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The Merciad, Feb. 14, 1991

The Merciad, Feb. 14, 1991

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Published by TheMerciad
The Merciad, Feb. 14, 1991
The Merciad, Feb. 14, 1991

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06/06/2011

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Phonathonj
wraps up another successful campaign
By Yvonne
Ma
herMerciad Staff ReporterThe sounds of
phone
conversations filledthe third floor of Egan Hall for the past ninedays as students, faculty and alumni volun-
teers
phoned every corner of the nation in the
hope-off
acquiring pledges* for the 1991Phonathon.
This is the 11th
year that people
have
cometogether at one central location to get dona-tions for scholarship funds from
^former stul
dents of
the
college.-,
This is
an opportunity for alumni to inter-act
with
present students,'' said
Gary
Bukow-ski, co-organizer of the event,
"It
is a greatlearning experience for students, and it createsa nice interplay between both groups."
As
of Tuesday,Feb.
12,
the Phonathon hadgenerated $44,000 which is about 70 percentof
the
targeted goal $65,000. This money hasbeen pledged to
volunteers
from different groups,including: the Irish team, the Hospitality
4 4
Gleeson
and Katie Sweeney participate in
the
annual
Photo
by
John Furlong
S&&
Management
department,
crew, the baseball
team
J
Students,Against
Driving Drunk, theCouncil for Exceptional Children, Phi Eta
S igma
and others.
4
'Sister Damien
is the number one per-
son,"
accordingtoPatLiebel,
alumni
director.
4
*S
he really gets
in
volved and
puts in hours on
Sundays and evenings,
ova-
and above herwork schedule.
She
really gives her all."According
to
Bukowski, the money gener-ated from
the
Phonathon
goes
toward scholar-ship funds. Last year
the alumni held
a dinnerso that scholarship donors could meet therecipients of their scholarships. Bukowski saidthat
the
Phonathon would not have been pos-sible without the contribution of time by thevolunteers.
^
The team that gets the most amount ofpledged money receives a percentage of thetotal, which amounted
o
 $250
last year. Head-ing
the
poll
thus
far is
the
Irish team."All I can say is that the volunteers havereally lived up to the motto of
'Carpe
Diem'
and
have given
199
percent,*
] §akl
Bukowski
VOUS4
NO. 13GLENWOOD HILLS. ERIETHURSDAY, FEBRUARY
14t
1991
College Senate reviews college issues
CHECK
IT-GOT
By Kevin
McHugh
Merciad Editor
*
«.
..£.
.-+Ba£m
hursday,
Feb.14:30
p.m.
Zurn recital
hall,AC presents The Datingame.*aturday,
Feb.16
p.m. Campus Center,en's basketball hosts Buf-alo,featuring a noise and
anner
competition. Re-
freshments
follow in the
nion.
-The
Mercy hurst College Senate met Thurs-day, Feb. 7,
in the
Carolyn Herrmann StudentUnion Meeting
Room.
Highlights of
the
meet-ing were the following:- Academic Policies Committee Chair, Dr.Kenneth
Schiff,
reported on matters currentlyunder examination, including refinement ofthe Honors Program and the impact of theMcAuley Junior College on the academicperformance at the main campus.
I
The committee was concerned with mak-ing the honor's program more attractive tostudents. This may be done
by
conductingactivities outside of class for honors students,according
to
Schiff.
He
added that
the
currentpractice of honorizing a class often involvesthe student being asked
o
 write an extra paperor report This,
he
said,
often appears punitiveto students and so he suggests more creative
campus
and
Corry,
and a proposal that will becoming to the Senate recommending facultystatus for librarians. Pinto said faculty statusfor librarians would facilitate the recruitmentof librarians, the retention of librarians, andprofessional development
He|said|that
the
move
would entail a substantial revision of thefaculty handbook, especially
in *
the areare-garding academic freedom and privileges.Librarians are the only administrators that arerequired to report to the
academic
dean, ac-cording
o
 Pinto.- Middle States Steering Committee Chairs,Tom
Sillingsley and Michael
McQuillen,
spokein favor
ofia
proposal recommending thatSenate standing committees
serve as
workinggroups for
the Middle
States self-study. After
MBA
presentation
a lengthy discussion over the increased work-load, the senate voted to accept
the
proposal.-
Dr.
