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The Merciad, Nov. 1, 1989

The Merciad, Nov. 1, 1989

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The Merciad, Nov. 1, 1989
The Merciad, Nov. 1, 1989

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ON PAGE
5
TWO POINTS OF
VIEW
ONLOCKER ROOM WINDOWS
NEWS
if
OPINIONAD-LIBFEATURES
ENTERTAIN
PERSPECT.SPORTS
ON PAGE 8PROF GIVES VIEW
ONINTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
ByStudents For
Students
VOL.63
NO.^6
1
MERCYHURST
COLLEGE.
GLENWOOD
HILLS. ERIE, PA 16546WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER
L1989
CHECK
OUT
Thursday,
Nov.
2
8:30 Pete Benekos
DWI
8 p.m. Zurn recital hall SAC8 p.m. A Meeting Of TheMinds psychic/ hyptotisimdemostration in the Clipper's.
Cove
«
ih
ri
Sunday, Nov. 5
Nicol
Azicri art show
opens
in Hammermill Cummings,reception from 3 p.m.; to 5p.m.2:30 p.m. D'Angelo windensemble concert
jin Zum
recital hall
zZ.
-
Tuesday, Nov. 7*.
8 p.m. D'Angelo percussionensemble in Zurn recital hall.
Wednesday, Nov.
87:30 Spring break informa-tional meeting, Main 208, A
trip
to S. Carolina to help inthe
.cleanup
after
hurricane
Hugo will be proposed.
CRIME
ON
CAMPUS DOWN
BY
TEN PERCENT,
DEVER SAYS
j
\
By Theresa KloeckerMerciad
News
EditorCrime statistics for the 1988 school yearshowed crime to be down by almost tenpercent according to statistics availible fromcampus security.Crime statistics for the
1989
are not
yet
availible because the year hasn't ended.
88
crimes were reported during the 1988compared to 92 in 1987.The areas where crime was lower compared to
1987
include, DWI, underage drinking, drugviolations, and theft all categories.;Crime rates
were up
compared to
1987
inthe
following
areas,
assau
It,
and public drunk-eness.Crime statistics for
Mercyhurst
Collegeare availible from Merill
T."Bud"*Deaver,
whose office is in the second floor of OldMain. The crime
statistics
are availible
due
tocompliance with
Act #73
under Pennsylvania
state
law.Pennsylvania
is one
of
the
few states thatrequires college^ campuses to make crimestatistics readily availible to students. Lastyear colleges reported to the FBI a total of1990 violent crimes, robbery, aggravated
assault,
rape and murder.
t
*
The incidence of property crime
was
evengreater
more
than
107,000 cases
of burglary,larceny, arson*
and
motor
vehicles
theft werereported on college campuses.There are ways to control violence oncampus, according to a Reader's Digest
ar-
ticle.
'Start
a campus watch program. Security
experts
agree that any community can reducecrime simply by remaining alert Colleges are
no
exception.
\
Lock
and monitor doors. There
have
beencases of assaults when dorm doors or apart-ment doors
were
left open to allow late nightentry of pizza delivery men. On the
Lehigh
University campus a pilot door alarm pro-gram is being used. Keys are replaced withplastic cards; a machine records
the time and
the idendty of each card
user;
and a building-wide alarm
sounds
in case of intrusion. Also,exterior doors are wired to notify police if theyare propped open.Improve lighting and install emergencyphones. At night, beautifully landscapedcampuses offer shadowy hiding places formuggcrs, rapists and robbers.
One
solution tothis problem is improved lighting.Use escort and van services.' Curb alcohol abuse. According
to
studiesby Townson State University, alcohol is in-volved in 80 percent of rapes, assaults andacts of vandalism on campus. Most
states
have raised their legal drinking age to 21,
disqualifying
roughly
three-fourths
of under-graduates. But the laws are useless unless
schools
enforce them.
"
Fightrape
with
education. The chances ofa woman's being raped at college
are
aston-ishingly high.
"Some
25 percent of thefemale college population have been victimsof rape or attempted rape/' Claire Walsh,director
of the Sexual
Assault Recovery Serv-ice
at
the University
of
Florida Inmostcases,the rapist
is
an acquaintance or date.
