
itsadmissions policy for nurses, according
to
Dudzinski,
because £
it will have
to
meetVilla's higher
standard j
of admissions
for
nurses.
I
Besides the programs possibly
affected
atMercyhurst,
the merger may also
bring otherchanges.
Villa has about
500
adult
students,according to Roth.
*
'Villa
and Gannon couldhurt
the adult college,'' he said.
I
'i
But Director of
Adult
Education Cather-ine Anderson doesn't foresee
that as a
prob-lem."We will continue to offer the sameservices
that
we always have," she said.
In
the past, people have often preferred Mer-cyhurst over Villa
and
Gannon, she added.Villa
Maria
was "irrelevant," according
to
Roth, because Mercyhurst didn't compete
with it
for students.
In the last
five years, Rothsaid that less than 3 percent
of
the studentsapplying to Mercyhurst applied to Villa.Despite possible changes, Garvey wasoptimistic about the merger of Gannon andVilla. "We
regard the
new entity
as an
ally,"he said.
|
"The competitive nature might been-hanced,' ' Garvey said. The competition initself isn't
bad or
unhealthy,
but he said
if thecolleges
aren't
careful, it could become thatway.Mercyhurst
and
Gannon have enough incommon
to
maintain
a
good relationshipdespite their differences. "We are bothCatholic, and we are both private," Garveysaid.
"Gannon has adifferentdestiny than
wedo. Mercyhurst sees itself
more as
classic."
He explained that the'Hurst has a
strongemphasis on the liberal
arts and
is
more
of
a
classic-based
j
traditional college like
Al-
legheny College
in Meadville
or John CarrollUniversity in Cleveland.
THE
BEAUTIFUL SPRING
weather
on Monday prompted
Veronica Sansom
andRachele Ault
to teach the
iner
 points of soccer
to
young Lindsey
Porter.
Photo
by
Karen
Sampson
Adult apathy towardstudent activities common
By Robi TaylorMerciad staff writerThe 346 adult students, who make
up
about 19 percent of the student population,
are
restricted from election to MSG or
SAC
positions by a policy
that says
they
do not
paythe annual $60 student government fee.
|
I**Adult
students have the reputation
of
showing
up,
going
to
class,
taking up
a park-ing space, and going home," William Ken-nedy, director of
student
services,
said
aboutthe apathy shown by adult students towards
school activities.
;
-
The lack of involvement associated withadult students concerning college activitiescreated a nationwide policy of waiving stu-dent government fees called "bundling",Kennedy said. Mercyhurst student govern-
ment also
adopted a similar policy for those
students who
start college after
the age of
21.
I
i
"Those policies make them (adult stu-dents) ineligible to
run
or vote for any posi-
tion on either MSG or
SAC.
The only way anadult can run
for office is if
they
voluntarilypay
die
fee*" he said.
\
However an adult student student can
present ideas
to the
SAC
without paying the$60. Larrv
Koslowski JSAC
staff advisorsaid. "All they have to do is visit the SACoffice in the student union
and
ask
to
be put
on the
agenda
to speak at the
next meeting,"he said.
| |
MSG should be saved for the traditionalstudents, because the adult students seem tobe "out of contact" with the needs
off
theyounger students, Jim Callahan, a 30-year-
"The
Adult College should
be
represented in
the
SAC.
We
arepart of the
College ]
and should
have an
interest in what's goingon.
t
-Jim Callahan
«»
old accounting major said. "But the adultcollege should be
represented in the
SAC. Weare part
of
the college and should have aninterest in what's going on at Mercyhurst,"he said.
-J |
"The adult students would
be
able
to
offer useful insights to problems because of
See
j)
Adult'
pg. 5
..
 
i
*
*
i
i
i t
j*
_
t i
ii
I
F f *
I
r*
1
 
PAGE
2
The Merciad
MARCH 30,1989
Weekend thefts resultfrom unlocked doors
By
Robi
TaylorMerciad staff writer
44
Two first floor apartments at4012 Briggs
Ave.
were burglarizedMarch 10 between 9:30 p.m. to
11:30
p.m. while the building wascrowded with about 200 people
at-
tending parties in the upper apart-
ments
and
die
building next door.