William P. Garvey,
who was
scheduledto give the
President*
s£State oi^ihe
Collegemessage
o
he Senate at
this
meeting, limitedhis remarks, because of the lateness of thehour, to a brief discussion of the healthy
finan-
cial situation at
the
college. He said he wouldbe glad to return for a more comprehensivediscussion at a future meeting.
«
The senate is a group of students, faculty
and
administrators,
that deals with the
variousissues that impact on the college and
advise
the
president on its
findings.
The next senate meeting
is scheduled for March 7, and anyone mayattend.
Guest speaker discusses discrimination
**
unday,
Feb.17:30
p.m. Zurn recital hall,rformance by
D'Angelo
hamber orchestra.
Jp.m.
Ice-skating shuttlesleave Baldwin.onday,
Feb.18
ummings gallery exhibitf new watercolors. 1
ednesday,
Feb.20p.m. Student union, food
or
finals.ways of honorizing classes.On the subject of the
McAuley?
JuniorCollege, which was tabled for the next meet-ing, Schiff said the committee is
mainly
con-cerned with the academic competency of jun-ior college graduates
enrolling as regular
Mcrcyhurst
students. He said that it must beensured that
the
existence of the junior collegeshould not
lower the academic
standard of themain college.
3 |
- Campus Life
Commiuee
Chair,
Cay
Maloncy,
reported on concerns
being
investigated bythat committee, including inconsistencies in
\
fines and penalties imposed by RA's. E. Wil-liam Kennedy, director of student services,addressed the issue, admitting that there areinconsistencies. He said this is because of
differing
personalities of
R
As.He said that thisproblem may be relieved by educating RAsmore.
^
- Library Committee representative, DavidPinto,reported
that the commiuee is
now work-By Karen McGuireMerciad
News
Editor
ing
on
plans
for
the
Harry Burleigh MemorialCenter, library facilities at both North EastHostility and tension bounced off the wallsof Preston
312 last
Tuesday when
Mr.
MartinShannon told of his work ethics. Shannonconfessed
to an
astonished
audience
about
his
everyday discriminatory work procedures.Shannon owns a small private companythat doesn't
do
business with
the
governmentBecause of this, Shannon can discriminateagainst whomever he wishes, and has littlechance of getting caught. He displayed hisbigoted views openly without discretion. Hetold tales of times he discriminated againstminorities and women.
|
Shannon
is not a
real
person.
He
is actuallyan actor from the comedy troupe
"In
AllSeriousness'' who
was
asked
o
 participate inthe Mcrcyhurst Business
Association(MBA)
presentation
entitled,"Discrimination
In TheWorkforce.*'
Hie imposter
set the stage for avery real and very
serious f
problem in thebusiness world.Guest speaker Sid Booker, personnel di-
SID
BOOKERrector at American SterilizerCompany(AMSCO),spoke to a group ofapproximately 20 people about the importanceof laws and orders requiring equal employ-ment and
affirmative
action. He
was able
o
 use
his
experience at AMSCO
o
 relate the laws
to(cases. The company does approxi-
mately
$94 million of work for the govern-
I
is strictly regulated.
|
See
'Discrimination'
page
2
"
»n
Page 2enior Dinner
Dance»n
Page 4
la
former English prof looks at Hamlet {Student valentines
 
PAGE
2
THE
MERCIADFEBRUARY
14,1991
SIPR
wlwffli*
WKSM
f«ftff///m
SVf
•#S8
W&^SM&y
mm.. WMMBMB.
Wwm
Editor's Note:
This
column is de&^„^
rmgmm
«
w
happening in the international and national
areaseitd
from a
variety
of sources.By Karen
McGuire
Merciad News EditorINTERNATIONAL:Lithuania - Lithuanians voted for
tndepend
to one in a referrendum.
M
This
will give
strc
nation, qualities we will need in the future,"said.
i
Tokyo, Japan
A nuclear accident occurred on Saturday at the 19-year old
Mihama
Nuclear Power
Plant when a
pipe apparently broke,and an
emergency
cooling system was activated to avoid disaster.