Gang
rapes, which typically occur at fra-ternity parties,
"are all
too common
on
manycampuses,'' report Julie
Ehrhart
and
B ern
iceSandleer, who studied the subject for the
Association
of American Colleges.
Theytve
documented 100 such cases at college
of
every stripe, public, private, big, small, relig-iously affiliated and Ivy League.Walsh's advice to women for avoidingrape: Date in groups until you get to knowyour dates. Avoid being
in«any
isolatedsituation. Don't drink with people you
don't
know well. Beware of
men
who talk aboutwomen as conquests of adversaries,
and
Keepstudents and parents informed.
*
Students
must
be aware that there is crime on campus,''Dan
Sm ith „ S tan
ford University special serv-ices manager
said*
%
Clean up bad neighborhoods. No college
Can
isolate itself from the community. If aschool is surrounded by a
high-crime
area,crime will seep onto campus unless peoplefight back.
*
Mercyhurst crime rates have decreasedsince last year, but assaults and public drunk-eness are up according to the statistics. No
statistics
were availible on attempted rape,gang
rape
or acquaintance rape. But campus'security noted that attempted rape and
ac%
quaintance rape may go
unreported.
Theyurge reporting rape or attempted rape if itoccurs.
 
PAGE
2
By Theresa KloeckerMerciad News EditorNine months ago Paul Iddings,
an
assistant professor of theater wastold he would be paralyzed com-pletely for the rest of his life as aresult of
Lyme
disease.
' £*
Iddings has gradually improved
since that
diagnosis with help fromphysical therapists at
Hamot,
andGreat Lakes Rehabilitation Hospi-
tal.
He
s currently
at Erie
Independ-ence House, f With rehabilitationand
determination
on Idding's part
he is
now only paralyzed from themid-chest down, and some feeling
has
returned
to his
legs.
^ .«
it-
Iddings
does not know if he
will
ever
completely
recover.
He hopesto get an appointment with a neu-rologist at the Cleveland Clinic todetermine the complete
ex ten t
of hisparalysis, and how far
he
can hopeto recover."I am primarily working on in-dependence skills, and living as
modi as I can on
my own,"
Iddings
said.
He
is living in a
training
apart-ment at Independence House that
was
designed
to
do just thatHe doesn't know if he
will
ever
be
able to return to his
home,
9
'
Cliffhanger'
*, in
Lake City,Pa. In order to get up to it in awheelchair a 17-foot ramp wouldhave to be built and this would be
"I AM
PRIMARILY WORKING
ON INDEPENDENCE
SKILLS,
AND
LIVING AS
MUCH AS
I
CAN ON
MY
J
i OWN<
J J
M H?
PAUL IDDINGS
sloped
too
much upward
to allow a
wheelchair to get up
i according
toIddings.
He does not know how he
would
make
it
to campus
and
back
every day
after
he comes to teachbecause
die
"lift**
which providestransportation to the handicappedonly runs
 from
 9
a.m.
to S
p.m. andit would cost
$50
for each round
trip.
*'I
am thinking of getting anapartment in town that is more
ac-
cessible!
tof
wheelchairs, and iscloser
to campus,''Iddings
said.Iddings is scheduled to teach aclass this spring. And he
has
kept upwith teaching while he was away.One night a week he teaches
sign
language to two students. He hasbeen asked by
some i Mercy
hurststudents to do tutorials,
i
He
also reads to some
of
the
clientsat
Erie
\
Independence
;
House that
cannot
read.
f-Iddings
wants to make somechanges in the theater department
when
he
returns.
He
is
scheduled
to
teach
an
acting
class,
and
he
wouldlike to teach a comedy class and adinner theater course.
He also
saidhe wants to
make an
acting class arequirement for dance majors. Oneacting
class was
required for
dance.
majors, and two were recom-mended for those in the dance de-partment by Jean-Marc
Baier's
predecessor, according to
Iddings?!
"Ir
would like to revive theNational Playwrights Showcaseagain, it is extremely exciting andGarvey was supportive of
it," Id-
dings said.Iddings hopes
to
be in
his home
by Christmas although
he may
not
be
able to live there because of
his
physical limitations. |He was toteach a class during the winter term,but it was decided
this
might be toodangerous for him because of thesnow.
| * * One
of
the
greatest handicapsis I don't have the upper bodystrength to lift myself,"Iddingssaid. "I have developed a fairlystrict
exercise
program on my ownto develop my upper bodystrength/' Iddings
added.
