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The Merciad, March 18, 1993

The Merciad, March 18, 1993

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The Merciad, March 18, 1993
The Merciad, March 18, 1993

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On Page 4:
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On Page 6:On Page 8:
Hockey championship preview
VOL, 66|N0. 17
•MERCYHURST
COLLEGE, GLENWOOD HILLS^RIE, PA. 16546
iMarch18,1993- "•Mt
^m
Pro-legalization group startedMercyhurst
By
Jule
Gardner
Merciad News Editor
An organizational meeting for
the
Mercyhurst chapter of
the
National Or-ganization for the Reform of MarijuanaLaws (NORML) was held on Tuesday,March 9 at 6:30p.m. in the governmentchambers. The meeting
was led
by RobKampia,
Penn
State student governmentpresident; Chuck Thomas, Director ofPennsylvania NORML; and MelissaPaolello, a Mercyhurst student
who
ap-pealed charges brought against her foralleged
marijuana use
(see related story).According to a press release sent byKampia, the pro-legalization group hasbeen
brought
to
Mercyhurst
as
a result ofPaolello's "disciplinary problem." As
an
activist
at
Penn
State, he said
he
was
"outraged"
when
he
heard
of Paolello's
situation.
"At
Penn State, they would nothave misbehaved like Dr. Gary Brown(allegedly) did/' he said.
Thomas said that the
Mercyhurstchap-ter is one of
ajnumber
of groups PANORML is trying to start on college
campuses.
"We are
trying to
get
as many
chapters as possible. Here's where thestudent movement
is.
We are not a bunch
of old men handing out flyers that say
"Hemp
saves trees/If
we
show
the
legislation enough politi-cal force, we'll
win,"
he said.Paolello said,
"It's
depressing. A fewmay harp, 'Oh, how feeble,'
but
groups
such as this one
are hustlers.
Sma 11 groups
CHEC
OUT
Saturday,
March 203 p.m. Government Chambers.
"Funny
Ladies."
8
p.m. Zurn Recital
Hall.
"Fried
Green Tomatoes."
Monday,
March2&|6
p.mf
MSG
Offlce.fLetters
ofintent for
1993-94
MSG Execu-tive Board positions duel
8i30
p.m.?Government
Cham-bers. MSG Meeting.Wednesday, March 24
£
p.m.
.-Weber Little
fTheater.
Diversify
Yourself,
"Ofll
theBeaten Palh."Thursday! March
2&m
I8
p.m. Sullivan Hall. Diversify
Yourself*
"An
Examination^
ofSocial Discrimination" with Dr.Charles Dufour.
Kamp
of Mercyhurst NORML.can flourish and get things done."Kampia and Thomas stressed thatpeople
who wan t to join
the group shouldnot fear involvement You cannot, bepunished for voicing political views onmarijuana. Kampia also
talked about
hisexperiences and the reasons he becameactive
in
;
promoting^ legalization.
Al-though he doesn't smoke anymore, hewas once busted for growing, served
time
in jail,
lost
his scholarships
a
nd
was
expelled from school. He pointed outthat before his arrest he was a
straight
MA»
A
Physics student When he returnedto Penn State, he ran for student bodypresident and won after an openly pro-legalization campaign. "I've been soscrewed over by the law, I feel I mustpersonally do something," he said.The reasoning behind legalization wasalso discussed at length, Kampia said
that
NORML pushes for
the 5ame
regu-
lations
involved with alcohol.
Th
is would
mean
that users would
have to
be 21
and
adults
would be able to grow marijuanajust
as
they
are
able to brew homemadebeer. Kampia stressed the medical ben-efits linked to marijuana for such dis-eases as AIDS, glaucoma, arthritis andpremenstrual syndrome. Literaturepassed
out at
the meeting cites
that
mari-
jua
na
is a
relatively
sa fe drug
and
has
notbeen known to cause any deaths.
"Our
group
does
not
encourage
use. It
should be a personal choice and peopleshould be
 free
o
choose,"
Kampia said.