Kansai
Electric Company, which owns the plant, said no radiationescaped and no one was injured. Japanese newspapers and outside
ex pens
said
that
the accident
could
have
resulted
in
damages eq c al
damage
Johannesburg—The
African National Congress has criticized
a poli
roundup over the weekend in which
11,000
people were arrested
fcrimes
ranging from murder to cattletheft.The BNC questioned tAfrican
Government's
motives and demanded a
breakdown by
racethose held.WAR LOSSES: The Pentagon
said
during
a
briefer
on
Monday thatthe cumulative total of the combat losses of U.S. troops was
60:12
killed
in
action,
12
wounded, 28 missing,
and
eight prisoners of war.The total number of U.S. aircraft lost is 18. More defections pushedthe number of
Iraqi
P.O.
W.'s
past 1,000
Monday.
No meaningful dataon military
casualties are
available beyond
an
unconfirmed report inan Egyptian weekly that Iraq confidentially informed friendly Arabcountries
that 15,000
soldiers
had
died
thus
far.
As
for civilians killed,a senior Iraqi official said that "thousands" had been killed orwounded in
air
raids.NATIONAL:Washington, D.C.
-
Defense Secretary Dick Cheney and Chairman ofthe Joint Chiefs of Staff General Colin L. Powell returned from aweekend of listening to the strategic advice of
American
field com-manders in Saudi Arabia. They agreed that the United States stillneeded to continue its bombing campaign before a ground attackmight be opened against Iraqi forces occupying
Kuwait
Jim
Bakker's
45-year jail sentence was thrown out by a Federalappeals court, which ordered that he be given a new sentence. Thecourt
said
that the judge
had
improperly mentioned
h
is own sense ofreligious propriety in sentencing Bakker.
Since the
war began in
the Persian
Gulf,
sales
of American
 flags
 havesoared. Not
in
decades
has there been such
a demand
for
flags
that
can
be
flown outside a
house or
from apartment windows, manufacturerssay.LOCAL:Snow and ice combined
to
make treacherous conditions on Interstate90 Monday afternoon, causing a 22 vehicle pile-up that killed fourpeople
and
injured many others. The chain-reaction crash took placecast of Exit 9,
Harborcreck
Township.
Senior!Dinner Dance approaches
By Dan
Langcn
Merciad Staff Reporter
Time
is starting to run out forMercyhurst seniors as they enter
the
last phase of their careers on thehill. The official beginning of thefinal countdown
can
be consideredto be the Senior Dinner Dance,
which
will
be held at the
Erie PlazaHotel on Friday, March 8.
X
The co-chairpersons who areresponsible for planning the eve-ning are seniors Lisa
Demas
andDave Parsh. According
to
Demas,the purpose of
the
event
is
to bringtogether
the
senior class for
one
of
the
finaltimes,and for seniors andtheir guests to enjoy anight"
of
food,
drink,
fun
and entertainmentActual planning, began in* De-cember
and is
done under the guid-ance of
Patricia
Liebel,
director ofalumni relations. Funds werepro-vided
through
Mercyhurst StudentGovernment (MSG) according toDemas.
,A
total of $4,500 wasallocated
to
the event
by
MSG, andDemas and Parsh are required to
submit their
inal
 allocations
to
MSGTreasurer Dale Mancuso. Thedinner dance is free to all tradi-tional
Mercyhurst seniors
who havepaid their activities fee, but adult
students
whose activities fees havebeen waived must pay
SIS
to at-tend, according
to
Demas. Seniorswho
are
bringing guests must alsopay
$15
in order to cover the costof the meal, she said.The cost buffet dinner, whichconsists of
tossed
salad; vegetablesand dip; fresh fruit; marinatedcucumber and
onionl
salad;
dclmonico
potatoes; rigatoni andmeatballs; vegetable
du
jour; rollsand butter, baked chicken and
as-
Ij
sorted desserts,
is quoted at $12.95
per person
plus
tax
and
gratuity. It
is based on an
expected attendanceof
250
people, Demas said. Therewill also be two cash bars withmixed drinks, beer,
wine and
sodaavailable for purchase.Entertainment
will
be provided
throughout the evening by D
J.
John.
'Demas
said guests will be able tohave group and individual photos
taken by
photographers from Son-
ney's
Photography also. Shuttleswill be provided to and from theErie Plaza Hotel, she said.