^^
The thieves entered the apart-ments through the front/doors,which were unlocked at the time,"Detective Washburn,
Erie S
PoliceDepartment, said.Residents of the building toldpolice that it is common to leavetheir doors unlocked if they thinkthey
are
going
to
stay
in the
generalarea of the building. "This is to
make it easy for the tenants and
theirfriends to use the facilities while ament," Dever said.Apartment resident
Tim
Timko
said that the cash and discs takenfrom his apartment were very wellhidden. "Only my roommate
and
Iknew
where
the
stuff
was
hidden,"he said, "The rooms weren't ran-sacked. Everything, includingclothes that we had folded in ourdrawers, was just
as
we left it""He must have been very re-laxed about the whole thing,"
Timko
said.
"He even finished
off a
new
bag
of
pretzels
before
he
left."
"Keep
parties restrictedto people that you invite.This is an important stepin keeping your property
party
is
going on,he was told by residents.
The
school
does
not assume lia-bility
for
the stolen property becausethe
doors were
left unlocked, whichis the student's responsibility, ac-cording to
Merrill
Dever, director ofcampus security.Taken in the burglaries were
property
and cash valued at
about$277.
v
The stolenjitems
include aNintendo game console, four com-pact discs,
$83 in
cash
and
two pre-recorded cassette tapes.* 'The thieves must have knowntheir way around the apartmentThey were very
selective about
whatthey stole, leaving 31 CDs and the
player
'
(
behind
in the one apart-
Washburnsaid
from being stolen.
Bud Dever
Both the
Erie Police and campussecurity said they have no leads.
* 'Because of the number of
people,including outsiders, wandering
around thebuilding at
the
time
of thethefts, it
will-be
impossible to findthe person who did it,'' Washburnsaid.The
times
just before and aftervacations are when a majority ofbreak-ins take place, Dever said.
"Because
students are gettingready to leave for break,
it makes
itvery easy to simply carry stolenitems home without fear of getting
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?
caught,he said.
|
He
added that the
end
of
springterm
has got
to be
the worst
time
forthefts.
* 'This
is because of all theparties happening all over the cam-
pus.
Thieves can see what can beeasily stolen from an apartment byjust looking around during aparty,"Dever said."That is most likely
what
hap-pened
in
this case/'
Washburn
said.
"Students
and outsiders came to a
party
at
the building, saw
what
theywanted and came back later and
took
it" ,
I |
Dever added that students haveto be careful about who comes totheir parties. "Keep parties re-stricted to people that you invite.Never open a party to the generalpublic,'
*
he said.'
'This is
an
impor-tant step in keeping your propertyfrom being stolen."
f
THE EMPIRE BRASS QUINTET
(clockwisefrom upper
left):
J.
Samuel
Pilafman, Jeffrey
Cur
 now,
Martin Hackleman, Scott
A.
Hartman,
and
RolfSmedvic.
Photo
by
Christian S teiner
D'Angelo Series:
Brass quintet performing in April
By Theresa KloeckerMerciad staff
reporter
The
D'Angelo School of Musicwill be presenting The EmpireBrass Quintet on April 2 at 2:30p.m.
at Tech Memorial High
SchoolAuditorium,
3325
Cherry Street
$The
concert will be the finalconcert in the 1988/89 Concert/RecitalSeries,
which
is
being
spon-sored by the D'Angelo School ofMusic.
The
program
for Sunday's con-
ceit
will
[include
works by Bach,Handel, Purcell, Gershwin, Co-pland and Bernstein.The Empire Brass was the firstbrass ensemble to win the prestig-ious Naumburg Chamber MusicAward. They were also
the
recipi-
ent
of
a
Harvard
Music Associationreward. Leading
composers such
as
Leonard Bernstein, Peter MaxwellDavies,and Stanley Silverman have
been
commissioned to create worksespecially for
the
Empire Brass.The ensemble enjoys an interna-tional reputation as
North
America's
 finest
 brass quintet TheEmpire
Brass
has given
a
commandperformance for Queen Elizabeth
II,
and performed at a
Presidential
Inaugural concert
':
They also participated in theopening concerts of the newly-renovated Carnegie Hall, and havetoured extensively
in NorthlandSouth
America,
Europe
and
the
FarEastThe Empire Brass performsregularly in such cities as Berlin,Paris, Amsterdam, Oslo,
(
Zurich,
Caracas, Tokyo, New York, Bos-
ton,
Chicago, and Washington,
D.C.