"The
trick
is
for
people
to
think
in
termsof
what
was
wrong with (alcohol) prohi-bition
and how
reversing
marijuana
pro-hibition can also reverse the problems
Major media want Heibel's
opinion
By Michelle
Ryan
Merciad Copy
Editor
New York City's World Trade Centerwas rocked by a terrorist bombing lastmonth, killing at least six and injuringmore than 1,000 people.Robert Heibel, coordinator of the Re-
search/Intelligence Analyst
Program and
an
expert in counterterrorism, spoke hisviews
to
several major media segments.
The
Erie Daily Times,
Morning
News,USA Today\ Toledo Blade,
Pittsburgh
Post-Gazette,
and the
Washington Post
featured-Heibel
in their papers. Heibelalso appeared on
"Talk
Radio
America,"
KDKA
in Pittsburgh and Erie's
Flagship1530
a.m.Heibel was contacted by CNN for
"Larry
King Live" but satellite hookupproblems prevented completion. One ofHeibel's counterparts was substituted."When the bombings took place, Istarted to get some calls," Heibel said,noting that "As things
developed...and
they identified the first individual," hewas contacted for talk shows.The programs were interested in
Heibel's
opinion on whether he
believed
the bombing was
done
by
a
professionalRobert Heibel, coordinator of the
Research/Intelligence
Analyst Pro-gram, talks about the bombing.organization
and
what was
the
responsi-
bility
of the investigators involved
in
theinvestigation.Heibel, who worked 24
years with
theFederal Bureau of Investigation, saidthat in such a bombing as in the
Twin
Towers, it was "very likely a terrorist
act"The
motive
was
political,
and
those
involved
"are
part
of
a
militant-Moslemfundamentalist group that is headquar-tered in
Egypt,"
Heibel said,
k
"A
terrorist
act is an
act that
is in
viola-
i
Continued
on
Page
2
with it."
"There
is
always
something
to
do
while
marijuana is still illegal. One goal is tocounter the lies that
pop
up in newspa-pers.
Letters
to the
editor
can
fix that
and
help them
to
report accurately instead oftaking part in the
'partnership
for igno-rant America'," Kampia said. Thomas
echoed th
is sentiment
when
he said," We
want
the
media
to
start
talking
about die
families
that have been ruined
by
grow-ing two plants in their closet"The next meeting for the MercyhurstNORML chapter is
scheduled
for Thurs-
day,
March
25
at
8:30
in
the Union. Newmembers are welcome.By
Jule
Gardner
Merciad News
Editor
Melissa
Paolello,
a
junior
psychology
major
at
Mercyhurst,
made
an
appeal to
dismiss
disciplinary
action aga inst her
inan alleged pot-smoking incident! Re-
cently,
Paolello had accused Dr. GaryBrown, director of Residence Life, ofalleged misconduct in coercing her toadmit she smoked marijuana. The stu-dent judicial board, however, decidedthat there was not sufficient evidenceand did not grant her the
appeal.Her
punishment stands at a $200 fine,sub-
stance abuse
assessment
and one
year
ofdisciplinary probation.Paolello made the request before theboard, consisting of two students, twofaculty members and two administra-tors, on Friday, March 12. The boardthen sent a letter within the three-day
time
limit stating
the
reasons
for
its deci-sion. According to Paolello, the boarddecided not to proceed in the appeal
process because they
did
not believe
her
due process rights had been violated.
'The fact that
my
appeal
was not
heard
says that I am facing punishment formerely not accepting it (the charges),"Paolello said. She
said that her goal at
themoment is to seek action in an outsidecourtPaolello is the spokesperson for theMercyhurst chapter of the National Or-ganization for
the
Reform of MarijuanaLaws (NORML). She said that her in-volvement
in
this group
"can do
nothingbut help" her
as
she proceeds in litiga-tion."I was knowledgeable about
NORML be fore I was
ever accused,"she
sa
id.
 
PAGE
2THE MERC1ADMarch
18,1993
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Campus
Question
Should
marijuana
belegalized?