*
Iddings will still be in a wheel-chair when he comes to teach atMercyhurst in the spring term, but
the
improvements
made
during thesummer, ramps etc. will make itpossible for him to get aroundcampus.
4
'
I thought I was aware of thedifficulties of getting around inwheelchair, but I was not aware at
all;
the physical dependency on
other
people, is
phenomenal,
9
'Iddings
said.
DAYCARE\CENTER
DEDICATED TOHONOR SR. MA
URA
SMITH
By Kevin McHughMerciad
Editor!
Mercyhurst*s
new day carecenter was dedicated
to
SisterMaura Smith,
who led
the campaignto keep day care at the college, onSunday, by Mercyhurst officials.
!f|
The new
center,
licensed for
91
children aging from four weeks to
12
years, was built
by McCormick
Materials
fine,
of Erie. It was de-There are
some basic
problemsthat all colleges face every year.Tuition increases, higher admis-sions standards, lousy cafeteriafood,
and the
lack of parking spacefor commuter students are
among
the most common.
Back on March 8, 19S7
when
Mercyhurst president Dr. William
P.
Garvey
was
the editor-in-chief ofthe Gannon Knight and he faced,
as
a Gannon
student,
the
same park-ing problems that we, as Mer-cyhurst students,
are
facing now.
In
his editorial
about!
their parkingsituation he
wrote:
f
i
"Outside
the battered GK(Gannon
Knight) offices
is
a small
plot of
ground,
worthless
on thereal
estate
market.
It
can 't
grow
anything but weeds, and grass
doesn't even stand
a chance. Yet
this strip
of
ground
is
coveted
bymany
Gannon
student and acultyalike for
the simple reason that Itcan harbor three
cars. And
park'
Ing
space at
Gannon
is
more
valu-
able than
gold."
,,
"This little "Gaza Strip"-thelast
remaining
parking spaces
on
campus
has
been
icketed
or
theJunk
pile*
Gannon's
war
on
park-
big
demands that this strip ofground be closed off, officially
because cars are sneaking
by thepole and the new
Engineering
building.
m$$
signed by four Mercyhurst interiordesign majors, John Ritz, KimThomas,
Sharon
Capela,
and
ReneeBook!
The
keys to
the $257,000,4,800
square feet facility were officiallyhanded over by James Zurn, chair-man of the Board of Trustees, whowas largely responsible for raisingthe finance.Dr. William
P.IGarvey,
Mer-
cyhurst College
President,
said thatunder a year
ago,
the
future of daycare at the
'Hurst
was very shakeyand that
the
administration
was
notvery enthusiastic about day care.
However,
Garvey
added,
the perse-verance and*"tenacity" of Smith(brought about change fin theadministration's thinking and so thecenter was given
the
go ahead.
"While
they
accomplish
thisdifficult and hazardous
feat,
often
a
corner
is
chipped
off
the
build'ing.
So,
Gannon's
last
frontier in
the
parking
world
is on its way
out.
w^x
But why should
it
be? The pole
orbar
stopping cars
from
enteringshould be placed beside the
Engi-
neering
building,
not
the harmlessparking
strip.
'
"It
strikes
the GK as sort of
impractical
and
needless
that
the
ground be closed off,
especiallywhen parking space
is at
such
apremium. True,
It's
only three cars,but
nowadays that's three people
who have a place to
park.
And
that's something
to
consider.
It's
time
for
a truce on the
battered carowners."
Every year it costs each driver$18 for the right to put a piece ofpaper on your bumper and drivearound Mercyhurst looking for aSmith, who is a Mercyhursttrustee, was the principal of Mer-cyhurst Preparatory school for ten
years
until
die was
elected superiorof the Sisters of Mercy of Erie,County in June 1989.
I
The center has a color-coded
design
system by which the childrenrecognize which rooms or materialsbelong to their
age
group.