The ensemble has also per-formed
with
orchestras, includingthe Chicago {Symphony, BostonSymphony, Cincinnati Symphony,
and
the Minnesota Orchestra. Theyare also a popular attraction] atsummer music festivals in placessuch as Chautauqua, Saratoga andTanglewood.This season the Empire Brasswill perform over 100 concerts,
including
a debut with the SaintLouis
and
Detroit
Symphonies and
a
return
to Carnegie Hall. Touringhighlights will include visits to theSoviet Union and Venezuela.Since 1976, the Empire Brass
has
recorded over 20 albums. Therecently released A Bach FestivalFor Brass and Organ withDouglas
Major
for
Angel/EMI
has
been
praised for
its
*
4
brilliant
soundand breathtaking performances."Tickets will be available at thedoor for $5, or reservations can bemade by calling 825-0364.
Social consciousness purpose of campus play
By Theresa KloeckerMerciad staff
reporter
Call CPT Jim
Dalton*at
871-7673
*
Four people were awarded rolesin the play Jacques
Brel
Is Aliveand
Well
and Living
In
Paris afterauditions were held on March
12.
Pf
The
play is to be performed inthe Mercy
hurst Little
Theater fromApril 21-22 and
 from
 April 28-30.Half of the cast
is
made
up
of Mer-
cy
hurst juniors, Cathy
O'Gara
and
Kathy Baker. Both are from themusic department The other tworoles will be performed by twocommunity people, John Burton
and
Paul Urbanowicz.
The
play is more of
a
review of
25
songs,
but the
songs
do
follow
a
certain pattern or progression, ac-cording to Director Igor Stalsky.
Jacques
Brel
was a
real person who
died
of
lung
cancer about
five
or sixyears ago, Stalsky said.Brel was a song writer and apoet who was popular during the1960s.
"All
his songs deal withsome social consciousness,
and
his
t«»
purpose
in
singing to us
is
to raiseawareness of
why
we
are failinglization," Stalsky said.Jacques Brel Is Alive andWell and Living in Paris is
a
60splay, but the problems are stillaround, according to Stalsky.!
'Jacques
Brel was popular duringthe hippie times.
Maybe
during theReagan
era it
is no longer relevant,but if you listen to his songs andthink of Yuppies, it fits," Stalskysaid. |Stalsky has directed the playtwo times in the past 17 years. In1972 he directed it at the Mer-
cy
hurst Little Theater. In
1980
hedirected
at
the Village Dinner Thea-
ter
in Erie, which no longer exists.Jacques Brel Is Alive andWell and Living In Paris will
be
performed from April 21-22 and28-29 with all performances at 8p.m. There will also be a
matinee
performance on Sun., April 30, at2:30 p.m. All performances
are
atthe Little
Theater!in
Weber Hall.
All Mercyhurst students with LD.'s
are admitted
 free.
 Adult
admission
is $6. Admission
f
of!
outside
stu-dents and senior citizens is $4.
 
MARCH
30,1989
The Merciad
PAGE
3
Newest Mercyhurst students
little
i
birdbrained
By
Robi
TaylorMerciad staff writerMercyhurst College has raisedthe admissions requirements inorder to attract the most academi-cally motivated students
 from
 highschools
 from
 across the country.
But
recently a new type of
stu-
dent that can only be called birdbrained has been caught enteringclasses through open windows onthe third
 floor
 of Old Main.
4
'One
teacher came
to our
com-mittee to complain about pigeonssneaking into her classroom
and
disrupting her class/
9
Mike
Falk,
chairman of the administrativeoperations and policy
5
committee,said. The birds are landing on thewindow sills and radiators, thenflying around the classroom anddefecating on
the
desk tops, he said.
4
'Actually
the birds are quitetame. A
couple
of them are bandedso they were probably pets at onetime,*'
Judith
Wieczorek, professorof sociology said.Wieczorek
is one
of four teach-ers that are having problems withthe intrusive students.;Students say
that
English
comp
classes with Dr. David Palmer arealso
bothered by
the
invasion
of thenew students. "Their
roosting areais
just outside the windows
and theirmating
noises are what is bothering
the
classes,
9
* said Palmer, who hastwo pigeons
regularly attending
hisclasses.