By
Jule
Gardner
Merciad
News Editor
Editor's Note: This column
is
designed
to
represent differentviewpoints
of
Mercyhurst students about current,
newsworthy
topics. The opinions are obtained through
a
phone poll of on-
campus
numbers.Jim Wolfe, junior, Biology:"Yeah, actually I do, only because kids
are
getting killed on the
streets
because of illegal selling. It's
no
worse
than
alcohol.
It's
noworse than
prescription
drugs.
I
just don't think kids should losetheir lives overit"
.
Anonymous, senior, Interior Design:
i
"No.
First of all,
there a
re
a
lot
more problems with
marijuana thatwould be made worse. I can't see (President) Garvey supporting
it
(at Mercyhurst). Also, the Board of Trustees are very narrow-minded. It would make Mercyhurst end up with a public schoolatmosphere."
Pam
Crowell, junior,
Sports
medicine:
"Yes,
I do.
It's causing
a
cycle of problems. If they wouldn't have
placed
restrictions
on
marijuana, we wouldn't have the illegal drugtrade problems we do."Chris Jurusik, sophomore, Political Science:
i
Totally. It's theraputic"Scott Choura, junior, HRIM:
A
"Although
I
don't smoke
it
myself,
I
don't think
a
substance suchas
marijuana
is
at
all addictive as other harsher drugs."Nick Krayger, freshman, Family Ecology:|
"I'm
not sure. I think it's
O.K.
for medical purposes
but
I
think it
I
would be abused by the general population, kind of like alcohol. It
i
would become too readily available."Amy Kellogg, junior, Accounting:
"Yes.
If
it
helps people get over illnesses, it should be legalized."Jason Runtis, sophomore, Dietetics:
I "Everyone's
doing it anyway. It's not
a
drug
that gets
you totallymessed
up. It
wouldn't
be
good if it fell into the wrong
hands
but itshould be legalized.
>
Heather Marshall, freshman, undeclared:
"Yes.
Enough people use it illegally so if it were
to
be legalized,it would
cut
down on the usage."
i
Chris Thompson, freshman, undeclared:
"Yes.
It
has many theraputic uses
and the
advantages outweigh
the
'disadvantages."Susan Flanagan, junior, Music Education:
"No.
Drugs affect children and hurt them. Although it's abusednow, if it's legal people will do it more often. There will be easieraccess like alcohol."Lynette Gargasz, senior, Political Science:"Sure. There's nothing wrong with the drug.
t
Susan Voll, sophomore, Elementary/Special Education:
S
"No.
I
think it would
make
a
bigger
problem than
there already
is."
Joni
Dick,
junior, Voice Performance:
"No.
It would be easy
to
get and it would give people
an
excuseto abuse
it
more."Joanna Shirley, freshman, undeclared:
j >
"Yes.
There's no medical evidence that says it's really harmful.It's no worse
than
cigarettes."By Anne L. McNeils
A&E
and
Features
Editor
Mercyhurst Student Govern-
ment (MSG) held
its second meet-ing of
the
Spring Term on Tues-day, March 16. President John
Bruno opened
the
meeting
with
a
discussion about Spring Activi-
ties
Weekend, which will
be
May7-9. Bruno said
*he hippes
thisyear's weekend will
be
unique.Bruno then brought up his re-quest for reimbursement for $90which he left in his desk drawer.The money was subsequently lostor stolen. Bruno requested MSGreimburse
him
for
the los
t money.
The
representatives voted
to
giveBruno the money.The next topic was thisweekend's
trip
to
Bemidji, Minn,for
the
hockey games.
The
fee forthe trip is $40, which will coverbus fare, tickets
to
the hockeygames and hotel accommoda-tions. President
Garvey
requestedMSG cover the
remainder
of
the
cost
of
the trip. Twenty-fivepeople havesigned
up
for the
trip,
leaving on Thursday and return-ing on Sunday. MSG decided tofund
the'remaining
cost
of
the
trip.
Remaining
business
at
the meet-ing
included
a report from Stu-dent Activities Committee (SAC).