Demas said that the dinner dance
is planned based on a structuredsystem
which has been in
place forthe past three years.
|
She stresses
that she
is
very
satisfied about whatseniors will be getting for theirmoney since she
was able to get the
same price that has been chargedfor
the past three
years. "I think itis a very good deal consideringwhat is included in
the price
we'repaying for
the
evening,'* she said.The deadline for
placing
reser-vations for
the dinner dance is
Fri-day,Feb.15. If
the
reply
card hasbeen
i
lost
or misplaced, reserva-tions may be made by contactingDemas
at
825-1362,
or
Dave Parshat 825-1148. | |
f
Demas is excited about thedinner dance and the amount ofwork she put forth.
**I
really en-joyed putting the dinner dancetogether since so
many
people willenjoy it,'' she said.
Bookstore buys back used books for bucks
By Robin
likely *
Merciad
Stall
Reporter
For the
irst
ime
in
Mercyhurst
history, our bookstore is going tobuy back used books. BookstoreManager
Dan
Cullen says,
'*
Be-cause of the teachers' cooperationwith getting their book orders inearly, it is possible to have buybacks this term."
|J
The bookstore will buy backany books that have been high-lighted,
and
have little written notesin them. They will not buy backbooks that have been damaged(cracked bindings, water-logged,etc.).
Study
guides and workbooksare not normally bought back be-cause of
torn
out pages or the an-swers are already in them. Cullensays the bookstore will buy backyour books with consideration tohow large* the demand is for thebook
(number
of
people
registered)and how many books they alreadyhave on hand. If 30 people areregistered for a marketing class,the
bookstore is
obviously
not going
to buy back SO books from thestudents.
Students are to bring their
usedbooks to
the
bookstore
and
Cullenwill decide whether or not to pur-chase the book from you. Thebookstore has agreed to purchaseyour books for half of
the
originalprice. So if
you
bought
the
book at$50,the bookstore will agree togive you $25 for it
*Tlie
bookstore will continue tosell new books,
but the majority
ofthe books will be used. Cullen hasagreed to special order books forstudents if needed.This first time event! beginsWednesday, Feb. 20
from
8:00 am.till 6:30 p.m. and continues on
Friday,
Feb. 22 from 8:00 a.m. till4:30 p.m.
From
page 1
Discrimination;
in
theiworkplace
Booker explained that it
is
ille-gal to discriminate against anyonebecause of race, age, sex, religion,national origin or handicaps. Hesaid the government requires thatemployers provide equal employ-ment, opportunities. That doesn'talways happen: Booker said dis-crimination in the workplace doeshappen in certain situations.Coordinator of
the
event,
Russ
Robison,
said he and
Howard Paul,assistant professor of business,wanted to see how unsuspectingstudents
would
react
to
discrimina-tion by an employer in theworkforce. So, they created a reallife
scencrio
to test student reac-tion.
M
"It worked," said-Robison.The females in the room all gotupset
»
At the conclusion of
the
lec-ture, Howard Paul thanked Bookerfor speaking on
such |
a touchy
subject MB A had a hard
time find-ing anyone to speak on the topic.
"I
called up four personnel direc-tors, and they told me discrimina-tion was a good topic, but no onewanted
to
bring
up war stories and
discuss it/
\
Robison added. Heconcluded,
"Discrimination
in theworkforce happens, but no onewants to talk about it*'
Exam week & Spring break hoursMercyhurst
College Hammer
mill
Libi
Feb.
19
-
21
Feb.
22
Feb.
23 - 24
Feb.
25
-
Mar. 4Mar. 2Mar. 4
8a.m.
-Midnight
,
8.a.m.
-
4ip.m.
CLOSED1 - 4 p.m.CLOSED8 a.m.
-11
p.m.
 
FEBRUARY
14,1991
THE MERCIAD
PAGE
3
Sisters of Mercy denounce Gulf war
To the
Editor,
.
f
The Sisters of Mercy of Eriejoin with the
Sisters
of
Mercy
fromthe United States, the Caribbean,Latin America and the Pacific, whogathered in St Louis
on
Jan. 27,
1991,
to appeal to the good willand human decency of
all
govern-ments involved
in
die
Persian Gulfto end the military action and towork together for a
just
and lasting
peace.