{
' 'Most of
the
time there
are
only
two
of them,
but
sometimes a thirdone
wanders
in.
You can tell by their
markings that they are the samebirds that keep
coming
around,
9
*Wieczorek said.She added that the birds are adistraction because they make dis-tracting noises and leave "messes
all over
the place.**She is angry that students have
to
be more
concerned about what
iscoming
at them
 from
 above
insteadof
the
lessons on
the
board. "I likeanimals,'* Wieczorek said, "butthis is a little too much.**"If the pigeons continue to at-
tend
classes,
the
school would haveto charge them for the credits,**secretary to safety Joan Cook said."But," she added, "the pigeonsmight face charges of illegal entry
for coming
through
the
windows.'*
Toronto trip becomes religious experience
By Theresa KloeckerMerciad staff reporterRecently eight Mercyhurst stu-dents and George Garrelts, assistantprofessor of theology, traveled toToronto to learn about
and
experi-ence
different
religions.
i
The
purpose was to get
a broad
look at religions from
various
points of view, Garrelts said.
The students
were
rom
 variousmajors including English, religiousstudies and math. There were fourmale
and
four female students.Caryl Unseld, a sophomore,went
on
the trip which was duringthe weekend of
March
17. "I per-sonally think
that it
is important forpeople
to
understand
and
be tolerantof other
^people's
religions, so Ifound the
trip
very thought provok-
ing
and educational, but we
had
fun
too,
Unseld said.The experiences varied, fromthose in
the Far Eastern
tradition tothe Christian and Jewish tradition.The students went
to a Taoist
serv-ice,
two Buddhist
temples,
a
Chris-tian ecumenical service, a Hindutemple, and a Moslem mosque.
* I
On Friday evening the group
went to the
Taoist temple.
A Tei Sai
group member from
Malaysia
demonstrated how martial, artsexercises were used for religiousmeditation. Taoism is based on theteaching of Mao Tse-tung, a Chi-nese leader
who
followed the teach-ings
of
Karl Marx.The first stop for the group onSaturday was a Chinese Buddhisttemple. "The Chan San Buddhisttemple, was full of worshipers onSaturday morning putting fruit infront of their
favorite
Buddhas,"Garrelts said.
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The
group
then went to the HarZion synagogue
which was
located
near the
Buddhist temple.
They saw
the scrolls
and the
ark which play animportant part in Jewish services.They also
met
a minion,
12
Jewishmales
who
were worshipping there,and shared lunch with them, Oar-
relts
said.
« ^* «
«MT
They then traveled to a KoreanBuddhist temple.
"We satin
medi-tation for about an hour, and thenhad
#
discussion with a Koreanmonk, who was in residence at thetemple,'' Garrelts said. The monkstressed that people should be mind-ful of the grace in every action,according
to
Garrelts.On
Saturday
evening
the
groupattended a Christian ecumenicalservice
at
the
Thomas
Moore Center
at the
University of Toronto. "Theecumenical service
was in
memory
of *
Archbishop Oscar Romero, aformer
archbishop
of
San
Salvador
in El
Salvador,"
Garrelts
said. Theparticipants in the service includedRoman Catholics
and
Protestants.Sunday
morning the
group wentto the Vishnu Mandir, a Hindutemple. "We sat on the floor withmany
Hindu
gods
and
goddesses infront of thesanctuary,"Garreltssaid. Garrelts added that
there
was
a
great
deal of
worship and
partici-pation in this unusual setting.
The
last destination of the groupbefore returning to Erie was theSunni Moslem mosque.
When
thegroup arrived, the congregation wasalready at prayer on the floor, andwas being
addressed by
their imam,the prayer leader of the Moslems.He spoke in Urdu,
an Indian
dialectthat was interpreted by a youngadult male from
the mosque for the
children, according to Garrelts.Following
the
service
the
group
met with
five Moslems of
the
com-munity
and
discussed
the
teachingsof
their
law, according to Garrelts."We found
the Moslems
very anx-ious to communicate their ideas,"Garrelts added.
f
The trip was paid for by theAcademic
Enrichment
Fund, Gar-relts said,
f
m
The admissions office
said
thatthere is currently no policy set for
pigeons
\o
be admitted to Mer-cyhurst as undergraduate students.It is also unknown which of thecollege* s three tuition schedules thebirds would have to follow if theywere admitted."They don't
take up that much
room, so we
could just put
percheson the windows and let
them
learnfrom there," one faculty membersaid.
