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The Merciad, Oct. 1, 1992

The Merciad, Oct. 1, 1992

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The Merciad, Oct. 1, 1992
The Merciad, Oct. 1, 1992

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#K¥
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Pag
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VOL. 66 NO. 3
MERCYHURST
COLLEGE, GLENWOOD HILLS, ERIE,
PA.
16546
OCTOBER
1,1992
New program offers free counseling to students
By
Jule
Gardner
Merciad
News Editor
Mercy
hurst now
has
professional coun
sel
ing services available to all students.
A
new program,
guided
by
Bob
Hvezda,director of counsel ing and student trans-fer services, has been implemented toprovide confidential sessions to studentswith any kind of personal problem.The need for
a
professional counselingcenter was recognized by the Middle
States
Association after their evaluationof the college; Soon afterward, the
staff,
consisting of
Hvezda
and two
part-time
employees,
was
put
to
work
to
organize
the
center.
The
two
part-time
counselors
are
Warren
Hohwald,
licens
e
psychol
o-
1gist/counselor,
and
Maria
Hvezda, thera- ing Out Problems. Hvezda believes the
In the
first
three
weeks of the program,the staff has seen over 40 individuals.When asked about expected growth,Hvezda said, "I expect much more because
students don't leave
their personal
problems
on
the sidewalk
on
38
th
Street,and
personal issues
effect both their academic
and
social
lives."
Hvezda continued.
"I
see the serviceas being a support system for the students. Now they have
a
target office on
campus
for
their
fears
and
concerns. If it
becomes very
popular,
it will be
up to theadministration to decide to compensatethe part-time staff
with
added hours ofwork."Part of the new program is a focuscalled "STOP," which means: StartTalk-
lems are
too
minor
to
talk
about, Hvezdasaid.
"Seeking
assistance from our
of
fice
doesn't
mean you need Counseling. ' It may mean you need advice orguidance and a helping relationship isoftendeveloped."On the reverse side, the professional
staff
is
trained to deal with very severeproblems students might also encounter.
"We
want students to feel secure incoming here. First of all, they won'tshock anybody and/secondly, everything is totally confidential," Hvezdasaid.pist/counselor.
All appointments
are made confidentially with Hvezda. Students can either
call
824-2555,
stop
by room
209Main
or
fill out one of the information sheetslocated outside that office. The centerwill try to contact students within 24hours or, in a crisis situation, immediately.-Hvezda
is
very
excited about the futureof the program because
it*
is new andthere are many possibilities.
'It's
fabu
lous.
I
mean
that from m
y
heart,"
he sa
id.
problems students face in the
'90's
arevastly different from problems othergenerations have had to face. Through
various
media, such as talk shows, "thesickness
has-been
brought out of thecloset. This
is
something
you
don't haveto be real secretive about anymore," hesaid.
Signs
thatdisplay
the
"STOP"message
will soon appear throughout the cam
pus.
The intent of the displays is forstudents to pause and think about theirpersonal situation, and then decide ifand student transfer students
"I
think students know we have genuine time for them. I'm very much pro-
student
and I'm
very
excited about what[ I'm doing because it affects so manyBob Hvezda, director of counsel ing people," Hvezda said. He summed up
I
his
life .philosophy
in one quote:
'To
love
what
you
do
and
feel
that it
matters,how could anything be more fun?""We want to stress the counselingcenter's environment It is a friendly,non-threatening and confidential atmosphere," Hvezda said. The Neil YoungIssues of Life
are
practiced
in his
office.According to him,
this,
entails the ideathat,
"You
never lose sight of people
a
ndtalking to the professional staff is theright option."What I
hope
through this is that we'll
be able
to support students
with
personalproblems and that we'll be able to havethem overcome those problems, therefore
retaining them
as students.
We
can't
save
everybody,
but
this
can
allow
them
some place to turn," Hvezda said.
Students should
not feel that their
prob-
their importance."
wiSSS&SssK:
CHECl
I
OUT
Student discusses health hazard
^
Friday,
October2,1992
f
i
j
S
pan.
Zx^m^t^ltsi
BaUlHypnotisVMentalist
Mark Pittman.