SAC
has
planned
a
regular
movienight, beginning this Saturday,March 20
at
8 p.m. in
Zum
Re-cital Hall. The movie costs $1,|
SAC
|is also sponsoring In AllSeriousness,
a
comedy
game
showon Friday, March 19 at 8 p.m. in
Zum
Recital Hall. The commit-tee has
also
begun
to
plan forEarth Day, April 30 and May 1.Throughout April, the Recyclingcommittee will sponsor collec-tion of used
tires,
newspapers andmagazines. The collections willtake place every Saturday in April,with a location
to
be announced.There was
also
a
discussion ofthe Residence Life Committee'splans
to
hold
a
sobriety test usinga panel of five students and fivefaculty members. The committeehas requested funds to take thepanel out to lunch.Letters of intent for the MSGexecutive board are due in
the
MSG office by
6
p.m. on Mon-day, March 22. Anyone
who
wishes
to
run for
a*n
executiveposition must have
at
least 30credits
and
a
QPA
of at least 2.25.A meeting of
all
those
running
for
MSG
offices will be held
onTues-
day,
March
23
at
8:30 p.m.
in the
Government Chambers.MSG meetings are held everyMonday
at
8:30
p.m.
in the Gov-ernment
Chambers
in
the StudentUnion. All meetings are open to
the
^Mercyhurst;community,
so
come and make your
voice heard!
Diversity week exposes different lifestyles
By Yvonne MaherAdvertising ManagerMercyhurst College's
student
government is sponsoring the sec-ond annual Cultural Diversity andAwareness Program with guestspeakers encompassing a
broad
spectrum of events
and
presenta-tions.The program includes sixevents
that
will
help
participantsbroaden their perspectives abouttopical, controversial issues sur-rounding them.
X.
"This is a wonderful opportu-nity for students, faculty and mem-
bers
of the
public
to join togetherto enhance awareness and exploredifferent lifestyles," said Cass
Shimek,
director of the StudentUnion and project co-coordina-tor.
'The
ultimate
purpose
of thisevent is to increase awareness ofpeople who
are
different from us
and to
decrease stereotypes," shecontinued.Several representative of the
Hari Krishna and
Sun
Yung
Moonorganizations
will
\
discuss
theirunique backgrounds
and
demon-strate
activities that are
traditional
in
their lifestyles
on
Wednesday,March 24
at
8;p.m.
in
Weber
Little Theatre. The* program willalso include a speaker on cultssuch as
the
Branch Dividien
groupin Waco, Texas.On Thursday, March
25;at
8
p.m.'in
Sullivan
Halloa
specialprogram on social discriminationwill be featured. Under the guid-ance of
Dr.
Charles Dufour, as-sistant professor of Psychology,whose doctoral specialty is
in so-
cial discrimination, participantswill be given the opportunity toexplore the effects
of
differenttypes of discrimination that existin today's society.
"One
Love, Different Forms" isthe title
of
the presentation onWednesday, March 31 at 8 p.m.
Several
"non-traditional"coupleswill discuss how families of in-ter-racial and gay/lesbian couples
react
to
their lifestyle
choices and
the
reaction of
the
general publicto them.
The
ultimate purpose ofthis program is to unveil and ob-tain
a
better understanding of themany different relationships
in
our
society.The program will conclude onThursday, April 1 when severalmembers of
the
Mercyhurst com-munity will contrast
their
experi-ences of being 60s college stu-dents with those of our presentday 90s students. This presenta-tion promises to surprise peopleas to the similarities that existbetween the two eras.Previous activities included anInternational food event!featur-
ing tastes
and
entertainment fromall
around the world;
a
presenta-tion by Bill
Demby^an
AfricanAmerican Vietnam veteran whostars in the Dupont commercialplaying basketball on two artifi-cial-legs; and
a
visit to Erie's
Veteran's
Hospital by students.
"Students
volunteered to orga-nize activities on cultural diver-sity. Courses they had taken hadsparked their
interest!and ithey
wanted to learn more about theworld
around them,"said
HowardPaul, assistant professor of busi-
ness.