It is
open to Mercyhurst Collegefaculty/administration, staff andstudents and also to employees ofMercyhurst
Prep,
Mercy Center ofthe Arts, St Luke School, and tochildren of Mercyhurst alumni,
trustees, parents,
Mends
and bene-factors.
decent
place to park, which
does
notexist That is in addition
*to
the$10,000 tuition it costs to enroll for
die classes you
would attend if youhad a place
to
park.
5 The
members of the schooladministration
must have
forgottenwhat
it's
like to be a student andhave to rely on the officers of thecollege to give them what they
needed.
It
is
their position
to
allow,if not encourage, the college enroll-ment to increase every
year and
thenput minimal
effort
toward increas-ing the number of parking spaces
alottedifor
both commuters
$
andresident students. This year thenumber of parking spaces increased
by
70 to accomodate about
200 new
students.
| ]
One way or another
the
shrink-
ing
ratio of parking
spaces to cars is
going to hit a limit and the onlypeople who are going to suffer arethe students.
]
$
What we need is for
Dr. Garvey,E. William Kennedy and the
Board
of Trustees to remember what lifewas like when they
jwere
studentsand maybe build one or two moreparking lots, expand the current
lots,
or assign
permits
that allow thedriver
to
park only in one lot
Sometimc^omewhere^^omeone
has
to
face this current minor incon-
venience
before it becomes a majorproblem.
f
 
NOVEMBER
1,1989
The
Merciad
PAGE
3
in Pennsylvania
a
crime occurs
once in every seven minutes.
S
There
is
one violent crime every
12
minutes
IS
seconds and
a
prop-
erty crime takes
place every
minute
34 seconds, according to statisticsfrom campus security. g
"i
. Violent
crimes
are classified asmurder, rape, robbery and aggra-vated assault Mercyhurst is notimmune to these statistics,
jCrimerates
for the
1988
school year were
down on
an overallbasis,
but assault
was up, and so was public drunk-eness
which
is
often
associated withassault
j
Property crimes
fared
better at
Mercyhurst;
crime from dormrooms and motor vehicles was
down,
although crime from officesand other buildings was up by onereport higher than last year. Thedecrease in
the
crime rate could becontributed to students being moreaware of crime on campus or toextra efforts
on the
part of
security*
A property crime occurs
once
inevery minute 34
seconds
some-where
in
Pennsylvania.
Pennsylva-nia classifies property crime asburglary,
larceny-theft,
motor ve-hicle theft, and arson.Campus security and the stu-dents at Mercyhurst in general de-serve a commendation for the de-crease in the crime rates at Mer-cyhurst in the last
year.
Hopefullythe crime rate will even decreasemore in the future.The problems with a higher
The Merciad
Mercyhurst College's First-Class newspaperas rated by the Associated Collegiate Press
Vol. 63 No. 7
W*S-f.
November?!, 1989Kevin
Mc
HughTheresa Kloecker
Robi TaylorJohn DeasyCarl TriolaEditorPatty ConeglioLiz RichardsSteve RushPat
Stcckman
Tom SmoulderLen KholosNews EditorManaging Editor
S.
Sports'Editor
Assistant Sports EditorBusiness ManagerDesign Director
'
CartoonistPhoto EditorMerciad PhotographerFaculty AdviserReportersCassie
Bakmaz
Ann Marie BythewayDerrick ChristieMonica GibsonTheresa HewittMaria KellyGarth McCurdyTammy PethtelNick RobertsDeborah SchmidtTracy Schmitz
The Merciad is
the
student-produced newspaper of
Mercyhurst
College, Box
161,501
E.
38th
St,, Erie, PA 16546. Phone: 825-0376.
]Vf
 atertal for publication must
be
submitted
bv
noon on theMonday before publication.
The
Merciad welcomes
letters to the
editor.
Letters
must
be
signed,but
the
writer's
name can
be withheld by
request
assault
rate
and public drunkeness
could be
solved in the manner givenin the front page story of
this
issue.Assault could be prevented bystudents being made aware of theproblem and taking
j
precautionsagainst it Precautions
like
not walk-ing
in
unlighted areas and calling forescorts between buildings. Campussecurity does have
an
escort serviceavailible to students up to campus
"ALCOHOL
IS
ASSOCIATED WITH
80
PERCENT OFVIOLENT CRIMES ON
CAMPUS...