Saturdayjoctii^lIf
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By Joseph Legler
Editor
in
Chief
Everyone knows that smoking is thenumber one
cause of
lung cancer in theUnited States today. What most ofthem do not know is that radon is thesecond leading cause of
lung
cancer.
s
Radon is
a
colorless, odorless, tastelessradioactive soil gas that infiltrates al
most every structure
in
varying
degrees.It poses a possible health hazard inschools, office buildings and factories,
as
well as in homes.Presently, there are no laws forcingcolleges or universities to have radontesting done,
butsthe
health hazard itposes may change that.
gBill
Greenleaf,
a
Mcrcyhurst
collegestudent and owner of Northwest
Radon
Detection Service,Inc., said, "Basically,
radon
is
airborne radiation which
is
pro
duced from the disintegration of uranium and radium in the soil and rock
around
a
structure
which
gets
drawn into
the structure by
means of/the
soil gasmovements."He said that once radon gets into thestructure it can be contained at dangerously high levels that can pose
a
healthhazard."Virtually
a
nyone
who
spends
any
time
(3 within
any structure is potentially at
risk,"
Greenleaf stated. "Because you cannotsee radon; you can't taste radon, youcan't smell radon, and you can't touchradon, there is no way to
know
whethera structure has a radon problem unlessit's tested."There are two different ways to have
a
structure
tested
for radon,
short-term
testing and long-term testing.
"The
short-term test that
^^
a diffusion barrier charcoal canister,"said
Greenleaf.
"It's simply a charcoalcanister
with
a
membrane on
top
that weexpose to the environment within thestructure for seven
days."
The
canisters
are then sent to an independent laboratory that analyzes them for the level of
radon
present
in the
structure, Greenleafadded.The; long-term test, according to
Greenleaf,
is done with alpha-track detectors
that measure radon
levels over
a
six to
12
month period. "The alpha particles are the particle
that
does the lungdamage," said
Greenleaf.
"The
alpha-track device
has
an
emulsified
plate inside
the
detector. As these particles
ire
emitted they leave an etch mark on thesurface which
can .be
detected at thelaboratory."
There
are
two ways
to
deal
with
a
radon
problem, an active approach
and a
passive approach."The passive approach is simply sealing off all of
the
entry
routes
that radon
can take into the structure," said
Greenleaf.
The active
approach
is
generally usedwhen dealing with high levels of
radon
or when sealing alone is not effective.
"What this
involves is creating
a
zone ofnegative
pressure underneath the slab
ofthe structure where you're evacuatingthe radon gases into 44 inch PVC pip-continued on page 2
Greenleaf,
Service, shares his knowledge of the radioactive
gas.
 
PAGE
2THE
MERCIADOCTOBER
1,
1992
By
Jule
Gardner
Nferciad News
Editor
Editor's
Note: This column
is
designed
to
let the
Mercyb
community know what is happening in the world of politics,news is gathered
 from
 various issues of
The New
York
Times.
Current Leader in VariousPolls:Bill Clinton
10-15
PointsOn Ross Perot:
*
Eleven days ago Ross Perot announced he may re-enter the raceand formally declare himself
a
candidate. The reason behind thisturn-around is that declaring will enable him to buy television airtime*Apparently,
he wants to announce on TV the
"issues" Americaand its candidates should face.* Republican
and
Democratic campaign strategists
agree that
Ross
Perot's
possible candidacy will
not
hold
the same threat it did in the
spring.
Bush
forces
are
hoping it would stimulate
a race that has
seenthe President stagnant in the polls.
>*
Bill ClintonGeorge Bush
The
Democratic
Scene:* Governor Bill Clinton gave
a
speech about his plan for rural^America
in*
Iowa on Monday. In
it
he spoke about his broadpromises to help farmers and he also defended
his
record andelectoral base against the attacks made by Bush's campaign. Heblamed
the
President for lost sales of pork
and
wheat
to
Russia andpromised it would not happen in his administration.
Senator Al
Gore attacked
the Bush administration
Wednesday fortheir efforts to befriend Saddam Hussein in the years before thePersian Gulf War. He charged that this lead to a war which wasunnecessary.