"We
were
overwhelmed
by
the response
of the
entireMercyhurst
community
andex-panded the program to a
month
long event for
this
year,"
he
said.All events are free and open tothe .public. For further informa-tion, contact Howard Paul at ext.
2894
or Cass Shimek
a t
ext.
2433.
Heibel gives insight on bombing
•don
of
criminal
law that is usedto coerce
a
government
or
civil-ian population or any
segment
thereof for political
or
social be-
liefs,"
Heibel said.
'The
United States
has had
very
active groups (since) the 1960sand 70s. There were over
100
bombings (terrorist incidents) inthe United States in the late 70s.These
usually
involved bombings,arson," Heibel added.As for researching
the
source ofthe bomb, investigators use vari-ous tests
to
identify key clues.There are chemical tests; thereare electronic
tests.
What they
arelooking for is residue from theexplosion. Prom
the
residue they
can
tell you what type ofexplo-sive it
was,"
Heibel
said.
\
For
example, it took
only
a
ma
t-ter of
days
before a suspect wastraced to
the
van allegedly used totransport
the bomb into
the
World
Trade Center. Heibel said thatinvestigators found
a
piece of thevan's axle with a serial numberon it
and
identified
it
"I've
known of incidents wherefingerprints were (left by terror-ists
on a wri tten
communication),"Heibel said. He also noted thatfingerprints
have even been
found
on
bomb
parts. Another example
Heibel
mentioned concerned partsof a
watch which
were
traced
backto where the watch was sold.
'They
(terrorists) are just
not
aware of the capabilities of lawenforcement," Heibel
sa
id.
"Some
people
aresoblasl,
they
just don'tbelieve they can get caught"
 
March
18,1993
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PAGE
3
E^E—
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>%•:•:•
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.
ill
on^-ft%
ftWaK
Clinton's
view onfobortion criticized
Dear editor,This nation has selected a
pro-
abortion president Two days
af-
ter William
Clinton's
inaugura-tion,
he
signed
an
executive
order
facilitating information about andaccess
to
abortions. Mr. Clintonwas educated
in a
Catholic
pri-
mary school
and
GeorgetownUniversity,
alsorfh
alleged Catho-lic institution. Clinton thanked theChurch for supporting his candi-dacy. Some of
us who
are Catho-lic gasped
at
his gratitude.The
'American
CatholicChurch leaders provided no spe-cific moral counsel about
the
matter of voting for pro-abortioncandidates. Truly, it was
the si-
lence
of
the shepherds. Becauseabortion
is an
abomination,those
Lent as
we
await the
Lord's
chas-
tisement.
Catholics who
voted for pro-abor-
tion politicians^became
accom-plices. The political prelates
did
notmake this declaration of moraltheology.
This
sin
will surely
con-tribute
to
God's imminent wrath,
I
Let us pray and
do
penance this Washimgton,
CT
Joseph E.
Vallely
Third Order Franciscan
Happy
St.
Patrick
f
s
Day from
t
the entire
Merciad
staff!
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AND PLACE ITCVER ^DURTV SET.BraBaH24rss«
The Merciad
College's First
Class
newspaper
as
rated
by
the Associated
Colle
Vol
66 No.
17Marchl8
Joseph Legler
Jule
Gardner
Editor
in
Chief
iNews Editor
Anne McNeils
A&EIFeatures Editor
Craig Rybczynski
Sports Editor
John Danknich
Asst.
Sports EditorCopy Editor
ichelle RyanYvonne Maher
[Advertising Manager
Timothy Moriarty
Faculty Advisor
Merciad Staff
Dave McQuillen
I
Megan CircleJennifer TrinidadLeon MumfordRich SheltonJohn Shanahan
Liam
Barron
11
^^ ^^
Stephanie Wainright Karen
Trapolsi
Mary MedureErin HauberTonie
Bolan
David
Kosobucki
Beth Nichols*David
Rumsey
Steph SzaboSusan Lee EbackMonica
Sertikp
Nick
Krayger
Katie
Johnson?