I
apartments,
and
the townhouses. Ifa person cannot get
an
escort call afriend
and let them
know you're onyour
way
home.
Set
a time limit foryour arrival at your apartment ordorm
room
and
call them when
youget there. If
you
don't
call
back atleast someone
has a general idea
ofwhere you might be and whetherthere might be a
problem.
|
Public drunkeness
is
a problem
on
most college campuses. Sugges-tions from the
Reader's
Digest ar-ticle to prevent this included educat-ing the bartenders at campus parties,so they know when
to
cut
a
personoff. Alcohol is associated with 80percent of the violent crimes oncampus,
so
if this
is
curbed perhaps
the
assault rate will go down also.Campus ^^^—a-™,problem to
solve
because so manydifferent factors are involved, forexample, campus parties, alcoholavailibility, lighting and access tostudentareas.Campus security atMercyhurst seems to be on theirway in dealing
with
many of theproblems, especially propertycrimes. They still need to work
on
violent
crimes < especially
I assault,but educating the students
is
part ofthe package
in
dealing
with
thatarea. The crime report that
is being
made
to
all students
is a
step towards jmaking students
more aware
of
the
problems on campus. JL. 1Mercyhurst will probably neverbe
a crime
free campus, but it couldbe one of
thejbetter
campuses interms of
low
crime rates if campussecurity keeps on making students!aware of what is happening oncampus and how they can
protccl
themselves.!
!
LIVE BANDSNEEDED A
TMER CYHURS T
By Kevin McHughMerciad
Editor
\
%mm
Why
don't
we have
live
bands onj
campus? More to the point, whydon't
we have any student
bands; andif
we
do,why don't
they
perform infront of
the
students?
Is everyone in
D'Angelo
satisfied with performingonly classical or traditional music?Live bands
instill
enthusiasm,
and enthusiasm
is
the
opposite
of
that
dreaded state of
mind known
as apathy that
seems to
have
seeped
into theminds of many unsuspecting Mercyhurst students.
| *
The success of an event is measured in the level of enthusiasm aparticular event evokes.
Rock/Pop
bands, preferably
*
Hurst rock/Popgroups, seem an obvious way to bring out enthusiasm.
J
The
Cove
would
be
a perfect place for
the
introduction of
bands
andentertainers to the
'Hurst Many colleges have a week
night
set aside
forsuch performances.
f
I
IF
THERE ARE NO STUDENTS BANDSWHY NOT CHECK
OUT
ERIE BANDS
THA T PLA Y
THE LOCAL BARS?
IF
WE CAN'T SUPPORT 'HURSTBANDS (BECA USE
THERE
ARE NONE)
LET
US
SUPPORT
ERIE
BANDS.
Thursday night
could be
rock night
at
the Cove. You
may say that
thecove would
be too
small. On the
contrary;
it's perfect
The Cove
conjoursup
images
of the
Cavern,
the
small club in
Liverpool,
England,
where the
Beatles first
performed,!
A small stage, a smoke-filled room, hot andsticky from
the heat
of pulsating
bodies swinging to the
beat of energetic,loud and, most of
all
live, music.
! ^f
Live music is what is needed at the
'Hurst
The recent Halloweendance at
the
cafe
was
a success simply because it
was
Halloween.
%n
The DJ did not play the music most
students
listento.Most students
listen to
WRKT,
"the station
that makes
Tiffany
puke.'' Another
WI^KT
slogan is something like "no rap music, never had it, never
wiil.'V
I'm sure many students enjoy
"Tiffany**
type music and
rap
music, but that's
the only type
of
music
I've
ever
heard at school dances.Classic rock played by live groups is
the
perfect alternative.I've attended numerous Mercyhurst Student Government meetings atwhich the possibility of hiring a big band has been hinted at
fWedon'tneeda
4
*big
band."
Itseems that MSG thinks that
the bigger
the
better.
That's
not true. Rumors of hiring
10,000
Maniacs for May areexciting and show that money may not
be
the obstacle to live bands. Iwould far prefer lots of
little bands to one big
one.
*
If
there are no
student bands,
why
not
check out
Erie
bands that play
the local
bars?
If we can't support
'Hurst bands
(because there
are
none)let us support Erie bands. f

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