He said both Bush and Reagan had a
policy approvingthe sale of technology to
Iraq
which, in turn, proved useful
in
Iraqi
arms
buildup.The Republican Scene:
President Bush
rolled
through
Michigan
on his
campaign trail. He
warned that Michigan would lose
40,000 auto
jobs
if
Clinton hashis
way
with
automobile
pollution
standards.
He also declared America"the
greatest country
on the
face of
the
earth"and accused Clinton
nf
trvincr tn "tear
down America."
*
Bush has
challenged
Clinton to debate
four times,
after
all.
He has
declared a plan for televised debates to air consecutive Sundaysfrom October
11
to November 1, two
days
before the election. He
proposed that two
of
the debatesbe
controlledby a single moderator,a format favored by Clinton and the non-partisan committee onpresidential
debates'and
two
of
the debates include a panel ofJournalists, a format the Bush campaign favors. He has also saidPerot would
be
welcome
to take part in
these
debates
if he decidedto join the race. Clinton
wants
the decision on datea
to be made
bythe non-partisan commission
and Bush has
insisted
he does not want
commission
.
to
be partly inspired by the possibility of
a
Perot candidacy.
College,
Dr.^Waiiam
Garvey, is pictured with
Kathy
Kappa Gamma
Pi
Publicity
Cooidinator.
Garvey
was
the guest speaker at theorgan!kick-off meeting on Tliursday, Sept 24. Kappa Gamma Pi is a national catholicgraduate honor society.
J
-1
Blood drive seeks donors
By Stephanie
Wainwright
Merciad
Staff Writer
Imagine
Walking down
the streetand witnessing the following:
a
car
 flying
 across 38th Street at
50
mph recklessly
piles over
an
elderly woman walking to get hergroceries. The woman lies unconscious
and
bleedingemersefully. The ambulance arrives taking
the
hemorragingvictim away. With the amount
of
blood lost, a transfusion will in
deed be
needed.
A
victim
such
asthis needs your help.Starting Wednesday,
October
7,a blood
drive
will be held in theGovernment Chambers
of the
Stu
dent
Union
 from
 9 a.m. to 4 p.m."All the blood donated
by
thestudents will stay in Erie. This is
a good
way
we at Mercyhurst can
help the Erie Community," said
Cass
Shimick,
Director of theStudent Union.
j
This event is the first of threedrives
that
will take
place on
campus. The project is sponsored bythe
Student Union Office
and Student Government.In order to donate, you
must
bea healthy 17 to 65 year-old andweigh at least
110
pounds. Youmust
not have a
history of diseaseor
ca
ncer
or have
the
 flu,
 a
cold ora sore
throa
t
The donation process
will take
a
total of 45 minutes of
your
time.During this time, you will register, go through
a medical
screening, donate and relax with refreshments in order to replenishyour system.
Hurst
TV
airs jproj
ects
By Monica R. Sertik
Merciad Staff Reporter
"Welcome to another edition ofM.C. Magazine. A look at interesting people and events here atMercyhurst College.
9
* These arethe
words
that begin
each
episodeof
a new
weekly television seriesto
air on
HTV, Hurst Television.All of the programs were produced
in
Mr. Richard
Ragan's
Television Production classes.This past summer, the students
had a
first-hand look
at
producingtheir own programs. Each student had hands-on experiencelearning the different operationsof producing
a
television program.The student
producers had the
jobof designing sets, lighting andfinding a guest. Students alsolearned how to operate graphics,audio, floor directing, switchingand interviewing the special guest
Some
of
the topics to be
coveredare football, fall school fashions,karate and hair styles.
The
fif
teen-minute show will be aired
during the
school
year on a
weeklybasis on HTV. The shows willbegin
on Monday at
5 p.m. Theywill be repeated
on
Tuesday at
8
p.m.
and Thursday at 7
p.m. starting
on
Monday,
October
5. Eachweek,
a
new program will
be
shown on HTV.The
 first
 program
to
air will
be a
look at fall fashions. You canwatch
it
next Monday,
October
5
at 5
p.m., Tuesday, October
6 at 8
p.m.
or
Thursday, October 8 at 7p.m.
HTV can be
found
on
channel 19Bor62onErieCablevision.