I
"We know that most of thebirds
are
decent upstanding
citizens
but
we
do expect some trouble fromthe street pigeons, you know the
ones that live around
the docks.
For
those birds we have a counselingservice
that
may
help,"
she said.
I
"However,"
she
added,
"if
thepigeons come to learn, that is fine.But
if!they
come to disturb theclasses then that is something thatnobody
has to put up
with.
Let
themgo to down to Gannon where theycan
join
a fraternity
so
they can raiseall
die
hell they want' *"If they (the pigeons) are
dis-
rupting classes we would have no
choice but to do
something about itThe birds would be
caueht
and
charged
with criminal trespass,harassment, and defecating in theclassroom," according to MerrillDever, director of security.^A local law officer
said that the
birds could face penalties that in-cludes fines of up to
$250
and sixmonths in jail for each offense."But the case would probablynever get to trial There are no pi-geons on the jury call-up lists, so atrial before their peers would foeimpossible for any pigeon arrested
at
the college,"
the
officer said.The problem
could
be
solved
byinstalling screens over the openwindows, Wieczorek said. Sheadded
that as an
adviser she wouldbe glad to
help
the pigeons worktowards
their
degrees, if
they
com-
plete all
the
necessary
classes. Shejust wants them to stop disrupting
her
classes.Palmer agrees that the pigeonsshould be
allowed»to
continueclasses here at Mercyhurst as longas they fulfill the requirements ofthe classes.
He adds that
any pigeonthat wants a degree should see itsadviser to
"make
sure that all the
ma
jor.
Europeaii| market
joffess
opportunities for all
By
Robi Taylor
Merciad staff reporterContrary to the beliefs ofAmerican businesses and govern-ment officials, the 1992 free tradeagreement between twelve Euro-pean countries will benefit coun-tries on both sides of the Atlantic,according to Gerd Brueggemann,economic correspondent for theWest
German
newspaper. Die Welt[The
World].
:' :
There
will
be numerous benefitsfor U.S. businesses in dealing withthe twelve countries as one group,
now
called the European Economic
Community
[E.E.CJ.Instead of having to negotiatewith each government with differ-ent regulations, one group speaksfor
the entire
community. By
mak-
ing deals with a central office ex-ports from
the
U.S.
would
be avail-able
to
all the 320 million consum-
ers!
living within the Europeancommunity, he said.
|
Importing products from thecommunity will be easier for U.S.companies, Brueggemann said. Theagreement encourages outsidecompanies
to
make purchases fromnationsame trade benefits within the Euro-pean Community that companies
already in the
E.E.C.
currently
have,Brueggemann said during hisspeech
for
the Academic Celebra-tion on Jan.31. "But," he added,"the companies from outside thecommunity would have to followthe same regulations that are
im-
posed on insider businesses. Much
the same way foreign banks
followU.S. regulations when they set upoffices in
this
country."One
problem
currently between
the
U.S.
and
the
European
Commu-
nity
concerns
the import
of Ameri-can beef
that has
been treated withgrowth hormones. Since
the
Euro-peans banned the import ofhormone treated
beef,
ithe U.S.
any
company
in any mem
by lifting the restrictions
in place in
the separate countries. The agree-ment gives the same benefits
I
tobusinesses wishing to invest moneyin European businesses.Part of the. agreement underwhich the community will operatestates that the equal treatment ofoutside companies
would
allow thegovernment
has been
claiming thatit is being discriminated against bythe Europeans. "The truth," ac-cording to Brueggemann, "is that
the ban is against all
beef producingcountries who use hormones, not
just the
U.S."]
%k
This type of problem is all thatremain between the U.S. and theEuropean
;
Community." Talksbetween the two sides
are
working
the
problems out,"
he
said, "but*
itis going to take a lot of time and a
lotof effort
on
both sides."
"The
new European Marketwill be the largest in the
world,"Brueggemann
said. "It
will
be larger than the market of theU.S.
and
three times larger
than
the
market
of Japan, establishing itself
see
IT!
\«-5
N.
* **
*

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