•<&
As Christians and as womendedicated
to the
service nf
thns*» in
need, we deplore
war as
a primitivemeans of conflict resolution.! Wedecry the destructive human andmaterial cost of war. We find thisexpense particularly tragic at
a time
when
We,
along with others com-mitted
to
education,healthcare andsocial welfare, are struggling tofind the means of providing thesebasic human needs for a growingnumber of people.We are impelled to speak outagainst the suffering of civilians,especially women and children, the
lack
of respect
for
the various
faiths
and cultures involved in this con-
flict,
and the wanton destruction
of
the earth.We urge the United States touse
its
influence within
the
United
Nations alliance
to
bring
an
end tothe hostilities as soon as possible
and to
make every
effort
to
negoti-
ate
a ust
and compassionate settle-ment of the competing claims inthe Middle East We pledge our-selves to pray for the safety of allpersons, of whatever nation, who
are
affected by
the
military action,and we commit ourselves to con-tinue to search for peace.
Better behavior and planningneeded to ensure future formats
4
By Kevin McHugh
Merciad
Editor
Arts coverage needs major
improvement
To the
Editor,
I'm quite disappointed
with
theattitude expressed by
The
Merciadtoward covering
the
performing artsin the Mercyhurst community. Al-though in the recent past you andyour staff have focused more atten-tion on areas such as the dancedepartment (no doubt due to bigMercyhurst demand for"ballerina"photos), the effort seems to beconcentrated around only one ortwo staff members.
,
I think it's
deplorable
that
L'EK-
•r
D'Am
ore,
the
D'Angclo
Schoolof Music's
comic
opera production
which rah
Jan.
31 to
Feb. 2,
was
notreviewed
in
The
Merciad.
Agfeat
amounfbf'
'Huf st**talent
andhard work
went into
the opera,
which
incidentally
was
delightful, and yetthe performers and technical crew
received
no recognition in their"student" newspaper. (Written by
^K
and for...).
Now,
I'm
mote
than well awareof
the >
fact that most Mercyhurststudents simply
aren *
t
turned
on
by
operas,-and
they aren't terriblyconcerned with reading the reviewof an event they had no desire toattend. This doesn't discount themusic students' right to be recog-nized
as
they deserve.Although it must be
assumed
that a number of important
article!
and events aren't covered by TheMerciad due to its small
staff,
itshould
also
be
understood that thereare quite a few names, printed inthe staff box, that have not beenseen
in
a by-line since the first issuecame out in
September^
This,
I believe, is due to
die
auitude of editor Mr. KevinMcHugh. Granted,
Mr.
McHugh's
job
isn'Uan
easy one, and
IJ
dobelieve that he's doing the best hecan. Unfortunately, "the best hecan" seems to have a blind side tocertain 'forms of art appreciation.
~ vThc
aim of this letter is not
lo
personally attack The
Merqiad's
editor,
but it is intended
to
broadenawareness, and coverage of per-forming
arts
events,
especially thoseon campus.Mercyhurst College prides
it-
self
on being a liberal arts school.That means its educational philoso-phy
is
to promote students
who
arealso well-rounded individuals.Theater, dance and music depart-ment productions
are
just a few ofthe programs Mercyhurst offers topromote broadening of horizons.In neglecting to cover themabsolutely, The Merciad showsitself
to
be rather two-dimensional.Theresa
Hewitt
The newly released
igures
 for
he winter formal, held Jan.
15,
reveal that the event produced a deficit of
$6,900.
The main reasonfor
the
high
loss was alcohol. As
the
Erie
Plaza hotel had recentlylost
its
liquor license,
alcohol
could not
be
sold
at the
formal. MSGdecided
to
go
with bring
your
own booze,
and got the
go ahead from
the
Plaza. f
-3
Then, the night before
the
formal, the
Plaza
informed
MSG
that
they
could not permit b.y
o.b.
because of liability implications. The
only
options remaining
to MSG
were to
buy booze
to
give away, orto conduct the
 formal
 with
no
alcohol
whatsoever.
MSG decided onthe formeroption,limiting
the
number of drinks
to
six per person,and closing
the
bar at
12
a.m.
i
fThe confusion that arose over the planning of
the
winter formalhas highlighted
the.
problems that exist in the feet
that
no
other
(;
establishment is willing to hold a Mercyhurst formal. Vandalismand liability problems have led to a situation where
the
Erie
Plaza
hotel
is
the
only area facility that
is
willing
to
hold our
formals.