MMHii
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X-KSK*
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At the present time, the Community Blood Bank
of
ErieCounty has called for an emergency appeal
for all types
ofblood.Because of
the
increase
in trauma
accidents,
open-heartf
surgeriesand internal bleeders,
the
supply
ofblood is
low, stated blood bankofficials in the Erie newspaper.
from page
1:
Ri
nawarenesscontinues
(Continued from Page 1) -ing,"
said Greenlea
f. He
stated that
thisdraws the harmful gases
through
the network of piping
and out
into
the air
through
a
vent
in the
attic.
kThe
active approach is generallyconsidered the most effectivera
don
reduction technique.The price,
 for
 radon removal depends
on
several variables, including the type of
structure
andtype of removal.According
to
the EPA (Envi
ronmental
Protection Agency), anestimated
four-to-eight
millionhomes in the U.S. may have
in
door radon
levels
at or
above the
EPA's
recommended guidelines.Greenlea f thinks
that it
will eventually
be a law
for
all
public buildings and government
funded
hous
ing
projects
to be
tested
 for
 radonbecause there is a lot of legislation before the House of Representatives right now.Should all colleges and universities be tested for
radon
becauseof the increasing health hazard?
Greenleaf
thinks that it wouldbe a smart idea, not just for thestudents who only spend
*four
years
on
campus, but for
the
faculty who spend
a
career there.For more information on radon, you can call Northwest Radon Detection
Service?at
835-
1262.
They are certified by thePennsylvania Department ofEnvironmental Resources and
lo
cated in Ebco Park, 2001 Peninsula Drive, Erie, Pa. 16506.
 
OCTOBER
1,1992
THE MERCIAD
PAGE
3
I.L1i
I i
 
»
• * * •
4».
• *
« »
»
Football staff requests consideration
'
Dear Editor,
*You have
requested, in the column
"Everything
on my Mind"by Anne McNelis which ran theweek of September
24,
an explanation
 from
he football
program
on our decision to have
players
stay off campus
the
night before
a
home game. An explanation isalways available to you ^however, you chose
to
comment on
a
situation without necessary background information
which
wouldhave enabled you to make
a
professional and ethicaleditorial.Despite your uninformed comments on most items in your article, an explanation is called forconcerning the football budgetOur budget this year is LESSthan
it has
been in
the
past
in key
areas such
as
equipment
J
recruiting and summer
camp.
We un
derstand
that times ate tough, sowe work within these budgetaryrestraints.
For
example,
our
sum
mer
camp
budget
was
smaller this
year,
so
we
canceled
severalpractices and sent our players homeduring camp which
we
haveneverdone before. Not only did wework
within that
budget, but weactually saved money. With theextra money we decided (aftermuch discussion and thought) to
take the players
who would
play amajority
of the game and ensurethey would have a good night'srest away from a bustling cam
pus.
Despite our budgetary concerns,our staff has had
success
i
in
recruiting, fundraising, facility improvements, and we are always
striving
for excellence
on
the field.Your uninformed editorial is anovert attempt at demeaning ourefforts. All we ask is that nexttime, before it
goes I
 from
 yourmind to the paper, you exercise your duty as an editor to askquestions to
 find
 out the truth.Jim
s
Chapman and the football staff
BAAU»
The
Merciad
Mercyhurst College's First Class newspaper as
 rated
 by the Associated Collegiate PressVol.