Nicole GeraciJohn FurlongBeth HaasGrace BrunoTate Davidson
1
Elizabeth JohnsonKeith CoursonJay KennedyHeather
Ryan-!Suzanne
ConeglioTiffanie WilliamsJay FitchpatrickThe Merciad is the student-produced newspaper
of
Mercyhurst
College, Box
161,501
E. 38th St., Erie,
Pa.,
16546 Phone 824-2376*The Merciad welcomes letters to the
editor.rm
Editorholding final
responsibility!
The opinions expressed
in
The Merciad arenot necessarily those of The
Merciad,
its staff or Mercyhurst College.
t
r
Ymskh
e
er
»
By Joseph Legler
Editor-in-Chief-
I would like to commend
the
Erie County Court system
for
establishing
a
mandatory pro-gram designed to assist divorc-ing parents
in
supporting theirchildren's mental well being.
**The
"Children Coping
With
Divorce Program" covers
ill
case filings, dated after
March
J
1,
involving children
or
a
dispute
involving
the
custody of children.It requires both parties
in a
divorce action
to
attend
a
four-houreducational seminar which focuses on the developmental needs ofchildren with emphasis
on
fostering
the
children's
emotional
healthduring periods of stress?This program, which has its origin in Atlanta, is
one
of
only
sixestablished in the United States. The divorcing parents must
go
tothe seminar or they could be arrested for contempt of court.I know
a
large number of young people
who
come from divorcedhouseholds.
I
came from a divorced household.My parents were divorced when I was barely two years old, so
I
wasn't*affected
very much
Ifdidn't
even realize
what J
washappening. My mother remarried,
and my
stepfather
(I
jokinglycalled him my phony-father until I was about nine) is the greatestguy
I
know. The two have been happily married
for
over twentyyears now. However, divorces aren't always this easy
and*don't
always affect children
this
lightly. Some children take it very hard,
blame themselves
and
go through an
excessive
amount of emotionalstress.Divorces can be devastating to some children. They may be tornbetween their parents' loyalties, forced
to
"choose" one
of
them.Each parent forces
a
difficult situation when they tell their child
to
"not tell
daddy
this,"
or "don't let mommy know
that**
These
mixedsignals can distort
the
view their
child
has
and
lead
to an
emotionalcollapse.Parents often worry about what is going to happen
to
them
in a
divorce action, rather than what
will
happen
to
their child.
This
program may prevent this from occurring.There has been
a
tragic breakdown of the family in this country:
*One
out of every
two
couples marrying
this
year
will
be
divorcedin 10 years.
*60
percent of divorces occur for
people
between the ages of
25-39.
* ***$ *'
•'?*
**More
than
1,000,000
children
are
affected
by
divorce each year.
*70
percent of all children born
in 1980
will
spend time
in a
singleparent family.
*75
percent of women and
80
percent of men
remarry within
fiveyears.
'"Second
marriages are at greater risk
for
ending
in divorce thanfirst marriages.*70 percent of divorced parents
fail
to build a cooperative post-divorce relationship, which is crucial for their children.
""Children
of
divorces are two
to
three times
as
likclv
to
sufferemotional or behavioral
problems.?*More
than
1,100
divorce cases
were
filed in
Erie County
last
year
alone.Children in a divorce must overcome possible feelings of rejec-tion, humiliation, unloveableness
and
poweiiessness.
Some
need
to
resolve anger and stop blaming themselves. They must disengagefrom
parent
conflict, accept
the
reality
and
permanence
of
the
situation and preserve ideals of
love
aiuMoyalty.This program
is a
good starting block
for
divorcing parents
to
assist their children in these matters.It
will
help them recognize the symptoms in children's behaviorsthat reflect
their
difficulty
in
adjusting
to
the divorce
and it
will
benefit them in the longrun,
*
All participants in the program pay
a
fee of
$20 to
cover
the
total
costs
of the seminar. People may be reluctant
to
invest
this
much ina four hour seminar,
butwit's
worth
it The
stability
of
a child's
••«.
emotional health
is
worth well more than that paltry amount.My hat is
off
to
the Erie County Court system.
«••
}
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