Themajor problem with
this
is
that the Plaza
can
call
the
shots.
They can easily adopt an attitude of,' 'like it or leave it"So what's
to
be done? We can't hold the event
on
campus,
first,
because of alcohol related liability issues, and* second becausestudents may not
go
for a dry formal.Let's make the Plaza
work.
Let's iron out
problems
regardingstolen coats and poor cloakroom facilities. Let's
havejgreatcr
security at
the
cash
bars to ensure alcohol is not stolen. Let's
act in
a manner that is conducive
to
the expectations of students of highereducation,
i.e.
cut out excessive drinking and vandalism. This way
we.
can.
show
that it is worthwhile, for establish
men ts-^to
hold
a-Mercy
hurst
 formal:
 $$P.*S ^^
The spring formal
will be
held April
19,
in the
Erie Plaza Hotelwith a probable cover of
$10.
The increase from $7 to $10 is tooffset
the
deficit incurred by
the
winter formal.
l
#t
*M«
iM^ltHISfHOlt"-
'*••'"
r,y
**
The Merciad
Mercyhurst College's First
Class
newspaperas rated by the Associated Collegiate PressVol. 64 No. 13Feburary
14,1991
Kevin McHughKaren McGuireAngela
M.
CampRobi TaylorNick RobertsMolly McCormickMelissa ManginiAndy PenhollowMaureen ConnollyMaria Kelly
1
Timothy MoriartyEditor-in-ChiefNews EditorFeatures EditorEntertainment EditorSports EditorAsst. Sports EditorPhoto EditorCopy EditorDesign ManagerAdvertising ManagerFaculty AdvisorMerciad StaffMary MedureLaura Blabac
DanLanganYvonne
MaherTracy
Schmitz
Amy FitzgeraldJill Schreckengost John BrunoTammy Pethtel Tricia Kuhar
Liam
BarronRobin Illsey Monique Parent
The
Merciad is
the
student-produced
newspaper of
Mercyhurst
College,
Box
161,501 Ea38th
st,
Erie
Pa.
16546.
Phone 825-0376
Material
for publication must
be
submitted by noon on theMonday before publication
The
Merciad welcomes letters
to the
editor.
letters
must
be
signed.
hut the name can
be
wfthfyeld
bv request
Registration process gives student
$.
headache
_jerclad's editorial
opinion
is
determinedby
the
Editorial Board
with
the
Editor holdingresponsibility.
The
opinions
expressed inMerciad
are
not necessarily
those
of
More
ad.
its
staff or
Mercyhurst
College,To the Editor,I found it extremely frustratingto find
| that ?
seniors and juniorsregister
for
classes
at the
same
tune.
Being a senior, I was upset
to
dis-cover that I was shut out of a re-quired class for graduation, espe-cially with the
*
knowledge
?
thatjuniors had already
registered.
Had
I been three hours
late,
that wouldhave been one thing, but I arrivedpromptly at 9
a.m.
As
r
finally approached thebeginning of the
line,
I
commentedon the registration^process.
\
Theresponse I received was less thanpolite.Well I didn't hear you com-plain
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
junior trying to get into seniorclasses."
\ \
The comment made by*
1
amember of;
the
registrar's office
was
not only inaccurate
and
irrele-
vant,
but very rude. Needless tosay, I was livid.To make matters worse, eightor
more
students
have been
"signedin"
by an
instructor who isn't teach-ing full time, doesn't have an of-fice or a phone) on campus, andisn't presently teaching a
class.
Andnot a single soul has an explana-tion!I've relocated from a
state
col-
lege with
8,000
to
12,000 students.I
 find
t hard to believe that
I
can't
get into
a required class
in
a private
liberal arts
college where only
2,000
students attend,
not
to mention howmuch this valid education is cost-ing
me.
It's simply ridiculous.
By Steve Rush
I'd also like to point out thatI'm not the only senior who feelsslighted
by
the
school system.My suggestion to the admini-stration is to clear up the apparentlack of communication and giveseniors priority in terms of regis-tering.Concerned Senior,
Monique
Parent
When
backwardlmasking
goes too
far...
44
*
p.£CO?t>\NG
OF
V^ENYO\J
rW
H- BNJKWW, IT

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