66 No. 3
October
1,1992
>-^5^Sfea^5^g^aRggR
3
Joseph Legler
Editor
in
Chuf
jule Gardner
News Editor
Anae McNelis
A&E IFeatures Editor
Craig Ry bczyn s ki
Sports Editor
JohnDanknlch
Asst. Sports Editor
Michelle Ryu
*
Copy Editor
Y vonne Maker
Advertising
Manager
Tiraoth y MorUrly
Faculty Advisor
'
Merciad Staff
Dave McQuillenMegan CircleErin HaubcrGrace BrunoKeith CoursooJay KennedyNicole GeraciSuzanne ConeglioMary MedureTiffanie WilliamsMonica SertikTonie BolanLeon MumfordRick SheltonHeather RyanLiam BarronKatie JohnsonSusan Lee EbackMichelle BovaElizabeth JohnsonAndrea MyersDavid KosobuckiStacie KaneJohn ShanahanSteph Szabo
.j|
Stephanie WainwrightKaren TrapolsiAmy TiernoSean WallMike McCloreyChris FielyBeth NicholsJohn FurlongBeth HaasThe Merciad is the student-produced newspaper
of
Mercvhurst College, Box 161,501 E. 38th St., Erie. Pa., 16546. Phone 824-2376The Merciad welcomes letters to the editor.The Merdad's editorial opinionis determined by the Editorial Board with theEditorholdingfinal responsibility,Theopinionsexpressed in The Merciad arenot necessarily those of The Iad, its staff or Mercyhurst College
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a
•»_«•
•«v
a
By Joseph Legler
Editor
in
Chief
Sitting in Professor Triola'scontemporary social problemsclass this past
week,
I began
wondering
if I
had
a
n
emotional
or
behavioral problem.We were talking about emotional disorders
and
most
of the
class,
including'myself,
knewsomeone who
had an
emotional
or
behavioral problem at one time, or they had personally experienced one.The text book
that
we use for class states that the two (emotionaland behavioral problems) are global labels that cover an array ofproblems: depression, excessive anxiety, feelings of inferiority orisolation, being alienated, being sadistic or masochistic, maritalproblems, broken romances, parent-child relationship problems,
being
hyperactive, committing unusual or
bizarre
acts,
being
overlycritical, being overly aggressive, having a phobia, abusing
one's
child
or
spouse, being compulsive or having
an
obsession, feelingguilty,
being
shy, showing violent
displays
of temper,
being
vindictive, having nightmares or insomnia, displaying sexual deviations,and so on,I, like
most
of society, have felt depressed
at
least
once
in my
life.I have been overly critical. I have been shy. I have been obsessedwith something. I have been...Does
this mean
that
I
have
a
mental
illness? I
don't think it
does,
but it does mean that I, like everyone, have encountered seriousemotional difficulties at one point in my life caused by extremecircumstances.
a
' ^___
This brings me to the most
important point
of this column: Whatis mental illness?
Is it
a
physical illness
that
can be
detected
or is
itsomething
that can't
be
proven,
but
exists
somehow
in the
mind
ofa human being? Beginning October 4, and running through theweek, America will be recognizing Mental Illness Week.
I
don't think
that
mental
illness
will ever
be
proven
to the
point
ofabsolute agreement
by
everyone, but
it
should
be
something
that
isdefinable by
a
vast majority.!Professor Triola was quick to
point
out that you can get
Ave
doctors to declare a criminal suspect insane and another five to
declare
him
sane.
This should
be
modified
if thepuiltvbv reason
ofinsanity plea is
to
be used effectively.
I
do think
that certain
people
are
insane on the grounds of mental illness,
but
I
wish
there
were
a
more
d e fin i
tive
wa
y of
prov
ing it.
What can be said
about mental illness
that
can
prove anything?I'm
not exactly sure, but I can give you some startling facts about it:
1.
Nearly 25 million American adults
and
over
7
million childrenwill have some form of mental illness in any six month period.
2.
One in
three Americans
will experience
a
mental illness duringtheir lifetime.
»
i
3.
Most mental illnesses
are
more easily
treated than
heart
and
lungdiseases.
i ^
4.
Schizophrenia is
a
severe mental illness which alters
the
livesof nearly 3 million Americans during the course of
their
lives.5. Almost 90 percent of people with mood disorders respond toappropriate treatment6. People
with
mental illness are
no
more
violent
than
those
with
cancer, diabetes,
or
any
other
serious illness.|
7. Only one person in five
with
a
diagnosable
mental
illness seekstreatmentThere is available treatment for some mental illnesses. If
it's
just
a
depression over
an
event
in
a
person's life,
or
a
feeling of anxietyor
alienation
in
a certain
situation,then,
I
believe
the
best
thing
to do
is
talk
it out with somebody who will listen.Mercyhurst
has
established
a
free professional counseling servicefor just this reason.
You
can
arrange
for
an
appointment
by
calling
extension
2555
or by
stopping by 209 Main. All of the counselingsessions are confidential. For more information, please read Jule
Gardner's
article on the front page.

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